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The Sun and the New York herald. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1920-1920, April 19, 1920, Image 3

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THE STJR AM) NEW YORK HERALD, MONDAY,- AP&L-19, 1920.
'BRITAIN SUBJECT TO
FINANCIAL MADNESS'
Xord llolhermcro roints a
(Jloomy Picture and Demands
Iteturn to Sanity.
jfBEI) NO MORE MANDATES
GERMANY'S REAL MILITARY PLANNED
PERIL IS ECONOMIC
Continued from Flrit Pair,
Sees Possibility of Gonciu
Bankruptcy and Denounces
Expensive Colonics.
c..t r,ih!t nttnatet. to TllE c AND Sw
Yokk !lr.Bti.n Copyright, 15M. by Tue 9oM
... Nrnr Ynnlt Hrail.D.
London, April 18. Never Ims a fiscal
.....nn nrnnawl such ronular Interest
JliturMi. " -
thnt which Austen Chamticriain
riianecUor of the Exchequer,wM offer
i tho House of Commons to-morrow,
-i.n hn introduces tho budeet. Details
df the iiroposed mensuro are Uclne'closely
..i,.r.if-,l. Uusincss. from tho largest fi
nancial deals to retail sales of liquor, la
held up until we ueiaiis 01 mu nw imw
am wealed.
Tir neems central ncrecment tiiat
the Government must raise a hundred
million pounds sterling In new taxes. It
is predicted that there will be two penny
letter postage, an increase in ..-(, n,n
and telephone rates and taxes on wines,
mirli mill automobiles.
inl Rothermere. brother of Lord
Northdlfle, in a signed article In lita
newspaper tiie Sunday Pleural, paints
the gloomiest picture of the situation
and demands a return to financial san
ity. He det.tunces new Imperial ad
ventures in the Near East and else
where.
"Wo do not want moro mandates,'
he declares, and compares tho present
financial position of the Government
with what it was in the mqst desperate
lime of the European war.
Every Government Reckless.
"Financially, wa arc In the period of
the battle of tho Sommo in July, 1916,"
he says. "I know no precedent for tho
recklessness with which every Govern
ment In Europe Is refusing to recognize
the possibility of general bankruptcy.
The estimates are framed In a spirit
which suggests that Europe has had
Borne marvelous accession of wealth In
ibtead of having largely destroyed the
wealth of her productivity. So Inverted
has this process of reasoning become
that one group among us positively
reckons the war debt aa an asset.
"Our external policy shows signs of
the dementia which prevails everywhere.
While France Is entering on enterprises
in Syria; while Greece Is avowedly ready
to march Into the interior ot Asia Minor
and simultaneously keep the Bulgurs out
of Thrace, and while Poland, with an
empty cash box, maintains her troops in
a territory far beyond her natural fron
tiers, we aro certainly not sotting them
a better example."
Lord Rothermere declares that the oc
cupation of Constantinople Is utterly fu
tile as a means of stopping the Clllclan
massacres and denounces the policy of
holding Mesopotamia nt n cost of more
than 2O,ftj0,0Q0 pounds sterling nnd Pales
tine and Egypt at a cost of more than
J2,(X.(i pounds sterling. He declares
that tho new budget will be Sra.OOO.OOO
pounds sterling more than what Mr.
"hamberlain sets down as the expend!
'urea for a normal year, which excesa
coea not take Into account 60,000,000 In
crest accumulating on what Great Brit
;iln owes the United States. He assorts
that the army budget will run well over
3,OM.0 pounds sterling and announces
V, e want no more mandates! The Gov
rnment la Instrusted with a mandate
'or Great Britain, and It is its duty to
lulfll It, instead of creating a daln. o'f
ir.en ana money 10 inese distant lands."
Civil Service Expenses. ,
He bitterly denounces the Increase in
civil service expense over before-the
war costB of 500,000,000 pounds sterling
and says: "This makes a mockery of
'he recent Supreme Council declaration,
"Necessary measures must be initiated
n every country to balance recurrent
Government expenditure with national
income.
Kothermere calls subsidies of various
Muds totalling 200,000,000 pound the
most dangerous of all Government
policies, but Insists that the British out
look Is "sunshine Itself compared with
that of France, Italy and the new States
of Europe. The promised German In
demnity has become a figment of the
Imagination In consequence of the col
lapse of German exchange, apart from
other difficulties. If Germany handed
ver to France her whole national rev
nue this year It would not materially
lessen the intensity of the necessity cf
rur ally.
"If there Is daylight anywhere, 1 can-
i.oi see it," Lord Rothermere continues.
Western civilization is far more rickety
to-day than It was a year ago, and
Iracherous paper money keeps it in be-
in?, out Is no bulwark against the crash
that Is menacing all alike. It Is true
that In the cool, temperate minds of our
people we have an asset of greater value
than any gold reserve. We may even
hurvlve the shock of nations toppling
over all around us, but we will do so
only if the Government realizes that we
ore Immeasurably poorer than we were
Mx years ago. We must choose between
solvency and downfall and choose
iiulckly."
Two moro budgets such as Mr.
' hamberlain Intends to Introduce to
morrow may mean our extinction as an
rnplre or a great Power. They would
Imply famine and ruin, for a bankrupt
People dopendent for the bulk of their
food upon others cannot hope to ro-tover."
Mnt liaise Billion Founds.
Despite the gloomy predictions of
Lord rtothermere, Sunday newspapers
usually well informed on administration
matters are hopeful on the budget pros
tata, but banking and commercial cir
cle are nervous over tho Income and
"cess profits taxes.
It Is generally predicted that tho
oudget will contain a straight out out
line of the actual financial situation,
otrraslng the burden of the floating debt,
outlining tho principles upon which this
Mian be funded and a sinking fund es
tablished with the payment of the bulk
of war costs In fifty years.
Tha consensus of pxtlmntpn nt fh
total to bo raised Is a billion pounds
rtefllng, involving possibly aa much as
i200.O00.00O in new taxes. Had
tal reforms such as a levy on cap
"i and important reductions In the
'stlmatcj, especially the army and navy
'if clv" servlce, aro anticipated,
e Chancellor Is expected to unfold
proposals f the immediate Increase of
axei on incomes of over 1,000 an
nually, modifications on smaller In
femes. substitution of a straight profits
'or an excers profits tax and new taxes
tug fortunes increased by death.
LANCASHIRE WEAVERS TO QUIT
IVr Cent. AVnue Advnnce De
manded l.r'250,000 Operatives.
lJucKnun.v. England. April IS. At ft
Mtlnit to-night of delegates represent
In every section of the weaving; branch
' tho Lancashire cotton Industry. It
defld " tender strike noto to
in n. comi,ll!"'"! of the demand for a
" per ront increano In wages.
k- arf?;Ylr.or1V",ll!cn "JWatiVM will
affectd by the move.
liostllties in 1914. Ho wns then on hla
way homo from Squth Africa nnd was
finally released on account of dlplomatlo
privileges. Ho had been a Ilhode.t
scholar at Oxford.
After returning to Germany ho nerved
as an aviator on the Russian front for a
year, nnd was then recalled and attached
to tho Berlin Foreign Office, where ho
had chnrgo of the arrangements for
rending Nikolai I.enlno from Geneva to
Ilussla. Ho participated In tho Brest
Lltovsk negotiations nnd wns prlvnto
secretary to Dr. von Zlmmermann when
the latter was Foreign Secretary.
He escorted Ambassador Gerard from
Berlin to I he Swiss frontier when dlplo
matlo relations betweon tho United
States and Germany were severed. Later,
after the crash, ho wiw assistant to Han
icl von Halmhausen on tlin Armistice
CommlslKon at Spa, succeeding Herr
van Hnlnhausen In that work. Ho
is now attached to the Borlln Foreign
Ollice on duty in connection with the
Allenstcln plebiscite,
Count von Ow-Wnchendorff was an
intimate of the German Crown Prince,
of Prlnco Henry of Prussia nnd of othor
members of the Hohcuzollorn house, of
Count Mettcrnlch nnd of Dr. Solf. Hla
father Is a wealthy landowner, Desplto
theso connections, however, ho now pro
fesses to bo an International Socialist
and thoroughly In accord with the So-1
clnllst doctrines of the German republl
can Government,
"I stood with Mettcrnlch and Solf In
the latter's house, in Wllhchnstranse on
tho evening of November 9, 191S, when
tho first revolutionary armored cars.
flying the red flag, dashed by," he said
Metternlch turned to me and said: J
am glad that I lived to sec the dawn
ot this new dajv, It means tho end of
all monarchies. You will llvo to seo
tho new era flourlbh.'
nermann Done With Itatserism
"Ho was right. Tho German peoplo
aro definitely finished with Kalserlsm.
The fee ne of German nationality is
almost none.
'After all, Germany was the home or
Karl Marx. Now Marx has come into
his own. Seventy-flvo per cont. of all
property goes to the "Government to.
day. Tho rest measures tho unused
wealth of Germany.
To-day Germany Is thinking only
economics. She Is thinking In terms
of continents, llko Goethe, not ot na
tions. So lone as the world prospers
the prosperity of an Individual nation
does not matter.
"DesDlto the size of the pre-war Ger
man Industrial structure Germany hat
no raw material to feed It; and as u re
sult this structure Is now prostrate.
The Krupp works In Essen are In des-
oerato need of peace time won: on
farm machinery. But there are no raw
materials to start this work. This is
typical of all German Industry to-day.
It s d fflcult to get money to ouy tooa
and therefore tho peoplo are willing to
turn to nny alleged panacea, from 1J01
shovlsm to militarism, although the
latter Is confined to the Ilelchswelir
crowd.'"
Count von Ow-Wachendorff was not
without Iiodo regarding the German
situation, however. Although he In
slated that tho economic clauses of the
Treaty of Versailles and particularly
those relating to coal must be modi
fied, he declared that thf situation, in
Germany was no worse that that which
existed In Prance in 18 0.
COUP WITH WORKERS
Socialists ttovoalcd Plot
Chancellor, Who Arrested
Leaders.
to
CONFERENCE HELD EAHLY
Itovclation of Scheme Permit
ted Arrest of Keichswohr
Officers in a Bunch.
IVnnt "World Economic Leairne.
The Count said that the opinion in
Germany was not In favor of a political
League of Nations, but Instead was for
an economic league with real power
to socialize control of all production,
lint as Herbert Hoover controlled and
allocated the allied food supply. Ho
defended Germnny against the charge ot
having started the war and declared tnat
the German Foreign Office had positive
Information that Russia, intended to at'
lurV f!prmnv In 1913.
He admitted that It was clumsy of
Germany to lot America into the war,
as her hearty cooperation with tho En
tente Allies won the victory Dy aiding
In the blockade ngalnst Germany and
helnlntr break the German blockade
arnlnst Encland.
Aa proof of his declaration that
there was no possibility of restoring
the old faction he asserted that a ma
jority of the most distinguished Im
perialists now are living, impuiesant, in
obscurity, including Frince iienry 01
Prussia, near Kiel: the Grand Duke of
Itaden. at Freiburg, and the King of
Wurttemburg, ns a private citizen in a
little Wurttemburg village.
BRANTING OUTLINES
SWEDEN'S POLICY
Social Reforms to Be Investi
gated by Mtntstry.
Stockholm. April 18. HJalmarBrant-
Inc. Sweden's new Prime Minister and
chief of the first purely socialistic Cabi
net in Europe, gave to a.correspondent
of tho Associated Press an outline of his
Government's policy.
"This Government is for the whole ot
tho people," he Bald, "and not a party
Government Regarding the socializa
tion of certain branches of production
and commerce and action toward Indus
trial -democracy we will propose the
setting up of committees to investigate
such questions, and such committees set
.. In. HnvurnmAnt will nnt 1A mm
posed entirely of friends of such eociall
legislation, but able men or otner opin
ion and other classes will also be placed
on the commissions."
Regarding the restoring of commer
cial relations with Russia, M. Brantlng
said that Sweden was much in favor of
such restoration, but must take Into con
sideration the position of America,
France and England. He added: "It
Is not our business to define what sort
of Government tho Russian people
shouia havo."
By 1XAVMOND SWING.
Staff Corrttpondtnt of Tnr. Srx ano Nr.w
yoit!CiHEHAt.P. CovyrioM, lOIO, by Tits Hen
and new Ynnic Herald.
Bkrlin, April 18. An interesting
sidelight on the arrest of several off!
cers of tho Itclchswehr in the offices
of tho Ministry of Defence, while they
were discussing: with workers a plot
to establish n military labor dictator
ship, is reported by the Frelheit, which
says that tho plot was revealed 'to
Chancellor Mueller bv Socialists.
About a fortnight ago Comrade
wegmann was invited to meet off!
qers of the Heichswehr to discuss
means whereby the militarists and
revolutionary labor might cooperate.'
tho rrelhclt rays. "WeRtnann declined
to accept the Invitation, and yet
conference was held curly in April
which was attended by Iieut. Erhardt,
chief of the Erhardt brigade and who
was a participant in the Kapp revolt.
A second conference was held ion April
8. Wo name as among those present
Gen. Eborhardt, Capt.-Llout. Altvuter
and Major Stuelpnagel, as well as
homo workers. The topic of the (lis
ctisslon was the possibility of nn agree
ment between tho officers and tho
workers.
Workers Demand Action.
"Tho workers demanded nctlon on
tho basis of workers' councils. The
officers proposed representation by
their own profession. Then the sub
ject of arming labor was broached
Altvater accepted tho proposal that
the military formations should be com
posed half of labor, which held out the
prospect of arming 300.000 workers,
However, ho promised to give a more
accurate estimate at the next meet nc.
uartrnm, one or tno workers .who
participated in this meeting, sought out
Wegmann, whom he found at tho head
quarters of the workers' councils. Weg
mann again declined to meet the Rcichs-
wehr officers, but finally agreed to re
ceive them In his home and, if possible,
learn their real Intentions. A Llout
Blebhan, who attended it, declared that
tho cooperation of the Heichswehr and
tho workers was essential If civil war
was to be averted.
"Wegmann expressed distrust of tho
sincerity of the officers; saying that if
It was really tme that they had changed
their minds they must find a way of
saying so openly. The officers refused
to make a public statement, however,
declaring that such a course would re
veal prematurely their plans. i
"Altvater said that on an appointed
day workers throughout Germany must
go to weapon depots and then they
could establish a proletarian dictator
ship. But all operations must be con
ditioned on discipline, and youths must
be disarmed.
Ume Worker to Help.
"Bleihan suggested that Wegmann
write handbills addressed to the sol
diers which would prepare them to co
operate with tho workers, saying that
meanwhile he would write some articles'
for publication In the Relchswehr news
paper. Great secrecy was promised and
the next meeting was net for Thursday,
when they' would assemble In the offices
of tho Ministry of Defence. It wns
promised that 'rellablo representatives'
of the Independent and Majority Social
ists should bo present. Wegmann took
a leading comrade Into his confidence,
who advised him not to attend the
meeting, and who carried the story to
tho Chancellor, and the arrests of
Thursday followed,"
REICHSWEHR MUST
QUIT RUHR APRIL 24
German Government Orders
Tin Troops Out of Neu
tral Zone.
FRENCH LAND ON
ASIA MINOR COAST
Disembark Three Battalions,
hut Unable to Go Bcj'ond
Range of Gnns.
ARMENIANS WIPED OUT
SSunicir. April 18. According to
Wolff Bureau despatch from Berlin, the
German Government has ordered tho
Relchswehr to evacuate the neutral zone
In tho Ruhr region on April 24.
Bebltn. April 18. The Chief of Pollco
of Berlin has directed that all arms in
tho possession of the citizen guard In
the Berlin metropolitan police district be
given up. Tho guard la declared to be
dssolved.
The Norddeutiche AUacmetoc ZeUuno
says it learns authoritatively that the
Ministry ot wo interior is nuoui to in
augurate a system for the weeding out
from tho civil service of officials who
have not unconditionally sworn nllcgl
anco to the constitution.
The newspaper usscrts that the mild
verdict in the cases of Prince Joachim
Albrecht of Prussia and others In con
nectlon with the attacks mado on mem:
bers of tho French mission In tho dining
room of tho Hotel Adlon apparently has
stimulated the Government to extend
tho combing out process to Include the
Judiciary. The Judge who presided at
the Joachim Albrecht case also officiated
ut the recnt libel suit of Mathlas Erz
berger against Dr. Karl Helfferlch. Tho
newspaper says this Judge Is strongly
suspected of having reactionary leanings.
Frankfort, April 18. Tho French an
nounccd this morning that the wltlv
drawal of the Thirty-seventh Division to
Wiesbaden had been completed with the
exception of Btaf officers, who are leav-
ng this afternoon.
The division Included tho Moroccan
nnd Algerian troops, whoso presence in
Frankfort was greatly resented by the
populace. No colored soldiers are here
now.
Paris, April 18. The Echo tie Paris
says that the Belgian Government has
Informed France that It adheres to the
ollectlvo communication proposed by
Great Britain to which Franco adhered
Friday, notifying Germany that the
Allies would not permit the establish
ment of a regime tho policy of which
would bo opposed to the execution of the
Peace Treaty.
LETTISH PREMIER
ESCAPES ASSASSINS
Dynamite Exploded as Car
Passes, but No One Hurt.
Lon&o.v, April 18. Another t.ensa-
tlonal attempt has been made to assassl-
rate the Lctvlan Premier, Karl Ullman,
this time while he wns engaged In an
electoral campaign,
The assailants, whom the Lctvlan au
thorities presume were Communists act
ing In concert with Russians, exploded a
quantity of dynamite nt the base of
tree beside tho road Just as the Pre
mier's motor car passed. The car es
caped without damage, however, and the
IYeinlers party, which was armed.
toped and engaged In a pistol duel with
tae assullan'.s, who fled. This was the
third attempt on the life of M. Ullman.
Wires Cut to Adnna und Na
tionalists Occupy Hadjin,
Kcmal Reports.
By the Auociatttl rrttt.
Constantinople, April 18, A French
cruiser landed throe battalions ot In
fantry, some batteries .and cavalry at
Merslna, Asia Minor, on April 14, ac
cording to an official communication
issued by Mustapha Kcmal Pasha,
leader of tho Nationalist Government
In Asia Minor. Armenlnn volunteers
covered the landing, but, says tho com
munlcatlon, wcro wiped out, and the
French wero unablo to advance f urthor
than tho protection of their naval
guns.
Reports reaching Constantinople say
that communications between Merslna
and Adana, thirty-six miles distant,
havo been discontinued for several
days.
A communication Issued to-dny by
Mustapha Kemal says the Nationalists
have occupied tho town of Iladjln, wiucn
lies a short dlstanco northwest of
Mums)..
Tho Government proposes to fight the
Nationalists by Bending bands of adher
onLt Into various districts of Anatolia to
stir un minnnrt for the Sultan. One thou
sand men already have be'en despatched
to panderma to aid Anzevour Pasna in
his butti. against Mustapha Kemal
Pasha. Others will go shortly to Trefci
zond and Samsun.
Tho Government hns abandond plans
for a general mobilization and now Is
trying voluntary nellstment. A $30
monthly wage Is being occred volun
teers, which Is about '100 times the
amount received by soldiers before the
armistice.
Great difficulty Is being experienced
in the distribution throughout Anatolia
of mandates ordering the slaughter of
rebels becauso of the fact that the Na
tionalists are largely in control. Air
planes, however, are being used to
scatter the documents where it is be
lieved they will Induce Mohammedans
to support the Sultan.
The period within which the rebels
may return to fealty to the Government,
originally fixed nt seven days, hns been
extended to seven days after the man
date has made Its appearance.
The Nationalists In Anatolia have
eliminated he Sultan's name from their
prayers, substituting that of Prince
DJemal Eddlno Pasha.
Many arrests havo been made in Con
stantinople In connection with the Na
tionalist proclamation which appeared
In many parts of. the city charging
Damad Ferld Pasha, the Grand Vizier,
with using religion as a cloak to realize
his ambitions, thus becoming tho Idol
of lnfldols, who wcro betraying the true
faith and trying to destroy national
unity. One paragraph of tho proclama
tion reads:
"Arise, young patriots, follow the
principles of the Konn, which empowers
us to fight God Is with us."
Jamaica to Han Profiteers.
London, April 18. Agitation against
profiteering fn Jamaica, British West
Indies, has becomo so widespread that
the local Government has been asked to
pass legislation similar to the English
profiteering act.
BRITAIN CONTROLS
ALL PERSIAN ARMY
Four Ministers Resign and Of
ficer 6f Commission Ends
Lifo as Result.
FOR PROTECTION OF INDIA
Generals, Colonels and Other
Field Commanders All to
Bo Englishmen.
ttntr4nl rnhU Dnoateh to Tn SDN AND Ns
- r - - - ; . . . ... a . i
Yoke. ITerald. Copyright, HOT. tt al-"
and New York Hebald,
Paris, April '18, By reason of a I
series of accords growing out of thoj
Anglo-Persian treaty, Great Britain lias
established complete control oyer the.
Persian army, according to information
Just received hero.
When the question of pproval of the
army 'scheme was brought before the
Persian Cnhlnet, four Ministers, Includ
ing tho Minister of War, resigned and
one Persian officer on the Anglo-Persian
Commission killed himself, his net caus
ing a great sensation throughout Persia,
The Persian army will consist ot 70,-
000 officers and men, the generalissimo
to be a high British officer, while a urn.
tali officer will head each divisional start.
In each regiment tho Colonel and four
other officers will be British.
French newsnnDers containing this re
port comment on it nnd say that the
Durnouo of Great Britain seems to oo
tha creation of a new Persian army, I
completely controlled by the British, and
which will servo to protect inuiu irum
anv attack from Central Asia.
The report says the Persian uamnei
Ministers who have resigned are pro-
testing against tho British scheino on
the ground that the Anglo-Persian
treaty has not been submitted to the
League of Nations or to the Persian
Parliament for approval, as one of the
treaty clauses expressly requires.
Tho agreement signed between the
British nnd the Persian governments at .
Tehran on August 9, 1919, provided
(Article IV. i :
The British Government will supply,
at tho cost of the Persian Government,
such officers and such munitions and
equipment of modern type as may be
adjudged necessary by a Joint commis
sion of military experts, British ana.
Persian, which shall assemble forthwith
for the purpose of estimating tho needs
of Persia In respect to the, formation of
uniform force which the PerBlan Gov
ernment proposes to create for tho es
tablishment and preservation of oroer
In the c6untry and on its frontiers."
In this agreement the British Govern
ment bound Itself to respect tho Inde
pendence and Integrity of Persia.
DENIKINE BEACHES I0ND0N.
Commander of Ant! - Bolshevik
Army Seeks Rest, He Say.
London, April 18. Gen. Denlklne,
former commander of the antt-Bolshcvllc
army in South Russia, reached London
last night from Constantinople.
He told interviewers he was tired and
orn out, and that ho would like to find
little house where he could rest fur
three months or so. With him were the
son and the daughter of Gen. Kornlloff,
former Russian Commander In Chief and
leader of .the revolt against the Russian
Provisional Government In the early fall
of 1917.
POLAND'S FRONTIERS
CLOSED FOR 10 DAYS
Action Due to Exchanging of
Austrian Crowns.
By tht Associated Prttt.
Warsaw, April IS. Poland -was shut
off from the world to-day. All the fron
tiers have been closed for ten days by
Government order while Austrian
crowns are exchanged and stamped.
To prevent crowns 'from being
brought to Poland by speculators during
the excharwo period railroad traffic to'
and from other countries has been sus
pended; the transport of commodities
lias been forbidden and all post, tele
graphic and tolephonlc communication
has been suspended In the casu of prl
vain Individuals.
When the process is completed marks
and crowns will be of the same value.
Heretofore tho crown has been worth 30
pfennigs more than the Polish mark,
Cnr Hit by Anotheri One Killed.
HonN'Vu,, N. v, April Is. George
Taylor, Postmaster of Arkport, was se
riously Injured and Mrs. Taylor was
killed this afternoon when tho automo
bile in which they were riding was run
down by another car between this city
and Dansvlllc. Three men who were In
the far which struck the Taylor machine
arc under arrest at Dansvllle.
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AN ASSEMBLAGE COMPARABLE WITH THE
FAMOUS
DAVANZATI PALACE COLLECTION
TO BE SOLD
AT THE AMERICAN ART GALLERIES
On the Afternoons of Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
and Saturday of This Week and Monday and Tues
day of Next Week-April 21ot, 22nd, 23rd,
24th, 261 h and 27th at 2:30 o'clock '
AND
In the Grand Ball Room of
THE HOTEL PLAZA
Fifth Avenue,, 58th to 59th Street
ON MONDAY EVENING of NEXT WEEK, April 26th,
BEGINNING PROMPTLY AT 8:30 O'CLOCK
(Admission by Card to be had Fire of the Manager!)
FINE DE MJXE ILLUSTRATED CATAI.OGVK. WIUTTEN 1IT Mil.
IIOItACE TOWNBENM, WITH AN INTUOnVCTOItY BY TIIE IJXPEIIT
NEYMOUR HE HICCI. MAILED ON HEt'EU'T OK C5.00. OnDlNAItY
EDITION Ol' CATALOGUE ONE SOLLAII.
ALSO
ON FREE VIEW 9 A. M. UNTIL 6 P. M.
The Widely Known and Remarkable Collection
OF
EARLY AMERICAN
AND
BRITISH PORTRAITS
Together with a Few Landscapes and
Historical Subjects
1 ORMEO BY THE WEIX KNOWN CONNOISSEUR, TIIE LATE
Frank Bulkeley Smith
OF WORCESTER. MASS.
WILL BE SOLD BY DIRECTION OF ADMINISTRATOR
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY EVENINGS
of This Week, April 22 and 23
Beginning at 8:30 o'clock
In the Grand Ball Room of
THE HOTEL PLAZA
Fifth Avenue, 58th to 59th St.
(Admission to the Flaza by rard, which may te had tin of the manager)
DESCRIPTIVE AND PROFUSELY" ILLt.'STltATKn riTiinnnc
MAILED ON RECEIPT OF TWO DOLLARS.
The Sales Will Be Conducted by Mr. THOMAS E. KIRBY
and his aailstontl, AIR. OTTO BERNET and MB. II. II. PARKE
of the
AMERICAN ART ASSOCIATION, Managers
Madison Sq. South, Entrance O E. 23d Street. New York,
II
Franklin Simon Boys1 Shops
' FIFTH FLOOR
Boys' Middy Suits
Good Quality Fast Color
Well Made Low Price
$AS0
'4
If there is one'reason more than another
why we like to sell a Middy Suit, it is
because a low-priced jgarment is always
the greatest test of quality. As a great
merchant once said: Show me a store that
" is dependable in the little things, and I will
show you a great store. These Middy Suits,
popular for home, dress, or school wear,
may be only 84.50 apiece, but the qual
ity is splendid. :: 'Ages J to 10 years.
Regulation Middy Models
in these combinations
White Drill vvith Navy or Cadet Collar,
or .Gray, brown, blue or green Chambray
with White Collar
Other Suits $3J5 to $JO.jO
franklin Simon & Co.
Fifth Avenue, 37th and 38th Street.
Boys' and Children's Haircutting Shop Fifth Floor
IfKl .4
' All II
1 ! 1

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