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The New York herald. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1840-1920, June 24, 1873, Image 8

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NEW YORK HERALD
BROADWAY AND ANN STREET.
JAMES GORDON BENNETT,
PROPRIETOR.
Letters and packages should bo properly
sealed.
Volume XXXVIII No. 175
AMUSEMENTS THIS EVENING.
TITEATRK COM I QUE. Na 614 Broadway.? Tn? Sbksa
TIONAL DRAMA or DlBDHim.
WOOD'S MUSEUM. Broadway, conior Thirtieth at?
Wmmao Hand. Alicrnc ii and evcuiiu
TflBLO'B GARDEN. Broadway. between rrlnce and
Houston sts.? Koomlr.
UNION FQl'ARB THEATRE. Union square, near
Broadway ? Jank Etrb.^
OLYMPIC THEATRE. Broadway, between Houston
and Bleeder street*.? Fidkua.
WALLACE'S THEATRE. Broadway and Thirteenth
Itreet.? Mora.
NEW FIFTH AVENUE THEATRE, 728 and 730 Broad
way.? Madklbin Morkl.
TERRACE GARDEN THEATRE. 68th st, between Lex
ington and 3(1 avs.? Die Scho.nk Galatiua, Ac.
BOWERY THEATRE. Bowery. -Tn* HATfT Maji
Ala? Out at Ska.
BRYANT'S orERA HOUSE. Twenty-third st, corner
6th av.? NB6B0 Minstbxlat. Ac.
TRVINO nALL, corner of Irving place and 15th st?
Billiard Exhibition.
CENTRAL PARK GARDEN ? Schitbb Nights' Co?
CBRTS.
METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, 128 West Four
teenth it.? CrrniAN and Loan Collections or Art.
NEW YORK MUSEUM OF ANATOMY, 618 Broad way. -
?cibncb abd Art.
TRIPLE SHEET.
Hew York, Tuesday, Jane 84, 1873*
THE NEWS OP YESTERDAY.
To-Dny's Contents of tlie
Herald.
??VERY WEAK; BUT, PLEASE GOD, WE WILL
WEATHER IT ALL !"' ? LEADING EDITORIAL
ARTICLE? Sixth Page.
A GRAPHIC RECITAL OP MOST SURPASSING
PERILS AND PRIVATIONS) PEERING INTO
HYPERBOREAN MYSTERIES! DIARY AND
TESTIMONY OF THE STEWARD OF THE
POLARIS 1 HEARTS1CKNESS FROM nOPE
DEFERRED I GOD'S HELP FOR STARVING
MEN I A GLORIOUS SUNRISE AFTER ARC
TIC GLOOM I SAFETY TANTA LI/IN GL Y
NEAR1 FUTILE AGONIES OF THE DE
SPAIRING WRETCHES I BUDDINGTON, THE
SOT? Fourth Page.
PERILS OF THE RAIL I A TERRIFIC AND FATAL
COLLISION ON THE ATLANTIC AND
PACIFIC RAILROAD? THIRD Pagb.
GREAT FIRE AT CARDIFF, WALES! THE MAG
NIFICENT DOCKS CONSTRUCTED BY THE
MARQUIS OF BUTE AT THE MERCY OF
THE FLAMES? Seventh Pagb,
THE PERSIAN SHAH VISITS THE GREAT BRIT
LSII M1L1TAUY STOREHOUSE AT WOOL
WICH 1 JOHN BULL ORDERS OUT "THE
FINEST NAVY IN THE WORLD, YOU
KNOW," IN HONOR OF HIS REGAL VISIT
OR I WARM MENTION OF AMERICA AND
A MESSAGE TO PRESIDENT GRANT? SEV
ENTH Pagb.
*UBA AGITATED OVER THE NEW SPANISH RE
PUBLICAN STATUS ! THE TIDINGS FROM
THE FIELDS OF STRIFE I TIIE BRAVERY
AND TELLING BLOWS OF THE INSUR
GENTS?^ Third Page.
SPANISH FINANCIAL TROUBLES I CAR LIST EX
ECUTIONS? NAPOLEONIC AND RADICAL
ACTIVITY IN FRANCE? SEVENTH Page.
MAGNIFICENT BILLIARD PLAYING I DION VIC
? TORIOUS IN THE MATCH FOR THE CHAM
PIONSHIP I DALY DEFBATS UBASSY!
SUPERB OPENING OF THE GREAT THREE
BALL TOURNAMENT? TENTH Pagb.
THE CHOLERA IN AMERICA! THE EPIDEMIC
RAPIDLY ABATING IN THE SOUTH AND
WEST! FAVORABLE WEATHER? SEVENTH
Page.
THE NEW ATLANTIC CABLE! 1,065 MILES LAID?
IMPORTANT TELEGRAPHIC NEWS ? Sev
enth Pagb.
THE PLOTTING AGAINST GOVERNOR BAXTER
OF ARKANSAS I ANOTHER COMPLAINT
FILED? THE DEMOCRATIC UNION GENER
AL COMMITTEE? Third Page.
COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES AT OUR INSTITU
TIONS OF LEARNING! AN INTERESTING
DAY AT ST. FRANCIS ZAVIER'S COLLEGE?
Skvknth Page.
SARATOGA SPRINGS IN THE EARLY SUMMER!
PREPARING FOR THE SEASON! PUBLIC
AND PRIVATE ACCOMMODATIONS! THE
SALIENT ATTRACTIONS SET DOWN ON THE
CARDS? Third Page.
YACHTING AND AQUATIC NEWS-FLEETWOOD
PARK? THE HONORS TO THE MEMORY OF
JOHN A. KENNEDY? Third Pagb.
CNSATLSFACTORY TERMINATION OF THE
GOODRICH MURDER INQUEST? BROOKLYN
REFORM? THE PUBLIC SCHOOL SCAN
DAL? Third Pagb.
PARTIAL OBTAIN A1 EN T OF A JURY FOR TIIE
TRIAL OF MESDAMES WOODHULL AND
CLAFI.IN I SHARKEY'S SENTENCING DE
FERRED! THE VOGT EXTRADITION CASE?
Iifth Pagb.
IMMUNITY FROM PESTILENCE! THE CITY
SANITARY AUTHORITIES ON CHOLERA
DANGERS? WARD'S ISLAND? Fifth Pagb.
MATTERS IN THE MUNICIPAL OFFICES! THE
MAYOR'S RETURN ! THE CORONERS'
QUARTERLY "RAKES" ? REAL ESTATE
IN THE CITY AND AT THE SEASIDE
FIFTH Page.
FINANCIAL AND COMMERCIAL NEWS AND
BUSINESS AT THE WALL STREET EX
CHANGES? EIGHTH Page.
The Late Elections in Stbasboubo have
Resulted in the triumph of the anti-German
candidates. If France were strong enough to
?enew the fight Alsace and Lorraine might be
relied on to lend effective help. France, how
ever, is not strong enough for any such effort,
Hot is bhe likely soon to be ; and it is not
inn fair to take it for granted that time will
keooncile the people of Strasbourg to their new
Vnasters. Years were needed to make them
French. Years of good government will again
make them German.
The Yen dome Column, which the Com
munists destroyed during their mad and ruin
ous rule in Paris, is to bo restored, no doubt
$o their sorrow, and, it would seem also, to a
pertain extent, at their expense. The effects
t>t M. Courbet, a noted Communist, are to be
#old by order of the government and the pro
ceeds are to be devoted to the reconstruction
,cf the famous pillar. This is really a sensi
ble idea. If the destruction of the Vendomo
i?Jolumn gave the Communibts pleasure it is
!but fair that those of them who can now be
jgot hold of should be made to pay for their
lenjoyment. No better use oould be made of
i Communist property. A few more such ex
amples might have a wholesome effect ou the
Commonixte of the future.
r
"Very Wrak ; but, Please Got!, %Ve
Will Weather It All."
This simple, comprehensive and sublime
expression of faith in a merciful Providence is
from John Herron, who went out from New
lork on the Polaris as steward of tho ship,
and who at Washington, the other day, gave
in his testimony as one of the witnesses of the
misfortunes of that ill-starred expedition. In
his examination, as liis evidence in reference
to the adventures of Captain Tyson and his
party on their ice floe, he submitted his diary
of that wonderful cruise, the material portions
of which we publish to-day, ouly regretting
that we have not space for the whole of it In
perusing this diary the reader cannot fail to
be deeply interested in the plain, unvarnished
and thrilling story, and particularly in the
terrible trials which call up from the believing
heart of John Herron such a strength -giving
assuranco as this ? "Very weak ; but, please
God, we will weather it alL"
And they did weather it all, those heroic
nineteen souls, whites and Esquimaux, men,
women and children, "the bravest of tho
brave, ' including the brave little baby, whose
adventures from its birth in those regions of
eternal ice and snow roduce to feeble fictions
tho baptism of Achilles and the infantile
prowess of Hercules. And how tame and
commonplace appear tho adventures of Telem
achus, tho exploits of Sindbad the Sailor, the
difliculties of Columbus in an unknown ocean,
the story of the "Ancient Mariner," the com
fortable solitude of Robinson Crusoe and the
mild sufferings of Enoch Arden on his tropi
cal island ? how tame they appoar compared
with the trials, perils and sufferings
of this six months' cruise of Captain
Tyson and his heroic band, drifting down
through the broken ice and massive icebergs
of Baffin Bay, and through all the cold and
storms and darkness of an Arctio Winter, fre
quently threatened with starvation, and from
day to day in danger of being dispersed and
engulfed by the angry waves ! John Herron's
diary of this most wonderful cruise and timely
rescue, in short, dwarfs all the stories of
reality and romance hitherto recorded of mar
vellous adventures and escapes from the perils
of the sea, whether under the burning sun of
the equator or among the dismal ice packs
beyond tho Arctic Circle.
On the 15th of October last, expecting tho
ship to go down every minute, tho crew, after
the women and children had been brought
out, were engaged in discharging the pro
visions, & c., upon an ice floe to which the ship
was mado fast, and next they were bringing
off tho boats. While yet engaged in these
preparations for abandoning the ship a largo
iceberg came drifting down, and, striking the
floe, shivered it to pieces, freed the ship, and,
in the gathering darkness, it was out of
sight in five minutes. Thfi nineteen
souls adrift on different pieces of
ice, were, however, soon reunited on
the main floe, but most of their pro
visions were lost or adrift Six days after
wards some valuable supplies were recovered j
and in reference to this stroke of good for
tune Herron says, "We returned to head
quarters weak, but thankful to God, and had
a good supper." On the 3d of November
they gave up the hope of working to tho land.
They were hopelessly adrift and must go
where wind and wave would carry them. Yet
with their memories of home, they did not
forget its holiday festivals. So on Thanks
giving Day they had an extra dinner, includ
ing mock turtle soup, and on Christmas they
hud "quite a feast."
The alternations from abundance to short
rations and from fasting to good feeding were
frequent on the voyage. The Esquimaux, Joe
and Hans, were, in all their straits, tho food
providers of the party. It was well th&t they
were supplied with warm sealskin clothing ;
that they had their boats for emergencies of
danger ; that they had cooking utensils ; that
their ice floo was large enough to admit of the
building thereon of several comfortable snow
houses ; that they had some good rifles and
plenty of ammunition saved in good order,
but it was particularly fortunate for the party
that thej had with them those experienced
Esquimaux hunters, Joe and Hans, as their
"bread winners." The steward naturally
delights in their achievements, for in evory
emergency of famine Joe or Hans or both of
them came in with their seals, dovekins,
oogjook or a bear to prove they were equal
to the crisis. Thus speaks John Herron on
these occasions: ? "Hans brought in a seal to
day. Thank God, for wo were very weak.
God sent that seal to save us. Thanks to His
holy name. It has been so all the time. Just
as we were played out something came
along." Again, "Joe shot an oogjook, plenty
of moat and oil. Good Sunday's work drag
ging the fine fellow to the hut and twiri^
God for all His mercies." Again, April 22,
when the party were nearly starved, Joe and
Hans secured the prize of a bear. Says John
Herron, gushing over with rapture:? "Along
came Bruin, thinking he was coming to a
meal instead of furnishing one. Click, bang !
went two rifles, and down went Brain, to save
a lot of starving men. The Lord be praised. ' '
On considering the invaluable services of
their Esquimaux companions to the whites on
this long and perilous drifting cruise, we
heartily concur in honest John Herron's opin
ion of Joe and Hannah and Hans, that "if we
ever get out of this difficulty they can never
be paid too much." The government should
give them oocli a handsome pension, and the
children likewise. We are inclined to regard
the many fortunate escapes of Captain Tyson
and his party and their final rebcuo as they
were drifting out into tho broad Atlantic
Ocean, on a mere cake of ioe rapidly melting
away, as duo to that special intervention of
Providence which takes note of the fall even
of a sparrow. We can appreciate the simple,
earnest and constant faith of John Herron
and his overflowing gratitude when he says: ?
"God sent that seal It hau been so all the
timo."
This is tho sublimo moral of Herron's diary.
It is that faith which brought the living water
rom the rock in the wilderness; that faith
which St Paul defines as "the substance of
things hoped for and the evidence of things
not seen' '-that faith which can remove moun
tains. Bat in many other respects, the facts
and events narrated and testified to by John
Herron are of great value. Ho shows that the
Polaris was well adapted and well equipped
for her Polar expedition, but that in steam
power she was deficient; that the probabilities,
from her strength, are in favor of tho safety
1 of ths ship; (hat on leaving Polaris Bay,
homeward bound, ebo was, perhaps, too
heavily laden to fight her way through those
ico packb- ; that with the discharge of the
stock of provisions put out on the ice on the
15th of October she was sufficiently lightened
to reach at least a safe anchorage ; that a
large stock of provisions still remained in the
ship for the subsistence of the fourteen men
left on board, and that though Captain Bud
dington had been occasionally intoxicated he
was perfectly sober and diligently active for
the preservation of his ship's crew on that
memorable 15th of October.
Among other important facts established by
Herron's journal of his involuntary voyage
down Baffin Bay is the fuct that a party of
nineteen souls, adrift on an ice floe in that
stormy sea, by two good and faithful Esqui
maux hunters, well armed and supplied with
ammunition, can all be subsisted through
the threo months' darkness of an Arctic Win
ter, and through a six months' cruise at the
mercy of icebergs, snowstorms, winds and
waves. On December 20 Herron makes this
memorandum: ? "To-morrow will be our
choicest day; then the sun returns (meaning
that, having roached his farthest point south
of the Equator, he will turn again to the north
ward), and in three weeks we will have day
light" Again, on learning, January 7,
from Mr. Meyer that they had drifted down to
north latitude 72.07, Herron writes:? "News
so good treated myself to an extra pipe of
tobacco at twelve o'clock last night." They
were longing for the sun ? they had not seen
him for months. For a brief space, at high
noon in New York, ho had given them each
clear day a relieving twilight, but the intor
posing bulk of the globe had cut off even a
glimpse of his glorious face. In view of this
difficulty of prevailing darkness, only now and
then relieved by the aurora borealig, we feel
that we cannot too strongly approve the har
mony, endurance and heroism of Captain
Tyson and his party, or tho skill and fidelity
of Joe and Hans, as hunters, in keeping them
all alive. We, therefore, heartily commend
the gallant Captain and his party, each and
all, to some special and substantial recognition
of their services by the government.
Lewis. Tappan.
The famous anti-slavery agitator, Lewis
Tappan, has ended his mortal career. He
died at the advanced age of eighty-five, at his
residence in Brooklyn, on Saturday last
Looking at tho great work he was largely in
strumental in accomplishing ? tho abolition of
slavery? he might well have said on his death
bed, as Simoon of old said, "Now lettest Thou
Thy servant depart in peace, for mine eves
have seen Thy salvation." Bowed down with
years, after an intensely active life, Lewis
Tappan did live to see the salvation he worked
and prayed for and had faith in. Yos, ho saw
not only the four millions of blacks in tho
South emancipated from slavery, but raised
also to a position of political equality, or even
of political supremacy in some cases, that he
hardly dreamed would be realized. We can
well imagine the sweet gratification this m?n
of venerable years must have felt as life began
to close when contemplating tho stupendous
revolution that had been effected. Mr. Tappan
was a reformer by nature and education, a
genuine philanthropist and an earnest worker
in whatever he undertook, and hence he
labored indefatigably for other reforms as
well as for the freedom of the negroes. In
him was fully developed the type of restless
ness, energy and aggressiveness of the New
England character. Such a man will always
bo heard and make a powerful impression
when agitating political or social reforms.
Nearly all the men who commenced and car
ried through successfully the anti-slavery
crusado were from New England, and most
prominent among them was the deceased. He
was a leader in the free church movement
tho American Missionary Association, the tem
perance cause, and in other movements for
the elevation and progress of the human race.
Knowing well the power of the press, he be
came a journalist for the purpose of promot
ing his views as well as from a natural dis
position to be engaged in a busy and active
life. Though his mind was narrowed some
what by a Puritanical spirit and education
his philanthropy and comprehensive reform
views overshadowed that defect He was
especially the friend of the blacks, and will
long be remembered as one of the first to de
mand their freedom? yes, even when it was
odious to do so. Hardly any name will be J
more prominent in history than his in connec
tion with the abolition of slavery. Consider
ing his great age and the many years he was
engaged in advocating measures for the ameli
oration and improvement of his fellow men,
he may justly be called the patriaroh of re
formers.
The Mexican Congress. ? The session of
the Mexican Congress was closed, as the
readers of the IIkraxd have been already in
formed by telegraph, on tho 31st of May.
Frosident Lerdo's speech to the national rep
resentatives on the occasion, with tho reply of
the Parliamentary President reached us in
exlenso by mail last night The interchange
of opiuion and profession of sentiment was
harmonious, and, on both sides, patriotic and
conservative. The President complimented
the army on its "bravery and loyalty," and
asstfred the Republic of continued and zealous
effort on his part for tho sustainment of the
"prosperity of the nation." The legislative
body reciprocated tho pledges of His Excel
lency in words of happy expression. The
Claims Treaty Commission renewal with the
United States was referred to as a measure
which "fosters the hope that right and reason
shall predominate in the world, and that caa
non and bayonets shall no longer hold judg
ment over the differences which arise among
nations." Telegraphs and railroads are to be
encouraged and extendod, and the crime of
kidnapping punished. The question of the
Church is not directly touched.
British Honor to the Shail? His Majesty
| the Shah of Persia reviewed a British floot,
comprising all the vessels of the Channel
squadron, off Portsmouth, yesterday. The
display was exceedingly fino and the naval
muster and inspection were oonducted with
great iclcU, in the presence of very
many thousands of people. Many prinoes,
of Great Britain and from Russia, accompa
nied the Persian potentate, who must have
received a very impressive idea of the power
of the flag which has "braved ft thousand
yeara the battle and the breeze." The Shah
regrete his inability to Visit America, bat
Las specially forwarded, through Minister
Schenok, a message of compliment to the
American people and President Grant.
prepare tor the Season of P?itlle?c?.
When the Dog Star rages and the air be
comes heavy and oppressive the dread shadow
of pestilence hangs over the land. Great
cities, where a long Winter has left its legacy
of filth and disease-breeding miasma, look to
their Boards of Health at this time with par
ticular interest This city, the metropolis of
America, is especially interested in the sani
tary line. Street cleaning has been for some
years one of those peculiar institutions that,
like the phrase lucus d non lucendo, means the
very opposite from what one would be led to
imagine. It has been, in fact, an elaborate and
labored system of keeping the city as dirty
as possible. Immense sums of money have
been expended and numerous self-sacrificing
citizens have been selected to solve the vexa
tious problem, whother it is possible to keep
New York clean ; but the result has generally
proved the same ? unmitigated filth. Our
Summers have been, lately, fruitful of disease, J
and certainly in a great city like New York
the very suspicion of a pestilence should be
sufficient to awake the authorities to imme
diate action on this all-important subject of
health. Wo cannot speak too often on this
subject There are rumors, which even non
alarmists cannot afford to despise, of pesti
lence and epidemic in this country. Whether
the terrible destroyer, oholera, is the agent so
actively at work in the Southwest or whether
some local disease swells the bills of mortality
thore, the Health authorities in this city should
display more zeal in their duty or show some
more tangible results on the Bcore of cleanli
ness.
The Police Department is responsible for
the condition of the streets, and that condi
tion is lamentable in the extreme. The
plague spots are fast multiplying; an invita
tion is, as it were, held out for the arch-de
strover to reap an abundant harvest on Man
hattan Island, and yet we are blandly in
formed that the sanitary condition of the city
is excellent Largo districts in this city con
tain permanent swamps and stagnant pools
which offend the olfactory organs' and which
are rarely disturbed by the scavenger. It is
late, but not yot too late, for that great anti
dote to pestilence ? precaution. The subject
is too senous for even the authorities to ne
glect, for they are as liable as the denizens
of the tenement house to fall victims to
the destroyer. Thero is no greater crime
against tho well-being ot the community than
indifference or procrastination on the part of
those to whom that well-being is entrusted,
and we hold, as do the entire publio, the Police
and Health authorities to a strict accounta
bility should they neglect to place the city in
a proper state of defence against pestilence.
Tlie New Departure (No. ft) of the
Ohio Democracy.
The new departure of the Ohio democracy,
called the "Allen county platform," is being
responded to very generally by democrats in
other parts of the State. The new idea is to
throw overboard all old party traditions, old
fogy loaders, old crumbling landmarks, all
sorts of old party incubii, and come out with
a young, fresh and vigorous democracy, with
new men, now principles, new beacon lights,
for leaders and guides. In referring to this
movement the Dayton Herald? formerly Val
landigham'B organ and supposed to represent
the Yallandigbam democracy of Montgomery
county ? referring to the destiny which, it
alleges, the party in power is driving on re
publican institutions, and that there is not a
moment to be lost in averting the danger be
fore us, pertinontly remarks , that "men of
both parties are, to a certain extent responsi
ble for this alarming state of things. Political
parties of every sort heed purification. The
only way to accomplish this is for the honest
unselfish, patriotic men of all parties to unite on
a common basis and labor for this grand result.
The present state of the political atmosphere
gives cheering promise that the people are
going to do this. The demonstration at Lima
is one of these indications. More of the same
character will follow, if we do not greatly mis
take the mind and the temper of the people."
The Herald sees in the great movement of
tho farmers of the West another indication,
and a most formidable one, in the same direc
tion. "In that movement alone, if inspired
by right influences and prudent counsels,"
continues the organ of the Vallandigham dem
ocracy, "separate and distinct from all parti
san control and dictation, may be hailed a
power for good that will be irresistible and
overwhelming." This indicates the courso
those who followed the fortunes of tho great
apostlo of the first new departure of the Ohio
democracy are inclined to take in the present
emergency, with what results remains to be
seen. It looks now as if the opposition were
organizing for the campaign of 1876 on the
old "Anything-to-beat-Grant" principle, to be
followed, from present appearances, by a simi
lar want of success.
Bt Special Correspondence prom Cuba
we have an extended, spirited and very in
teresting report of the progress of affairs in the
Antilles island to the latest moment of date by
pmil- The fighting, particularly in the Man
zanillo district was of a very fierce and
stubborn character, quite a number of Span
ish soldiers having been Blain in battle, and
many, very many, Cubans having again at
tested the sincerity of their patriotism by the
sacrifice of their lives. There was still a vast
deal of Captain-Generalship, of official se
crecy, of the prison fortress rigm?, and of
political roports of representative fusion with
Spain in the Madrid Cortes. But notwith
etanding all this, the red spots of the great
local struggle wera repeated almost daily.
Touchino the Progressive Spirit op Jour
nalism in this oouutry, the St Louis Democrat
justly remarks that "the Congressman of to
day is not half as great a man in the eyes of
his constituents as his predeoessor of twenty
years ago was ; and it is not because he knows
less than his predecessor knew, but because
his constituents of to-day know so much more,
through the newspapers, than the constituents
of twenty years ago." The Democrat might
have added that whila Congressmen are be
coming less and less objeots of publio esteem
and confidence, from their notorious jobs and
corrupt practices, the respectable newspaper
press is continually rising higher and higher
in the scale of popular regard and practiool
Kmperor Wlllinm mid tl?e
Regency.
Again we have it reported that Emperor
William is ill. This timo the report comes to
us in minute and circumstantial iorm. The
Emperor, it is said, is incapacitated for fur
ther public duty, and arrangements are being
made for the proclamation of a Regency under
the Crown Prince, Frederick William. It is
possible, of course, that the report has but
little foundation in fact. Still, Emperor Wil
liam is an old man ; he has seen his seventy
sixth birthday, and it would not be at all won
derful if he were now overtaken by tho
infirmities incident to old age. A Regency
would not be a novelty in Berlin, for Emperor
William himself during the illness of his
brother ruled as Regent of Prussia from 1858
to 1861. In England a Regency is associated
with painful memories and with scenes which
not even the enemies of that country oare to
see reproduced. In Berlin it is different
With the Regency of William began that policy
which has made Germany a unit and rendered
Prussia the mistress of Germany. Of the
Grown Prinoe no fears need be entertained.
Self-controlled, resolute and in hearty sympa
thy with the policy which has made for him
so grand a position, his advent to power
will be followed by no radioal change in the
government of the Empire.
PERSONAL INTELLIGENCE.
Secretary Richardson is In Boston.
Commander R. B. Wallace, of the United States
Navy, ts at the New York Hotel.
Colonel P. Dent, of the United States Army, Is
registered at the Astor House.
Ex-Congressman James F. Wilson, or Iowa, is
staying at the St. Nicholas Hotel.
Lieutenant Commander H. C. White, of the United
States Navy, is at the Astor House.
Bradlaugh pledges hlmsolf to be a candidate for
Northampton, England, at the next election.
The Ahkoond of Swat (ludta) shelters Bakrara
Khan, tho murderer ol Major MacdonalU, of the
British Army.
General Randolph B. Marcy, Inspector General
United States Army, was at Fortress Monroe on
Saturday.
J. D. White is a candidate for Judge of the Court
of Common Fleas of the First Judicial district,
Kentucky.
Prince Camporeale, now in Vienna, has been
appointed Attache to the Italian Legation at Jeddo
and Pekin.
Jerome Buck will deliver the Fourth of July
oration before tl^e Boulevard Club of this city.
"Bucks, have at ye all l"
General Rosecrans is on his way to San Francisco
from tills city, having been on a visit to a friend
here for several days last week.
The Chicago Tribune calls young Walworth the
?yellow-covered murderer." The Boston Post
thinks this is a "novel" way or putting it.
"Off With Their Heads I"? motto of half a score of
Western railroads with regard to deadheads. All
the better for the farmers' movement.
In case Captain Jack should sutler on the scaf
fold, It has been asked would it be called the
"Hlffb, Lol (the poor Indian), Jack, game?"
Willis B. Machen, United States Senator, is men
tioned as a candidate for Governor of Kentucky.
Is it not a little like taking a "step backward t"
C. G. C. Canby, brother of the late General Can by,
died in the Missouri State Lunatic Asylum on the
otn inst. He became insane on learning of the
General's murder.
His Excellency Kldo, one of tho Mlkado'a Privy
Councillors, with Gah, his secretary, and Jugol
Arlnori Mori, late Japanese Minister at Washing
ton, have returned to Japan.
Secretary Robeson arrived at the Fifth Avenue
Hotel last evening. He will visit the Navy Vard
to-day, to arrange for the speedy lilting out of the
Tigress for her Arctic voyage.
Mr. George Odger, the English republican, has
been adjudged an involuntary bankrupt, being
unable to pay the costs of an unsuccessful suit he
brought against the London Figaro.
It is stated in a Western paper that Captain Jack
will not be executed, and that he Is likely to live
long enough to boast ere his departure that he was
once the nurse of General Washington.
Senator Matt Carpenter, of Minnesota, following
in the wake of Ben Butler, will take the Held In
defence of the back pay steal on the 26th Instant.
He unloads at Janesvllle on that day.
Seneral William 0. Butler, who ran for the Vice
Presidency on the ticket with General Cass in 1848,
still lives, at the ripe old age of eighty-two, and
still robust mentally and physically.
? Father Koeneke, of the German Methodist Epis
copal church in Belleville, Mo., died on the 19th
inst. He was born in isoo in Zeven, Kingdom of
Hanover, and emigrated to America in 1836.
A complimentary dinner was given the other
day by the Macon (Ga.) Bar to Herschel V. Johnson,
candidate lor Vice President on the Douglas ticket.
He made a speech which bad the ring of the old
ante-bellum metal.
OBITUARY.
Edward S. Mosely.
Edward S. Mosely, State Treasurer of Connecti
cut in 1887 and 1868, died at his residence In Hamp
ton, Conn., on Sunday, the 22d Instant, at the age
or sixty years. He was greatly esteemed In nls
official life and respected as a gentleman and citi
zen at aU times.
Admiral Grlflln, R. IV.
From England we have news of the death or Ad
miral Griffin, of the Royal Navy. He expired at
Plymouth, at the age or seventy-flve years. His
exploits in the great war with America and in the
Syrian campaign of 1840 helped to maintain the
naval prestige of England. The deceased, whose
life bad been one or almost incessant active service,
worked hl? way, step by step, from the lowest
ranK to the highest. He wa-i fond of showing tils
soars and narrating his experience iw a prisoner of
war.
James Murray.
The English Journals record the death or Captain
James Murray, of the queen's Army, In his nineti
eth year. He had received the War Medal ami
Clasp for his services in the ilrst year ol the pres
ent century in the Egyptian campaign. In 1606
he served at the capture of the Cape of Good Hope,
lie was present also In the Nepanl campaigns of
1814, 1*15 and 1*16, and In the Mahratta War In
1?17 and 1818. He attained the rank or quarter
master In 1817, and was placed on half pay from
tho Twenty-fourth Infantry in tie year 1842.
WEATHER REPORT.
War Dkparthkvt, )
OPPICl or TUB C II ikk Skin al Officer, J
Washington, June 24?1 A. M. - )
rrobahilitiM.
For New England, gentle and fresh southeasterly
to southwesterly winds, rising temperature and
partly cloudy weather are probable; for the
Middle States, occasional light rain, partly
cloudy weather and winds veering to
gentle and rresh southeasterly and southwesterly ;
for the Southern States, east of the Mississippi,
generally clear or partially cloudy weather and
light to rresh winds; tot the lower lake region,
partly cloudy weather and occasional rain
areas, followed by winds veering to southerly and
westerly; for the upper lake region, partly
cloudy weather, with occasional areas of light rain
W odnesday night.
The Weather In This City Yesterday.
The following record will show the changes In
the temperature for the past twenty-ronr hours In
oompartson with the corresponding day of last
year, as Indicated by the thermometer at Hudnut's
Pharmacy, Herald Building:?
1873. 1873. 1871 1878.
3 A. M 76 60 8:30 P. M 83 67
6 A. M 76 61 6 P. M 83 Oa
0 A. M 78 65 0 P. M 76 63
12 M 81 70 12 P. M 72 61
Average temperature yesterday 66s
Average temperature tor corresponding date
last year ? ....? ? .. 77X
[ WASHINGTON.
i'
Washington, Jane 23, 1873.
Report* pf the Indian Agent for the Bit*
Perce*. >
The radian >gent for the Nez Percys in Idaho
Territory reports' Jo the Commissioner that the
crops on the reservation are looking fine. Dur.
log the first part of May tlie Oregon Presbytery
held a regular meeting at Lspuat, which was at
tended by many Indians. During ths week tho
latter held religious services, and after the adjourn}
ment of the Presbytery returned to their home*
well satisfied with what they had seen and heard.
The agent further reports that Pickett, who killed
an Indian woman last September, has been con
vlcted and sentenced to be hung at Boise City on
the 25th of July. He remarks that this Is
the first Instance where a white man haa
been brought to Justice for the murder
of an Indian in this Territory. The Nea
Perces are remarkably quiet, notwithstanding
former reports of their hostile intentions. A copy
of a letter written by Iudiau Agent Haworth to
Indian Superintendent Houg at Lawrence, Kan.,
has been received at the Interior Department, llio
letter Is dated Kiowa aud comauche Agency,
Indian Territory, June 12, and states that on
the day previous a train came In ltom
Texas, bringing the Oomanciie women and children
who had been held as prisoners of war, from Fort
Concho. Agent Haworth says he at once sent word
to the Comanche camps and a large number of
Indians came in to weloome their friends. A coun
cil with the principal Comanches followed in which
the latter expressed their gratification at the re
lease of their kindred and gave renewed assuranoes
of luture good behavior. Agent Haworth again sug
gests that the government should keep Its faith by
releasing Satanta and Big Tree. He says the
Kiowas will have a medicine dance soon, and that
as peace or war Is frequently decided on such
occasions, good policy would dictate the release of
the Kiowa ohiefs.
The Kichapoo Captives Not to be Re
turned.
The Commissioner of Indian Affairs on Saturday,
by direction of the Secretary of the Interior, sent
the following telegram to A. M. Atkinson, Special
Commissioner at San Antonio, Texas:?
"The recommendation ol Commission to return
Indian captives to Mexico is not approved. They
will be taken to their reservation, and the Klcka
poos will be forced into good behavior."
? Counsel with the Sioux Indians.
A despatch to-day to the Secretary of the In
terior, from Mr. Brunot, Chairman or the Indian
Commission, mentions a council held with tho
Sioux Indians, at Fort Laramie, June 20 and 31,
resulting successfully with regard to changes in
the agency and the continuance or peace.
The Montana W ar Claims.
There are no new developments of consequence
In tho recent Montana war claims cane. It ap
pears, however, that on the 12th Instant Mr. Cur
tis, the acting Second Comptroller, gave a deci
sion in favor of Mr. M. K. Iuslcy, associated
with Black, on the ground that the law
requires that tho sums found to be due
shall bo paid to the parties directly
entitled to them. His decision occasioned dlssat
Isfactlon on the part of those holding vouchers in
trust for services claimed to have beon rendered,
and owing to other circumstances was followed by
aocusatlons alTecting the integrity of Mr. Butter
field, the clerk in charge of the Montana war
claims. The accusations against Mr. Butterfleld
remain to be substantiated. All the awards have
been paid with the exception of those amounting
to between forty thouaaud dollars and fifty thou
sand dollars.
The United State* Steamer Frolic
Aground.
The United States steamer Frolic, which brought
the officers and crew of the Polaris to Washington,
while on her return to New York, ran aground off
Matluas Point, in the Potomac River. The efforts
of the tugs to relieve her having been unsuccess
ful, a well known wrecker from Norfolk has been
employed to float tho vessel, and lor that purpose
she has been unloaded of coal and provisions.
Proposals for the Construction of a
Steam Sloop-of-War.
The Navy Department has issued proposals for
the construction, includiug all the materials ex
cept the live oak timber of the hull, of a
steam sloop of-war, complete for sea service. The
cost of construction of the eight sloops-of-wnr au
thorized by act of Congress is not to exceed
$3,200,000.
Extension of Mail Service.
The Posflnaster General to-day ordered an ex
tension of the mall service on the Houston and
Great Northern Railroad from Tyler to Mlneola,
Texas, twenty-five miles, the pay to be increased
to $1,250.
Xhe Payment of the July Interest.
The Assistant Treasurer at New York has been
directed to pay the coupon Interest on the 25th
instant, and the registered Interest on the 28th,
without rebate.
Revised Regulations Governing the Issno
and Redemption of Currency.
' The Treasury Department has promulgated a re
vised regulation concerning the Issue and redemp
tion of United States currency, rendered necessary
by the passage of a law requiring postmasters to
register, free of charge, letters containing muti
lated currency mailed to the Treasurer of tha
United states for redemption and now currency re
turned thereior by him, the discontinuance of the
practice of returning transfer checks for remit
tances received by him by express and the aboli
tion of the franking privilege, to take effect July 1.
1873. Among the new rules are the following
Banks and other parties situated without tho
limits of the territory covered by the contract are
i>ermltted to forward currency lor redemptiou to
the Treasurer by express, at the expense of the
DeDartment, only In sums of $1,000 or an even
muUtple thereof. The remittances should be
marked "under the government (contract with
AdanisjEx press Company," from the point of con
nectlonwith that company. The charges should
be prepaid to that point, the bill therefor being
snnt to the Treasurer tor settlement through the
proper accounting officers In favor of the ( con
signor. New currency will De returned in all
cast's at the expense of the Department.
The l'epartment is desirous of withdrawing from
circulation all legal tender notes issued prior to
the idiue olW whether they are mutilated or de
laced or not, and will redeem on the same terms
and in the same manner an notea unfit (of clrcuia
tion. All remittances of money by mall for redemp
tion must be addressed to the "Treasurer of the
I'nwed states, Washington, D. C." Lnder the act
of January 31, 1873, abolishing the franking
privilege, all letters containing such remit
i Ees must be prepaid with the full legal
rato of postage, the same as ordinary
letters. Letters that aro not prepaid are not
mailed to the destination, but are sent to the Dead
Letter Office. The postage on all letters whatever
must be prepaid. It Is, however, the duty of the
postmaster to register free 0* J* *5?
containing currency of the Lnlted States ad
dressed to the Treasurer for redemption on which
; the postage has been fully prepaid, and all new
currency returned by him therefor. It is recom
menSe^ thai all such letters be registered, as the
registration is a protecUonaffalngt loss. ,
I Returns for amounts of $8 and upwards In
| fractional currency and $60 and upwards in egal
| tender notes received by express are lnvariably
made by express at the expense of the Depart
ment to the parties from whom the old currency Is
received in new legal tender notes or frao
tional currency in such denomlnotlons as the
owners may request. When the kind of currency
desired is not specified returns are made In new
currency of the same kind as that received. 1 ho
practice of returning transfer checks for such re
mittances has been discontinued In all cases.
Returns of less than flltv dollars in legal tender
notes, and for less than five dollars In fractional
currency received by express, are at the expenso
of the owner? the charges of contract rates being
deducted from the remittance.
Treasury Balances.
Tho balances In the United States Tressury at
the close of buslnoss to-uay were:? Currency,
$8,726,231 ; special deposits of legal tenders for the
redemption of certificates of deposit, $3'i,420,000{
com, $76,033,439, including $34,054,000 in coin cer
tlficates; outstanding legal tenders, $356,000,000.
PROBABLE MURDER IN HEW HAMPSHIRE,
Great Falls, June 22, 1873.
The body of Martin Gorrish, of Springvale, Me.,
was lound floating In the Moussm River, in that
village, on Saturday last. He had been missing for
two days. Foul play la suspected, as his skull was
broken and his head otherwise injured. Mr. Oer*
rlsh was ? shoemaker, iorty years of ago. aaA
leaves a wife aud family.

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