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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 27, 1922, Image 10

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There* s a pict?re aheatf,
f^f?i* nmv?this week.
The family on Thanks?
giving Day, or the- f oothail
game?or both.
Aim! there is firm to be
had, or perhaps eren a
Kodak?or both.
We can help yotrr selec?
tion, or sell yo?-?or bash,
?hodepiwg, firmtimg <rtni ?*
larging sjtks tmfitrhr i-msd.
Eastman Kodak Co.
(Bsa?HM Stockho?*e4?e.)
&u\ Mm?htxm Ave. at 43th St
?ft Cheese is the most
aomical "meat food**
ne pound
is equal
twenty
Cheese
o ttnpor
i ?vatante*: American,
Pimento, Swiss, sold by
the slice, pound or ?oaf,
8 VARIETIES IN
TINS
I^Look For The Label W1
?jays ^Bernard ?Shaw:
"Jliroat germs -
"the ola mistakes
of creation.
'"TRUE to form, he re
?*? marks: "When a man
puts a Formamint tablet in'
to his mouth to wipe out
a few million bacteria, he
is trying to correct the old
mistakes of creation."
All of which admirably
sums up the services of
Formamint, the throat tab?
let that actually hjils germs.
At all drug stores.
hl?amint
trCHMKIUING THROAT TASUT?
SAMPLES:
To .litfuafat you uiih frvrnuimint we mill
tend a trial Tube on isc ap> ef 4c in tuxrnpi
to defray mailing cost. Addreii T\f Ba'ier
Chemical Co., 113 W. i&.'i St., N. Y. City
1030?China ??*? plat? with htm?
ptinted perforated tin cover? 910.
THE THOUSANDS of
good gifts at Oving
ton's are a full palette of
colors to gain the best
expression of the art of
giving. And the variety
is almost as great as the
different pictures that
could be painted from the
set of paints!
OVINGTON'S
'T?O Gin Shop of Fifth Avotiuo"
Fifth avenue at 3sth st.
fey uaiua Warranted For? Wor-i
Vermont Blankets
Overuse 73x84 rait
Immm Pair $14.00
' Delivered ?t VViar Hour
Pl.VK. BLtt. KO?B BOBWfcJEtS
A? yvtxtt?
VERMONT NATIVES' INDUSTRIES
Er??sewBter, Vermont
Bach Revived
In Programs of
Two Concerts
i
Friend h of Music O flf er Group
of Cantatas by Father?
Son's Concerto Feature?!
by New York Symphonj
Value Is Chiefly Archaic
Failure to Preserve Sacr?e
Motif in Former Man
Effect of Presentatiox
By H. E. Krehbiel
We are net at all disposed to mak
merry at one feature of yesterday'
muaic, for that which we heard wa
calculated to put ua in bo contemplt
tivc a mood that when a fellow of ir
finite humor remarked that "we at
getting: back to Bach" we could onl
reply that it seemed eo and wish thi
we were making tha progress on line
somewhat different than those marke
j out for U? by our leaders. It wi
I juat after the first concert of tk
Friends of Music in Town Ball In t?
aftornoon and we heard two enure
cantatas and a violin concerto b
; Johann Sebastian, father, and it he
I been reported to tin that all had gor
j well at Aeolian Hall with a concerl
I (grosso, we suppose) of Carl Phil
! Emanuel, son, at a concert of tl
'; Symphony Orchestra.
Though this Bach was nearer to or
i generation, in manner, than his fathe
; and it is likely that his music w?
i made to sound still more contempori
neous by the transcription of It whit
was played by Mr. Damrosch and h
orchestra, it must still have be?
archaic enough to convince the aud
ence that there was a large infusion <
, educational purpose in two of the si|
I nlficant concerts of the day. This b
j ing so, we pondered a bit on the que
j tion whether the laudable purpoi
j might not have been better served i
, Town Hall if the vocal music had be<
j of a kind intelligible to the listener
' To all of them we mean, those familii
j with the German language as well i
to those to whom German is an u:
| known tongue. Why should the ca
j tatas have beer, sung in Gorman? 1
i the choir English is a native tongu
! The hymns which it san? oifer no o
: stacks to effective translation. Sor
j of them, v;o believe, have found the
i way into English hymnals. So far
j the singing of the choir and two of tl
I four solo singers are concerned t!
! sounds winch they uttered might
j well have been Choctaw as Germa
? Only Mr. Header, an American, and Si
Bender, a German, uttered words whi<
? were intelligible to anybody.
Opera and Concert Confused
Perhaps there were reasons for
choosing the solo singers from the
! Metropolitan Opera Company. If so,
i they had no artistic validity. No ar
] tistic end is achieved by transferring
j the principle alleged to be dominant at
'the opera to the concert room. Aa u
matter of faet, the rule of preserving
? the original language of the opera in
the Metropolitan is not strictly obeyed.
1 Rus?5nii operas ?re sunpc in Italian;- so
j are some French. Some, like "Boris
' Godounoft"' are simultaneously ?;ung in
! both. The public is indifferent in the
j matter, because the public doesn't care
' fo." the -words of the opera, but only
for Its music and its outward integu
! ment.
: It, ?s diff?rent in the concert-room
' and in music like that sung yesterday,
i The cantatas were portions of church
; services?the first, "Der Friede'sei mit
? Die" for the I'east of the Purification;
the second. "Christen, ?tzel-diesen
Tag," for the Feast of the Nativity, for
Christmas. Bach wrote scores of these
services for the Sundays and holidays
of the Church year. They are gener?
ally short, made up of recitatives, cho?
rals (i. e., hymns), and moro or lem
?labor?t? choruses. How beautlfu
mtfny of them are every culture?
music lover knows. But except for th'
hymns the texts are as a rule littl
better than doggerel. Bach was no
greatly concerned beyond seeing tha
they were proper to the lesson of th
| day and afforded stalking horses fo
' his music. Occasionally ho indulge
' In delineative effects, but when he di
, so he put no insuperable rock in tl
j way of a translation.
Value Chiefly Educational
j It is only for musical folk of a studioi
; mind that the cantatas ave good cone?
! material and they are likely to acce
; them for what they are?churi
? services. Now a query: Would not t!
' laudable purpose which underley y?
1 terday'a concert have been belt
I nchieved if the text had been intel
; gible and the performance more 11
! that which prevailed in Bach's tim
I Suppose the choir had been like that
? the Church of St. Thomas in Leipaic
[ one of men and boys.?and as * <?onc<
slon to the occasion (and the mus:
| both choir and orchestra had be
nearly double in number thoee tl
Bach controlled, say, twenty singers
twenty to thirty instrumentalists. Si
pose that the concert had been gh
: (n a hall (or better, a church), with
, organ and that the figured bass h
| been worked out by an accomplis}
musician, 30 aa to be something mi
than a support for the voice?
chorda! harmony. Would the ?udlen
j which was a fine one and one of s?
' ous mood and inelination, not have
joyed an artistic sensation very c
ferent from that afforded by jest
day's concert?admirable as it was
the main? We think so; but some n
think we are disposed to think
curiously about these concerts.
All the above is a Sunday m?dit?t
in which and in the pleasure wh
the concert gave we could not h
indulged had it not been for the i
that the Friends of Music gave a B
concert. To i% Ms. Bender gave <
tinction by his singing of the solo
the cantata first mentioned t,nd
Huberman by his playing of the e
certo, and also the obbligato wh
accompanies the solo voice, which
the chief factor in the service
the Feast of Purification, the cho
having little to do in the cemposit
In the eecond cantata there was
quartet of solo voices?Mines, Per;
and Telva and Messrs. Meader
Bender. The contribution which
ladies made to the pleasure of
occasion was rather negative t
otherwise. Bach's music must be a
with a steady outflow of tcne?
that of Mr. Hubennan'a violin
obbligato and concerto?as far as
sible away from the style supposei
be dramatic at the Oper? House.
sisal pacsages, ?ike the words, mus
lucid. Concert singere trained in
English school of oratorio shouk
employed in such work.
The concert began with -an ore
tral transcription by Mr. B^danzk
Bach'e organ choral prelude en '
tiefer noth schrei ich su Dir."
Townsend's chorus sang with precii
good balance of "-one and good ex|
Bion. It may have had more viti
of effect for the listeners in the
cony than for those on the main f
Acoustical conditions are also im
tent in concerts of such unusual c
acter.
At the Symphony Orchestra's con
given eimultaneonsly in Aeolian '.
Mr. Felix Selmond, the scholtrly
finished English 'cellist, played Bn
t transcription of the Hebrew melody,
"Kol Nidrei," after the concorto by
{ Philip Emanuel Bach, and the solo
?art of Strauss'* "Don Quixoti" after
Respighi'e "Fountains of Rome."
?.>.?' "? '?
M'Cormack Sings German
For First Time in City
"We find ich Trost' on Pro?
grant at Hippodrome
, Concert
German song was an unfamiliar
feature in John MeCorraack's Hippo?
drome recital yesterday evening, and
there were signs of careful preparation
in hi? single number in thi? language
(the first, it was said, that he had
sung in public hero), Hugo Wolf's
"Wo lind' Ich Trost."
He u?ed his ful! vocal power and re?
sources in striving to bring out the
fullest measure of expression, and
seemed well able to do this, while, as
in his other languages, he had a dic?
tion that brought out the words with
unmistakable clearness. Still, he did
not seem as yet thoroughly at homo
in this medium, giving an impression
of conscious care not found in the ap?
parently effortless freedom of his
numbers in English.
The opening Handel aria, "Lascia
ch'io piangi," and an encore number
from "Boris Godunoff" were sung In
Italian; elsewhere Mr. McCormack ad?
hered to English.
The first number seemed to require
some effort; but his voice warmed up
in the flowing ornamentation of an?
other Handel aria. "Tell Fair Irene,"
and thenceforward was at its best,
with the familiar McCormack clearness
1 of tone, capable of a wide range of
volume and fine shade? of expression.
His Irish songs had, of course, the
reatest appeal for the audience; but
e was equally effective in numbers by
Jarnefelt, Merikanto and Tcherepniii,
and both Irish songs and more sophisti?
cated numbers were sung with artistic
refinement.
As usual, the house was filled and
Mr. McCormack liberal with encores
until "Tho Last Rose or Summer'' and
darkness sent tho lingering audience
home. As before, Edwin Schneider,
represented on the program with "Only
You," M'as the accompanist, while
Rudolph Bochco showed a good, clear
tone and plenty of technical skill in
five violin numbers.
Audience Shiverg
At Metropolitan
Symphony Concert
Unfinished Repairs Let icy
Blasts Sweep In, but Mu
sic Lovers Stay ' to End |
of Excellent Performance !
Yesterday afternoon was undoubted?
ly cold outside, and it vas not much
warmer inside the Manhattan Opera
House, where the City Symphony Or?
chestra was giving the first of its pop?
ular Sunday cfternoon concerts, achiev?
ing, on the whole, a success under ad?
verse conditions.
These were obvious. The repairs
which had delayed the concert a week
were still far from finished, especially
those on the outer '^a 11, so that icy'
draughts played around hands, feet and,
noses both of the musicians and of the !
audience. Thi? jres not, of course,!
the fault of the orchestra, as its man- j
agcr, Arthur. Gaines, in thanking the
audience for its support, explained, !
adding that the heating apparatus '
might have acquire^ temperament from
the days of Mary Garden and Mr.
Hammerstein. The glacial conditions,
he added, would not occur in future.
Dirk Foch began where he had left
off eight days ago in Carnegie Hall
with the "Tannhaeuser" overture, tak- I
ing it mostly at the same leisurely '
pace as before until, inspired perhaps
by the temperature, he led the orcheS- I
tra in a closing sprint. In general the ?
performance was smoother; the brasses I
were still rather rough and a sour
horn note was heard near the begin?
ning, but the etrinjrs had an agreeable
smoothness, showing up well in the
ensuing "Peer Gynt" suite, "Fleder?
maus" overture of Johann Strauss and
the second Hungarian Rhapsody?this
last a brisk, spirited performance.
. With an orchestral concert in each
of the three principal halls it wan
obvious that the City Symphony would
have to draw on its hoped for wider
public for an audience?which it ap?
peared to have done; while the audi?
ence did not fill every seat, it was of
a very fa'r size and cordially braved
the cold until the end.
The Stage Door
"The Bootleggers" at tho Thirty-ninth
Street Theater Ana "Liia" at Daly's Sixty
third Street Theater will open to-nurbt.
A private invitation ?reas rehearsal of
"The Bootleggers" was hold last night.
The Threshold Playhouse will present its
third bill of the season at the playhouse,
571 Lexington Avenu?, to-night.
James T. Powers in "The Little Kanjra
roo" will open to-night in Stamford.
The Grand Street Boys -will have a
theater party at the Central Theater to?
night in honor of Henry P. Dlxon, a mem?
ber of the organisation and producer of
"The Midnight Revela," a Shubert vaude?
ville urlt. There will he 500 men in the
party, and many of them plan to sit in
tho tfal'.pry an a reminder of the days of
their youth.
Holiday feature? will be nrtdod to
"Better Times" at the Hippodrome to-day.
The features are for the thousands of chil?
dren who com?; to the big playhouse at
holiday times.
The Keith vaudeville circuit will add its I
ninth Ohio house to its string to-night,
opening a new- theater In Dayton.
Frederick Perry is to act the part of the
"grin?o" ?r. Outhrie McCllntlc's production
of "Gringo," by Sophip Treadwell, which is
isoon to be presentad h?re. Edna Hlbbard
will plf.y the part of his daughter and
Jose Ruben will be seen as a Mexican.
tVilllam A. Brady Is vesting In Atlantic
City. Since the first of September he has
made five productions hero, including "The
World W? Live In" at Jolsor's fifty-ninth
Street Theat?r and "Up She Goes" "at tha
Playhouse. Br. Brady will begin prepara?
tions this week for an early New York
production of "La F!a.mme,,r by Ch?ties
Mero. Rehearsals ara to begin on Decem?
ber 1?.
n
John Golden announces a prise of flflO
for the b?et "constructive" criticism of
Trank Craven's comedy. "Spite Corner," in
wv,j..)l ???<??-* Kennedy ia ?tarring at the
Little Theater.
Mam Hume, director of the San Francisco
Stftge Guild, has arranged with Brock
Pemberton for the Guild's presentation of
"Six Characters In Search of an Author"
as Its first play of the 19"3 season at the
Plaza Theater in S?n Francisco. Air. Peni
berton is now presenting the play at tho
Princess Theater here.
Schwab & Kussi!, producers of "The
Gingham Girl," now at the Earl Carroll
Thrxtcr, are planning a melodrama 83
their next production. .Daniel KusslI is l
now at V?r!( on th? dramatization of a.
novel which win furnish the play.
"Bavu," the play v.-hich Earl Carroll j
wrote to open his new theater, is now
h*'nr made 'into a motion picture by
Universal. It Will be called "The Attic of
Fell* Bavu." Wallate Berry hag the title
rolu, created originally by Henry Herbert.
West Harlem Easy Victors .
The West Harlem Football Club eas- !
ily defeated the Bay Ridge eleven by o
goals to 1 in the New York Stat?!
League game at Harlem Oval yester?
day. Forman shot three goals in suc?
cession for the winners in the first
half, thereby clinching the victory.
After the restart Kelly and Neil added
a goal apiece, making it 5?0. With
five minutes to go Murray scored for
Bay Ridge.
Wide Range Marks
Concert Program
of Philharmonic
Scipione Gtiidt. as Soloist,
Admirably Renders Bruch
Fantasy ; Brahms Sym?
phony Is Well Received
It is * far cry from the serene medi
I tations of Brahms to the dance of
i Salome In tho Stradts opera of thut
! rim?, That was tho distance traveled
! by tho Philharmonic ai its concert
! yesterday afternoon in Carnegie Hnll,
! with Liszt and Bruch marking the
! milestones.
Scipione Guidl. concert toaster of
I the orchestra, was tho soloist of the
afternoon, and gave an admirable por
formance of Bruch's Scottish Fantasy.
Mr. Guidi in always something more
than routine in the brief passages that
I occasionally fall to him alone in the
various orchestral works which the so?
ciety performs, and at; the violinist of
the New York Trio he has often won
praise for the excellence of his cham?
ber music playing. In the moro pi o
tentious offering yesterday he ac?
quitted himself exceedingly well, play?
ing with excellent tono and styie mid
with a poetic feeling that avoided the
excess of sentiment so easily read into
Bruch's composition. He was heartily
applauded and wo? n chorus of
"bravas" from his associates in tho
orchestra.
Tho first section of the program was
d?voted to the Second Symphony of
Brahms, which thus had tho advantage
of playera reRted and refreshed
Whether for that reason or not, it was
played with the most caressing warmth
of tone. Mr. Stransky conducted it
and the large audience listened to it as
if they still considered it far more
than merely a tender memory, in spite
of the pronouncements of M. Pierre
Lalo, delightfully discussed in Mr. Gil- j
man's progrnm note. If it ic facing
sunset, its sunset colors still burn with
a steady glow. Perhaps it is u mid?
night sun.
Liszt's Symphonic Poem, "Tas3o, La?
ment and Triumph," followed, and con?
trast and balance were further given
the program by the music of Salome's
dance before Herod; which brought it
to .- close.
? ii ?i
Emeralds Gain Two Points
Defeating the Victorias by 5 goals to
1 at Howard Field, in Brooklyn, the '
Emerald Football Club gained two .
points in the New York State Football !
League competition yesterday. Me- j
Mannus. Hughes and Kano scored in
the first half for the Emeralds, who j
led by 8?0 as ends were changed. Lsn- ;
ahan, of the Emeralds, scored twice in j
th? second half and Vecsey ?cored for
Victoria,
On the Screen
Toll of the Sea" at Rlalto I?
Perfect Color Picture;
"East Ib Weat" Filmed
By Harriette Underhill
Jt was just our luck to have to go
to see "The Toll of the Sea" at tho
Rinlto Theater, and now wo are afraid
that it hns spoiled us for nil other
pictures of a similar nature, it is so
beautiful!
In color and in production it is one
of the loveliest, daintiest pieces of art
work that you could find. It seems to
bo just a little bit of life lifted out
of the Orient, framed and sent here to
delight thn eyo and sadden the heart.
We had not dreamed that the old,
old st--y of Mme. Butterfly could ever
again wring tears from us, but this
story called "The Toll of the Sea" did
just that yesterday.
We aro one of thou? persona who
cannot enjoy a picture if the people
n.round us rustle their programs or eat
lemon drops or fuss with their furs,
so when wo found oursclf wedged in
between n fat man who was so expert
nt chewine gum that he made it crack
loudly caen time he set his jaws in it
and two girls who combed their hair
snd lauHied all the timo wo felt that
"The Toll of the Sea" was not going
to get a fair chance. And then at the
end of it, after poor little Lotus Flower
had been swallowed up by tho cruol
sea which had once given her her lover,
we turned around to sec where our
tormentors had gone to, and there they
were still chewinp and laughing. Where
!s there another picture that could
ma're us oblivious to such surround?
ings?
The people who have made thir, new
colored picture have done something so
beautiful that it is rather nwe inspiring
rnd critic i siinr? it is like dissecting a
butterfly. Never have we seen such
perfect color as this, and while it
seems almost like vandalism to tear it
apart and say: "it wns made by the
Technicolor process which consists of,"
etc., of course it is necessary to give
credit when credit is due.
If this proce?a is not perfect then,
nt least, we could find no flaws in it.
None of the fault'! ct' other co'or proc?
esses are apparent. The tones are
soft and lovely; there are no fringes
nor flashes; the outline is clear and
there are no deep shadows. Also, ob?
jects appear to posse's another dimen?
sion, and it seems as though you could
reach ont and take tho hand of Httle
Lotus Flower.
That Oriental beauty, Anna May
Wong, is tho Ch'nese bride who loses
lier most honorable husband. Never
before have we seen either Anna May
or Kenneth Harlan do such splendid
work as they do in this picture. No
wonder Lotus Flo-.-or broke her heart
mourning for her "honorable mun." If
being photographed in color can do
this for an actor, where is tho hero
would would remain Just a black and
white shadow? We predict that "Toll
of the Sea" will incroano Mr. Harlan'?
fan mail 100 per oert.
Then, In addition in the color and
thr. oast, there In the direction. This
is by Chester Franklin, and we doubt if
Ilex' Ingram could have improved on it.
"The Toll of the Sea" .seems to US th?
perfect picture, and v.' : do hope that
there will bo plenty ol* other person?
who Will derive from it a pleasure
equal ;?> our own. It has ft frail,
spiritunl quality v*liich provide!? a iioill
Bati.ii'ying Interlude it. ft prosaic world.
Fiances Marior did tho ?tory and J.
A. Ball bar. charge of the photography.
Besides Anna May Wong and Kenneth
I Harlan, Beatrice Bentley 1? a very
beautiful American wife, Baby Moran
a ch?rmirig young son and Etta Lee
and Ming Yung are cunning as the two
Chinese gossips.
Hugo Riesen ? eld has fitted aome
hauntlntr music to it, and the prologue
is sung by Miriam Lax and Adrian Da
Silva -sh? us Lotus Flower and he as
the American hero.
The overture is "Samson and De
! lilah," followed by nome classical Jazz.
I "The Mirror," showing the first Wright
? airplanes, and ft Mack Sennett comedy
called "Teddy in Bow Wow" complote
the program. Do hot miss "Toll of the
Sea."
If vre had known wo should have
chosen another tim? to go to the
j Strand to see (Constance Talmadge's
new picture, "East Ib WoBt." Miss Tal
! mndge Is one of the most likable of all
f the stars. Frank, kind, non-egotistical,
and such a sense of humor! Therefore
j It would not bo possible for us not to
j like her in anything she did. She has
?had some pretty bad pictures, but never
i have we failed to enjoy tho atar's per?
formance. Therefore, while we do not
think that "East Is West" is a good
I picture, <wo do think Constance is a
? good actress.
! "If Eant Is West" is merely a ekit
| thon we are wrong and it Is a good pic?
ture. You can laugh easily just as you
can at Ben Turpin?almost us easily
| as you can at Charlie Chaplin, but
there in no sense of reality, no hint of
tragedy in it.
You know that Ming Toy Isn't afraid
of Hop Toy nor of Charley Yong; she
is jutt having a lark; and we remember
when we saw the play how worried we
were over the perils of Fay Baintor.
Of course the fact that w? hud just
come from "Toll of the Sea," where it
is proved conclusively that "East is
East and West is West," may have
had something to do with the s'tate of
our mind; but then, after all, they
?prove that East is not W?el, for Mint/
Toy is of the West and not of the Eu
Of course, Billy Benson could never
do anything so unconventional us
marry n Chinese gir!. Oh, yes, indeed,
Ming Toy turns out to be of Mav
fliwer stock and all that sort of thinir.
This is no surprise to any one, th?
surprise being that she could cot?-?
her identity as long as sho did. Wh; '
on O&rth wou^d ever make them Kill '
she was Chinese? Any one can J??;
an embroidered kimono and her hair i]
a pigtail or twisted over her ears.
Probably everybody went to see.
Samuel flhipman's play, and every or.'
knows the therne, thouTh it is C?ttaid
crably jazzed uj? to suit the OCp?afon
-1 '"" ' i"!+b what f? known as sure?
fire stuff. It is also filled with beruti
iu. sets, wonderful nhotoT-'tphy and
??orne mighty good acting. This is con?
tributed by the star and by W?.*ner
Oiand, *ho is simp'y mar"elous nn *he
sinister Charley Yong We remember
the original Charley, and Mr. Oland ?3
not onlv "^om(.*\\ir,g just as good"; he
is something better.
Others in the cast who do good work
...... "-"?<,,,.,?( R,1rnrt Hs Biliy Benson,
Nigel Barrie 0* Jimmy Potter, Winter
Hall and Lillian Lawrence a1? Mr. and
M it. Benson, and E. A. Warren, Frauk
Lanning'and Nick de Ruiz as China?
men, good, bad and indifferent. Frances
.\r^r?.>n r.i>i(](? th's S*t*%iBrf<>. also, from
the play by Samuel Shipman and John
B. Hyrner. Sydney Franklin, who is,
e, a ?other of Chester, di?
rected tho picture.
The overture is, of course, "Madame
Butterfly." Robert Armbrust er gives
a demonstration of one of those me?
chanical pianos which go right on play?
ing when the pianist resttf. 8fi? ?t
the most interesting thing? on the pro?
gram in the Fokine ballet called Fan?
tasie Chinois. It is danced by a lot
of barefoot misses in Oriental gor
geousness who flourish long and dan?
gerous looking swords as they dance.
At the Capital the feature is "Hun?
gry Hearts." "Singed Wings" is a*
the Rivoli and "What Fools Men Are"
io et tho Cameo. These will be r*.
tic.-cd later in the week.
Mile, Sorel to Stay
Comedie Fran?aise Company |#
Give 8 Extra Performances
?iwjng to the success of Mile, /-'it?,'
bee associ?t?? hn th? Com???
cftiHo Company, Lee Shubert kse
made special arrangements with ta*
French government through the
French Minister dea Beaux Arts, fay
eight additional performances in New
York. beginning December ?. A
theater has not yet been selected, but
wail orders for reservations may &*.
addressed to tho Thirty-ninth Streif
Theater. The repertoire will he:
Monday and Thursday evenings, 'ft*
Demi-Monde ; Tuesday evening' gg?
Saturday mfttinec, "Le Duel"; Wf-rlm?.
dny and Saturday evenings. "Carr.ill**j
and Friday evening, '?'Le Mis??.
ihropc."
Today
at Luncheon
ask the waiter for a
bottle of Lea & Perrins'
Sauce, 1 se it with your
soup, fish, meat'and
salad. Ask for
LEA&PERMHS!
SAUCE I
THE ORWINAL WOPrCESTcRBHlpr, M
AMERICA'S iyiyB>TOST Tino ?TiirH ANP PITS. p'"F("r"<\ of i.KK ANH J. J. Kin'IlERT"""
lirio. W.NTER GARDEN &?!|
? ? LAST U NIGHTS. POP. MAT. TO-MW. I'
The PASSING SHOW of 1922
l'rewnt- um
I'M
WILLIE &EUGEHEHOIWRD
!)
c
e*t im y p?&.i' %k sac
St. 8:?0. >I?U. WM., ThanK?. 4 But.
BLOSSQM T?IWE
Boo SEAT? I 500 Hi AT? I 7<M> SEATS
nt 5<)c at S 1.00 ! at ICJ.oa
SHUBERT VAUDEVILLE
Tni
l>al'
?:ig * t-.is. ucn i n?i? and ?'way.
liEC-INMNO MATINEE TO-DAY.
WHIPPLE RIGGS &
& HUSTON WITCHIE
?? MIDNITE REVELS
AND ALL STAR VAUDEVILLE RILL
r??nt e?d & Tout. rk. W. Kv.l
nOOl M?ts. Tun.,
Cfin'ury num mm?, tu?., nigs & ?at
Rny Comrtock and Morrh fi'-st announce
From >lo .?<>.--I'urin? LohUOlt
| 10th Month?Extra Mat. Thaaka'g.
G?S'NO
?9th > ??lit BVay. TOrtf?. R:?r>.
Mats. Wed., TiMiiik?.?'* A Sat
MUSICAL COMEDY SENSATION
SALLY, IRENE and MARY
With Eddie Dowlin? and Oroat fail.
DCCT CE?TP EVS- ?2.50.'K.\-cr;,t. rtut. &
btOI OCA 10 WED. MAT. W.IHoliday?.
BB?4DHURST Matj. TU&nkairlti'A ?at.
SPRINGTIME OF YOUTH
THK "PERFECT" MTSICAL PLAY.
39TH ST ^:VTO-NIGHT^
MAjDlSOfc COREY Announces
iBOflMCCBS
a Timely C?mfrtJy by WM, A. PAOE.
AQTtj BT The?... W. of B'y. Kr?. S:80
**?? lud?) Hats. Thiiikaxlv.r.s & Sat.
SUPER MYSTERY PLAY.
WHI3S*ERING? WIRES
Maxine Elliott's IS?Al^8*5
Extra Matin?? Thanksgiving ?ay
SAM H. HARRIS preen'?
JEANNE EAGELS in "RAIN"
jt'iranrttil on W, S. Maiurhe.:?'? "Mus Th>vrnp
BUrcd by JOHN I>, WYiAAAMH.
JOLSON'SSSth ST. fefc?rt *?
MATS. THANK8HIVINO DAY aJid SAT.
THE WORLD WE LiVE IN *r?LT
The apngatton of the <''<;nt ury.
45th, W. of -B'Wajr. fis. R::7tT
Mat*. Wad., Thk??. Day 4 Hat.
?.AJ3TJ?TEEK
"TO LOVE.''
by Qeraldy.
BIJOU
GRACE GEORGE
Norman Trevor ? Robert Warwick
PLAYHOUSEA^riayl'lat
"Delightful musical comedy, well
artel, dnnccl and Bung."?Eve. Post.
UPSHEGOES
;AM8ASS*D0r1:'%.:"t&,??I
International Musical 8iieres?
|THE LA*>Y IN ERMINE
I With W'ldn Bennett sr.'i Walter Woolf
t.OOI> BAU'ONY SKATS ?1.00.
?2 illllDCCTTn?^' Juh- w- of ?'y. Str.8,-30.
I vflUDi.nl Stats, Thanksgiving ?nd Sat.
GnegNWiCH Y?s,*,a?e Follies i
? Fourth Annual
BELM?NT^o48-^?MS- BT8
THIN ICE COMEDY HIT
MuT'k?r'?A8it.'
SOLID
TilJ.lATRB, VVU8T 4? 8T.
OPENING
RITZ
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
(THANKSGIVING EVE.). SEATS NOW.
SAMUEL WALLAru i>rascnta
THELAW
A Now .Melodrama by Elraer U Mea.
Frum a story t'y Hajdi'n Talbot,
D>crteil by lister l^-ii?rsan.
With Alma Tall, Arthur Hohl, Warburton
Gamblo. A. H. \Tan Duran. William Ingur
?nu, Hn<m Hurilkk, Aloxamlfir Oiialuw,
Walter Walk?-. Han? Robrrt, Chas P.
Dates, Frank Wo?tsrUm, Valerie Valarl?,
Joseph P? Staphani?, lUchard Stevenson.
(. W. (looiiricli. John V. HiK-he & otlior..
First Matine? Saturday, 2:20.
SELWYN
THKATRK. W. 42<1 St. K?((5. S:S0.
Mats. TUCKS, anct SAT.. i:HU.
h Harne.- m\ Alexander
?ERNARD&GmBR
US! PARTNERS AGAIN
T!i.,4lSt.,Rof B'y. Btb.8:S0
Mats. Thanksg'g Oaj
GOiVSEDY
A. A, MILNE'S
The ROMANTIC AGE
?7 .Mont?un? GIa?a and Juiej Eckert Goodman. | Prince??, 39th 8t. I??. 8:45. Mats.Tke?.IHy & 8*1
-__-| ?j^ rJ?w>ck P?*?l>?rton'ji ProdnotloA
West 4?il HL Evening? at, 8:30. | W^. ' ne (?reutest play I'm ?ver aten."
". CHARACTERS -^v? Rowland.
t, ,\?, SPRCH OF AN AUTHOR
P4rpwaeHo'8 Sensational Dramatio Xovclty
1
REPUBLin
Matrv.Wwl..T?\ur?.Ar B?t. at 2:Z0.
Abies Irisli Rose
The Play that Put ? In Humor
CI TIM?C Theatre, Went 43d St, ?hiJ. 8:30
M.llilUC Matinee? WED. and HAT.. 2:30.
AL'S
HEF?EI
H
t)
By DON MAHQUI8
B! VRfiftlIT??' West <?5.""?5ven!n'fV'?:Se.
fi? ? 111 UU I 11 Mat.s.Thaafo;g'gI>ayASat.
_J
MATINEES WEI?., TH.UH8. and SAT.
Frazee Thea<
42nrt, W. or Il'wty.
HvcnlnR? 8:S0.
By W. SOMERSET MAIGIIAM,
UATU?EES THANKSGIVING and SAT.
GarrickThea.
West 4.-.I!) St. Breninis 8:S0.
Mats. Wed..,Thur?. * Sat.. 2:80.
i EXTRA HOLlDA? MAf. THURSDAY
Bio a UBT HIT tN TO W.V /
THE
LUCK
LAST WEEK
*faf NATIONAL
ft N g ' . C5 ?Wcst 8S Street
^H P I.retiiii?s S.30.
W. of ?'way.
KveR. 8:30. Matinees
_ \\>d.,T1itik??. DayAdat.
Extra Mat. Thanbgiving Day.
He-fln- T?T?C f?ch C SEATS
nlnjf IWCO?? MCI?? w TO-DAY
"FASHIONS FOR MEN"
XrZ Molnar a0oV,or' "Liliom"
with O. P. HEGGIU
?is~SQ. eV-!I&.':
"HAS CAPTURED NEW YORK.'??
Ch.innlnfr Pollock's Poworfu: Play,
MATIK'CSR THUB9DAY i. 3ATURPAY at 230.
nKnOSTNOmiU ACWeV?WeilT Of TH? Off EM?T?
D0?GIASFA?RBANKS
HCTHEATR3
WW?MrVp sr.
JOHX
HITS
Madge KENNEDY
In PRANK CRAVEN'S R?OT
I ITTI P W. 44 St. Kt.S 30
a.? I I a??> Mats. Wrxi. & Sat.
?? " Ross Bernd "
L0NQA&RE
By
Hauptmann
Mats. Wstl. ?ad Sat. S:3.-.
A Love-dram? of Joys and Thrill?.
At Rf?fiTU W. 45 St. Bf.SlS?.
The WUU I H Mats. Wed. & Sat.
Kxtra TlianUngirliiE Matlneo Both Xneatres.
D.W.6r?'s
8ui?remo
clasaiu
of the tilma
For One W?ek
1'ti'SfiimlwK
Mon. Evo.,
Dec. 4,
SELWYN
Thea., W. ?I2d.
Twice Dally.
Seats on Sale
To-day.
m/ ? -W??X?AM ^oi P^enta0"8^0'
"THE TOW? THAT
LAST WEEK '
P. W. GRIFFITH'S
bB ht G Orchestra. N??hta. Jl.OO aucl ll.Jfl;
rlliHfci'J. a?lctny, 50c ' it. ?Its.. 56e 6 II.
Hippodrome, Sun.
Ev., Dec. 3, at 8.15
Seats Now on Sale
Prlo? SI. S.J.50. J2 %-? s?
anil $3.00 (plu? io-^ Tax).
Aeolian Hall, Wed. Aft., Nov. 29, at 3:15.! r~
v'?ns Recital'?BLAISE
Mfft. JSvelyn Hopper
Stein way Pla.no.
iVOU'8,h8edW58'??aS
^? Paramount Picture:
H'.v.40?t. Rivoli Concert Orchestr"
Aeoliun Hall, To-morrow Afternoon at 3.
BERYL
RUBINSTEIN
PIANIST
Mgt. Ijoudon Oharlton. Stelnway Plan
Special Req B? Organ Rerita|_
Wednesday I)Iov^ber 29th
A'anamaker Auditorium, 2:30 ?L
^IJ^-rt Bureau Wana.,^
f-aS
Moai
IS St. ?
IALT0
THE T0LL^f SEA' I l^-^-^VfHV'BBBriDJE
ti!?
SENNEPk' COMEDY
l'amous .Rlallo Orcn^ocra
AEOLIAN HALL, TO-DAY AT 8.
Piano Rocita.1? MAIiGKETI?;
SOMME
VlBt. Daniel Mayer.
Steinway Piano.
IjAMfi KIRKWOOO
noSlE FROM HER SENSA?
TIONAL LONDON ULCCBSSKS
I Seat."? at Box Office. . Mtolnway.
B.S.Mo ? PYRAMID PICTURES Uo., ?HViear?
C?"?:.SSHgCKOSrK'il
State ?"TM?Lma""^
?W* ?', * .J5 Ht. ?W Wrtfoja "Goln* S
B'y at 61?t.
M A it K
Constance Talmadge
In "Ea?t Is Weit"
U'y &. 57 8t "^ Strand Symphony Orchestra
and the Baunou? I OKS-NL HALLET
SKI A It K b^
TR?N0
Opeoa H;38 A. Id. I
itii JANE
-NOVAK
V!iCltr,.,l- ???w Siralisht"
EIHHE FOYER
a?ui othara.
Th? Ev?-ninpr .Twjrjia? said:
"Wo UMually fry to pre
?i*rv? a stony reviewer'?
face, but w? Utvghrti till xve
wer? nnhamwl of ourselves."
The Texas Nightingale
With .?OI?YNA HOWTAM).
' Cut UiCliiUln? CYRIX KEiaHTKEY.
AT TUB
FMBURL* ?'?-?y * 40 fit. Ev?. 8:20.
KM r IIIC. Mat/i. Wcri..Ttiurs.&Sat.. 2:2.")
3M?TS.THISWEEK^S&-J
'New Antterdaro Theatre at 8:1C*
PO?*. MATS. TH1K-. A SAT.
C0R?
? THKA.,
%..
MERTON
evek ??. a
? i's?*. W?d,,
ItTi- & s OF THE MOVIES
?wwOUNN HUNf ER-HOREMO VAS?
AKTUi'K HOPKINS presents
JOHN BARR?M0RE
' "HAMLET"
. W. ? Si
Tiiurt. aii.l Hat.. 2
DALY^S 63d ST, | Tftgj<j||
StTD?flOHT FKRFOMTO? WED., 11:4*1
sja -s?.A?r
COMSDT
-PEOPLE--?
1 SPECK MAT. THKRS.??RZ'V. MA.
LIZA
sr HARRIS Th" w !
G5.? COHAN THEATRE
E'way
GCQPVCOMAtIS COWtOAflS
LITTLE
NELLIE KELLY
EXTRA MAT. THANKSGIVING OAV "
VANDERBILT ffi? &1^
KXTKA MATIVKK THANKSGIVING
Mat*. Th!, \V<
WEI?.. Till RS. & SAT.
m?H?!IH
THE GINGHAM GIRL ci
EM DI BISSAU THEA. T Are. & V, Sfc?j
AnL bAnnULI. Mat?, thtjbs. * .-at.'
MlIBf AH ^??sr eves e?_.
ri WVllr W9 fl*rs WS 17 (/SAfj K>^
oeo. ?rt. cowan pstesenrs
TM? HIT CP TH? TQWtN
KXTKA MATI.VKK THANKSGIVING. ffJfL J I I f jM f JP If S
TteTORCH-BEARERSli^Ml
or hikvkioi's comedy
ta?? a Howutic success "Post
4 MATINEES THIS WEEK: WED,
(POP.). THIBS., FKI. (POP.) and - \T
THEATRE
g'tt/AY <ir
4-6th Sf
TOMORROW NIGHT
0PENIN6 OF THE REGULAR SEASON
CMAM.ES WIUNOHAM rueseirrs
A Ml SIC Ah ENTERTAINMENT
Till BUNCH and JUDY
fcrcsic v.v jkbosoe kern
BOOK BY ANNE CALDWELL & HIGH FOKD. STAGED BT JTBED G. luATHAK.
With
FRED and ADELE ASTAIRE
JOHNNY DOOLEY RAY DOOLEY
GRACE HAYES SIX BROWN BROS.
lau.Tiiu.kss'g o* Sat.
"Real blueblcod ainonq showt."?Tribune.
A. L. ERLANGER'S Musical Production,
The YANKEE PRINCESS
(From Kaiman'? "DIE BAJADERE")
With VIVlKNNEi 'lltOKI'E! JOHN T.
&KGAE i B.ViKH i .UCKKAi
I VPCIIM w?t 45th st. Bfieolnca at $:S*.
LIVkWlTl Mattneas THTJRS. A; S.'T.. J:8ft.
THE IRRESISTIBLE COMEDY HIT:
DAVID HKt.ASCO Pruscr.ts
'SHORE
LEAVE"
FRANCES STARR
IN
Hryaiit ut??.
?..Th.A-S.it.
EQUITY 48TH ST. 5
Entire 2nd Balcony TIES. MAT. 25?.
"HOSPITALITY"
SS? JT-rlT'S WORTH WHILE:
SPKC-i; THANKSOIVINO DAY MAT. 2:?0
r?7j~T?IM THANKSGIVING (ThOrV) MAT.
PUL, IV ft Regular Matin?? Batahlay.
. et>wA#o sr% r>ovce-s
HANGE OiQSSOm
GAIETY m
B??rlns?i8:30, Mat?
Wed.. Vtwiv. & Sat. I P.
Hop?t?e?
y JOHN GALSWORTHY
ASSOCIATION
AEOLIAN HAKE, TO-NIGHT AT 8:S0.
IIINKEE?KOCUAN SKI
RVfHNSTKIN?WlUM .K K - ?OS?
Seat? now ri Box Ofllce. Stetnway Piano
F. C. OOPPicus?. M*oa*er.
CARNEGIE HALL. TUES.-EV. at 8:30 gjfic E
Coneort to ntiasla'? Gr??teiit Slnotr
Heals $1.05 to $8.85. at Bo\ OIT. Baldwin Piano.
M|t Metropolitan Musical Gurrnu and S. rlurok.
H?iYA-13EIHESMfiDFnLIVEAHD
BREATHE BEFORE Y0 R EYES!
So wonderful it wHI thrill and entrance yon
Technicolor Presents
?f
??
A rail Length Matare! Color Dram
Released by Metro
ALL THIS DIA ITU Broadway
WEEK HIH?. IV & 42d St
J
flTY SYMPHONY
???rnto?.e il4ii. iu?n^itA at 8.30
eOWN HAUL, NKXT WED? ACT. At :!:0t?.
?LENA ?ERHARDT fe
Irahms lat Symphony; Beethoven, Ov
-*on?r? No. 3S jBehubeit, 8o?uh ans? Roms,
W>o. 88c at Ho? Office. Arthur J. Ualuo?, Mgr
ITS SOMtf STQ?Y
5?
?imamt .'
^Awfw?Trulh* ?)
<s 68UCE- m?JA?
/?r *
HENRY MfUiffS r*w *?wf^i?uer?r ' ?
DCLHObU Matinee? Tour?. &ad Sat.. J*?L ?
417th Performance To-night
DAVID BELASCO Trcsecta
a? JJLRIC ^KM?'
Greenwich Village f^i ?jj%t$$??
A "FANTASTIC"fR?CASSEE"
with .TAMES : MABEL BOBB?
_WATTS I ROWLAND : EDWARD?
MUSIC BOX K?fSfc?Sl
METROPOLITAN Hot*i
To-nijht, i:*5, Tristan. Mateenauer. Gnoffet
Taurh-jr. WhitehM. Bentar. Bodanaky.
Wed., 8:15, Tot? Stadt. Jeritia. Telte; Fr?!?.
rold, Sri?uuemV.ir?. Mai?et Bad?. Boda.-.jkj'.
? Thurs. TltinxsgT^MaX t: 2. $1 to $5. CarTf
mes. Saaten, Mario (debut). GfcU!; Mart?- |
celll, Ue Lupa Hwwhuan?. j
.iur?.. 8:U, Ls Traviala. Bor1.. GalU. G:f
i aiilse. l'icthi. Bada. laoranioaL
Fri., BUS, Tcica. Jt-r?tis; Jota;son, Scottt
riwiii. tfatttacUu Mora-'i?.?-.:.
S?t., 2. Oon Caris?, lirait*. Gordo?. GaCL
Mar?nel?. D? Luc?, Cuallaptn. Rothier. PapL
S?t., 8. Top. Trices, ?raselo. Borl: Oaiale?.
HqaCU, lHiur. Moiatt&uni. Paollaecl. Eet ?
ber*r KIu?s?co, L>ani?o. Tapi.
Next M??, et S. Hem?? et ?ulistte. Bort. D?!a..
iio??; Gig-11, I>? Luca. Rothisr. IMdu?. Haaseliuei ?
i FM. Aft.. IH?. 8. at 1. B?DClC?l " ?*> l;"
j Matlne?M?t te $5). ran?lrak ?norrovi
j Matstiiauer: Tauch?. SflUdar. WmtehflL
?i '.uisoiiUorf. Guatafoxt. lledanzky.
H AROMAN' P1A.NO l/SKD.
GHTI
?T-2.20S 8Eft
mm
WAS m FLOWER
PHILHARMONIC
Jeaef 8('??sxy eoodwctto* aaETROroLiT?t
CPEKA HOUSE. To mcuro* ?ve.. 8:80.
TCHAIKOVSKY ?H* SVMPH?NY
Uulniistflti. 4tJi Beethoven Concerto I
Ciwneate Hall. JPai. Aft.. Doc. 1, 3:00.1*
vi.i'^m ?s v m phony, 1st Time. "SehehertwatUf*
8at. Eve., Dec S, 8:30. tortoi.
?' F A T H K T I Q ?j K "
Dec. S, B'kly? Aeademy. Steinway Pianf|
COL??SSA"?^
?Ia^s:_?(NI0^ KM_
\?m }m 8?t?Bnat to^f?J
Luncheon ?Se. Dinner $1. A La Caxto Bartiea Al??'.
I ti*ciai ancien WaSlo Lunciwoti ?i. vrmmt tlJSf;

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