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The sun. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, March 16, 1913, Image 10

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THE SUN, SUNDAY, ' MARCH 16
2,000 BOY SCOUTS
SET A SWIFT PACE
Cheered by Multitude of Friends
nnd Ifelntives in Armory
i:liibition.
ONE OETS A II KIM) MEDAL
HeSnvodTwoLiuls From Drown
ing1 Show Fine First
Aid Work.
The Pcvrnty-dMi ItcRlmcnt Armory
may lmvo witnessed Impnxlnir reviews,
elaborate drills and hautlv! Inspec
tions, nil environed with Hold lace, wnv
VK l'lumes iiud mllltnrv pomp, but It
never lieforn haw anything like Hint
reconrt nnnunl rnlly of the Hoy Scouts
of America, under the auspices of the
city council yesterday afternooji.
Take about two thousand dellphtcd
mother, fathers, !lters and brothers
other side of them a troop of a dozen
Injys suddenly found one of their number
Injured.
This was n first aid drill, nnd the
way that particular younRster was bnn
daKed, slun Into a stretcher nnd car
ried to n hospital made real doctors clap
their hands. Over In another corner an
entire troop brpnn wlKwnRKlnK. and still
furlher oveY n field telephone was set tip
rlKht next to n troop of bridge builders,
who constructed n wonderful structure
to pnss a running strenm,
The one scene might ko for many that
succeeded, except that now and then a
troop would suddenly shoot up n human
pyramid or there would be single stick,
Jousting tournaments, boy liaek tilting,
wrestling by way of variety and then
somo races.
The Anlelnpe liner.
mere whs one race, yesterday that
caught the crowd. It wa cnlloH ho
antelope race. It was n lino of Imvs
with u leader, back of whom were
twenty or thirty more, each with iiU
arms clasped nround the waist of the
man nnead. They would line up and
race ncross the nrmorv floor to snntrb
a flag and return. Then there were fire
making contests. This was for fire
made without matches, steel or tinder.
In which event Oeorgo Heyne of Troop
32. from East New York, made every
body shout as he showed how to put a
sparic into tho tow nnd light a fire.
1913.
f-
RELIEF IN SIGHT
FOR STRAPHANGERS
Chairman Mcrnll Snys It Will
Show Tiingibly Inside of
Eight Months.
ritAISES CITY OFFICIALS
up In the galleries; add an Imposing 1 ro"P which looked like a band of
reviewing stand and then set up out rrKUIar cowboys, showed everybody
on tho armory lloor about 3,r,00 nifty. ''"L'T,' "Tr,T i"!?' v'y, CifW
,.. .. i ,. , . . ,n,lpi "! N". 104 of Now York shot
keen eyed American youngsters. In Ilp u coiiapslMe tmver whlch wouM
khaki an, tlanml shirts ready to do ,mvp rcnclUM, ronf ,f (
'" '"' " "'. wanted t til rn thnt fur.
During all
the time tho Hoy Scout band of Port
Chester was playing music when It hnd
a chance and the Hoy Bcout Drum
Corps was shaking tho rafters In Its
turn.
Then came n race that made some
of tho mothers sigh longingly. It was
would have permitted, got out on tho
nnd who actually did do things that
made every man, woman and child
looking on Jump up from their teats,
and you have a scene that bcuts any
show In town, even such thrillers ns
the Hippodrome, Harnum's Circus,
J'aln'H fireworks nr tin Olympic meet.
Speaking or American youngsters
a lew analyses isterila. There weru
only about twenty nationalities repre
sented among those boys who have
floor and nt a signal made a dash for
flint, 1.LH1.. T 1 . T1 II . a
taken oaths or made promises that even .V" ' , " ' ',' , , f i ... f i
.. ..11 .......... . Mount vrnnti, about the littlest boy of
the ancient knight would have hesitated
to say. There were boys of white
faces, black faces, red and yellow faces.
There were boys who In their uniforms
showed the drill nnd setup of the
fashionable private school, as well as
boys who had to hike away from the
factory nt 1 o'clock to get there yester
day afternoon. There were boys who
look forward to college careers and
lives In which there wilt be no worry
over the cost of living and boys who
ylll have to light every foot of the way
to keep the wolf back.
the fifty, won the race, nnd If he does
that as a rule be will never be bite for
breakfast. It took him a minute and n
half to get his clothes on and then get
down to the Judge's stand.
Fifty Trnm. In "First Aid" Itacr.
Then enme the first nld race. About
fifty teams left n boy who seemed to be
badly hurt at one end of the nrmory nnd
rushed from one end to the other to
bandage the boy's broken leg, then
make a stretcher out of their poles nnd
coats nnd bear the Injured boy to a
doctor. It took about three minutes for
the fastest team to do the trick, and the
doctors, looking nt a bandage made out
of the signal tings, n lint bandage nnd
the pole, said that any ambulance sur
geon would be proud of the Job. Itaces
All Hoy Seoul ToKethrr.
All thnt mattered not for any of them,
for they were all boy scouts together;
nil obedient to their principles and their
ollicers and they were all getting tho
ular boy should act and n great MS'?"d?
brotherly spirit of democracy mndr, W
JiZZ Z:Tt:;r Krn8t Y1
'ou'io1 lhpy ha" 10 hmv what" ---- S 'nXKisT!
me coma no. ... Hrtirtment to keep things clean. I'ark
The ra ly yesterday was to begin at 3 0omml!I(1n,r (m,r hn madfl
oc lock, but the troops, as they were whc), ,
called, began to get to the armory as Ppcelvc(, b CHn(1(latr ,Mt
early as noon. I . w under the nm-1 fn HMnii ke murmur. M J
pices of the New or Council, but tho , 8al(, ,hnt lhero W(.rp nf , ,
troops came from about every point ac- ,n Prt WttMnlngton ,,ark , h ,,,,,
. .. v........ .) i-nrk. Inwood I'ark and over on Stnten
and all the ( onnectlcu shore towns. I ,Hlnnd, w.a a h
New- Jersey sen big delegations; XcwiWno(li nnd thrrpfnr( nldp() nJ
ork. not only the city but all the up- n.i 1,.. i,., n....i ,u .... ...
m. ne was
Tlielr Work Wns Complete;
They Left Mo Nothing to
Do," He Snys.
Chairman Kdwnrd K. McCall of the
Public Service Commission said last
night thut ho hoped the subway con
tracts would be slgnud by Monday night
or by Tuesday morning nt the latest.
"Hut tho signing of the contracts Is
not the most Important thing." said
he. "The immediate and effective oper
ation under those contracts Is of far
more consequence. The assertion which
I havo heard made many times lately
that there will be no relief from present
transit conditions for nt least four years
Is absolutely false. Inside of eight
months there will be a tangible show
Ing of relief, and Inside of fourteen
months thero will be marked Improve
ment In the boroughs of Manhattan,
Kings und Queens."
Mr. McCall, who wns the guest of
honor at the twenty-ninth annual ban
quet of the New York I'nlverslty Law
School Alumni Association, held 'nt the
Hotel Knickerbocker, said that to for
mer Chairman Wlllcox, Hnrough Pros!
dent MeAnetiy, Comptroller l'render
gast nnd their associates on the Hoard
of Estimate should go the credit for
"the best contract which ever has been
or ever could be made as far as the
city's Interests are concerned."
"Kor the last two weeks," he said, "I
have devoted all my time studying the
Incomparable work of tho most devoted,
loyal and patriotic ollicers It has ever
been my fortune to come across. Their
work wns complete; they left me noth
ing to do. The citizens of New York
must, as a matter of duty, recognize the
work done by these fearless men In the
face of tho most abusive tirades and
criticism."
Over 300 members of the nlumnlasso
elation were at the dinner and greeted
Judge McCall's remarks with enthusi
asm. President David I.eventrltt, the
toastmaster, urged thos- present to do
their share in raising the morale of the
bar.
"Wo hear little nowadays about the
ability of lawyers." said he, "but wo
should hear less about the character of
some practitioners. Kverv lawver
should make It n matter of duty to read
carefully the lists of candidates for ad
mission to the bar and should give to
the character committee any informa
tion he has In regard to the ehnrne.
tor and standing of applicants."
Other speakers were Justice Samuel
Seabury, Justice John AVoodwnnl una
James M. Heck.
TTlll.nn tAM'ne ilnr... .... M" "ll
""" ".... .uii.,.,1. KOlnK ,,, navo a ,ot (lf i,liis erected
from the ages of 9 to 10. It seemed. ln the nntllraI kH of , ,
Moat 0' thorn wore the khaki, the leg-! thosp mPnt0ned. nnd the Hoy Scouts
gins, the llannel shirt and the care- ; mcilt use thp.sp aMn tnl summpr
fully peaked ha . Some of the boys , It was much more convenient to keep
could not afford a full costume of yollr nKPn n yollr parH whpn ,hp 3 5(0
course so they wore what they could, , young shouters heard this. Ulshop Greer
tut all of them were there to show;d he thought It wns the finest sight
people, and they showed until tho big he ever looked upon nnd praised the
audience not only aroso to cheer but ' boys because their object wns to fight
occasionally stopped to wonder why against lighting; they were men of
they had a choking sob In the throat . peace. Then came the medal giving
and so much moisture In their res.
That was particularly the "ase when
learned Two liny Mrnnt.
.Mr. Spencer said that last tviirnnrv
thoy Called nut young Johnny Sinclair
of The Kronx to give him a me.1,1 f.,r Mattlo Vllllo. 11 years old, skatlnn on
diving through tho Ice to save an her the Hronx Hlver. had fallen in and was
boy who had fallen Into the Hronx River , drowning when Scout John Sinclair of
on February IS. ' It was told how- the Kagle Patrol, Troop No. 104, with head
boy, freckled faced, slightly red as to quarters In tho Heck Preshvterlun
hair, had remembered his boy scout Church ln Kast ISOth street, hannened
duty and gono Into tho water to pull out
one boy and then had to get out an
other hoy too.
Everybody knows how n twelve-year
long. Tho water was nine feet deen
and sure cold. Young Sinclair promptly
went In nfter Mnttlo and was bringing
him u. ..vl.. ... ... .... . .
....I. t.m-ij n niniiu wnen jonn .Mura-
0111 ooy Dears nimseir when praised, nnd 1 tony, s years old, fell In too. Young
Johnny was a typical boy, but the audi-, Sinclair grabbed him too and struggled
ence did not seem to know that he ' to the edge of the Ice with both of
hewed his hat. toed In, twisted his 1 them. There brother scouts, Woelfred
body nround until his ribs were in dan- Looser, Hubert Williamson and Harry
ger; nt least they forgot to laugh. j Heneko pulled them all out and then
rv Hi- .. . administered first nld to Mattlo. who
Many rl.J Stnown .11 on There. j waH uncon!cloUH,
All sorts of well known men went to Mr. HpVncer said that this kind of
the platform at 3 o'clock, when J.orll- 1 honor deserved recognition, whereupon
mm .ii..in.ii, .mi. 1.111 me raiiy, nan .nr. Livingston, me national president,
nis youngsiers piawiereu pack against stepped forward and pinned upon the
the walls ready. Col. William G. Hates, coat of the very much embarrased
who commands the .Seventy-first; Ushop Johnny Sinclair 11 bronze cross und gave
David Greer. Dan Heard, the artist, the other boys certificates of dlstln-
j-uik. oiiHiiiHHiuiicr mover, John I.. . gtilshed service,
T.nvcnnD tllt.. f 1 1.1 .... . . ) M. . ...
'ol"'' "" .'iai.-uiuiMiu. namuei 1. 1 iiio noys looking on raised a big
Stewart, Victor V. Hldder, Colgato Hoyt. I cheer then and a moment Inter as the
nana hit into the tune those 3.S00
showed the grownups how to sing "Tho
Mnr spangled Hanner" and "My Coun
try, 'TIs of Thee." Those songs havo
been sung before, but when 3,000 voices
or noys who know the tunes and most
nil trebles got hold of them they almost
lifted tho glass and stone roof and
they brought every living being tip
standing with some Idea of what those
particular tunes mean throughout a
considerable stretch of territory.
If you see boy scouts creeping over
vacant lots, watching candy stands
without eating nny, stopping tierce look
$100 OF DE CROISIC RICHES LEFT.
MnrqnliiF Iliirlr.l nt llxnenup of Ml..
Knte Hover, n Prli-ml.
Nkwtort. March 13. - The body of Mar
quise do CroMc (.Mrs. Itlchnrd de Log.
crnt), who died at the Ilutler Hospital
In Providence on Thursday, was bur
led In the Island Cemetery here this
afternoon.
It was lenriud to-day that all that
remained of the estate once possessed
by tho Marquise was about 1100 de
posited in one of the Kinks here.
The body was accompanied to the
grnv by Ml Kate Hnveo of New
York, a eloie friend of tho deceased,
who come hero to pHy her last tribute
of respect and who will also care for
tho expenso of burial.
GRIEVING MOTHER A SUICIDE.
Mm. Jural! Ilnrrln Inhnlrs (in
IMudliiK Vnr.r
liter
Mrs. Dora Ilarrlj, wife of Jacob Harris
a tailor, committed suleMe te vestenlny
afternoon by inhaling gas ln a bedroom of
"4 TO v'"lr,,,mm ' Hoffman Court,
at -4 Last Nlnetv.n nth ui. .1.- ....
1 m r mis.
Jr., Alfred Chalmer Charlts, Park Com
missioner uudolph P. Miller of Tho
Hronx, Dr. John II. Kinley of the Col
lege of the City of New York, Otto T.
Hannard, Collin Livingston, president nf
the national association; Georgo D,
J'ratt and James K. Wood were ready
on time.
At a signal tho boys all rushed to
gether to tnnko a lane, for the guests to
go to tho platform und then the bugler
Uoy Scouts too bounded the necessary
calls. Just to show what kind of boys
they wero It may be said that tho hu
filers, neither of whom wns moro than
1 feet 3 Inches tall, were Louis Carlozzl,
uroop 6, .-sew vork. and James Whclnn,
lng drivers nnd talking back at them,
touehlni? ineti on ihn uhnnllaF ....... . 1.
Troop 78 also of this city. Tho could 'on the sidewalk, making baby cry by
bugle loo, If that Is tho way to do- explaining that certain things must not
scribe it. and they sounded "Ashemblv." 1,.. ir,ei,.,i,i,..,-i ir L. ". 1
"Attention and all tho other calls so battlecry of Dr. Marlon McMillan, being
that everybody could hear and under- delivered right now to tho Soventy-flrst
stand them. Iteglment Armory Hoy Scouts, has taken
They sounded the first call soon nfter effect
J,hM.h,"i ,11S"lnK",'Sl,"''1 KWS hai1 takenl "Cl'c" "P." ' to b the watchword
Itiiftn! ? n and then men who had nc-of ,he Hoy Scouts of America hm--ITr.TVr
, ' my':h ' " to h" '' "Vl ' about In tho month of Commissioner
ringed circuses had to hold their eyes , Lederle'a spring housecleanlng and the
V . "out u Uiien troops of young- captains and generals havo
Tlhow' vh' n" an:LJ,,"nPd ." tllcro wo't ' "''"Vtlvo rag unro-
... I.. ""-..in in no. 1 ported to tho societies w
? "rj"'.'-'l'l different up to direct the work of tl;
nnd did It at the top of Its speed. One. 'tractors.
roop, cons sum; otanout eleven' "The week's work of planning has
boys slid out a pile of long poles, m been very satisfactory," mm tho com"
a Jiffy they had produced ropes; in 1 ruhsloner yesterday. "Inspection
another Jl Ty they ., ,.,, Utlnta. ; tll() c, . , rf completed
fastening tho ,,1, together; Just ; and on Monday we will havo read, all
another twinkling of an eye and a tower tho figures aa to how much rubbish
was shooting up, upon the too of which there is and wh,r. ,u .
.1 slender joungstei c llinhed carrying a moval, and will submit them to tho
ulgnal ling It took him only a second l Aldermen for an appropriation.
ho nro lining
tho special con-
to start telling some Ih,vm. ninrn un
known, that the encms w,ih coming.
Vlillo this was ilmng another troop had
rnndo a human pyramid, on top of which
u very small boy. with ,. pole which wns
nliout as much us he could sustain, had
climbed. Thlij, was a wueless station
and down, below flat on his stomach a
third youngHtvr started In sending
messages at a,, great rate. Just on tho
Public sentiment Is nbsol utelv essen
tlal to success, however, and we want
responso from ovcry civic organization.
Wo can clean up by executive authority,
going Into homes and compelling clean
liness, but this would mean confusion,
delay and antagonism. Tho work would
take a year In that manner, while with
eager public support wo can do It all in
a month."
I.j,l u..l.l ..u- 1. . -. 1.
death of her eleven-jear-old soe PerclvaT
p'i:,h,.W!l1H.,k"1'" b" automobile t
-Mrs. I.uise dross, who liml ,ern en
gaged by Mr. Harris to net as eoinp 1. "u
and muse to his wife, was sitting ith
tlr,rJ 'i:r,S, 1-'ep,": "f-mo" w
-.- . r.ie. cue nnuiu K nI(1 ,or ,,,.
room f,,r her usual nap b..fr in,.r. 'A't
S.JO o clock Mrs. Gross smelled gas and
she ran to summon the Janitor
It was not until 7 ;30. however, so nrlgl,.
bors of the Harrises sy. ,lilt Mr u n?H
and the Janitor decided ,h, ;,,.,, '
serious had happened and went tnr 1'?.
.... ..,...,.,.,,. ,,,,.. iiuivacK and an.
i iTrri.,--"rrn '"ok." In "" "",,r '
Harris s bedroom; there they ,,,
Wng on the lloor paitly dress,., ,,"
was escarping from an open Jet Into t
room. The keyhole !,., L-, st iff e w th
nu,Ma,rrevve";i;1
Plllinotor biought from the Couso dat.Ml
(.as Company at 11 1th stieet , ,.'rB
avenue was of avail, and ), , , ,
bulanco surgeon from the Harlem ,," .
U d came h said that M,s. Harris
GEORGE W. DA CUNHA MARRIED.
Advnenle of oiM.,ilor AVpilloek
'I'll lien n IVIfp HI 7.-,.
MoNTCLAin N. J., Mr,h iK.K,e,ifc
rf.M fK". U , lM r""ha' il w,' k'"'n
resident of this town, who was a candl
clalo for Mayor on several occasions, are
Interested In his reported marilage at
hanta Monica. Cal where he has ,e,n
spending the winter, to .Mis. C. R. Swan
Mr. IU Cuuha Is 75 years old. His Hist
wife died here last May.
At the office of Mr. Pa Cunha's brother,
A. L. ,)a Cunha. 105 West fortieth ntnet
Mann.ntan, tho report of the imiirl.ige
was confirmed to-dav bv u hninu.
clatv of Mr. Da Cunha, who said that the
nuit i ii,,u uvea iiiiurmeu or tim man luge
In a letter and that thu Lrl tie u :m 11 ft I..,.
of tho family.
Mm. William H. HiuhIi of 47 rhni-ei.
street, this city, at whonu homo Mr. Da
Cunha lived before going West, has le
eelved Instiuctlons frorn him to t-eud his
iTiouiiai euecis 10 naiila Jlonlra.
Pullowlng the death of Mr. Itli i ?imli.'i'a
wife proei-edlngs were begun by her rela
tives to set aside tho will orTeied fur pro
bato by Mr. Da Cunha. They sld that
there was a later will. Tim im.iinr i
still In court
Mr Da Cunha attained iintlnnnl in..
torlety a few years ago by his esiunitml ,,f
eompulniry marriage thiough the agency
of a Pederal buieaii, He Is a Htlied arclll-
uii ano ouuuer. tm oiu .lenvrsnn Market
Court Building In New York was built
by him.
IBest&Co.
Easter Wear
In Our New and Enlarged Departments
Smart and Exclusive Millinery
For. Women and Misses
On the Second Floor
For Junior Misses and Children
On the Fourth Floor
Featuring the Popular Prices
Second Floor
Women's and Misses'
Suits Gowns Coats
Now Ready A bomldcringly largo nnd Sunerb Selection
Adaptations and Copies of Paris' I .nV.st Dictation
Coats y
This pection is full of novelties in JCont and
Wraps this is the season of the unusual in both the'
Dressy Afternoon and Evening Mantles, as well as the
Run-about, Motor and Travpl types.
We Specialize at
19.75 25.00 29.75 35.00
Suits
32 to 51 Bust
A Cosmopolitan Section reflecting the ultra character of mode
nnd fabric Always Introducing the Newest and Be.st never
forgetting the conscrvntive and practicnl.
Specially Adapted Suits for Extra Sire Flgurea
Specially Designed Suits for Regular Sizea
Specially Created Suits for Misses and Small Women
Specially Featured Monday Only
Women's Dress Suits Value $69.00, 45.00
Small Women's Suits Value $50.00, 35.00
We Specialize nt
25.00 29.75 35.00 45.00 50.00
Wedding Gowns
Maid of Honor Gowns
Bridesmaid Gowns
The Easter Bride-! or the Prospective June Brides, will
find models in stock, or speoially created color
plates will be drawn upon request.
Orders executed in our Special Order Depart
ment, at Surprisingly Moderate Prices.
Gowns
A'Ready-to-Wear Section broad in its scope, showing
an individuality, andSforeign touch, that singles it out
and having the added advantage of a tcustom order
section, where in many instances, models may be had
atJLess price than those, ready-made.
Specially Featured Monday Only
Women's Afternoon Silk Frocks
Valuo 350.C0, 35.00
Smart Trot-about Serge Dresses
Value 35.0O, 22.50
Afternoon Silk Gowns
25.00 29.75 35.00 45.00 50.00
Women's and Misses' Blouses
We have just received un importation of French Blouses.
.Paris last word in Chiffon, Lace, Soft Silk, Plain and
Hnnd-embroidered materials. Among which are the fol
lowing models: The Clunedi, Herman, Lucie, Florence,
Juanita, Dorothia, Cleo, Claudine, Yvettc, Garibaldi and
Norma. At prices ranging from
35.00 to 75.00
Also An Entirely Different Model in a
Beaded'Blouse at 16.50
Particularly Good Value
Crepe do Chino Blouses, collar of Persian'colorings;
bow to match; crystal buttons
6.95
Special Note:
Any garment purchased from stock, or ordered from
our custom order department DELIVERED
POSITIVELY SATURDAY. IF DESIRED.
Dainty Easter Parasols
Unique models in the newest effects, colors and
combinations, including the latest Paris novelties
La Champignon La Sonnet Palm La Cnprice
comprising Floral, Bulgarian, Persian nnd Black rind
Whito Stripe Silks, Shadow Lace and Chiffon. Also
Carriage and Automobile Parasols. An unusunl variety
of double-faced effects, Pongee. Plain Color Tnffeln Silks,
Floral and Dresden Silks, also Hand-embroidered Linen
2.50 4.85 5.50 11.75 17.50
FIFTH AVENUE
Fourth Floor
Junior Misses and Girls
to 1 8 years
Many Imported Noveltiej, as well as garments
from our own dressmaking department.
New Cutaway Model Suits
Of English Serge and Black and Whit Check Worsted;
well-tailored. 14 to 18 years . 25.00 29.50
Imported Suits
In all tho now materials and colorings, including fancy
and plain Wool Epon?e, Bedford Cord, English Serge,
Black and White Check Worsted and Wool Brocade.
In models which include the French and Bulgarian
Blouse effect-). 14 to 18 years ' 35.00 39.50 49.50
Crepe de Chine Dresses
lu the new draped effects. French colorings. 14 to 18yrs 25.00
Matelasse Coats
Silk lined. Colors: briok, terra cotta, white and corn
flower blue. 14 to 18 years 25.00
Coats of Imported
Bouclo Wool Eponge nnd
smart, well-tailored model.
French Cotton Crepe Dresses
Trimmed with Bonnaz embroidery. Colors: white,
pink, cadet and chamois. 14 to 18 years 16.75
Sport Coats
In Wool Checks and Plain Cloth, in the new belted
enects. i4 to 18 years 12.50
Tan Covert, silk lined.
14 to 18 years 22.50
Third Floor
Children' sJJnderwaists and
Growing Girls' Corsets
We specialize in all styles.
Underwaists for Children 6 mos. to 14 years.
Growing Girls' Corsets
In Batiste; low and medium bust.
' Third Floor
Baby Wear
Low Neck andlShort Sleeve Dresses
Of fine Nainsook; neck and sleeves trimmed with ribbon
and beading. 6 mos. to 2 years. Special,
Yoke Dresses
Of fine tucks, embroidered dots and featherstitching;
lace insertion in center; neck and sleeves finishe I with
lace. 6 mos. to 2 years Special,
Russian Dresses
Made of fine Lawn; tuck with blue hemstitching.
I tp 3 years Special,
Fine Serge Coats
Double breasted with large white pearl buttons, box
back with strap; detachable collar and cuffs of pique
with embroidered scallopiug. Navy, cadet and white.
1 3 years Special,
Coats of Fancy Stripe Materials
Double breasted with notch collar of satin
50c
50c
1.10
4.25
1 to 3 years 5,75
Coats of Fine Serge
Box plaited with patent leather belt; notched collar of
velvet. In navy only. I to 3 years
4.50
Full assortment of Cojored Tub Dresses in all the new
wash materials. Also a full line of Bloomer Suits
and Separate Bloomers, at moderate prices.
Children's Night Drawers
A complete Btock in Light nnd Heavy Muslin,
Cambric, French Crepe and. Knit Garments
Fourth Floor
Children's Easter Novelties
In pur Toy Department
Fancy piljed Baskets, Fancy Filled and Unfilled
Easter Eggs, Chickens, Kabbits, etc.
Map a Full Line of
Easter Cards, Booklets and Postal Cards
And a Complete Line of Toys
At Thirty-Fifth Street
lie
SUES COL. WEBB FOR $10,000
Woman l-riicr.a Nrrvrr Snym
llmiairil llpr Houghl?.
Sirs. Ilallln Illenenfi'lcl. n process server,
bcKati suit yi'sterduy against Col, CI.
CrolKhton Webb of tho Hoffman Arms. ti
.MnillHon avenue, who Is n brother of Dr.
W. Reward AVpbb, to recover 110,000
damases on the, pound that Col. Webb
assaulted her when he tried to erv hlrn
U'lth n . - ....
"iu:r m me uoirmun Arms
last Kiido nlcht.
.Mrs. Illenenffld's story, as told In the
office nf Md,enr & SleI.ear. of 116 llroud.
ay, tho attorneys who enKajjed her to
serve Pol, Webb, was that when Col. UVbb
found what 8ho w anted ho tried to elude
hef by stepplriK Into the elevator at the
Hoffman Arms. Him said that when she
persisted In following him Col. Webb tried
to push her out or tho elvtor, and theq
Kot out himself. She said that Col. Webb
handled her roughly and that he ran away
front her Into the basement ot the Hoff.
man Arms. She said she followed him and
served him. '
The order the process server says she
wave Col. Webb directed him to appear be
fore City Court Justice Lynch yesterday
mnrnlntt to testify In supplementary pro.
ceedlngs on a Judgment for 11,000 obtained
against his nephew, Jacob Cram, who (s a
cousin of Publlo Service Commissioner
Cram, by Dr. James Emmtt Murphy,
i
Col. Webb failed to appear yesterda- (r
examination and as a result Dr. Mui-ph) '
attorneys will upply to-morrow to lu
hint punlsll'd for contempt of couit
' Col, Webb said last night that he did not
appear In court because the couit .'d',r
was not served on him. IT said that l"'e
Mrs, lllenenfeld was attempting to '
him she bud tho paper In her hand mi!
and didn't try to sot In out until he i
running uway from her. lie said Mr
chars that h used hr roughly
ridiculous.
. .

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