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The Sun and the New York herald. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1920-1920, February 01, 1920, Image 3

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THE SUN AND NEW YOKK HERALD, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1920.
4- 3
LABOR Ml ASSAIL
400 Delegates, Snid to Repre
sent 1,000,000 Persons,
Meet in Albany.
STKDMAN GIVES WARNING
Sterling, Grnhnm and Russell
Hills Are Denounced in t
Resolutions.
Special Vnpaich to The Sex Nsw Yon:
Hriut.o.
Albany. Jan. 31. Four hundred dele
gates from labor organizations through
out tho State met hero this nftcrnoon to
protest against tho ousting" of tho Ave
Socialist Assemblymen from Icw York.
About 12S organizations In New York
city were represented, besides seventy
five others throughout tho Stato, nggre
jatlng, according to Joseph O. Cannon,
chairman, approximately 1,000,000 mem-
I'M.
Tho convention call announced that
the meeting would bo called to preserve
iriresenlative C'vernnicnt, American
liberties as esempllfled in tho principles
of frci speech, free press and tho right
of arsrinblngo and to protest against
Government by Injunction.
Seymour Stedman, the Chicago lawyer'
who for the last week has acted as
chief counsel for tho Socialist Assembly
men, declared that the Assembly's action
was prompted purely by political mo
tives, and ho warned tho delegates that
tho assurance of tho perpetuation of
their' liberties lay In tho strength o'
their Industrial organization. ,
The Sterling and Graham Anti-Sedition
bills now before Congress, and tho Hus
sell measure before thn Lcglslaturo
were assailed ns un-Aniorlcan and con
trary to tho fundamental principles of
freo speech. .Stedman, after reletting
tho Assembly charges against tho, So
cialist members, warned the delegates
that they must' fight gag law In America,
insist on representative government, lib
erty of speech and tho right of workers
to lay down their tools and strike when
ever such a course was necessary.
William MacDonald, editor of The
Nation, came as a representative of Os
wald Garrison Vlllard. Ha told the as
semblage that because of tho pending
antl-Eeditlon bills tho rights of the
American peoplo wero in greater peril
than over before, He protested against
thn continued censorship of mail matter.'
Half a dozen resolutions condemning
tho Assembly's action, assailing tho Gov
ernment's use of nnti-sirlko Injunctions
and protesting ngninst tho .Sterling, Gra
ham and Russell bills wero adopted
unanimously and copies wero ordered to
be sent to every member of tho 'Legisla
ture. A suggestion to Impeach those
rosponslblo for the suspension of tho
flvo Socialist Assemblymen wao voted
down with tho explanation that it could
not.be expected that the Assembly mem
bers would Impeach themselves.
Counsel for tho Socialist Assemblymen
said to-night that it was their under
standing that tho Judiciary Committee
lawyers- would requlro another week In
which to present evidence. Tho Social
1st attorneys, however, expressed the
belief that the defenco would not require
more than one week. H was said that
each suspended member as well ns for
mer Socialist Assemblyman would take
tho stand and explain his reasons for
voting on each measure whero his, vote
has been attacked.
'RED FORUM ENDS;
DR. GRANT YIELDS
Cburcli of Ascension Rector
Agrees to Bar Radicalism
From His Meetings,
BISHOP APPROVES PLAN
Agreement Drawn by Vestry
men Limits Programmo to One
Speaker Each Sunday.
The most sensational controversy that
the Episcopal Church of this city has
known in many a day camo to an end
yesterday, with tho announcement that
tho night Itcv. Charles Sumner Burch,
Bishop of tho New York Diocese, had
approved a plan Submitted to him by
the vestrymen of tho Church of the As
cension, Fifth avenue and Tenth street,
whereby tho Sunday night forum held In
that ediftco Is to bo completely purged
of "Ited" radicalism.
The plan, which has been acceded to
by the Itcv. Dr. Percy Stickncy Grant,
rector of the parish, Is virtually a sur
render by that clergyman to hla ecclesi
astical superior. Ills indorsement of it
was obtained by the vestrymen only
after It had become apparent to tho rec
tor that ho could not continue his
forum as he had done In Iho past In
the face of tho expressed disapproval
of the Bishop and In violation of tho
church canons.
Under the terms of the agreement he
will bo at liberty to Invite laymen of
prominence to address his Sunday night
4 '
ItlMkst
lUuch longer
if you Use
Ulith it.
Your Grocer
congregations, ns he lias done in the
past, but It will be necessary for him
to submit tho namo of each proposed
speaker to a committee of the vestry
men in advance, and they n turn will
bo obliged to submit it to tho Bishop
and obtain his license for tho address,
The custom of permitting various per
sons In tho audle;icu to deliver brief
iduresse.i at the conclusion or tho ttilK
given by tho principal speaker of the
evening Is to ho abandoned, this cus
torn was Inaugurated by Dr. Grant, ana
lie was bitterly opposed to giving It up,
but the privileges extended these speak
ers had been abused so outrageously by
them on various occasions nnd ao ire.
quently had been used for voicing
SAYS BOLSHEVIST FIRES
WILL SWEEP ALL EUROPE
Continued All This Week
ANNUAL SALE
i
of
Quality Furs
OUR ENTIRE STOCK
At Greatly Reduced Prices
J -furriers
384 Hfth Avenue
BET. 35TH & 36TH STS.
HANAN
For
t FINAL CLEARANCE
We have placed on ,
SALE
Among our Stores as listed below
1 2,000 Pairs
Continued from First Page.
the wronj? basis but the wrong spirit," lie said. "V'ou cunuot' deprive
a nation of the fruit of its work and then feed it temporarily as an act of
philanthropy. The world cannot bo rebuilt in such a way.
"A few days ago I received n cablo despatch from James V. Gerard,
formerly your Ambassador to Germany. He said that there was some
money left from a movement started before America entered tho war
and designed to relieve suffering in Germany. He said It now could bo
used for the purpose originally intended. 'I suggested that ho buy milk
in America and send It to German babies in the name of charity. While the
ipeace treaty takes away 1G0.000 German milch cows I It Is all sheer
hypocrisy !
"Once there was a Russian who kept bees. He bought a new hive,
but made the entry silts so small that the bees could not enter it. Then,
when they would not. ami could not. enter tho hive, lie took his knout and
struck them, killing many of them. Some of the bees stung him, but none
of them went into the hive because the silts were too small for them to
pass through.
''So it is with Europe to-day. Germany cannot. live without 'her coal,
her food, her raw materials. The only way that civilization and Europe
can be redeemed is for America to come quickly with help and with a
spirit sho 1ms not yet shown a spirit to help us and to help nil Europe.
"And then the Entente must accept us as co-workers In reconstructing
the devastated regions on terms which nre feasible and tolerable. Itlght
now I do not sec that this help will come."
Hcrr von Gwiuncr sbrugpted his shoulders impulsively. j
"Do you know Goethe's 'Faust?'" he asked. i
" 'That which I receive, that must I faithfully report,' " he quoted. I
blasphemy and sedition that tho Bishop
would not give, his sanction to any con
tlnuance of the policy. '
Another vital pont on which the rec
tor has yielded Involves tho prnctlco of
permitting persons In the audience to
submit written questions for tho sneak
ers to answer from tho platform. "Ueds"
frequently have worded these questions
In such a manner that they "wore able
tn got their most violent doctrines read
to tho congregation", and the reading of
questions relating to anarchistic and I.
W. W. principles have been mado tho
occasion for demonstrations of approval
by radicals In tho pews.
In tho future, Dr. Clrant has agreed,
tho chairman at the Sunday night meet
ings shall not permit tho reading or an
swering of any question thnt he consid
ers Impropor, nnd this Insidious form of
propaganda will ho aono away wun
completely.
The agreement was drawn by aeorge
Gordon Battle. Junior warden of the
church, with tho collaboration of Harold
A. Content and John W. Cunningham,
vestrymen, who acted with him on a
special commltteo of threo thnt had been
selected to bring about a peaceful set
tlement of tho row that had been raging
for several weeks past. ,
Sir. Battle and tho two vestrymen sun
mltted It In substanco to Bishop Burch
on Friday afternoon nt his residence on
Amsterdam avenue, nnu placed it pernre
Dr. Grant yesterday morning at a con
ference held Jn the rectory of the church.
It was then put to a voto of the vestry
nnd unanimously approved, Dr. Grant,
who had held out persistenly for the old
tvno of forum service. Joining with the
others In voting for the adoption of the
new plan.
After this the terms ot the agreement
were Incorporated In n letter which Mr.
Battle sent to tho Bishop by moclnl mes
senger. This letter Kpcclfled "thnt In
tho body of the church on Sunday even
ings a religious servlcn bo held, such
servlco to bo of tho same character as
Is now held hoforo the address; that
after tho religious service an address be
delivered; (ind that after tho address
written questions be handed up; it be
ing understood that any question con
sidered Improper by the chairman shall
not be read or Answered by tho spenker;
that tjioro shall not bo tho short speeches
heretofore had after tho main address,
and thnt there ha no meeting held nfter
word In, tho parish house." It thcroupon
went Into details as to tho selection of
tho speakers nnd submission of their
names to tho Bishop In advance with tho
request thnt ho Issuo a license.
He remarked that Thomas It. Chad
bourne, In speaking at tho forum a few
weeks ago, had stated that If Its exist
ence wero ever Imperilled ho would back
It with all his resources. 'This would
bo n good tlmo for lilm, to come through,"
tho vestryman remarked. Efforts to In
terview Mr. Cliadbourne on tho matter
yesterday wero unsuccessful.
Tho letter of tho vestrymen brought
o the Bishop's attention tho fact that
Sldnoy A, Itcovo had been Invited to
addresn the church to-night in place
or Francis it. Sisson. vice-president of
tho Guarnnty Trust Company, who was
to linve spoken there, but who Is said to
bo out of town. Tho proceedings, it was
added, will bu conduced in accordance
with the terms of the agreement.
Immediately upon receiving nnd rend
ing thla lcttor Bishop Burch notified Mr.
Battle that tho plan Incorporated In It
was satisfactory to him.
llnrcelona Kick nt HIrIi ltrntn.
Barcelona (Friday), Jan. 31. Re
cent ndvanccs In rents announced by
landlords hero are occasioning consider
able complaint. H ,U said thnt In eomo
cases rates wero raised 00 per cent.
Klectrlo servlco compnnles In the city
havo raised their' tariffs 20 per cent.
HAAN'S.
FORMERLY PARK R0W BLDG
Opens To-Morrow
At 290 Broadway, Cor. Reade St. Dan Bldg,
This famous old Park Row Restaurant, one of New
York's noted dining places, Invites its many friends to'
enjoy at tho new location tho same high standards of
culsino and service which havo made it a downtown
institution.
TO EXCOMMUNICATE PRIESTS.
Holy See Will Act Airalnut Bohem
ian Uefuriulsla,
Bonn, Jan. 31. Tho Holy Seo has do
elded to excommunicato tho Bohemian
Reformist priests who are separating
from tho Vatlcari and forming a Czccho
Slovak national church.
A wireless despatch from Prague early
la' tho present month said tho Society
of Reformist Priests of Prague, by n
vote of 140 to 60, had decided to sep
arate from tho Vatican and form U
Czccho-Slovak national church.
Demands Unit an Moi'tnllst Trial.
The Central Ffderatd Union In reso-j
lutlons adopted yesterday demanding
tho seating of tho flvo Socialist Abbciii-,
blyraen, described tho trial as a travesty
avl a farce, and said It was "alleged",
to be conducted for furthering political,
nmbltlona of a group of men, nnd the.
uso of Stato funds In their Interest The
labor organization formally called upon,
tho Assembly to end tho proceeding to4
save tho taxpayeru' money 'and lticir
from disgrace.
Urnlierifcr Continue! t Improve.
llERM.f, Jan. 31. Matiitan Urssiorsor, I
Mlnlrter of Finance, who was wounded
by nn assassin last Monday, received
a number of visitors yesterday. Ills
condition was Improved, he had no
fever and his heart action showed
hardly any nbnormal symptoms.
ANNOUNCEMENT
i
We have for disposal the contents of the
complete library of the late
COLONEL JAMES D. BELL,
well-known lawyer of Brooklyn. Col. Bell
was a collector of rare books in Americana
(particularly the Civil War), Constitutional
History, English History and Govern
ment, the Classics, original and trans
lations, philosophy, archaeology, litera
ture, travel, general history, biography,
law, etc., etc'. There are about 7,000 books
and pamphlets in this collection, Col. Bell hav
ing been ti collector for over forty years.
The books have been marked at attractive
prices, And this rare opportunity to obtain
gems from this famous collection is offered 'to
our customers.
r On sale at our store
fieginning Monday, February 2d
Tpoms & Eroo, Inc.
Booksellers
50 John St., N. Y.C.
Phone John 4825-26 ,
No catalogue will be issued
t v jz'vv j0vv ui v
i.
OF
WOMEN'S BOOTS
in all leathers and styles of heels.
7,000 Pairs 5,000 Pairs
$12.40 $&85
Value from $14.00 to $24.00
, The $9.85 lot includes several broken lines of Low Shoes and
Evening Slippers. All shoes are from our winter stock and
represent" savings which probably never again will be offered.
516 Fifth Ave., cor. 43d St. 1095 Broadway, at 23d St.
JJ Wth Ave, at 37th St 297 Broadway, at Duane St.
255 Broadway, cor. 31st St. 205 Broadway, cor. Fulton St.
1391 Broadway, cor. 38th St. 35 Nassau St., cor. Liberty St.
438 Fulton St., Brooklyn
Good Shoes Are An Economy
SHOES
TNTRODUCING THE MISS -iFROM
SIX TO SIXTEEN TO
ART IN DRESS as interpret
ed BY THE HOUSE OF COLLINS
The Jfynes of Qirlhood
YOU cannot, says Ruskin, dress women beautifully un
less you inculcate the love of good taste in them in
their childhood. And Herbert Spencer says with equal
force that the qualities acquired in youth remain unchanged
throughout one's life.
In harmony with this educational doctrine the House of
Collins takes the pioneer step in dressing the miss from the
ages of six to -sixteen in correct lines, thus laying the, founda
tion for the right lines of the mature figure.
That mastery of line which has made Collins otrt in Dress
notable for women of two continents has now been applied,
wjth equal success, to clothes for children and the smart miss.
Every model is original and designed for the individual figure
since the miss from six to sixteen has her individuality.
She now makes her debut in Collins dress symbolizing the
ineffable sweetness of girlhood sculptured in flowing and beau
tiful lines.
J
1
9
Our newly inaugurated Misses Saontvill be permanently located at
fflne East Fifty Seventh Street;
7
urs
wmm in OiMinY
OlffllClVE INSTYLR
Annual Reduction
20 Discount
On the Entire Stock
C. G. Gunther's Sons
391 Fifth Avenue
Furriers ExclusiOcly lor Ninety-Nine Years
VERY IMPORTANT
UNRESTRICTED PUBLIC SALES
AT THE
American Art Galleries
Madison Square South, New York
. TO BE SOLD TO-MORROW (MONDAY)
and Tuesday Evenings at 8:15 o'Clock
MR. JOHN BOLAND'S ETCHINGS
By Buhot,(Fitton, Haden, Jacque, Legros, Palmer
and other Modern Masters
ON FREE VIEW BEGINNING WEDNESDAY OF THIS WEEK
RELICS AND MEMORABILIA OF
GEORGE WASHINGTON
CONSISTING OF
ORIGINAL LETTERS AND DOCUMENTS, STATUARY,
MEDALLIONS, SNUFFBOXES, WATCHES, CLOCKS,
EARLY AMERICAN SILVER AND OTHER RELICS
OR MEMORABILIA OF OR RELATING TO
GEORGE WASHINGTON
TO BE SOU BV ORDER OP
MR. WILLIAM LANIER WASHINGTON
On Friday and Saturday, February 6th and 7th, 1920,
at 3:00 o'Clock in the Afternoon
'.Uluitratrd Catalogue mailed on receipt of one dollar.
ON FREE VIEW BEGINNING THURSDAY OF THIS WEEK
The Exceptionally Important Collection of
,.Rare and Valuable
JAPANESE COLOR PRINTS
TOGETHER WITH A FEW
PAINTINGS OF THE UKIYOE SCHOOL
FORMED BY THE WIDELY KNOWN CONNOISSEUR
ARTHUR DAVISON FICKE, Esq.,
AUTHOR OF "CHATS ON JAPANESE PRINTS," "TWELVE JAPANESE
PAINTERS' AND OTHER WORKS
"It l not too much to say that the collection 1. easllr the molt Important
that haa ever been offered at public sale In the United Stales. This If not
only because or lta greater treasures nhlch cannot tall to excite active
competition but rather because of lta general high average and the fact
that every print haa been selected by a collector of discrimination, taste,
knowledge and judgment." FREDERICK W. UOOK1N.
TO BE SOLD ON THE AFTERNOONS AND EVENINGS OF
Tuesday and Wednesday. February 10th and 11th,
at 2:30 o'Clock and 8:15 o'Clock
.The Catalogue, which haa been prepared by Mr. Arthur Davlion Flrlt.
and Illustrated by fine half-tone reproductions, nlll be mailed to applicants
on receipt of Tvto Dollar.
ALSO ON FREE VIEW BEGINNING THURSDAY 6f THIS
WEEK 7
RARE ANTIQUE
FAIENCES AND LUSTRES
Rakka, Persian, Hispano-Moresquo Faiences, Italian Majolicas,
Persian and Indian Miniature and Rugs, Egyptian, Ptolemaic,
Sidonian, Roman and Arabic Glass, Greek and Roman bronzes
and Marbles, and, other objects of rarity.
BELONGING TO THE EXPERTS
MESSRS. KOUCHAKJI FRERES
NEW YORK CITY
To Be Sold on Friday and Saturday Afternoons,
February 13th and 14th
Beginning Each Afternoon at 2:30 o'Clock '
.Illustrated Catalogue mailed on receipt of One Dollar.
The Sales Will Be Conducted by Mr. THOMAS E. KIRBY
anl his assistants, MR. OTT BERNET and MR. II. II. PARKE.
AMERICAN ART ASSOCIATION, Managers
Madison Sq. soutn. entrance 0 c zaa street. New xoric
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