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The sun. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, November 03, 1906, Image 7

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nYI
I ffHE SUN SATURDAY A NOVEMBER If 1906
steps though his personal discoveries havebeen
been very Blight He was made Commlsonor
onor of tbs British East Africa Protectorate
torate and later of Uganda where bobhowed
bhowed decided administrative talent andhad
had the opportunity to learn a good dealabout
about Africa Me has received in additionto
to his knighthoods the gold medal of theGeographical
w Geographical Society He had the luckto
to discover tho okapi and be Is acceptedM
M a first class authority now on anythingthat
that relates to AfricaWhat
What immediate occasion there waaforSir
Sir Harry Johnston compiling the two bigand
and heavy volume of Liberia DoddMead
Mead and Company does not appearTbcre
There has been diplomatic friction beweenthe
the negro republic and Great Britain andthere
there ban been trouble with France whichmay
may account for present British interest inLiberia
i Liberia or it may be the tangled politicsof
of the African West Coast but no trace ofihU
this will be found in the book Amplejustification
justification for the publication will befound
found in the superb photographs whichthe
y the author took himself or was able to obtainfrom
3 from others and in the interesting coloredsketches
sketches he made The great numbernd
and slie of these picturee accounts for theweight
weight of the book Sir Harry Johnstonsuoquaintance
uoquaintance with Liberia extends over nogroat
great period of time be spent a summerthere
there In 1001 and was there all last winterand
and had stopped on the coast four timesleforo
l > foro in his travels but he has madepretty apretty
j pretty thorough study of all he could findubout
about Liberia and puts it in readable formchecking
1 checking book knowledge with per onalInIres
j impressionsbeginning
beginning with the story of the exploration
j lion of the coast from Hanno down and anicount
icount of the slave trade the author proceeds
weds to tell about the establishment of thecolony
colony the attainment of its independenceand
and its history to the present day TbIaI
14 followed by chapters on the conditionresources
r resources and geography of the country
i > n the flora and fauna the anthropologyi
i he folklore and the languages In many oft
t hfeo the author has been aided by epeciali
J ta tho name of the botanist Dr OttoStapf
Stapf appearing on the title page ThereIIrn
urn over 450 Illustrations nearly all fullpnge
page and 22 mapsHere
Here then III a monograph describingLiberia
Liberia literally to the present day andmore
t more complete than anything that hasl
been written about tho land or is likely toIw
Iw for some time The descriptive partsnro
I nro from first hand information Thenative
native races described are important farl
beyond tho extent of country they occupyThe
The summary from books is made intelligently
gently and fairly Africanlsts will be gladto
to get these handsome volumes and thecomplications
complications that may rise about Liberiamay
a may before long give them an interest fora
a much wider publicJavrnlles
> > JavrnllesThe
The knack of telling a story does nottleeert
tleeert Mrs Frances Hodgson Burnett whenshe
she addresses herself to children Shestrikes
strikes the right tone of the fairy tale andthe
+ the sort of nonsense that young ones enJoy
Joy in two pretty little books publishedby
p by the Century Company There is amoral
I moral in Queen SilverBell but It is notrubbed
+ rubbed in and the story of the little girlthat
r that hatched the eggs which follows hasa
I a peculiarly ludicrous touch In RackettyPacketty
Packetty House the author seems to sitdown
r down on the floor herself and play withher
t her dolls to her hearts content Thecolored
I colored pictures in both volumes by Harrison
son Cady are dainty and funny and ceallyillustrate
illustrate the textIt
It is the story of an Imaginative littledreamer
dreamer that Mrs Maud Balltagton Boothtells
tells in Twilight Fairy Tales O P Putnam
name Sons and the fairies he meet withare
are always at hand for the right sort ofchild
child He U a nice gentle boy for whomthe
I the author baa the kindest sympathy buthe
I he is not likely to be ready to meet thebattles
battles of life if humdrum necessary dutiesnre
are shown to him to be so disagreeableThe
The pictures are pleasantIn
In the pleasant stories that make upThe
The WonderChildren < Macmlllans MrCharles
Charles J Bellamy usually makes a goodstart
start with tho proper fairy material Hedoes
does not seem to have confidence however
ever that modem children will believe himand
and winds up with rather material matterof
of fact endings The rewards in the realms
of fancy are always intangible it seemsrather
rather prosaic to turn them into this worldsKoodu
KooduAn
An admirable hero for a boys book isLieut
Lieut William Gushing who sank the Albffcmarie
marie of whom Miss Jessie Peabody Frothingham
ingham tells in Running the GantletAppletons
Appleton She writes a readable storypitched
pitched In a high key of enthusiasm thatdetracts
detracts from artistic effect The steadypraise
praise of every action and quality of herhero
hero makes the marked feats of gallantrydifficult
difficult to distinguish from every dayevents
events The conversations between navalmen
men are remarkable If instructive and wofear
fear overmuch stress is put on ordinaryincidents
incidents of sea life The authors enthusiasm
siasm however carries her story alongThe
The wickedness of the bad boy in Westerntowns
towns is beyond description It lands himin
in jail early in Mr Amos R Wells Donaldliarton
Barton Little Brown and Company BadUN
UN he Is however he Is much more naturalthan
than the good boy or the extraordinarycitizens
citizens of his town The only people withpenne
sense in the community seem to be thewomen
women The theme of Jealousy betweenlx
boys carried to extremes Is a little too common
mon In juvenile fictionThe
The morals which Mr R F Outcaultappends
appends to his Buster Brown series ofiaricaturea
iaricaturea are printed by themselves InMy
My Resolutions Frederick A StokesCompany
Company The point of most of themis
is lost by the omission of the pictorialhistory
history of the events that lead to the resolution
lilt ionThough
Though the characters are birds andthough
though the plot is only an amplification oftho
the nursery rhyme Why the RobinsBrealltlll
Breast Is Rod by Emma GeUlbrand Fleming
trig II R veil Company Is really a sentimental
mental love tale It may bo humanizedornithology
ornithology carried to extremes but Itreads
reads more like a rather pretty fableSteadily
Steadily Mr James Otis In one volumeafter
after another leads American youth throughtho
the history of their country In ThoMinute
Minute Boys of the Wyoming Valley DanaKtes
Ktes and Company he deals with an unhackneyed
hackneyed episode of the Revolution andIK
IK able to turn tho strenuous fighting of binyouthful
youthful heroes against Indians as well asTories
ToriesA
A Laity or Rome by Marlon CrawfordF
F Marlon Crawfords new romance AlAdy
lAdy of Rome although set against tbebackl1oundof
background the Eternal City is as modernOH
OH a motor car and might have happenedunywhare
anywhere in tho world except In Americawhere
where the laxity of the divorce lawn interferes
trrfereh with the tragedy of lovers separated
rated by matrimonial obligation Homoin
in an Inexhaustible quarry for the romance
builder In no other city is to much pictnrrwqiie
nrrwqiie material avallabloancient palaceswith
with secret passages old tune customs andmanners
manners and traditions historic namesto
to embellish the page famous avenuestho
nn1 garden with legendry assoalstlonathe
the ever waiting confessional which since
tho uays of Romeo baa been the rendeavousit
it r
T
The Greatest R Religious Romance Since BenHurTHE
THE plot of Elizabeth Millers Miss Miller writes of nature andthe
new story is dazzling in itsvariety the ancient works of man with asheer
variety compelling in the sweep ofits sheer authority of utterance whosepower
its forward movement wide andswift power imposes itself upon the readerto
swift as a majestic river Thechariot to a wonderful degree Steeped inreligious
chariot race in BenHur alone maystand religious emotion dramatic from firstword
stand beside the magnificent sceneia word to last with humor and colormovement
ia which the heroine distracts theraging movement and passion charm ofstyle
raging mob of Alexandrians and savesfrom style and the bravery of genius Saulof
from death her lover and the Nazarenes of Tarsus answers the tests of thegreat
renes great in fictionSAUL
SAUL of TARSUSA
I IA
A Faithful Story of the Early Disciples of ChristTHE
THE same splendid irfttranationwhich The Apostle Paul the MartyrStephen
which reconstructed the Ageof Stephen Herod Agrippa and theEmperors
of the Pharaohs and revivified theglory Emperors Tiberius and Caligula areamong
glory of Egypt in THE YOKE hereplays among the mighty figures that movethrough
plays with lambent flame about thegreat through the pages Wonderful descriptionsheartstirring
great Roman world in the days succeeding scriptionsheartstirring incidents deepemotion
ceeding the Crucifixion The scenesare emotion high thought and a love storyof
are laid amid the pulsing throbbingvancolored of the noblest type mark this mostremarkable
varicolored life of Jerusalem Alexandria remarkable religious romance sinceBenHur
dria Rome and Damascus BenHurMagnificently
Magnificently Illustrated by Andre Castaigne
PriceLStiAt
At all Bookseller THE BOBBSMERRILL COMPANY PublishersBy
By ELIZABETH MILLER Author of THE YOKE
J
I
Here the Old Books havetheir
their rights and > are notcrowded
crowded out by the newbut
but the new are here alsonot
not some but all that areworth
worth havingE
E P Dutton Co
31 watt Tw tylhM Streetand
and door of communication for desperatelover
loverEver
Every tick and stone of this magio cityia
ia familiar to Mr Crawford and he baamarrelloua
marrelloua ingenuity in creating newformations Ifonnatlon
formations out of old materials lie ia apractised
practised claver constructor of romancesThey Irbeystand
They stand firmly upon their anctont foundations I
dations Thy rise gracefully to gildeddome I
dome or battlemented tower In harmoniousaccord Ia
accord with the laws of architecture Theyare II
are enriched with appropriate ornamentsand Iand
and authentic family crests and they areset
set la the glamour of traditional and historlo
torlo atmosphereThe
The particular problem to which theauthor
author applies his ingenuity in The Ladyof
of Rome is how to save the soul of theContessa
Contessa di Montalto and not sacrificeher
her lover or overtax the credulity of thoreader
reader The Contessa has a husband withdark
dark Spanish coloring She baa a loverwith
with blue eyes and thick brown hair Shehas
has also a son with blue ayes and thickbrown
brown hair Seven years before the storyopsn
I
opens the husband had left her and theI
boy to care for his mother in Spain Therewere
were ugly stories told of him in RomeTha
The lover Castiglione exchanged with aMilan 1Milan
Milan regiment and the lady led a blameless
less life with the blue eyed boy ThenCastiglione
Castiglione returned and after much prayerand
and confessing It was decided that he shouldcome
come back to Rome and that they shouldsee
see each other occasionally and still lead ablameless
blameless life It was the woman whoplanned
planned it No doubt the plan wouldhave
have been a triumphant success but thehusband
husband chose that unpropitious time toreturn
return and to forgive his wife The rest isinevitable
inevitable Of course she treasured herlovers
lovers letters and carried them with herto
to the old palace where they could be stolenby
by means of the secret passage Naturallyshe
she sends a message to CastIglione by thofather
father confessor who ought to wear apostmans
postmans uniform and they are redeemedby
by the lover Naturally too a Spanishgentleman
gentleman would fall into a rage and die ofapoplexy
apoplexy after willing his estate to thoblue
blue eyed boy and advising the lady thatit
it was her duty to marry CastiglioneIt
It is a pretty romance and a pleasant oneto
to read It is gracefully written and itsconclusion
conclusion is exactly in accord with whattho
tho reader expects and tradition has approved
proved Macmlllan Coie
Tile Commonplace Again Presented InCommonplace
Commonplace FashionTo i
To portray commonplace people doingommonplace
commonplace things in a way that arousesympathy
ympathy and compels interest is a giftif
of greater talent than Jane II Find laterdisplalIln
displays in her new story The Ladder to thetaw
Stars The book falls In the first groatjquloite
requisite of a good storythat it shall benterestlng
Interesting it falls short in the secondessential
essential of almost equal Importance thograce
grace of humor to enliven Its dreary chronicleof
of petty doings There is tho mechanicalrealism
realism of the photographerthat reproduces
duces accurately and the intelligent realismof
of the artist who selects Interprets andcoordinates
coordinates his sketches into a true pictureof
of life To read Miss Flndlaterit bookit
it to turn over the leaves of a family albumwherein
wherein Is faithfully reproduced exactllkencfwcfl
likenesses of personages we do not knowand
and do not want to know That such tiresome
some people such feudal notions of rankand
and caste are characteristic of Englishvillage
village life Ix not to be deputed Thattheir Itheir
their small affairs and uninteresting peculiarities I
liarities have been wrought Into a storywith I
with faithful precision and sincerity Is notto
to be denied But the chronicle Is tlrcHomoto
to road and barren of artistic merit ofInspiration
Inspiration or significanceOne
One gains as little by making the acquaintance
ance of j the Pillar family In the book asone
one could In real life Miriam the heroinemisunderstood
misunderstood and ambitious laboriouslymounts
mount a few round of The Ladder to thoStars
Stars through her love of books andtalent
talent for writing She goes up to Londonunder
under the patronage of Mr Alan loreand
and hilt sister where the reader must followthe
the details of her affairs even to the pattern
1
TAKNIGHTOF t
KNIGHT OfJOHN
THECUMBE S
CUMBERLANDeY
IYJ
JOHNFOX
FOXAuthor JrQAuthor
Author of The Little Shepherdof
of Kingdom ComeIllustrated
Illustrated in Color 100A
A splendid ove story where knight ofKentucky
Kentucky fight for ladies favors in a tournament
ment as in an Ivantioe of today The gayetypictltreaque
picturesque humor romantic adventure andsentiment
t sentiment make this an inimitable storyCHAflLES
CHARLES SCRIBNDRS SONS
of her underclothing and tho ordeal of herbeing
being properly corseted and becominglyclothed
clothed She meets an editor of radical110tlon
notion and his wornout wife and attendtheir
their receptions where gentry and geniusrub
rub elbows in a shabby drawing roombarely Ibarely
barely escape becoming the mistress oran
an Impulsive musician who has an unfortunato
fortunato attachment in the shape of uwife
Iwife
wife and finally achieves a book whichbrings
brings her fame and wealth She returns toher
her country home to nurse her motherthrough
through the usual Hlneo and ultimatelywe i
we hope to become the wife of Alan Gorewhich
which is the real goal of her ambitionTho
Tho title of the book in taken from asketch
sketch of Blakes in which two mannikinsare
are putting up a ladder to try to reach thestars3 IItarsBeneath
stars3 Beneath It U written I want I wantTo
To want to write a great story and to takeelaborate
elaborate pains in building up from commonplace I
monplace materials does not insure success
as Miss Findlaters book demonstrateD
lPopular
D Appleton A CoPopular
Popular HnmorUliU
It is difficult to criticiao the work of anumorUt
numorUt who has established a reputationPeople
People expect a certain kind of funnlnessfrom
from him and that kind he U bound to turnout
out whether he wishes to or not We reallyare
are unable now to say how the Dissertations
II
tlorw by Mr Dooley by Finley PeterDunne
Dunne Harpers would strike us if theywere
were the first colloquies between that worthyand
and Mr Honneeny that we had read Thefonn
fonn and the philosophy are now familiarthe
the inspiration seems to lag somewhat butMr
Mr Dooley brightens up when his subjectreally
really interests himAnother
Another author whose name describeshis
his book is Mr George Ade with In PasturesContinued
Continued on Eighth Tape
w
sYPearNeck1aces
PearNeck1acesw
w of the finest qualityin
finspection Vinspection
in all sizes
inspection InvitedIHIOWAIRD
IHIOWAIRD CO
264 Fifth Avenue
sty
t I
y u
S
1
Mt1 FVAT YARN MOrWYARBA
NEW BOOKS
a CWMPANY A COMPANYHOW
V SVHOW
HOW TO APPRECIATE MUSIC
By OUiTAV KOBiEA
A work of high value great comprehensiveness and from the modemviewpoint
viewpoint frankly addressed to those who do not appreciatemusic
music but want to and of great interest to all music loversSvo
I
deco 150 net Postage 13 cnlsOUR < > 1OUR
1I
S OUR CONSTITUTIONWhy
IWhy
Why and How It Was Made Who Mado It and What It Uy
By EDWARD WATERMAN TOWNSENDA
A popular history which is also complete concise copsecutive authoritative
thoritative and highly interesting No other one volume whollycovers
covers the field which this book fills8vo
Boa 150 net Postage 14 centsA
A ROMANCE OF OLD FURNITURETHE
THE FACE IN THE CIRANDOLE
By WILLIAM FREDERICK DIXA
A story of very charming quality and a gift book of high degreeHhulrAttd
HhulrAttd in colon Text fn faro printing betaitfuliy bound nd bond 300 nttpoattg
postage 16 cftttsALMABY
IRICHAR
ALMABY IN ITS THIRD LARQK EDITIONRICHARD
RICHARD THE BRAZENy
By BRADY AND PEPLEFat
Fat with the material of which thrills are made and warranted
ranted to be finished at one sfuingSf Paul Pioneer Pressttlattrtkdfa
ttlattrtkdfa Color fy George Gfti Into ft50COMfNGi
COMING THE VON LUMER8
By TOM MA8SON Author of A CORNER IN WOMENREMINISCENCES
REMINISCENCES OF A MO8BY GUERRILLABy
By JOHN W MUN8ONMOPPAT
MOPPAT YARD COMPANY NEW YORKNEW I
NEWBOOKS NOWREADY
BOOKS READYC
C N and A M WHIIamSOaS new story issued in holiday formRosemary
Rosemary In Search of a FatherThe
The Seasons Gift BookIT
IT Authors and publishers have worked together to make this the holidayk
y book par excellence of the Reason 18007 The authors of Lady Bettyand
and Mytheir Friend the Chauffeur hare written a story wb ich M ill surprise eventheir
> their moat ardent admirers by its humor grace delicacy and charmSix
Six tiluitrations in Photogravure by JIatherell and Decorations 150GeorflC
George ides richly humorous impressionsEn
In Pastures NewfS
fS George Ade globe trotter His observations in typical Chicago one
Q the thousand and one incidents which accompanied trip from London
don to the Pyramids George Ades funniest bookForlUfue
ForlUfue lllVBt rations by Lnering S125Eden
Eden Pblllpotls and Arnold Bennetts new novelDoubloons
DoubloonsA
ft A sensational mystery story with a vein of fantastic liiimor hithertonot
Q not found in Mr Phillpotts work Events move nt high pressurefrom
from London to the West Indies In a wild search for buried treasure Replete
plete with adventures that thrillCloth
Cloth f 160Stanley
Stanley J Weymans political romanceChlpptnge
Chlpptnge BoroughThe
ft The author of The Long Night and A Gentleman of France hereenters
enters a new Meld politic His characters aro drawn with the handof
of a muter and not one of them not even the delightful heroine is toobright
bright and good for human natures daily food N Y TintsCloth
Cloth 160published
published by McCLURE PHILLIPS COFortyfour
Fortyfour East 23d Street Now YorkA
A THRILLING DETECTIVE STQRYTHE
THE SECRET OF THE MOOR COTTAGEThe
The nearest approach to the famous storiesof
of A Conan Doyle by his own sisterH
i
H RIPLEY CROMARSHThe
The Electric TheftBy FATHER PINK
By NEIL WINN WILLIAMSA By FRED WILSON BARRETTAn
A New BookA An Ain teur DetectiveA
A Rather New AuthorA StoryHow
A Very New PlotFast How would you pursue a criminal
Fast moving and very excitingThe inal who uses a cage of trainedlions
The Novel that is Novel lions to cover his retreatAT PAT
AT ALL BOOKSTORESSMALL
SMALL MAynARD COMPANY BOSTONBLIND
I
BLIND ALLEYS
By GEORGE GARY ECGLESTONAmthor
Amthor If Dorothy SouthJ etc IlUdntcd ClothMr 120Mr
Mr Egglestonn story will Appeal to tho thoughtful reader aawell
well as to those who are interested only in the tory he has to tellThere
There Is all mystification and fascination of thoArnbiun NightHstory
story in following the career of Dr Field HtunfleldSpringfield
Springfield UnionMr
Mr Eggleston has managed to surround his new people ofvery
fiction with mYlllerM which will keep his readers very bURY andvery 1R
very pleasantly intcreKtedN r WorldHEARTS 1I
HEARTS AND THE CROSSI
By HAROL3 MORTO KRAMERIllnttrilrd
Illnttrilrd Cloth SlSfThe
The book taken hold of the render and keeps up it iKcriHt tothe
the end There aro sensational InoidentHnndHtlrrinKwcnps butthey jthey
they are not overdrawn Mr Kramer will he heard from againnna Innd
and will doubtless add hmtrn to the lint of writers that lire proudlyclaimed I
claimed by Indiana Boston TranscriptLOTHROP
LOTHROP LEE S SHEPARD CO Boston
In Harpers Magazine for Nbvemtef
tef fare arc ftffnAlng > rtstQrie9tA
A dtumtttc Inslalmtnt of GilbertParkers
Parkers great novel which Tau fastbegan
began serially and articles By famouswriters aorders
writers of science travel historyliterature
l
literature legend reminiscence natureetc F
etc etc Ibere is nothing aboapoittics
poittics graft or crimeCertain iBOOKS
LHARPES1
CertainDelightful ADelightful
DelightfulEnglish tEnglish
English ownsr
By W D HowellsA
A companion volumeto London
don Films in which Mr Howclliwrites
writes of Bath Oxford Canterbury
bury and other delightful Englishtowns
towns with glimpses of the country
try in between The authorcatches
catches the true spirit and dominant
nant tone of each locality and htregales
regales the reader with variouslittle
little adventures along the roadMr
Mr Howells is especially alertwhile
while sketching the broad outlines
lines of the English towns fordetails
details that link English historywith Ywith
with our own and have a specialinterest
interest for the American traveller
eller A Tourist Edition in limpleather
leather is also issuedt
Lew WallaceAn
An AutobiographyThe
The famous author of BenHurthe
Hurthe book that millionhave
have readdevoted his last yearsto
to the preparation of this remarkable
able lifestory A man who haswon
won distinction on the diversefields
fields of arms letters politicsand
and diplomacy must have in himthat
that which compels attentionbut
but this is more than the mererecord
record of a remarkable careerit
it is the presentation of the manhimself
himself an intensely individualand Iand
and manysided character andone +
one of the most forceful personalities
alities of our timesLord rLord
Lord RandolphChurchill
ChurchillBy
By Lord RoseberyThe rThe
4gives
The distinguished exPremiergives
gives an inner view of the largerphases
phases of English political lifeHis
His book abounds in freshglimpses
glimpses of Gladstone Beaconsfield
field Salisbury and other commanding = y
1manding
manding figures In his personalsketches 11sketches
sketches of Lord Randolph hCIwrites fwrites
writes as a close friend but withP <
greater freedomtha the son washable
able to It shows in every Unathe
the Prime Ministers mastery of Jt
the inner life of high poitJcsThe r iTh
The Very Ii ISmall
I
Small PersonBy
1
By Annie Hamilton DonnellRebecca 1 i
Rebecca Mary will be recalledas h
as a novel and altogether charming
ing volume of child life portrayedfor ffor
for older readers Mrs Donnells
nells new book is in a similarvein
vein It is a delightful series ofodd
odd comedies and tragedies ofchildhood
childhood quite beyond praisefor
for their delicate art and assuredof
of the same wide appreciationwith
with which Rebecca Mary wasgreeted
greeted The exquisite illustrations
tions by Elizabeth Ship envGreen +
Green complete the attractive
ness of the volume and make itespecially resPeciallt
especially appropriate as a giftbook
bookSome 5Some
Some SuccessfulMarriages
MarriagesBy
By Abby SMcguhc RoachThis
This volume shows that marriage
riage is not necessarily the endbut
but may be only the beginning ofromance
romance Here are a dozenromancesall
romancesall of an unusualcharacterdealing
characterdealing with a varietyof
of intensely interesting situationsthat
that married life is constantlyproducing
producing Collectively they present
sent an engaging commentary onAmerican
American married life todayHARPER
HARPER BROTHERSmxmsAii
mxmsAii out fit Dart IMUYia uppntd noboa
matter on whet IUbJIIC write me atulna boa liiluhtct
wanted r can re oe any book ever publlahtwben
wben In England call and Inpee my atok fir tuaarn
nn book DARERS BEAT nook ttol JoMBrtcBt
BrtcBt et BlrmlDphtm Bncl nd
r

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