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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 20, 1922, Image 10

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The Theaters??y Percy Hammond
One of the interesting features of
[the New York season so far?-intereet
i ing because it ia ?of new?is the num
i ber of "auccesses" in which the over
{lords of the theater had no faith. Play
after play of which the management
was ?ore?praised on the road and pre
' ceded by a considerable fanfare?fea?
; rushed into disaster. Play after play
; produced with forebodings and limp*
; ing into Broadway in a spirit of des?
peration has found quick end surpris
: ing triumph.
Three of tfee outstanding dramatic
hita up to now are "Loyalties," "Rain,"
and "The Fool." In the first of these
there was fom? confidence because its
author was John Gaisworthy and be?
cause it had been a success in London.
Nevertheless, there ware blue days be?
fore its opening and blue nights while
its fate hung in the balance. Then the
public gave its verdict?the one decree
from which, in the \heater, there is no
appeal?and gloom departed from the
Gaiety.
"Rain" is a version of Somerset
Maugham's short story "Miss Thomp?
son"?and report has it that the first
doubter was Maugham himself. They say
that, out of friendship, he read his tale
to John Colton, who saw a play in it.
Maugham didn't, and Colton asked
leave to attempt the task. When the
piece was presented outside of New
York the management felt doubtful,
and Eugene Walter, author of "Paid in
Full'' and "The Easiest Way," was
taken to Philadelphia to administer
first aid. Colton's obdurate refusal to
avail himself of this assistance brought
"Rain" in its original form to New
York, and to o?? of the flushed vic?
tories of the season.
This story is merely whispered, but
there is no whispering about the his?
tory of "The Fool," which history is
being recounted in various forms. It
appears that Channing Pollock had the
idea for this play nearly ten years ago
I and was kept from writing it by the
frank skepticism of his managers.
These managers rejected the piece
'A-hen it was finished, and "The Fool"
enjoyed the usual number of round
l trip excursions to other impresari.
Finally, accepted jointly by two of
these, one of the pair gave up his in?
terest following a try-out in Los
Angele?. After rather an extraordinary
? number of vicissitudes the piny
reached the Times Square Theater,
; where it has scored a sensational sue
; cess. Not only has this work achieved
i r. following among entertainment-seek
Iers here, but it is being published by
Rrentnno's and if about to be produced
in London. At present "The Fool"
gives every indication of being a |
world-wide hit.
ft
The inevitable consequence of such
histories is to make one wonder how
much the average manager knows his I
business and his public. Does the
metropolitan producer underestimate i
the intelligence of playgoers, or ia his
own equipment of a sort to enable him
to estimate it at all? Tho most
charitable explanation lies in an ac
tount of a conversation with the late
t'harles Frohman. "How can anybody
be sure of being right as to a manu?
script?" asked that most influential
figure of the theater. "Take 'Peter
Pan."' (A matinee performance of
that comedy was going on down rtuirs
as he spoke.) "No one. now is being j
asked to judge that play from stark,
typewritten pages. It has the ad?
vantage of lights and music and
i-cenery?of expert realization of what
few non-expert minds could imagine.
It has the psychological impetus of be?
ing an accredited success, of having
been written by Barrie and acted by
laude Adams. And yet, even now, if ?
alf this afternoon's audience told tb>|
truth they would admit seeing nothing
in the play. How can critics blame a
manager for mistakes? Half the
critics found nothing in 'Peter Pan'?
even with lights and music."
All this is interesting and logical.
And, apparently, the better the critic
the more fallible his judgment. Ap?
parently culture, intelligence, train?
ing have nothing to do with picking
I soce-js/tes. One of the greatest failures
of tpt year was selected by three dis?
tinctly "high brow" newspapsr rcview
er-%. .fcrid "The Fool"?with lights and
ntiiM? was almost unanimously con?
demned by the wiseacres of the Pacific
nlopo? and by not a few in New York.
After all, as another eminent manager,
A. M. Palmer, was wont to remark: "If
there wore a man in the world who
could toll a popular play from the
r.ther kind in advance of production he
could earn a million dollars a year."
* ? *
The truth of the matter is that the
prosperity of a plav rests less in the
mind of the man who wrote it than in
the eye of the man who witnesses it.
A falling treo makes no sound unless
there is an ear to hear. Perhaps no
one ever got more out of a play than he
took to it. The success of three in?
telligent works this season may be due
chiefly to the fact that audiences are
beginning to think?to comprehend re?
marks that have more in them tban
"Drop that gun or I'll kill you!" All
three plays might have failed a year or
two ago, although the truly great suc?
res? is likely to contain something of
all plaees and of all time. Only, per?
haps, appeal as big and universal as
this may be a little large for the quick
comprehension of the busy and pre?
occupied professional reader who
Skims through a hundred and twenty
typewritten pages as ft prelude to run?
ning out to lunch.
Scrr.ebodv has said that dinner is the
srreat enemy ?f the theater. It i? pos- ? '(
sib?e that professional readers should ! ,
be asked to scrutinise manuscript? only : j
after a period of fasting and prayer, f
and that the managers and reviewer?, if ,
?
11 not the drama lovers, should diet be
j fore investigating a play.
! Shakespeare's "Shrew'9
Given hy Paris Artistt
j Comedy Retains Its Sparkle it
Translation, Though r#?/oi
Rol*9? hack Familiar l^enit*
I LA MEf.BRE APPRIVOISEE (The Tam
j Ing at the ,'-hre*'), adapted from Shakea
psJraMi by I'.-il feels Ir. Presenten by th
yhu?ert? *\\h ill? fells wing u**t;
, : ? ? ? ,-, . Milt. Sor<
. ?-,-, . M l.ambei
i n*ptl?t;t. st. R?v
j Blanca .??. Mlle. Boren<l
Granito .,. ?;, Chara!
? Cambio . ?s- Ci**?
Korters?o. M. St?r
The Cook . - M. d'Apolgn
The Tsilor . M. candei
Gregorio .M. Psro'.i
<-l:.,?is . Mme. Farm
Nathaniel. Mme. Lier?
There is no nationality to '"The Tan:
I ing of the Shrew," and every rease
jwhy this tale of Padua, which Shake:
jpeare wrote for th? English star
should be equally entertaining i
i French. Th? players from the Coaiedi
j Franca*?? who gave it Saturday nigr
! in their r?pertoire engagement at U
'Thirty-ninth Street Theater, ?how?
?that it could be so and that it? valut
! In drama and atmosphere, suffered r
whit through translation.
It was a performance smoothly ex<
i cuteri and deft in detail. The stagh
| was in the tradition and the costumir
I appropriate, though in the last ecem
; i???, Sm?Yn tfcrwiwi were a little out <
the picture.
The play was done with spirit, at
did not drag, except between the act
when the wait? were ove.rlong. Tl
important question to decide for acto
who are going to give this play seer
to be how seriously is this tamii
process to be taken. Mile Sorel ai
M. Lambert took it pretty seriously,
much so that at times the seen
veered away from comedy and towa
melodrama. The humor with whi
M, Lambert played at ?ret seemed
desert him as the play prcgressed, ?
il ho became a tornado of blusti
lile. Sorel's Catarina waa equal
asking in that salty quality. She w
thoroughly vixenish, but less the t<
< magant than the petulent gamine, giv
I to tigerish outbursts and feline rag
but without real courage. H"r en
j lation was sudden, almost ?is though
i cold calculation siie Wuru C?oo?>.u<? i
| safe course. Neither seemed to real:
! that it waa really a battle of witr; a
j that well matched was well mat
Their interpretations were, howev
| consistent with each other and w<
i carried out with much skilful det!
! M. Ks\ : was excellent as Baptist? a
I Mile. Istrendt as Bianca, M. Char]
| was a b-ijaiUly humorous G rumio.
Becaui .- or the interest in the p
formalices the engagement of
Comedie Fran?aise haa been extent
another week. "Camille" will be plaj
again to-night.
On the Screen
Last Scenes of "The Pride
Polomar" Make Up for
Uninteresting Start
By Harriette Underhill
"The Pride of Palomar" is the f
ure picture at the Rivoli and five r
utes before it drew to a close we v
about to walk out feeling sure 1
it would run true to form and '
the only thing left was to throw
the "clutch" and hear the heroine
"Yes" on the hero's shoulder. A
matter of fact, we had seen just al
all we could stand of that partie
hero, and if the heroine had to
cc-pt him, as, of course, she had,
didn't care to see hor do it.
Then we remembered that the <
inal piano trio wore to appear
and would play "I'll Build a Stall
to Paradise," and if we wantet
hear that we had to Stay; so we sti
thereby seeing "The Pr'de of Paloi
vindicated. Either the director t
the last scenes in the picture
when everybody concerned was f
or else he made them last and
genius displayed therein Was the
suit of enthusiasm for an irksome
finished. They were by far the
part of the picture, so good, in
that the pleasant foeling which
vaded our being amounted alrnoi
forgiveness. And even the avi
Peter B. Kyne, had an ace ur
sleeve?it was a surprise finish, \
made the hackneyed talo soem
quite so hackneyed.
'there was something in the dire
of those final scones that was sc
fe;ont from the rest of the picture
it really seemtd as though any
could have done the whole thin
suddenly changed from a fini
melodrama?une of those when
hero is tr, ing to keep the old 1
stead out of the .hands of the
scrupulous financier, who is. of c<
the father of the girl?and beca
ffe?tle comedy with the enemies j<
hands and pitching all of the Jap
land-sharks and agents and cleri'
of the window and shaking han
they rocked with merriment. Thi
unscrupulous financier says: "l'l
jou $2,000,000 for your land, bu
me, how much did you win on
horse in the Derby?" and the
Says, "I didn't win a cent. I nevi
but 1 knew that you would make
offer for the land if you thot
had money to pay the mortgage
then instead of having the c<
tionftl fade out with the he-ai
business, the pride of Palomar
his bride-to-be and .shows her th?
which burns in the chapel. ?
"So long as there is a single I
left on earth this lamp will not
tir.guished," and she replies,
may it burn."
If we were a director we
never choose Mr. Kyne's stuff
wished to slime, for his stories ;
more than "twice-told tales"; s
haps it was not Frank Borgase'!
that "The Pride of Palomar" ac
though it was never going to get
way and then, \| in it did. it a<
though it was niver going to ni
a matter of fact, the course it to
such -a. familiar one that the
might have found itsa-way about
It seemed to curry on its own n
turn and all the actors must hav
the things, which they were
cozens of previous times,
Don Miguel F&rrell owns a rt
Southern California which is
gaged for $300,000. When he
that his son, Mike, has been ki
the war he dies and the son dt
ivturn until after the funeral i
On the. train he meets "the girl
offers io cut his steak for him
dining-car, which seemed prettj
nn the steak until you learned t
hand was injured. Then th
steward of the dining-car was <
But her father is on hit
foreclose the mortgage on the
farm, and the boy finds that a
returning soldier, is the sole 1
has a year to raise the mon'
iourse he does it with Fanda
whatever the family equine pet
s, and they all live happily eve
fhe hero never knew how fai
?ango could run until one day
iway with th* heroine. Thii
i
] would have been more thrilling if ran
dango hadn't slowed up so perceptibl;
to allow the heroine to be saved and i
the man who doubled for the hero hut
? looked more like him. We felt almos
8m Merlon felt when he found out tha
".Beuiah Bsxter" wao only the "Mor.
. tagUc girl."
There were several good perform
anees given by the men; notabb
among them was that of Warner ?lnn<
i as Mr. Okada, a part of the yellov
'peril; Joseph Dowlinj as Don Miguel
, I and Alfred Alien as the financier. Th<
' j featured players are Marjorie Daw an(
j Forrest Stanley. Grant Carpenter an>
i ?John Lynch mode ?he scenario. Th?
, prologue is called "Serenade Espa
j gnole and is sung by Sylvio Gavarelli
'?The overture is fron? Aida.
"Trifling Women," or, as wo prcfe.
! to thing of it, "Black Orchids" (and
, | this is what Rex Ingram really named
! it), is at tho Capitol this week. Oi
course, we h.xd seen it twice before,
but we sat through it ?gain yesterday
! and found that at each viewing new
' charms unfolded themselves, so that
! *-o have come t? agree with a certain
? critic on a certain morning newspaper.
vii.: Robert Sherwood, of "The Her?
j aid." He says that, "Trifling Women"
i is the finest thing Rex Ingram ever
? has done. It. surely is a beautiful
I piece of work and it seems that Mr.
i Ingram must be at once the delight
and despair of all other directors.
Mr. Ingram named his picture "Black
Orchids," but he was finally persuaded
to allow it to be called by the other
foolish name, and probably that is the
reaoor. the story of the ?ack orchids
ha? a prologue and an epilogue. When?
ever a producer has a story that he
I feels would not be palatable because
? it is unhappy or "over the heads of the
i public" he says: "Well, we can make
it a dream," or, "wecan have him road
i ing in a book," and, as a matter of
1 fact, he is pretty nearly right. Probably
j if D. W. Griffiths had made "Broken
! Blossoms" that way, and had little
j Elsie Dinsmore reading "Limehouso
i Nights" and had her say: "Listen,
papa, here, is a sad story of a young
girl just my age, I can almost fancy
that I am she"?presto, fade out into
Elsie Dinsmore as the frail and fright?
ened drudge of "Broken Blossoms"; if
i he had done this, we say, probably the
I picture would have been a financial in?
I stead of merely an artistic success.
? So "Trifling Women" has a prologue and
an epilogue dragged in to give it a
! hanpy ending.
Barbara La Marr is an actress who,
?with the subtlety of her charm and the
fineness of her beauty, manages to
! make most other actresses lock like
awkward clods. She is a sort of cross
; between Betty Elythe and Pola Negri.
: P.amon Navarro is a cross between Ro
doloh Valentino and Richard Barthel
mess, so it may readily be seen that
Mr. ingram has ab?e assistance. The
pictun.' is the only thing on the pro?
gram, with the exception pf the over?
ture, which is "Ein Heldenleben" ("A
Hero's Life"), by Richard Strauss. This
is the first time it has been played in
i America, although it was performed at
Frrmkfort-on-the-Main as long ago as
,1899, with the composer conducting.
There is a lcr.g and tedious introduc?
tion by Charles Isaacson, which no one
\ can hear back of the tenth row, and
which is quite unnecessary, aa the
"tone poem" speaks for itself more
eloquently than any human voice can
do. It is divided into six parts?the
hero, the hero's enemies, the hero's
love affair, Cie battlefield, peace and
the hero's escape from tho world. The
audiences at the theater yesterday
were delighted with Sam Rothafel's
selection of an overture.
At the Strand Mary Pickford will re?
main in "Teas of the Storm Country."
"Ebb Tide." is the picture at the Ri
alto. This will be reviewed to-mor?
row.
- ? ??, ??
'Parsifal' Presented in German
For First Time Since War
CHICAGO, Nov. 19.?German opera
came back to Chicago to-day, the Civic
Opera Company presenting Richard
Wagner's "Parsifal"?the first time it
has been sung in America in German
since the war.
Ettore Panizza, who revived tho
opera in Italy last year at Turin, con?
ducted to-day's performance. Forest
Lament was in the title role, supported
by Mark Ostor, making his debut here;
Ivan Stoachenko, Ed Cotreuil and
Cyrena Van Gordon, the latter as
Kundry.
? .. ??'? ,.- ? ""?'
"Blossom Time" Celebrates
"Blossom Time" to-night, at the
Century Theater, celebrates its 450th
performance in New York. Tho op?
eretta was presented originally on
September 29, 1921, at the Ambassador
Theater. It went from there to Jo!
son's Fifty-ninth Street Theater and
then to the Century.
The Stage Door
"The Lucky One" at the Garrid: I'll?.
nier and 'The Texas Nightingale" at the
Empire Theater are to-r.lght's opening?.
"R. U. R." ?nove? to-nlfcht from the
Garrlck to I he Fres?? Theater.
Mil?, Certlii Horel and her associates of
the Comedie FrRne-ilse will appear In
"Camille" at the Thirty-ninth Street The?
ater to-nlpht.
Otil Skinner i? appearing In "Mister An?
tonio" at the Shubert-Riviera this week.
The Players' Company, which ta pr?tent?
inft "Crowns" at the ProvlneetOWn Theater
Will offer eiiolem Ash's "The Oort of Ven?
geance" on December 11. This will be tho
play's first performance in English.
?jSiloti Inspires
i Mixed Emotions
i
In His Audience
'?His? Scheme Decidedly V?
j; vied in Character am
it Playing Reveal? Con
siderable Incongruity
Throng for plulharnioiii?
De Gorgoza at Town Hall;
Concert at Metropolitan:
Irish Band at Hippodrome
Considering that Mr. Alexander Siiot
is looked upon as one of the master!
of Contemporary Russian musicians, hit
pianoforte recital in Aeolian Hnl! yes?
terday afternoon contained features
both of composition and performance
j calculated to cause astonishment among
seasoned concertgoers. That all of hit
listeners were not of this class was made
plain by several pattering outbreaks o?
applause which occurred ?it places mis?
takenly accepted as the conclusion of
familiar pieces.
Mr. Siloti's scheme was decidedly
mixed irr character and there was con?
siderable incongruity also in hie play?
ing;. A group of pieces by Bach began
the program, after which came four
pieces by Li?zt, which, despite many
years of effort to accept tho great
virtuoso as also a great composer, left
us with an old conviction, that the
music was showy salon stuff.
When a nocturne, etude- and fan?
taisie by Chopin followed, >e fell to
wondering what would have, happened
to the great. Hungarian virtuoso had
the poetically-inspired Paie, been a
courtier like him and sallied', out into
the world as a performer 't>{? his own
music. Would ho not h?v?7s?bmerged
Liszt ns Liszt submerged th? Thalborg'?.
and Kalkbrenner's, who were His rival.-.?
There was much sobriety and some
technical brilliancy in Mr, Siloti's play?
ing of the Pole's music, but; he made
Rubinstein's Circassian dance, which
came at the end of the recital, more
interesting than any of the Liszt
pieces. What cnn be called only ?
i charming little Interlude was forme
by the player's transcription Of taxtX
of the delightfully dainty and char
? acterlsticorchestrnl settings by Lifcdofl
* of four Russian folksongs. Mr. Nilot:
has reproduced the instrumental de
Vic?? of the familiar Utile pieces rti
s. j capitally as Liadoff did the cffecta oi
, i a musical ifttHxbox
_ I Philharmonic Concert Crowded
[{ The "All Senfs Sold" sign of the Phil;
I harmonic Society is showing signs o?
.weiir. It waa called into use again
""yesterday afternoon to confront, late
\r comers at Carnegie Hull at the so
' cicty's l,698d concert. The largo at?
tendance was certainly not because of
% curiosity to hear new things, for the
* program was made up of numbers that
? have often appeared on the orchestra's
| lists, or because of any sensational
, | soloist, for Mr. Stransky and the men
, of his ?nnd were the only participant?,
> As the program note said of the voice
? of the bird in "Blogf?Pl?d," in the con
* ! cert version it is "only an admirable
? woodwind player in a black coat," but
i | admirable players in black coals play
i Ing together music time-tried and ever
new are a sufficient inducement, it.
seems, for those who love music, for
? its own sake.
, Beethoven's Fifth Symphony led
yesterday's list, atld was followed by
' Tchaikovsky's tone-poem "Franceses da
! Rimini" and four excerpts from tho
i Wagnerian music dramas. Mr. Stran
i sky is no rigid precisian and conducted
', with seemingly boundless energy and
enthusiasm. The men of the orchestra
were more than once called upon to
' riso in acknowledgment of the ap?
plause.
De Gorgoza Varies Program
?milio de Gorgoza. in excellent, voice,
gave his hearers a thoroughly enjoyable
n'nety minutes In the afternoon at.
Town Hall. IJ t> can be depended upon
for variety, nnd thero wns ample
variety in hi:) program on this occa?
sion?Handel, Gluck, Schumann, Griffes
and modern French and Spanish num?
bers. His diction found nothing for?
eign in any of his four languages,
while he could be dramatically fervid,
as in the aria from G luck's "Iphigenia
in Tauris," or express quiet lyric emo?
tion as in his Schumann songs. Here
his voice seemed at its best, with softer
notes of a delightfully pure quality,
and such also was the case in the songs
by Charles Griffes.
"La Fuite do la Lune" and "Sym?
phony in Yellow" were in a vein fa
| miliar in Griffes'a works; quiet, con
! templative, rather modern French in
?atmosphere and still melodious, while
j there was a good tune combined with
?dramatic spirit in the setting of Maso
? field's "An Old Song Resung."
Three short, humorous, rather im
impressionistic fragments by Darius M
I j haud marked Mr. de (?orgoza's Fren
* ! group. Then he burst into ms Spani?
? | songs, displaying what might be co
f , sidercri lempo rubmo in an Andalusli
i , serenade, which was followed by cor
; positions of Granudo* and I)c Valla,
> j whoiie "Canel?n de) Amor Perdida
' j Was h strange combination of Spann
j atmosphere and ultra-modern dits
, nnncc. "La paloma," of course, ?r
? ''Clavelitos" wer? given aa encores
: thi- loudly expressed pleasure of tl
? , large audience. Hera the speed of b
flow of word a was fearful and wo?
, derful.
Meanwhile, ht th? Piincj-/ and Jut
, Theater, the second "Miniature Mus
? cale" for children was given by Adi
? laide Fischer, soprano, who sang nun
hers of a good musical quality, bt
easy to understand, with briet for*
Words, She Had a good voice and a
expressive manner that appealed t
her young and older, hearers. In fh
second part of the contort Gottfric
Federl?in played piano pieces by (?riei
Hiimperdinck and Godard, while Man to
' Marble, barytone, sang light Englis
and American numbers,
Concert at Metropolitan
"Cavalleria Rusticana" and "Pag
llaeci" were presented At the Metre
politan aa the initial offering of th
series of Sunday evening concert!
Tho performance of these operas !
concert form, while it is no new de
parturc, ia always somewhat in th
nature of an experiment, tho succ?s
of which depends upon the singers t
whom the roles h'jtV?. been intrusted
In the present instance the excel
lencie? of the artists was such tha
only tho visual appeal of the opera
was sacrificed.
"Cavalleria" was sung by Mme?. Po
ralta, Telva and Anthony and bj
Messrs. Tokatyan and P?ceo. As Tu
riddu Armand Tokatyan made his bo*
to local audiences, lie has a voice ol
great beauty and power, with effects
gained by legitimate means with little
resort to vocal trickery and with a
highly commendable repose of manner
His Turiddu was in every way equal tc
the splendid Santuzza of Mme. Peralta.
"Pftgliacci" was adequately per?
formed with Mme. Sundelius and
Messrs. Kingston, Denise, Bada and
I Keschiglian, A notable feature of tho
performance of the Prologue as sung
by Mr. Danise. Mr. Bamboschok con?
ducted both performances, while a
capacity audience heard and generous?
ly applauded both operas.
Toronto Irish Band Piaya
What is an Irish Regiment Band?
A musical representative of the new
army of tho Irish Free State or from
the old Irish regiments of the British
army? The one that nlavd last nieht
?X F W YORK'S LEADING T If B A T K F, S AN P ri V CCK8 S ES*
|r^kNURbARDi.li^^.
'? LAST 2 WEEKS. POP. MAT. TO-MOR'W
The PASSING SHOW of 1922
? ft? I U H I ?' cVo&a? ParicW.
K.rs. 8:80. Matinees Wed. aart Snt.
BLOSSOM T ? M F
150th TIME ""STrRAS?WN*NY
TO-NIGHT NEW York.
-?a?,?.,, -THERE'S A' REASON 1
."00 ?BATS ! ROO SEATS 1 700 BE *T
, ri?? cRT VAUDEVILLE
The
Sftffi?: CENTRAL and**?
IIEiilNNING MATINEE TO-DAY
WATSON SISTERS
^?'STOLENSWEETS'
AND ALL STAR VAUDEVILLE BILL
?lSnth 8t. Theatre, Near B'way Fln&i Weak of
COMEDIE FRAN?AISE CO.
Sorel, Lambert Ravet. To-nicht. 830, 'Camino.
vsiiiUidaaiCiUOf Msta* Wed. ?rid Sat!
International Musical Success
THE LADY IN ERMINE
With Wllda BonnMt ?uid Walter Woolf
C.r,-\T> !" * ? CC-"1' ff* ' " ~ "" e?
->i'W????'?U?Ss
SPRINGTIME OF YOUTH
J
'.>Ab?(tU Mat,
MUSICAL COMEDY SENSATION
SALLY, IRENE .antf.: MARY
With fiddle Bowling and '"Ors/rU i'ft?t
REST RrATfiEY-s- *S'?^1Hc^*,EfV; *
?Ap issLllUall S-.sd. Mts.Thuri.'*8?t
?-"H TH^N ICE C0M?"? WIT
I ..??.. -??<??. ??? "' B'y- Kv->. ?.-ai. I
I -iPl? I H dis Matinees Wsd, and Sat. |
SUPER MYSTERY PLAY
WHISPER-HG W'RES
if
CUlinLOT Tttes., 44th,"W. of Il'y. r\
dltUfJCni J:80. Mats. Wid. -aud Ska*.
6RElNWieHV?E.LAGe FO&.?.IBS
T!
IL
Fourth Annual Prorlu-?tion
?
S? ? vriiVAL, Mfctl??ss'WED.'A t?f
Engagement posi?vely ends Dec. 2
FVTRA MAT. THANKSGIVING DAY
jOLdON-$59ihST.&?i?V*&
MATS, THURSDAY 4. SATURDAY.
THEWaKL?WELIV?lfinVlRr
"Loftiest achievement of tlm theatre."
?Broun, World.
f?i SrtIB 45'h. W. of B'way. Evg?. 8:30
\?iii%JV M atinees Wed!, Timm, and Sat.
RAGE GEG7.GE VgA'*:
NORMAN TREVOR?ROBERT WARWICK
PLAYHOUSE ^.?&i?
"Delightful musical eomody, well
acted, danced ami sung."?Eve. Post.
Maxine Ellloils i^fssw^iiit
SAM H. HARRIS presents
JEANNE EAGELS in "RAIN"
Founded on W, S. Maugham's "M'ss Thoinp
I)
AL'S ?"'
HERS!I
DI VMnilTU WoBt is- Kvcnlnta 8:S0.
rLl IllUU I n Matinees Tlmrs. and Sat.
By DON MARQUIS
B CDS i RI 3f? West 42<l St. Erinlnsa at 8:30.
nCrUOklV Mats. Wed. and Sat. at, 2:30.
ANNE NICHOLS* Lnughins; Suc?es?
ELTINGE 2g****** *?-**?*
inecs VViid. and Sat., -J:30.
TMEATBS ?O/L0 P?CDUCno'is
lof** TONIGHT
\Clhe
?VS ?'SO ?ftATS WED SAT
saatCTearisiMisiins nao um
GARftlCK6bvuJr>?
EVS ?J0 IfiAIS THUW SAT
A<gY??n THEATRE, ?TWICE DAILY.
MO I Uli B'WAY at 45 ST.i 2:30?8130.
WILLIAM FOX presents
INCESS Th.,W.39th. Brs. 8:45. Mats.Thur.&Sat.
Brock Pemberton's Production
"An r\m.i.-i.iu play One of the best I'v?
seen in New York. Ki-en satire en lack of
t sincerity in aoilna on stage anil scruon.''
?Radolph Valentino.
' CHA RATTERS
IN SEARCH OF AN AUTHOR
' t'orn
moscow
, wuAf^TS TUE. cSAT. *A?.
JHQ OF Coi ?800 EV5.830.
Arthur Hopkins Presents
ETHEL BA9RYM0BE
ta "Rose Bernd" ,Ht?.
L0HG??RE afe^^fcjft
Wed, and Sat. at '?-M.
BIQGKST HIT IN TOWN i
By W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM.
Madge KENNEDY
n FRANK CRAVEN'S RIOT
Th? ?.? I I I.E Mate.Wed. ?k?st
-AND-?.
A Love-drama of Joys and Thrills.
?i ??ilTM W. 45Ht. ?>.?:10.
Tho ?UW ! il Mats.Wed. & Sat.
TIMES S& ?vs.3lTio.
"HA8 CAPTURED NEW YORK."?Eve. Sun.
M0|a.rS.^B0oJ00n..-T $l [PRifiES. Sltt
OrolMatt?l N?sD?a, 4l.00 ami $l.no.
Cu & (1. MU.. 30c it'il'
CiiBiinlnur Pollock's Powerful Plav,
POPULAR MATS. THUR8. and 3AT. St'2:30.
CCI UfYll THBATR.K, W. 42d St. Ktrgs. 8:30.
aE>s.V?IH Mau. Wed. (Poi).) & ?W.?.. 2:30.
WST+SnJSr. rtWCS &A/LY ?>.20-?.20
m?&% ?0MEDY SUCCESS "The Romantic Age" COMEDY &t?
41st, K. of R'way. Kvs
lat?, Thurs. & Hat.. 2:30.
NEW YORK;
SYMPHONY
WALTER DAMB08CH.Conductor
fiarnttvlt? Mal! T,,urB- A?,. Nov. 28, at 3
uaineg.e nan Frl. Eve., Nov. get at sus
Soloist: Of*SIP CABRILOWITSCH.
MOZART. PIZZBTTI. BRAHMS.
Tickets at ?ox ('ffloe. UEOKGE KXCLKJ, M?r
{ ARNKGIE HALL, RPf? ??
iH'XOAV AFTERNOON, AT :!, UCMt ?9
Rachmaninoff
TICKETS NOW AT BOX OFFICE.
Direction C, J. Fol?y. ."telnwaj- Plano.
LEOPOL!. STOKOW8K1, Conductor.
CARNEGIE i' fO-MOKROW at
HALL | EVENING, sir.
iSolotut: JEAN GEEARDY, 'Cellist.
-i KO LI AN HAM,, TO-XM.H'V it 9118.
Sahnelder ? NickerNR
TENOR. PIANIST.
Mgt, Evelyn Hopper. Steibwuy PUno,
AEOLIAN HALL, TO-DAY AT ?.
SSabel Beddoe
CONTRALTO.
Mgt. Evelyn Hopper. " ^ir?y Piano.
Or-re-i? Hal!, Sat. Aft., Nov. 25, at 2:30]
?VIOLIN UKOITAL. (Stelnway Piano.)
| A EO LI AN HALL, To-morrow Aft. At 3 I
?OSE
WHAT HE DID FOR ME
To-morrow Aft. at 3 and Tliur?. Eve., 8:15.
l?iimf.nl Hal!. 50 E. Hot 8t. Tick?'!* ?1.A5 A ?.1.10.
M?L (J. Arnold Shtw, PI,?no Ittvprvatlou?. Vami. 3038.
No ticket! at lia.ll CXCSpt one hour be-fore lecture.
\eolhin Hull. EH.
V?OLH
Evo., Nov. :
i RECITAL
:., at 8:15
sei
Mgt. '?velyu liy|>t(?-r.
LOKVT'fl
T?TE
B.S. Mot?'
AME
THEATRK
i'M. u'r irw?y.
Mmo? A Hafiilld l'l&i)a.
VIOLA DANA in
?I.ovp In The iifiU.''
ADLER & Dt NBA It,
T'rlinrn?* Minnticls
AND OTHERS.
?5? WHEKi THE
io?SERT 0?LL3I
CAPITOL
REX INGAAAI'ti
"Trifling Women"
B'way a* Slat. Capitol Grand Orcheitra
I
NOVEMBER 20-25
Competitiva display of food' and culinary tun- [
tcrpiccca nrr.tn?edb> 'vorlcl'? foremost chef?. I
Exhibits to Intet-! ? hveryofl?. See How the
Bin Hotels Operate Their. Business. It's Edu?
cational,
Admission 50c
^?jaBfa-mngr^jiiniiiiiistsiltsiliiii.ssiWi??? is?i,ir-?OT??sw?-??-a !
STt?Wb~l^;:S:
MARY PICKFORD 4
'Teas of the Storm Country"
FOK?NE BALLET
COURBO?N.
Ilsth Orttan Radial. Wadneadivy, Noveni- I
>er Sind, Wanamaker Auditorium, 8;80.
Vdtnloslon complimentary. Tloltets raady. 1
ivply Concert Bureau, wanamuKer'-s, i
- at the Hippodrom??, however, wsi
1 neither of these,' but came from tht
\ largely Ir??h 510th Regiment at To
! ron to. There vr?fi hin!f. of hosti!<
. d?monstration by ?-.orne local society
T but. nothing resembling Hlfs material
" ?cd. No occasion could have beer
! inore respectable, not to s<?y sedate
. ?rom the time when the ?emi circu??
- curtain at the. front of the stag?
j dropped to disclose the, KfS*ft-iIa<
g players, backed find flanked b.y B03
I, Scouts, ant! Lieutenant J. Andrew
. WiifR in;S began "'1 he Star-Spangle
Banner," until wh?n the atidieiice file?
, out after "The. American Patrol,"
Most of the program was larjreli,
. Irish- Benedict, Balfe, Wallace anf
. Sullivan, among: other*, while then
t were several fiolobtts, B?atrice
- O'Leary. a SOpT&ftO wi*!i,!i strong voie
1 but. of -inconHis'ent fiuality: two cor
) nctist?, William Toner and R. E. Ever
? j son, of whom the fatter w?>>: the bet
I j ter, and a bagpiper. The latter fur
' nisbed the really amusing touch ol
[itrio evening, marching up and down
, I the stage as lie played to a ketflcdrurr
j accompaniment. A? for the band it
j self, it was very fair, giving an agree
; able perfon,.anee of not pirticularij
j difficult rtuw.V-%'4, with one burst inff
- ; i-'Ong and an?'.hot into whistling, bui
? . it was nothing exceptional, hardly th<
> ? equal, for instance, of t.h/? ColAtwu
Band ?t. had a very fr,*,.,,
tion from a goon-MzU "?f? ?*>
however, particularly ,, udKr?-e, **
Town ff all Bears U^
Debate on VH; ^
A spirited debate o? vj-,
heard at Town flan Saturd*/?^
a meeting under tho a??*u "'*?'
Ar,ti-V?visect,on SoiWWlS? ?*il
Dr. Walter R, liadwin of ?2 ,?rt
. . England, the speaker "J$*$*?
?tacked the practice of S^M
j mentation, while several ??S ?"*
..audience who were eiv*n ?w*'"r:ill,, *?<
of the floor vigorously de.vl^i
, I Those speak)** in UvVrtfJ .*
, Vioii included Harold R R.u "'**
dent of the Humane SoeM?& ?9J
?den. N. I? and Dr. Lulu ?ttatV.^
of Los Angeler. Dr. Kad?*!?*
no real good had com?. ?( Vt?. "t*
land attacked it on th* ???*
; cruelty, " ???an-j -,
| Mr. Bains, in replying to n- u *
win, said that the 'sp?\k*r ? ^
familiar with his ?oojeciTn?! IKiS
stance, to .how that, tne ??A?*
human-. Mrs David B?lais. ?5^
of i he society, presidid. D> '?
flexner, director of Rockefell?"uZ
I tute, had been challenged tl ?
with Dr H?Hu?in V,,.. j:? _..l? <???*&
TO-NIGHT nt HiZS at thr EM
PIRE THEATRE. I?IARLES
FROHMAN nrwnt? Z'>E
AKINS' new roMKov. "tiik
TEXAS NIGHTINGALE." by
Ih? Aotl:or of "I)?t)la*tiStv' with
.lonr.vA lioivwsii f?f<i i>;
EXCEPTIONAL COMPAQrv.iv.
CIA fU>.i,< \ KM. KLIGUTLEY.
MATINEE
5 AT
VANDERBILT v
Mats. Wed. and Sa
'At'HIENCK S C R E A M E ? WITH
LAUGHTER."?/to SCn?.li r-i--~.ii
_..._,"__ ""I ?ttspt.
??.?,A' "??"r-?-M?7iTr
VERTON OF? -*'<?
THEMOViESl^^a
Harry Uoj, w??n'8 ?0? ?.??uJJJB
CM. ?. Kafwaa ?a? Maro Cor,?^
LAAT a TIMBA
puNmssrntwc^MfTiHrSt
mm ^^M
hfWi m ? ?.. sp
THE GiMGHAM G?RL _
EARL C?RROLL ?SS^L-af?
M-fS??!
ARTHUR HOPKINS presents
JOHN BARRYMORE
n "HAMLET"
Settings by Robert Edmond Jenes
".John Barryinore is f?r and
away the finest Hamlet we have
ever seen."
?Heyivood Braun, World.
"The atmosphere of historic
happenlnjt snrrminil. d John
Bnrij-more's appearance laut
night as the Prince of Denmark."
?John Corbin, Times.
"One who ha? seen all the Ham?
lets that have been trirrn in this
cotmtry the last twenty-live
.year? must report that fhl* new
one is the finest of them all."
?/tl?.ran<icr WooUcott, Herald.
sham HARRIS TflEATR
"The audience ws? the most
excited, at several point*. that'
we have ever seen in the the?
atre."?Percy Bammoni, l'-.foo:.
"It. sa? a gloriou? characteri
BSVtton of the Melancholy Prince.
Barrr-more lived the part."
?Stephen ??aihbun. Eve. Sun.
"??lukeftpeare'* play, with John
Bar*-.vmore, ?* superb."
?Robert IVrich, j-.'v. Telegram.
V West 42d St. Evenings 8.15
"Matinees Thursday & Saturday
Knickerbocker ?2 ftA?*wS?#lfc
"Real blueblood amone shows."--Tribu;.?.
A. L. 6RLANGERS Musical Pro?uctloa
The YANKEE PRINCESS
(From Kalmmi's "DIE; BA-TADEBE")
With VIVIENNEl THO-IiPEi JOHN T
SEGAL I BATES iMLKBAl
'VOU can't mi
KUW
TUFA..
W. 4? St
A Bat^M ^K??" ^'?.COURTLEtOH
and lay oiklm to haying lived."?Eer.chlep. Life.
LYCEUSV1 '
rctilnga at
I'd SAT..
THE NAUTICAL l'OMKDV H?T?
'??SHORE
LEAVE"
FRANCESST?RR
I^FIII aopaitic? I
w.*i. A- .-int.. i.SOJBy JOHN GAI.^WOBTHT ;
EQUITY 48TH ST. M???V?.t
Entire ?id Balcony TUES. .MATS. Me.
'HOSPITALITY'
A rare blending o? humor, heart, home
?Your home and ?nine.
nia Tf?M 40th St.. W. or U'way. Ers. S:30.
rULI UPJ BPECL PA?CB MAT WED..? SO.
MUSIC BOX MAS ? i
iA<?r
I ?rcier,t
TTT1 IRVING BEBLiN'3 NEW ! swarf'??1 ;
laiMiaiMIlaS???&l !
Grander llia.i lest season,"?Timos.
-LOEW'S THEATRES
METRO PR&8BS?B
the hex mmm
PHOOUCTION OF
To-day. New York: ALL THIS WERK,
Greele.v ftq.. Victoria. Orphettm. Iie
hutoey St.. Ave, B; .Vor. au il, ??, Sj,
S,, SM St.; Sor. -'.?. ti, Circle; NOV
?.i. ti, ?;. ?o-, it Hi St.; Nov. sj. ,.?
?tf, Lincoln *?.; l?o?. 2?, as, ?<s, 7th
Ave.. U?nt? Ut.; Vn.. 17, ifl lUo. En
tirs Weilt .Vor. XT, Boulevard. National.
Gates (B'k;*ti>i .Vor. ?o, }?, Deo. ;,
Victory; Vor. ?.'.!. SO, /). 0 j S 3,
Alpine (B'kl>?>). \?c. .;<>. ;?-,-. :. ?, s. >,
Burlandi /'-> ; <t,t,! j. Htitii ?-t.; Sfov,
JO, Dee. /, .'. Bijou (H'klyii). ?roadway
(IVklyn;; ,V?>- . SO, Jiec. I. *? S. l'aine
(B'klyn), Eu I ton (B'klyn). Warwick
(B'klyfc) | Opt?; /. ?, ,!. Breevort,
(B'klyn); Dee. ; m,rf ?, Spuoncr.
METROPOLITAN g**5i
To.night at S. Bet-Is Godurtow. Mattenauer;
tliaiispln, Johnson. Manlonr* Had?. Pap!
Wed., 8. Alda. Bo?Jbarj (debut). Otie?in (da
bu U ; Martliieiii. Uanlsc, MarUune?. Buike (de
bui). .Moranzonl.
Thurs.,1:45,W?lltuer?.Mair?ii?tier. Jerlt?s.Gordon ;
rsttchar (rttfoO-. w?it?hilljF?*nder. _??lana??
j FrL'is??aial MStlftjo si 2. Prices: il to~5
Butterfly. Bast?n, Perlul: MartlmtlH. BcoUi,
I i'nltren er|. Meraiiaoni.
FrL. a. Mtt?sto?c?o!
Ciisiiaplu, Paftrialei
Sat., 2, Romeo t-t Jullett?. Borf, l>ela:inols;
U S.I, Dt> I.uca. Bothler. Biflnr ilaMe.lmaua,
aat.. 8.15, Pop. Prices. Manon Lsj?aut.
Ai.u; Johnson. Scoti), alslatssts. Papl.
Next Men.. 7 a:,. Tristan. MatatnautT. Oaefflc;
laucher, Wlitteliin, B,-iidl?r. lkviansky
UAltB.VAN PIANO tSIU)
Aida,
Oiaiulee.
B'woa
II?LTD
"The Pride of Palomar"
wlHi ?til stuc east
ni''?? 'i,i CONOSRTOrchestra
?Paramtmnt Picturet?
"EBB TIDE'*
A Ueorte MtOfow? Prod,
FA AI OU 8 HiA?.TO Orohsstrs
50L?MB5A lwu
Dally
& 8'vray.Pr.p.
i A 1:13. il'rices
MOLLIE WILLIAMS *Hq H
00 M PAN Y
wINA ClAIREK
AND CO.. Snc'udinff BRITE .MrJUC
In the '"PREPOSTEROUSLY CLBVHt" Ctt&WI
^Tle Awful Tmih?
BELASC? 3?3^??*?
4Q9fh Perforrnaitei To-nifM
DAVID BELASCO Prisants
I?E ULRiC AS
DALY'S 03d St. Tel. y y'TTf^n
!'iIEA_. * Ar? ? 4!h It
Greenwich Village &&*??%&
A "FANTASTIC FRICASSEE"
with .JAMES ; MABEL : BOBBY
WATTS ! ROWLAND EDWARDS
_SUCCcSS _
? AIATIXEBS THANKSGIVING W?ER:
?U.D., THIKS.. FRl. 4 S;%T.-5sBsSo?1
The Great New
Radio Picture
"HOW TO
MAKE YOUR
OWN RADIO"
Can be Booke? &l
S. P. FILM EXCHANGE,
Samuel PinkenfcU, rret,
729 Seventh Ave.. N. Y.
TEA ROOMS
? re Irse Pasituraai ?-**?*-!? ? * ^aS
.unehion ?So. Di-rasr ?i. A La Car? ?f** *??,
ifscira Chiofcea waSIa iiUoctwoo ?1- O-*"* *^

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