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The New York herald. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1840-1920, May 14, 1873, Image 8

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THE RED ENEMY.
Details of the Flight at
Sorass Lake.
GENERAL JACK IN COMMAND.
The Savages Again Surprise the Troops
and Are Surprised in Turn.
A VICTORY AT LAST.
ttont of the Modocs, with the Loss
of Horses and Ammunition.
OUT IN THE OPEN GROUND.
The Troops Between the Lava
Beds and the Indians.
FOUR SOLDIERS AND ONt MODOC KILLED,
Central Davis Confident of Ris Ability to
Exterminate the Enemy.
THE SOUTHWEST INDIANS.
Condition of Affairs in New
Mexico and Arizona.
Lava Bed Camp, Cal., May 11, 1873.
Yesterday the scouting party under Captain
Basbrouek and Donald McKay met the
Modocs at the head of Sorass Lake. It seems
they had been encamped the night previous,
expecting to meet the Indians in that vicin
ity, though the only signs seen were fresh
tracks of one mule and a pony. Twelve men
of Jackson's cavalry were guarding the horses,
when,
IN THE GRAY OF THE MORNING,
Che Modocs attacked tho camp. They had
left their horses back some distance and
crept upon the sleepers, the first fire killing
one and wounding eight men. The soldiers
sprang to their arms, and, with the Warm
Springs, in a few minutes were driving th^
Modocs. Tt
-country was rather open, but still
pough, for two miles, which the Modocs must
pass to reach the lava bed.
THE WARM SPRINGS
ran them so fast that the Modocs lost twenty
one horses and some loads of ammunition. One
Warm Spring was killed. The Indians were
driven all day and last night. Donald McKay
sent back for water, saying he could hold
them. There were
THIRTY-FOUR MODOCS IN THE FIGHT?
all the band. They were working around for
the timbered butte, near the Sand Bluff, where
they hope to escape by way of Pit Range, if
forced to leave the lava beds. This is a de
cisive victory, and will do more to encourage
the soldiers and discourage tho Modocs than
all the previous fighting. The Warm Springs
fought nobly and to the purpose.
THE OFFICIAXi REPORT,
at half-past seven o'clock this evening, states
that the troops lost two killed?Corporal Tot
tem, of Troop G, First cavalry, and one Warm
Spring Indian. One Modoc is known to be
killed, and perhaps others.
To-morrow 170 men from thia side are
ordered to move towards the scene of tho con
flict. General Davis hopes that we now have
them whipped, and will improve the occasion.
General Gillem will not be interfered with,
tor his policy has been true so far. I think
We can see the beginning of the end.
further Particular* of the Fight.
Camp on Lava Beds, May 12, 1873.
I had little time in which to give particulars
Df the last fight before the courier left. The
forces acting against the savages are some
twenty-fivo miles from here, and aro working
this way, probably driving the Modocs to
wards the stronghold they occupied at the
time of the Thomas massacre. The troops
are moving from this camp this morning,
hoping to cut them off before they reach it.
?11 is action now.
THE MODOCS WILL BE ALLOWED NO BEST.
General Davis says that we have begun an
action which will end in exterminating the
tribe. It was a great mistake of the Modocs,
Who undoubtedly thought they could stam
pede this force as they had stampeded others;
but they met the Warm Springs.
THE INDIANS SUBPBISED.
Those warriors started at the first fire as
fast as they could get their guns, trotting on
tho flank of the Modocs, which surprised
them. The cry of the Warm Springs went
'through the Modoc ranks and they were stam
peded in place of tho soldiers. The Warm
Springs drove them steadily all day, and laid
on their flank last night, and will renew tho
fight to-day.
Batteries A and K loft for the lava beds last
oight. '
CONDITION OF LIEUTENANT HARRIS.
Lieutenant Harris, mother and brother ar"
rived last evening. The Lieutenant is in a
very critical situation.
THE WOUNDED
fn the last engagement arrived at Boyle's
camp last evening. shall hara particulars
of the fight to-night
The topographical party left for San Fran
cisco to-day.
another account.
Lava Bids, May 11?9 A. M. I
Via Han Khanoi sco, Ma; 12, 1873.1
Despatches from Lieutenant Bnyles* camp state
that at Kuunse yesterday the Modocs came Into the
camp aud fired on the picket guard. The com
mand of Captain Hasbrouck, after scouting all day,
had returned to Sorass Lake for water, and were
making efforts to secure some by digging, but none
could be found. Donald McKay was sent back to
Lieutenant I'ayles* camp as an escort of Battery
B o; the Fourth artillery, a and B troops, of the'
First cavalry, lelt for the scene of the fight, the
distance buin^r seventeen miles, and which occu
pied all night until dawn oi the next day. Captain
Jack's hand rode within one hundred yards of the
camp, when all dismounted and
charged on tub camp,
firing into the herd and guard. The first volley
stampeded the herd, which lelt for the camp, and
while the men were getting under arms the
Modncs gave volley after vollev, killing four sol
diers and one Warm Spring Indian. A rally was
made and the charge was sounded. This time
Donald McKay and some of his men united and
drove the Modocs into the timber, capturing
twenty-one ponies and three pack mules.
One Modoc was left on the field and nineteen
mules packed; also Bix dead bodies. Before the
retreat the trail was covered with gore. The In
dians beat
A UASTY BETKBAT
towards the McLeod range of mountains.
Captain Hasbrouck handled his men dexterously.
He is now furnished with five days' supplies, but
water is very scarce, which deters a long stay In
the field. General Davis is determined to keep the
savages moving until the last Modoc is killed. The
soldiers gain greater courage, having
TIJE ENEMY IN THE OPEN GROUND.
The wounded are being brought into camp in
wagons, and from there they will be taken to
headquarters. Two soldiers are reported mortally
wounded. Captain Hasbrouck thinks the Modocs
have no ammunition except what they have re
maining in their pouches, as they loBt their entire
reserve or ammunition In this fight. The cavalry
are in camp all safe, captain Jack has but seven
animals with him.
CAPTAIN JACK WEARING GENERAL CANBY'S UNI- |
FORM.
He wore the attire of General Canby, and took
his position on the field in as lordly a manner as if
be had been a brigadier general.
The artillery will move at once to the other side
of the lake. Enough men will remain In the old
stronghold to keep It safe, while the rest will give
chase and try to exterminate the fugitives. There
were thirty-three Modocs engaged. No squaws
were seen during the fight nor by the scouts on thQ
? -> .ITi.j- ...
following night.
WHERE DID THE MODOCS GET FIXBD AMMUNITION*
There Is a strong suspicion that Captain Jack is
receiving aid from some unknown party. It ap
pears strange how he got six boxes of central
primed cartridges. He did not capture them from
our forces, and It is certain that he could not have
picked np that amount after the battle of January
17. When the ?curler lea the troops were
BETWEEN THE LAVA BEDS AND THE INDIANS,
the latter being entirely out in the lava beds
?trongbold.
The condition of Lieutenant Flarrls Is much the
same as last reported, but there Is a greater hope
for his recovery.
The Troop* in Pnrault.
San Francisco, May 13,1873.
A despatch from Yreka states that the Modocs
are twenty-five miles from the place of the last
fight, and are hotly pursued by the troops and the
Warm Spring Indians.
Reinforcements to General Davii.
Laramie City, Wyoming, May 13, 1873.
Two companies of the Fourth infantry arrived
here to-day en route from Arkansas to the seat of
the Modoc war. 4
General Canby'i Remains at San Fran
cisco.
San Francisco, Cal., May 13, 1873.
The steamer John L. Stevens, from Portland, ar:
rived here last evening with the body or General
Canby. The remains were received by a detach
ment or the National Guam or California, and were
conveyed to the Army Headquarters, where they
will lie In state for two days. Mrs. Canby arrived
on the same steamer.
The funeral ceremonies take place to-morrow.
Flags are at half-mast on all the public balldlngs.
ARIZONA AND OREGON.
?????
Capture of Qulenhaltanoba?Movements
of Troops?An Indian Attack at Walla
Walla Gallantly Repulsed.
San Francisco, May 12, 1873.
Advices from Arizona state that the United States
troops captured Quienhattanoba, the Apache chief,
who had murdered five squaws, and were about to
hang him, but General Crook ordered that he be sent
to Fort'Alcatraz, in the harbor of San Francisco.
Three companies of troops have been ordered
rrom Arizona to the Modoc country.
Work Is to be commenced immediately on the
government telegraph line between Arizona City
and San Diego, Cal.
AN INDIAN ATTACK AND A GALLANT REPULSE.
A despatch rrom Portland, Oregon, yesterday,
says five Indians attacked the house or James Har
rison, eight miles rrom Walla Walla, ne refused to
give the Indians tobacco and they knocked the
door down. Harrison derended hlmseir and
daughter with a hatchet, knocked two of the In
dians down and was struggling with a third when
the daughter came to the rescue and knocked
the Indian down with an axe. The neigh
bors heard the outcries and came to the reller of
Harrison and his daughter, and captured three of
the Indians, who are In Jail; the two other Indians
escaped.
OH TO BED MAN'S LAND.
St. Louis, May 13, 1873.
The Now York excursion party, which left yester
day morning lor a trip to the Indian Terrltoiy over
the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad, arrived at Spring
field, Mo., last evening, where they were met by
many prominent citizens and pleasantly enter
tained. Tliey were welcomed by ex-Governor John
S. Phelps In a neat speech, which was responded to
by cx-Mayof Gunther and other gentlemen, ol New
York. ___
CONNECTICUT!
Legislative Honors to the Memory of the
Late Chief Justice?Only One State Capi
tal Wanted.
Hartford, Ct., May 13,1863.
In the Senate to-oay a resolution of respect to
the memory of Chief Justice Chase was Introduced,
and Senators Elmer and Tenny spoke in eulogy of
the deceased. The resolution was passed, and the
Senate immediately adjourned. The resolution
was adopted in the House.
In the Senate a resolution amending the consti
tution, so as to provide ror sne state capital, was
made the special order for Wednesday, May iJL
THE POPE
His Holiness Yery Feeble and Still
Sinking in Health.
A Protracted Fainting Fit, Followed by
Excessive Debility.
His Eighty-first Birthday Observed
Under Solemn Circumstances.
TELEGRAM TO THE HEW YORK HERALO.
Kome, May 13, 1873.
His Holiness Pope Pius the Ninth was very
feeble in health during the day yesterday.
He had a fainting fit, which lasted an hour.
STILL SIN KINO.
To-day the condition of the aged Pontiff
is rather worse, showing excessive debility.
A. SAD YET GLORIOUS ANNIVERSARY.
This day, 13th of May, is the eighty-first
birthday of His Holiness, but he was unable
to give audience to deputations which called
at the Vatican to tender congratulations.
Brief Sketch of the Popr*? Life.
John MastaV Fcrrcttl?Pone Plus IX.?was born on
the 13th of May, In the year 1702, at
Sinigaglia, near Ancona. lie received minor
orders In the church on the 6th of Jan
uary, 1817; Bubdcacon's order, 20th of Decem
ber, 1818; deacon's, 6th of March, 1819; and was
ordained prleBt on Holy Saturday, the same year,
at the hands of Monsignor Caprana. He celebrated
his first mass on the loth of April, 1810. In early
life he served In the Guard of Nobles, during the
Pontificate of Plus V1L When a young priest he
was engaged on a special mission to Chill, lie
was subsequently Archbishop of Hpoleta and of
Imola. Ho was proclaimed Cardinal on the 14th of
December, 1840, and was created Pope on the 10th,
and crowned on the 2lst of June, 1846. His
crosses and trials have been many and severe.
ENGLAND.
Heavy Demand for Accommodation at the Bank
Discount in Open Market and Bates
for Money on 'Change.
TELEGRAM TO THE NEW YORK HERALO.
London, May 13, 1873.
The demand for accommodations at the Bunk of
England to-day was heavy at the bank rate of dis
count.
The rate of discount for three monthB' bills on the
open market 1s 1-16 per cent below the Bank of
England rate.
The rate of money at the Stock Exchange on
government securities is lower than the Bank of
England by IX. per cent.
FRANCE.
Military Prohibition of a Press Publication.
TELEGRAM TO THE HEW YORK HERALO.
Paris, May 13, 1873.
General Ladmirault, the Military Governor of
Paris, has issued au order prohibiting the sale of
the newspaper Journal d'Etat.
SPAIN.
Bonrboniam Still in Beaotion Against the Be
public?An Eminent Statesman Disap
pears from the Capital.
TELEGRAM TO THE HEW YORK HERALD.
Madrid, May 13, 1873.
A Carlist conspiracy for the overthrow of the
Republic has been discovered in this city.
T hree of the conspirators have been arrested.
away from tiik centre.
Seiior Sagasta has disappeared from Madrid.
SWITZERLAND.
Domestic Joy in a Free Church Pastoral Family.
TELEGRAM TO THE NEW YORK HERALD.
Geneva, May 13, 1873.
Mmc. Loyson, the wife of Pfcre Hyaclnthc, has
given btrth to a boy.
LEXINGTON RACES.
Second Day of the Spring Meeting of the
Kentucky Association?A Bad Accident
on the Track?Two Splendid Races.
Lexington, May 13, 1873.
The meeting to-day was successful In all but one
respect. The races, two In number, were well con
tested, a good attendance on the track, and the
betting lively. In the second heat of the first race
a very sad accident occurred. Major B. G. Thomas'
entry, War Jig, fell down on the bacsstretch,
throwing his rider, Johnny Williams, who lay
stunned upon the track. When taken up it was
lound that his collar bone and two ribs were broken.
This boy was thrown by Victorlnethe day before, his
horse rolling over him. The following is a summary
or the first race :?
MII.K HEATS FOR ALL AGES?PURS I! $250.
McGrath's b. f. Jury, 4 years old, by Lexing
ton 1 1
Reynolds' c. f. Clarlne, 4 years old, by imp.
Australian 3 2
Gibson's c. c. Uarland, 4 years old, by imp.
Australian 4 3
Thomas' b. c. War, Jig 4 years old, by War
Dance 2 dls
Harper's I'latena, 4 years old, by Planet dis
Brennan's Flight. 3 years old, by War Dance., dis
Time:?1:45; 1:48*.
Second Racf.?i)ne and a quarter miles, for all
ages, for a purse of $150.
Richards' c. c. Major Macon, 3 years old, by War
Dance 1
Grinnstead's c. f. Eclair, 3 years old, by Light
ning 2
Reynolds' c. f. Elsie, 4 years old, ny Bonny
Scotland 3
Two others started.
Time. 2:12\.
NASHVILLE SPRING RACES.
Nashvillk, Tenn., May 13, 1873.
This was the first day of the Nashville Spring
races. The sport was considered unusually fine,
although the track was slow. The weather was
propitious, the attendance good and the pooling
lively.
The first race was for the Belmont stakes, for
thri'c-year-olds, mile heats. The following is the
summary:?
Joe Johnson 3 11
Nashville 2 3 i
Fannie Malone 1 4 6
Moselle 5 2 3
Alice Mitchell 4 5 4
Time, 1 :47?1:47\?1:4B %.
The second race was lor the Association Purse of
(300; mile heats. The following !? the summary:?
yuarteruiaster 2 1 o l
Frank Hampton 12 0 2
Mariposa 3 3 3
Young ilarry 5 4 4
Dosweii Dls.
Port Leonard 4 Dls.
Time, 1:45K?1:4fl>i?1:4?i?<?1:40*.
The first heat was wen by a length, the second
by a length and a half. In the third both horses
ran locked all around. The tonrth was won by
half a length. Both the favorites were beaten.
HEAVY FAILURE OF A GRAIN MERCHANT.
CntCAOO, May 13, 1878.
John Watson, a grain operator, suspended to
day. llis liabilities amount to il&o.ooo.
MONEY IN EUROPE.
The German Bourses Generally and
Severely Depressed.
Serious Consequenoea of the Money Panio in
Vienna-Prussia Preparing to Apply for Leg
islative Belief?The Operation of the Aus
trian Bank Act Suspended-"Wildcat"
Speculation and Other Cause* Which
Tended to Produce the Crisis.
TELEGRAMS TO THE HEW YORK HERALD.
IIkrlin, May 13, 18T3.
The Bourses or the principal cities of Germany
are extremely depressed in consequence of the
money panic In Vienna.
The German North government, with a view to
the relief of the different centres of'Change, will
Introduce amcusure Into the Diet applying Prussia's
share of the war contribution to the purchase or
bills and public securities to advances for the ac
commodation or merchants, and to the redemption
of the debt for ra.lway works.
THK PRUSSIAN RAILWAYS AND STECCLATIYK POLICY
OF THK STATE.
The German government proposal to borrow
120,000,000 thalers for a system or railways In Prus
sia was the occasion of an animated discussion in
the Chamber of Representatives during the latest
days of the month of March. The liberal party gen*
orally was disposed to support the concentration
of the railways in the hands of tho State. The
ultramontanists, on the other hand, who, it is
alleged, oppose everything that adds to the influ
uence of the central government, were hostile
to this view. The impression against the govern
ment produced oy the debate was very strong, and
tho course?so unusual in Prussia?or rcfosing to
grant the vote in question by a solemn, decisive
vote, was seriously canvassed by the majority.
The Austrian Bank Act Suspended.
Vienna, May 13, 1873.
The operation of the Rank act has been sus
pended, its national privilege chartering It to the
year 1876 being obliterated.
The Austrian Bank Act and Its Pre
monitory Difficulties?11 u n|;nrian Ac
count of "Wildcat" Speculation.
A special correspondence in llungary, dating in
PoBth at a very recent moment, presented some
words of admonition premonitory of the Austrian
Bank act crisis and the Vienna Bourse llnanclal
collapse, setting forth some few of the causes
which were more Immediately pressing towards
Buch results.
The writer saidTlie presence here of the Aus
trian Minister President and the Minister of Fi
nance has been taken advantage of to hold con
ferences on the bank question. This question hud
been left pending in 1807, when the arrangement
between Austria and Hungary was made. There
were then so many other lar more urgent ques
tions, and this question Itself was so intricate,
that it was thought more advisable to adjourn its
solution, as the privilege of the National Bank,
which lasts till the end ol 1875, seemed to admit of
such adjournment without creating much lucon
venlcnce. Hungary did not, indeed, recognize tills
privilege as Minding, and as the arrangement with
Austria did not mention tho bank as one of the in
stitutions common to both sides ol the Kmplre
she considered herself entitled, if her Interests re
quired it, to establish a national bank or
her own, and the status t/uo was ac
cepted in good raith on both sides. For a
couple of years things went on smoothly enough on
both sides. The Austrian National Hank, anxious to
maintain Its privilege over the whole Kmplre, did
everything io make things pleasant. Confidence
being restored in the stability ?r political institu
tions, as regulate* by the compromise witn Austria,
gave a fresh Impulse to Industrial and commercial
activity In Hungary. The Impulse was vigorously
promoted by a good harvest for two years, and ah
export ol grain and other raw produce such as had
never existed before. Financial and industrial
establishments were springing up in every direc
tion, all of which naturally expected to find sup
port in the National Hank. Nor were they deceived.
The Vienna establishment endeavored in every
way to meet tho demands thus made upon Its re
sources. The dotation for its branches in Hung.irv,
which had been ?l,Sou,ooo, was successively more
than doubled, whllo the low discount made
the benefits of this increased fund
easily accessible to every one. All this lasted till
about the middle ol 1S69, when gradually a change
arose. The impulse given to industrial and flnan
clal enterprise by the settlement of political affairs,
however healthy and legitimate in the beginning,
had gradually degenerated luto speculation or the
wildest kind. Every one was getting up companies,
or, at least, trying to obtain his share in the
fabulous gains which were realized by the pro
moters. The shares of companies which had not
yet begun their operations were driven up to twice
and more of their nominal value, while the whole
disposable capital in the Empire would have been
scarcely sufficient to supply half or them. Foreign
capital, which it had been confidently reckoned
upon would flow in freely, did not corne in bo
rapidly as was required to make up the deficiency
of capital in the country, and the result or all tnls
was a violent reaction, which, in the Autumn of
1809, culminated in a monetary crisis. To make
things worse, the harvest had been very in
different, not to say bad; so that the relief which
mignt have been expected on this side fell away
likewise. As this state or things was not comlned to
Hungary, bnt extended to Austria likewise, the
bank thought It necessary to raise its discount and
to apply the most stringent measures to protect Its
reserve of notes. A great disaster was the conse
quence. Shares of every kind rell to a fourth and
less of their former value. Most of the new indus
trial establishments being short of working capital
and relying on an easy discoun t were, if nor ruined,
at least crippled for years, and. in the bitterness of
deception, Instead ol examining the co-operation
of the many causes which had produced this
deplorable result, only looked out for a scapegoat,
which was found in the National Bank. It was all
the fault of this institution, which, by its anti
quated, heavy mcchanisrn and tho exclusive con
sideration or Its own Interests In preference to the
interests of the public, bad brought about the
calamity.
It would be immaterial to inquire how far these
changes were Justified, but the Impression has
remained from that time tnat this institution Is
not up to the requirements of the present time and
needs thorough reorganization.
SOCIAL SCIENCE IN BOSTON.
Boston, May 13, 1973.
The eighth general meeting of the American
Social Science Association commenced this even
ing In Freeman place chapel. The attendant*
included many learned, scientific and literary
gentlemen and ladles. In the absence or the Presi
dent, Mr. George William Curtis, the meeting was
called to order by Mr. Joslah Quincy, who Introduced
Dorman B. Eaton as a gentleman who had a great
deal of experience in correcting some of the evils
existing in the muuicipal government ?f New
York, and who had been Placed by President Grant,
as the successor or Mr. Curtis, at the head of t he
Civil Service Reform Advisory Board. At the eloso
of Mr. Eaton's disquisition, Mr. yuincy addressed
the audience. The Association will continue its
sessions to-morrow.
THE CENTENNIAL COMMISSION ADJOURNED,
Philadelphia, Pa., May 13, 1873.
The afternoon session of the Centennial Commis
sion assembled at four o'clock, with Mr. Crelgh, of
California, in the chair.
on motion Mr. Sawyer, of Utah, was substituted
for Mr. Crelgh, of California, on the Committee on
Mines and Mining.
On motion a committee of five was appointed to
attend the meeting of Governors to be held in At
lanta, Ga., on the 25th inst., with a view to obtain
the co-operation of the latter in the interests of tho
Centennial. The committee is composed of Messrs.
Byrd, of Alabama; French, of Mississippi; Cald
well, of Tennessee; McNcal, of Missouri, andGurtt,
of Arkansas. '
The Commission then adjourned sine die.
STEAMSHIP DISA8TER IN LAOHINE RAPIDS.
Montreal, May 13, 1873.
The steamship Remand struck on a rock In
Lachlne Rapids last evening, ono hundred and
fifty passengers were on board, all or whom were
landed saiely. The vessel is a total wreck.
A THOUBANi) MORE J0S8 WORSHIPPERS.
San Francisco, Cal., May 13, 1873.
The British steamer Altoona arrived this, morn
ing from Houg Kong, having l,ooo Chinese on
G'KELLY'S REMOVAL.
Special Herald ^Report
from Havana.
Arrival of General Pieltaln's Order
at Manzanlllo.
CARRIED OFF AT THE DEAD OF WIGHT
The Plover Steams Away fbr
Santiago de Cuba.
TELEGRAM TO THE HEW YORK HERALB.
Havana, May 12, 1873.
The British Vice Consul and Acting United
States Consul at Manzanillo, Mr. Lauten,
writes, under date of the 6th inst, as
follows: ?
THE ORDER TO BEHOVE MR. o' KELLY.
Towards evening of yesterday a telegram
arrived hero from Captain General Pieltain
instructing the local authorities to send Mr.
O' Kelly as a prisoner to Santiago de Cuba.
HURRIED AWAY IN THE NIOHT.
The order was complied with secretly, at
two o'clock in the night, by taking advantage
of the steamer Manzanillo just passing. The
Military Judgo, with the documents relating
to the sumario, accompanied the prisoner.
THE BRITISH GUNBOAT FOLLOWS TO SANTIAGO.
The British gunboat Plover left on the
following morning for Santiago de Cuba after
my informing her commander of what had
transpired.
AGRAMONTE DEAD.
Herald Special Report from
Havana.
The Famous Cuban Insurgent Leader of the
Camaguey Killed.
His Corpse Exposed in
Puerto Principe.
TELEGRAM TO THE NEW YORK HERALD.
Havana, May 12, 1873.
I have just seen General Montero, the chief
of staff hore, who assures mo of tho death,
in the Camaguey district, of tho famous insur
gent leader, Major General Ignacio Agra
monto.
HIS DEATH
took place in a fight with tho Spanish column
Leon, by whom tho remains were brought
into Puerto Principo.
THE CORPSE OF THE SOLDIER PUBLICLY EX
, POSED.
The soldier's corpse was exposed publicly
and identified by an immense concourse of
people.
The foregoing is corroborated by private
telegrams. Details are expected by mail.
CUBA.
Severe Fighting Between the Insurgents and
Government Forees.
Revolutionist Attack on a Railroad Train
and Fatial Results?Rigid Quarantine
Against American Trading Vessels.
TELEGRAM TO THE HEW YORK HERALD.
Havana, May 12, 1873.
General Sanguill is reported to have been killed.
Tbe Insurgents attacked a train on the Puerto
Principe Ilallroad and killed the commander of the
Molina Fort, two captains and a namber of sol
diers.
QUARANTINE AGAINST AMERICAN TRADERS.
Tbe steamers Ynzoo, Juniata, Germanla and
Havana, from Mew Orleans, arc still compelled to
remain In quarantine here, although there are no
cases of sickness on them and the Board of Health
of New Orleans certifies that there is no cholera in
that city. But the government here claims that
quarantine is imposed on Information from tho
Spanish Consul at New Orleans that cholera really
exists there. This rigid enforcement of quarantine
regulations does much injury to commerce, and is
believed to have been ordered on Insufficient
grounds.
ROBBERY OP PUBLIC HONEY.
Seflor Menrtlve, a collector for the Clenfnegos
Railroad, while en his way to make a deposit in the
San Josd bank, was robbed of $20,000 by a thief,
who snatched the package containing the money
from his hands and escaped with It.
CARLISTS LANDED FOB FORCED SERVICE.
A steamer arrived to-day from Spain with 1,000
Carlist prisoners to reinforce the array here.
OCEAN TELEGRAPHY.
A New Cable from Key West to Havana.
TELEGRAM TO THE HEW YORK HERALD.
The following special despatch to the Herald
has been received from our correspondent at Key
West, Fia.:?
Key West, May 13, 1873.
A new cable has been laid between here and
Havana.
PENNSYLVANIA PB0TE8TANT~ EPISCOPAL
CONVENTION.
Philadelphia, May 13, 1873.
The Elghty-nlnth Annual Convention of the Prot
estant Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania opened
Its session in St. Andrew's church this evening,
Bishop Stevens In the chair, and ninety-five
clergymen In attendance. After the announce
ment of standing committees two reports were
read. One of them was on the constitutions and
canons which had been in charge of the Commit
tee en Canons at the last Convention, and referred
to said committee for printing, but beiore it
reached the Convention it was destroyed by fire in
the burning of Jayne's liullding. This report was
referred to the Committee on Canons.
The committee on the formation of a federal
council reported resolutions as followsThat the
Convention elect eight clergymen ami eight lay
men. who, together with the bishop, may repre
sent this diocese In the Federal Council of the Dio
ceses of Pennsylvania, provided the other dioceses
of the Commonwealth shall appoint ror such couiv
ell in like manner, and that the appointment of
limn and place for the first meeting be le.t to tho
bishops.
The resolute ins were referred to the Committee
I onCttavau,
Louisiana.
Kellogfr'i Metropolitan! En Bonte for We* Of
leans?Officers Installed at Thibodeanz??
Surrender of Colonel De Blanc
and His Friends.
Nsw Ibekia, La., Mar 13,187S.
A squad of mounted Metropolitans arrived here
at noon, by land, from St. Martinsville, to await
the boat. The transport Ozart arrived at Ave
o'clock with Badger's force, and took on the cavalry
and a piece of artillery and proceeded to tiraahear,
en rout* to New Orleans, a squad oI
fifty got off at Terrebonne to Install officers at Thlbe
deaux. Two companies of United Ktates troops,
wltb Colonel Smith in command, left on the Minnie
Avery for Brashear city, where they have engaged
transportation for New Orleans, where they will
probably arrive to-morrow evening. Two com
panics or United States troops remain at St. Mar
tinsville, ten men and one officer of whom arc at
tbc service of tbe United Stales Marshal.
Colonel De lilano and several of his friends snr
rendered and are now on parole until Friday, when
they will leave for New Orleans. The names of the
eleven for whom the Marshal has warrants are not
ascertained. Quiet now reigns in St. Martinsville.
THE OHIO CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION
Coi.uk hus, Oblo, May 13, 1873.
The Constitutional Convention assembled In tbe
Ilall of the Representatives at ten A. M. Judge T.
w. Powell, of Delaware, wan chosen temporary
chairman, he being the oldest member of tbe Con
ventlon. Alter the members were sworn a mo
tion was made to proceed to vote viva voce foe
President of the Convention, which was defeated.
Ponding the question ol voting for tlio President
ol tlio Convention a recess was had uniil two P. M.
The Convention this aiternoon effected a perma
nent organization by electing M. It. Walte, of Tole
do, President, on the fifth ballot.
NOMINATION OF REGENT OF THE TO*
VER8ITY.
Albany, N. Y., May 13, 1873.
The republicans of the Senate and Assembly'met
in joint caucus to-night to nomlnato a candidate
for Hegcnt or the University, in place of Oswald OV
tendorler, resigned.
Speaker Cornell proposed tho name of James W.
Booth, of New York, and sustained his nomination.
Mr. Herring seconded this nomination In a lew
complimentary remarks.
Senator Cliutfleld named Anson J. Upson. Mr.
Pierson spoke in lavor ol the nomination of Or.
u pson.
The roll was called, with the following result u?
Alison J. Upson, It); James W. Booth, 49.
On motion of Mr. Pierson the nomination of Mr*.
Booth was made unanimous. Adjourned.
PRINT CLOTH MARKET.
Proviokncb, R. L, May 13, 1873.
Printing cloths are quiet, with small business. OB
a basis or 6%c. for extra tu's.
MAILS FOR EUROPE.
The steamship Nevada will leave this port on
Wednesday for Queenstown and Liverpool.
The mails for Enrope will close at the Post Office
at twelve o'clock M.
Tnic Nkw York IlRiiALn?Edition for Europe
will bo ready at halt-past eight o'clock in the mora*
lag.
Slnglo copies, In wrappers for mailing, six cenUL
Died.
Manning.?on Tuesday, May 13, J auks NklsoM
M anning, in the 42(1 year of his age.
Notice of funeral hereafter.
[For Other Deaths Sen Fifth Page.]
Bullets In Ilattle arc Not More Peril
on* to lift) than Sprint; coughs and colds. Tho only Dura
protection Is in HALE'S HuNEY OF HORKUOUNA
ANIi TAB.
PIKE'S TOOTHACHE DROPS cure In one minute.
A.?Lyon'i Insect Powder on Yoat
carpeta Tor moths, tfiid in your cupboards and kltchene
or bugs and unta.
A^-Pnr a First Class Dress or Brndnrns
Hat go direct to Iho manuiucturer, ESPENSOHKID, IIS
Nassau 8trout.
A.?Herring's Patent
CHAMPION a APES.
251 and2Ti2 Broadway, corner of Murraystraefc
Asthma, Bronchitis, Catarrh.?Norton's
CIGARETTES relievo immediately eventually cure.
No tobacco. Druggist* soli them.
Birch Dale Spring Waters Cure Pal*
Kidney, and other J
samples tree. 31) Broad way.
tnonnry, Kidney, anil other Blood Diseases Books and
Cancer, Cough, llnm rrholds, Epilepsy*
Ac., cured by Dr. ELMORE, 83 Warren street, Jersey
City. No charge until cured.
Corns Removed Without Pain?50 rents
totl. AH ailments feet eond IfDr. westervelt, M
Broadway, near Fourteenth street.
Corns, Bnnlons, Nails, <fee., Cured Wfttllss
out pain.?CORN and BUNION CURE by mall. 80c.
Dr. RICE, 'JM Broadway, corner Fulton street.
Crlstodnro's Excelsior Hair Dy? Trsns*
forms hoary heads into youthful ones Instantaneously.
Sold everywhere.
Dick's Encyclopedia of 0,454:4 Practical
Roeolpts and Processes. Price $?. DICK A FITZUEtt
ALU, Publishers, IS Ann street. New York.
Dyspepsia.?Cures Guaranteed bjr Dr.
SHARP'S SPECIFIC, at Hartnett's Pharmacy, Bibls
House, Fourth avenue and Astur place.
Kstabllshed 1840.?Corns Remove#
without pain, 3'lconts to $1, by Dr. WESTERVKLT, Sur*
geyti Chiropodist, 852 Broadway, near Fourteenth street
Holyolce's Celebrated Fever and Ague
CL'RK may hy obtained at V7H Eighth avenue, between
Fifty-seventh and Kitty-eighth streets.
Havana L<ottery Drawings on Pile.*
Irculors free. Order
Agent, 196 Broadway.
Circulars free. Orders promptly filled. JOSEPH BATKSL
r. room I, Chatham Bank Building.
Items Ahead.?Announcement of I>lvi?
dends. Interesting articles. KNOX'S Spring style oft
gentlemen's HATS. Hake your purchases at ids store*
212 Broadway.
Misslsquol.?The Waters ot This Sprlnjr
liave cured thousands afflicted with Cancer, Scrofula an<t
Blight's Disease. A iresti supply Just received.
JOHN F. HENRY, No. 8 College place.
R. C. Sheldon's Remedy a Sure Cure
for Nervous Debility. Principal depot and office iOf
West Fifteenth street
Royal Havana Lottery.?Prices Re*
duccd, circulars sent and Information given. We sotf
the WOOlO*) prize in the drawing of April 2i
J. B. MARTINEZ h CO., Bankers. 10 Wall street.
Post office box 4,685, New York.
Royal Havana Lottery.?Prlxes Cashed,
orders filled. Information furnished. Highest rates paid for
Spanish B ink hills, governments, kr Ac.
TAYLOR k CO., Bankers, tl Wall street, late of ML
Shirts, dollars, Cuffs and Drawers
made to order and warranted.
Enclose stamp for circular.
UNION ADAMS k CO., B37 Broadway.
1R40?Established 1N40.??. Banrhfuss,
Wig Maker and Importer of Human Hstr, S East
Twelfth street, near Broadway, New York.
T
NEW PI BMCATIOVS.
HE
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY,
conducted hy
E. L. YOU MANS.
No. XIV Prlcev flfty cents
Content* of No. 14, lor June.
I. The Constitution of Nebula). By Dr. H. SchclIeiU
(Illustrated.)
If. Tho Hygiene of the Ear. By .las, Hlnton.
HI. Economy of Railway Locomotion. By J. W.
Orover, C. E.
IV Instinct In Insects?IT By George Pouchet.
V, a scientific Home Missionary. (Postrnit.)
VL The Study of Sociology?The Political Bias. Bp
Herbert Spencer.
VIL Domestic Economy of Fuel?I. By Captain Dour
las Osltoe.
VIII. The Drift Deposits of the Northwest?L By N. HL
Wlnchell. (Illustrated.)
IX. Some Observations on Niagara. By Professor Jobs
Tyndsll.
X. Stale Geological Surveys. By Professor Albert B?
Leeds.
XI. Natural Selection In Politics. By Professor D. U?
Wheeler.
XII. Baron Liebig. (Portraits.
XIII. Correspondence: The ijucstlor. of Compulsory At?
tendance on Scholastic Exercises in Colleges-.
The I 'angers and Securities of Science?A Cor?
rectlon: Letter from Professor TyndalL
XIV. Editor's Table : fleologicsl Survevs in their Ed tics
tlonal Bearings?Scientific Ttieorlzlug?To tho
Public.
Literarv Notices; Mlrsrt's Lessons in Elunentary
Anatomy?Jones' Vutiauities of the Southern
Indians?Clodd's Childhood of tbe World?Helm*
liolU's Mechanism at tlie Ossicles of tko Ear uuA
Memhrana Tympssi?Books Keceived.
Miscellany: Action ol Drought and C-Jd on Fares*
Trees?Dental Art among the Jaiiaiese?Ve(eta?
hie Ivorv?Coloring Matter in Bli-ml?Kcnur-^a
lilo Diamonds?1Controlling Sex In Buttertt-.ea?
Hydrophobia, nn.i the Imagination?New Mater
rial lor Illuminating Uas, kc.
Notes.
The Popular Science Monthly Is pntrllshed In n large
octavo, handsomely printed on clear vpe. Turuu, IS
per anuui.w or 30 cents per copy.
CLUB TERMS.
Any person remitting $20 tor four roarlv subscriptions
will resolve an extra copy gratis or five yearly .subscrip
tions tor Wu
five Popular Science Monthly and Appletons' Journal
foi one year $8* . M .
D. APPLKTON k CO., Publishers,
My and Mi Jwedwen *?r*s

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