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The New York herald. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1840-1920, April 15, 1876, Image 5

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CABLE NEWS
"Prom .All Parts of th.e
World.
SPANISH REFORM.
French Republican Revision of
the Prefectures.
THE CZAR TO AID SERVIA.
Penin Military Movement Against Rnssian
Annexation.
THE SAMOAN TROUBLES.
ENGLAND.
VABIWK DISASTERS?'VESSELS WRBCEED A WD
MANY LIVES LOST.
London, April IS, 1876.
Numerous casualties to shipping are reported on the
last coast
Three vessels were wrecked yesterday In the Wash
and two persons drowned.
A ashing boat was lo3t off Elgin snd nine persons
wsre drowned.
FRANCE.
ntXriOTS TRANSFERRED?ON E DISMISSED?A
SEVERE SNOW STORM.
Pants, April 14, 1876.
The cbsnges of prefects reported this morning con
sist principally of transfers.
Only one prefect has been dismissed.
Eight have been placed on tbe retired list, one of
whom is tbe Marquis Jo Fournes, Prefect of Savoy.
REPUBLICANISM IN THE COLONIES.
M. La Serve, republicac, has been elected Senator by
the lie da la Rdunlon.
A BROW STORM.
A heavy snow storm has prevailed throughout
France.
The snow was unusually deep at Bordeaux snd
Marseilles.
VINES SERIOUSLY DAMAGED BY THE STORM.
London, April 16, 1876,
Tbo Standard11 Paris despatch says tbe snow has
lertously damaged the vines In the Bordeaux district.
WINTRY WIATI1ER IN PARIS.
No such wintry weather has bosn known in Paris at
this season for fifty years.
SPAIN.
THE PROVINCIAL PRIVILEGES OP TBE BA8QUE8
LIKELY TO BE MODIPIED.
Madrid, April 14, 1876L
It Is considered certain that the question of the
Jnerot will bo solved by placing the Basquo provinces
on tbe same footing as the rest of Spain ad to taxation
and conscription, but^permittlng them to retain their
democratic municipal organisation. ?
ITALY.
BARIBALDl's PROJECT rOR THE IMPROVEMENT
OF THE TIBER.
I.ONDON, April IS, 1876,
A despaten to the Standard from Rome states that
Baribaldi has sent to the government an entiroly new
Klietne for tbe Improvement of the Tiber.
Its chlel feature is tbe establishment of a sort of sea
port near Rome.
SPECULATION.
He asks a concession lor the works on behalf of ?
stock company.
AUSTRO-HUNGARY.
THE QUESTION OP INTER-STATE COMPROMISE?
CABINET COUNCIL WITH THE EMPEROR PRE
SIDING.
London, April 15, 1876.
A despatch from Vienna to the Daily Xews aaya a
final meeting of the Austrian and Hungarian Ministers
to consider the question of compromise Is fixed for
Tuesday next.
The Emperor Francis Joseph will preside.
A resolution will be proposed provisionally prolong
ing the existing arrangement fur a year.
TURKEY.
RUSSIAN ENCOUBAOKMEXT TO THE TURKISH
REBELLION.
London, April 14,1876
A special despatch to the Timet from Berlin says that
the journals of the Czech party In Austria assert that
Russia plainly informed the Servians that she will pro
tect them from Austrian coercion In tho event of Servla
declaring war against Turkey.
?USSO-AUSTRIAN DIPLOMACY TOR THE PACIFI
CATION OF THE PROVINCES.
Loudon, April 16, 1876
Tho DeuUche Zettung reports that Wessolitzkt, the
Russian Emissary, has arrived at Vienna from Kaguia.
He has had a conference with Count Andrassy, and
will go to Constantinople to propose certain conditions
of the Herzegovtnan insurgents which Austria sup
ports.
ALGERIA.
THE FOBCE OF THE IX6URGENTB WHICH WAS
DEFEATED BY THE FRENCH.
Paris, April 14, 1876.
The body of tnlantry in the insurgent force, defeated
by the French troops south of Constantino, Algeria,
numbered 2,000, not 4,000, as at first stated.
PERSIA.
THE SHAH AT WAR FOB THE EXTENSION OF HIS
TERRITORY.
London, April 14, 1876
The Rtutian Invalide says that the Shah of Persia
has sent a large force of troops to Mesched, a city in
Northeastern Persia, capital of the province of Kho.
raaan, whence they will commence war against Merv.
If the Shah succeeds he mar be expected to take
possession of Merv before Russia can annex it.
THE POSTAL UNION.
Loxdox, April 14, 1876
The Cbfopne GaxetU nays Ihst Canada and Newfound
land have asked te be admitted into the postal nnion :
?n the 1st of July.
SAMOA.
EOT A LIST TROUBLES AFTER THE ARREST OF
STEINBEBOEB?THE KINO DEPOSED BT THE
PEOPLE? BKOUOHT BACK BY BRITISH SAIL
ORS?REFECTED BT THE CITIZENS, WHO EX
PECT AID rBOM AMERICA.
Sax Francisco. April 14, 1876
The accounts concerning Stetnberger'a trouble In
Samoa are very conflicting. Additional private letters
received by the Ada May and atatements of passengers
by that vessel ars to the effect that tho people and the
legislature, after Stelnberger's arrest, deposed the
King, uantibod him to a neighboring island and de
manded Stetnberger'a release.
hkocout back nr trs nnmsn.
This was refused, and ine British man-of-war Bar
racnuia brought the King hick to the capital, but tho
people declined to acknowledge htm.
CtTIXKN nop a.
It Is reported Ihst the people earnestly desired the
release of tbo Premier, and were snxioualy looking for
the arrival of tbo Dotted State* eteamer Tascarora to
effect tbat purpose.
English erecruTiox.
Tbe personal property of Stoinbergar had been sold,
the principal purchase? being tbe office? of tbe Bar
racoula.
Tbe steam launch presented to tbe government of
Samoa by tbe United Slates was Included in the sale.
It la staled also tbat tbe English residents of the
Islands desire the aanesatlon of Samoa, which will be j
accomplished If tbe United States do not Interfere, and :
tbat Voster, tbe American Consul, backs np the British
residents against bis own countrymen; that tbe wbolo
trouble arises from the Interference of Stelnbergcr with
the British designs, and tbat tbe natives have great
faith In the Americans and desire their protection.
LOSS OF A FISHING SCHOONER.
THE HENRIETTA OBEBNLEAP CAPSIZED AT
BEA?FIVE LIVES LOST AMD FIVE MEN MISS
ING.
Gloucester, Mass., April 14, 1976.
Captain W. H. Oreenlesf, of tbo schooner Henrietta
Greenleaf, which was capsized and sunk on Friday,
tbe 7th InsL, arrived home last night with four men
who were rescued from the vessel. The Greeuleaf was
a new vessel* and left this port on Tbundny, the 6th
Inst., for her lint trip. On Friday they experienced a
terrific squall, which laid the vessel's masts even with
the water and gave them no time to secure oars, water,
lood orclotbing before quitting hor. Alter lunnching
the dories four of thocrew were lound missing, who,
having been unable to reach tho deck, were drowned
in their bertha Their names are as follows:?
Franklin Greenleaf, of this city; Alfred Short,
of Norway; Jamos Petors, of Prospect, K. 8.,
and George Connors, fifteen years of age.
Two dorias left the veseel and kept company donug
Saturday, suffering greatly trom cold and exposure.
The railing of tho dories was torn off and the vessel's
wbeelbox was piekod up and used as paddles. Ou
Saturday evening the dories separated, tho wind blow
ing heavily. At nvo o'clock Freeman Crawlord died
Irom fatigue. He belonged to Westport. Mo. Early
ou Sunday morning a sail was seen coming toward
them. Thoy succeeded In drawing the attention of tho
vessel It proved to be tha schooner Lizzie K. Clark,
Captain Thomas Hodgdon, of this port, who rescued
Captain Greenleaf, Lawrence Hardman, l'hilip McLoud,
George Olson and Charles Cook. The Clsrk laid by
until daylight and cruised all day on Monday, hoping
to pick up tbe other dory, but without anocoss. The
Clark then sailed for Halifax, where she arrived on
Tuesday. The missing dory contains Joseph Gardiner,
of Liverpool N. 8.; George Rowe, of East Gloucester,
Mass.; John 8. Tobie. of Norway; Bernard Jewett, of
Westport, Me., and Charles l'attie, ot Westport, Me.
The Grconlcaf was owned by Captain Greenleaf and
Andrew Leigliton, and was valued at $10,000, with out
fits; Insured for $9,000 in the Mutual Fisning Insurance
office of this city.
SOUTH CAROLINA'S PREFERENCE.
CALIFORNIA POLITICS.
IMPECUNIOUS STATESMEN.
FRAUD ON CONGRESS.
DISTILLERS* ACQUITTED.
Colombia, April 14, 1876.
The following despatch was sent to Senator Morton
at Washington to-night:?
The Associated Press ccspatch, dated Columbia, April
13, saying?'The Indications aro that Governor Cham
berlain will control the delegation, and the delegation
will vote Urst for Mr. Brlatow for President, second lor
Mr. Blaine, and in no case for Mr. Morton," is unau
thorized and untrue. The delegation Is controlled by
no man and bas expressed no preference.
ROBKRT ELLIOTT.
Chairman for and In behalf of the delegation.
Sax Francisco, April 14, 1876.
Tho democratic State Central Committee of Cali
fornia have fixed upon tbe 24th of May a* tho date for
holding tbe State Convention to elect delegates to tho
National Convention at 8a Louis.
SOUTH CAROLINA LEGISLATORS WITHOUT THEIB
FAT?THEIR LANDLADIES BELLIGERENT.
Columbia, April 14, 1876L
The Legislature, which bad been in session since
November, adjourned to-day. Many of the negro mem
bers from tbe coast counties aro unable to lcavo with
out their pay, and tbo Treasurer Is too poor to pn.v
them. As a consequence tbe Ashantce boarding bouse
women aro in revolA Most of the members wore
delogates to the late Republican Convention, and thero
was no money tn thaA
Portland, Me, April 14, 18701
Tbe Frets will to-morrow morning dcclaro that tbe
claim recently allowed by the House of Representa
tives for land on the border of Aroostook county,
under the treaty of 1842, is bogus, and that the appro
priation of $86,066 Is a eteaL Is does this on the au
thority of an army officer of high rank, who is entirely
conversant with the facts.
Milwaukkk, April 14, 1876.
A verdict of not guilty was rendered on the trial of
an Indictment against Bergenthal Brothers, distillers,
to-day, for violation of the?revenue laws. Some ex
citement was caused In the city by the mistaken sup
position tbat the defendants had got off In ono of tho
recent cases against them; bnt this trial was on a
charge which has been pending since November, 1874,
when tha delendants were running straight.
EARTHQUAKE IN MARYLAND.
A BUMBLING BOUND AND AN EXPLOSION?ALABM
OF THE INHABITANTS.
WAsnisaTos, April 14. 1878.
The shock of an earthquake was felt in a large por
tion of St Mary's county, Maryland, on Monday last.
It consisted of a roaring, rambling soand, accom
Bnled by a heary explosion, which led many to bc
va that the boiler of a sawmill In tho vicinity had
burst. The residents In the neighborhood were much
alarmed. Thore was a similar shock In the samo re
gion laat year.
GOODS FOR THE CENTENNIAL.
Philadelphia, April 14, 1878.
The steamer St. Laurent, of the French Transatlantic
line, from Havre April 1, arrived at this port this af
ternoon. Among her passengers are several members
ol the French Commission. She also brings 1,362
cases of goods for tho Centennial Kxposition. she is
now lying at Reed street wharf, and will be open for
public Inspection until her departure for New York.
A tug containing members of the Centennial Board
ol Finance and members of the press met her down
the river.
NAVAL INVESTIGATION.
Philadelphia, April 14, 1878.
The sub-committee of the Houso Nival Committee
was In session all day. E. G. Cattell, Naval Constructor
Hartt, Captain Wells, executive officer at tho navy
yard; teamsiars employed by Seyfert, McManus A
Co., of Readlag, and laborers employed by Nathaniel
McKay were examined, tho latter regarding material
alleged to have been taken from the yard by that In
dividual.
The committee, It is understood, considered certain
transactions at the Maro Island Navy Yard, and also
matters which came before the Willie committee at
Washington last Fabrusry.
NAVAL INTELLIGENCE.
Post Royal, S. C, April 14, 187&
Arrived, United States monitor Saugua and tho
United Slates steamer Monongshela, from Key West.
BOSTON BUSINESS FAILURES.
Bostox, April 14, 1870L
Spanldlng A Bumetcsd, hides and leather, Boston,
are asking an extension from their creditors Their
liabilities are $143,179 70, and assets $207,1*16.
The liabilities ot Isaac Taylor, merchant. Boston,
whose latlurc was reported some time since, are
figured at about $810,000. The two heaviest claims,
$292,400 90 and $81,218 Mt aro held by New York aud
Boston parties respectively.
A. F. Travis, shoo manufacturer, of Nattok, Mass.,
Is reported failed, with liabilities of $32,000.
POOLS ON THE NEW-ORLEANS RACES.
New Orleahs, April 14, 1870.
The following pools were sold to-atghl on the races
to be run here to-morrow:?
Hurdle Race.?Vandal, Jr.. 120; Colonel Nclligan, 45;
Port Leonard, 25; A ft rupee, 10.
.Seoond Rare?Pickwick Slakes.?Mediator, 150;
Harry Hill, 110; Harry Edwards, TA
Third Race?two Miles.?Sam Harper, 140; Verdi
gris, 25; Falmouth. 20; Kilburn, 17; Pompey's Pillar, 6.
BASE BALL."
New Haves. Conn., April 14, 1878.
The following Is the score of the base ball gamo
played here to-day between the Bostons and New
Havens:?
IXMJEIIS.
Clubt. lit 2'f. ->i. ilh, SfV 8ft. 7ft. m, m.
Boston I ?> O 1 0 1 0 i) o 3
New Haven OOOOOIOO 0?1
Ayrve, umpire.
IAMBS TO HAT.
Thle (Saturday; afternoon the Bostons play the New
Hevena and the Athletics play the Centennials at Pbtia
Aetykm.
LINCOLN'S STATUE.
THB UNTXILIMO AT LINCOLN SQUARE YESTER
DAY?CULMINATION OF ? WOBE INITIATED
BY A COLO BED WOMAN?CEREMONIES OF TBS
OCCASION?ADDRESS OF FRXD. DOUGLASS,
Washixgtob, April 14, 1870,
Tbe unveiling of the Lincoln etetne at Lincoln
square, In the eastern portion of the city, was the
main feature of to-day's legal holiday. The colored
population were oat In full force.
tiik fbocbksiob
thither was large, Including colored troops, Knights
Templar, Knights of 81. Augustine, the Sous of Purity,
the Sons of Levi, Good Samaritans, Labor League and
other unilormed benevolent associations, accompanied
by music. There was, prerious to their arrival, an Im
mense assemblage at the Park. The statue, covered
with llags, was the great object ot Interest.
TUB FIRST CONTRIBUTION
to the statue fund was made ou the morning after the
assassination of President Lincoln, by Charlotte
Scott, a colored woman, of Marietta, Ohio, who gave
$s. The original cost ol the monument, $17,000, and
other Incidental expenses, have ail been paid by sub
scriptions by the colored people. The Isst Congress ap
propriated $3,000 for the pedestal, and the statue was
allowed to pass the Custom House free ot duty.
TUB STATUS,
which is of bronze. Is of colossal size, being twelve
feet high, rcstins upon a pedestal ten feel high.
It represents Mr. Lincoln standing erect, with
the Proclamation of Emancipation In hla left hand,
wbilo the right band Is outstretched over tho kneeling
figure of a slave, from whose limbs the shackles have
Just been freed. Upon tho base of the monument Is
the word:?
; EMANCIPATION. J
There wero on the speakers' stand tho President,
members of tho Cabinet, Justices of the Supreme
Court, foreign Ministers, Son*tors nod Representatives,
and other persons of prominence. After music by the
Marine Hand?"Hail, Columbia"?prayer and the read
ing of tbo Emancipation Proclamation, Professor I-ang
ston formally accepted the statue In behalf of the en
tiro nation, and tbeh called upon President Grant to
unveil it.
THR UXVBIIIXO.
Prolonged applauae greeted the wordsof the speaker,
and increased when the President stepped to the front
and grasped the rope that waa attached to the flag veil
ing the atatue. The Piesldent gave one flrm pull, and
the atarry banner glided down, and amid tbe deafening
cheers of tho multitude, the playing of music and tho
booming of cannon the beautiful monument stood un
veiled.
A poem was read, composed by Miss Cornelia Ray,
colored, of New York.
Frederick Douglass was then Introduced amid ap
plause, and delivered the oration. In the courso of
which he said:?
BR. DOUGLASS' ORATfOX.
Lincoln's great mission was to accomplish two
things?first, to save his country from dismember
ment, and second, to free his country from tbe great
crime of slavery. To do one or tho other or both ho
must havo the earnest sympathy and tho poworful
co-operation of his loyal fellow countrymen. Without
this his elTorts must have been vain and utterly Irutt
less. Had ho put the abolition of slavery
before tbo salvation of tbe Union bo
would have Inevitably driven Irom him
a powerful class of the American people and ren
dered resistance to rebellion impossible. Vlewod from
the genuine abolition ground Mr. Lincoln seemed to
day cold, dull and indilTcrent; but measuring him by
the sentiment of his country?a sentiment he was
bonnd us a statesman to consult?he was swift, zeal
ous, radical and determined. Though Mr. Lincoln
shared the prejudices of his white fellow countrymen
against tbe negro, it Is hardly necessary to say that in
his bonrt of hearts ho loathed and hated slavery. He
was willing while the South was loyal that it should
havo its pound of flesh, becaoso be thought It was so
nominated in thebond. but further than this no earthly
powor could make him go.
SCENES AND INCIDENTS AT THE UNTKILING?
A REMINISCENCE OF UNCLE TOM'S CABIN?
CONFEDERATES PRESENT?EFFECT OF DODO
LASS' ADDRESS.
WASHtXOTON, April 14, 1878.
Standing alongside of General Logan on the roatrnm
at the nnveiling of the Lincoln statuo to-day, was Louis
Clark alias George Harris, who saw tbe nogro Uncle
Tom whtppod to death by Tom Canaday, of Garrett
county, Kentucky. Immediately afterward ho crossed
the Ohio on the Ice and gavo the particulars to M rs.
Harriet Beecher Stowo, upon which sho framed her
atirrlng drama of Uncle Tom's Cabin.
FRESIOBXT GRAXT
was as Immovable as a statue, flanked on one side by
ex-Vice President Hamlin, who served with Mr. Lin
coln through his first term, and on the other by acting
Vice President Ferry. Daring a pathetle passage of
Fred Douglass' oration, Secretary Chandler, the old
war Governor of Michigan, was observed to be moved
to tears. Tbe prominent
WAB OOVBRXOIIS
present beside blm were Senators Oglcsby, of Illinois;
Morton, of Indiana, and Brlstow, of Kentucky. Many
ex-Confederates also took part In the ceremonies, and
prominently ex-Confederate Poem aster General Reagan
and Doorkeeper Fttsbngb, of tbe Richmond Congress.
Frequently daring Mr. Douglass' reading of his oration
those on tbe stage exclaimed, "Good! that's good I"
which those commenting on It afterward said was hard
upon those gentlemen and their friends.
ritmcisixo tux status.
A coterlo ol colored savann, criticising the bronse
figure at Mr. Lincoln's feet In the statue group, said
that the slave should not be there, as It would be an
aggravation to the Southern people when they looked
at *t, and it should not hare any chains upon It. Tho
speaker was particularly Indignant about this feature
ol toe group.
SERIOUS FIRE.
Mxchaxicsbcbo, Pa., April 14, 187$
An Incendiary fire broke out here at half-past
ten o'clock this evening In tho American
House stable, destroying It, together with
Totton's, D. W. liberty's and Mrs. Kaufman's
siables; a row of four brick houses, belonging to Mr.
Johnson; Levi Market's residence, a three story brick
bouse and stable, Mra Sadler's and James
Long's stables, the school bouse and four
other dwellings. Several other buildings
wcro on fire, Including the American House and Odd
Fellows' Hall, but were saved. Tbe fire at midnight was
under control. The loss is estimated at between
$30,000 and $*0,000.
HORACE GREELEY'S HOME BURNED.
CitArrAQfTA, N. Y., April 14, 1870.
The old Greeley mansion in the woods, near this sil
age, which was unoccupied and unfurnished and be
ing repaired and refitted for the residence of Colonel
land Mrs. Smith (lua Greeley), was totally destroyed by
fire this evening. The origin of the Ore Is not known.
MACHINE SHOP BURNED.
Fai.l River, Mass., April 14, 187$
Marvel, Davol A Ca's machine shop. In thlselty,
was burned this morning. Tho building belonged to
the Fall Rivor Iron Works Company, and was valued
at $20,000; Insurance, $10,000. Tbe stock, fixtures,
engine, Ac., belonged to Marvel, Davol A Ca. and were
raiucd at $40,000; Insuraneo for $34,800. The cause
of the Arc Is unknown.
OHIO COAL MINE VIOLENCE.
Ct.nvtt.AXD, April 14, 187$
A riot occurred near Massillon, Ohio, this morning,
between the striking miners and green hands who
were about to commence work In the mlnea George
Wnrmington of this city, proprietor of the mines, was
Struck on the head and severely but not dangerously
Injured, devoral others were morn or loss herv Ths
bheriif has gone to tho mines with a strong posse.
INFAMOUS CRIME.
Ct.xvBt.AXD, April 14. 187$
A spec al despatch to lbs Cleveland Herald from Kor.
walk, Ohio, this morning, anyx:?' The Chronicle to-day
charges G. B. Kuentr., a teacher in the German Roman
Catholic school, with maintaining criminal intercourse
with twelve girls oetween nine and twelve years of age.
1i is stated thai Knentx was detected In similar crime*
.oinc years ago. when leaching in a school of the West
Knd Koman Catholic church, but the matter was
bu?hcd up. The indignation of tbe populace is very
great and if Kucntx. who has lied, should fall Into the
hands of the German citizens his life would pay the
penalty."
DROWNED.
Klixasbth, X. J., April 14. 187$
John White, captain or the boat Sarab Grimes. ?f
White Haven, Conn., wns drowned this morning In
jltaten Island Sound, off pier Mo. 2 F.lisabethport He
was intoxicated and rolled Off his bout. Tbe body has
boon recovered.
FUNERAL OF MRS. GENERAL
BUTLER.
'Ixtwxu, Mass., April 14,1874
The funeral of the lata lira. Bailer, which took place
!b this cttjr Faai Day, waa one of the meet Impres
sive services ever held In the city. Distinguished peo
ple from all parts of tho country were present to do
homage to one wboee roars were loll of usefblncsa and
goodness. Among them were Governor Ames, of
Mississippi; Judge SI an wood, of New Hampshire;
Wendell Phillips, Collector Simmons, olBoston; United
States Marshal Usher and lady; Colonel French, of
Boston; Francis D. Moulton, of Brooklyn; Colonel De
Kay. of New York; Colonel J. H. George, of Coneord,
N. H.; Dr. Hitchcock, General J. C. Palfrey, Captain
Pearson, of the United States Navy ; Mayor Scott, of
Lowell, and Judge Nathan Crosby.
But not alone tn that was the significance of the
event. The common people of the city mingled with
her neighbors to do reverence to the kindly, affection
ate spirit which bad departed. Tho services, ana they
were three lu number, occupied the entire afternoon.
The venerable Rev. Dr. Theo. Edson, of St. Ann's
Episcopal church, conducted all tho exorcises. He
spoke briefly at the bouse and offered prayer.
The remains, encased in an elegant broadcloth cov
ered and stiver mounted metallic casket, reposed In
one of the parlors. The face and figure could be so< n.
The features wore the look of peaceful repose, and sho
seemed liko one ol life in a plensant sleep.
In her hand was held a roso. No other colors to con
trast with the snow white robes were seen inside the
satin folds, but upon tho lop of the casket rested a
beautiful floral anchor and wreath. At the head, upon
a black pedestal, was a beautiful crown. At the loot,
upou a vine draped pyramid, was a largo white pillow
or exotica, from which urow a crown liearing a cross.
On either side was a tall cross of Ivy, relieved by spears
of wheat; before, au upright harp. Pendant to each
side of itie cu-ki't was a beautiful star, while from
the chandelier hung a cross and star. Each piceo
was composed of the rarest flowers, and each a trib
ute ol sotno near friend. Besides the largo apart*
menls were richly adorned with flowers, heavily lad
ing the atmosphero of tho mansion with their
fragrance.
The gathering of relations and moat intimate friends
was very large. When the body was carried forth a
lino of over forty private and public carriages followed
with friends to Saint Ann's. Crowds of people bail
assombled at respectful distance from the grounds,
and a line of citizens extended fo the church half a
mile away. In and about the churchyard wus an Im
mense throng. Tho body of tho church baa been re
served, but the side sittings and aisles were crowded.
Mrs. Butler bud long been a communicant there, and
her devoted pastor and friend with great leellng per
formed tho burial service ol the Episcopal Church.
Ho supplemoniod the usual lorm by delivering a
short address, in which ho spoko beautifully of the
true nobility of her womanhood. His tender words to
tboso who mourned were the outpouring of tho pas
tor's spirit; tn her Christian llio he lonnd a lesson lor
his hearers which he did not lail to impress upon
them. Her heautlos were thoso of the Christian
daughter, wifoand mother; still, the look should not be
backward, but forward toward an eternal life with her
and her God. The anthem Irom the Psalms over, the
casket was taken from Its elegnnt floral surroundings
at the hose of tho pulpit and borne from the church,
preceded by the clergyman and followed by the funeral
procession.
The pallbearers woro Messrs. James P. Frances, Dr.
8. Richardson. W. A. Burke, Charles P. Talboit,
James 8. Ludlam and Charles Hovey. The cortege
moved to the old Dracul burying ground on the north
bank of the Merrimac, whither a large company had
gone before, and where hundreds reverently listened to
tne final sorvices. At tho grave were additional floral
tributes. The choir of St. Ann's was present and took
part In tho exercises. Then the last look was taken
and the body commuted tolls final rest.
RAILROAD FREIGHTS.
Chicago, April 14,1870.
A rapture occurred to-day between the managers of
the Chicago and St. lx>uls railroad* leading to points
on the Missouri River, and the former gave notice that
they would hereafter take freight to points on the Mm-,
sour! River at the same rates charged from St Louis.
FATAL TUNNEL ACCIDENT.
Baltixohb, April 14,1874
Yesterday afternoon John McNatnara, who was work
ing In a shaft connected with a drain tunnel to Lake
Montebelto, a low miles from this city, was instantly
killed by a piece of timber falling from the mouth of
the shaft. McNimara. It Is said, leaves a wife and
children at North Adams, Moss.
RAILROAD ACCIDENT.
Worckstkb, Mass., April 14,1874
John 8nllivan and Cstherino Bowler, elderly per
sons, the former blind and the latter deaf, were ran
over by the cars while walking on the track of the
Providenro and Worcosler Railroad at Blackstone,
Mass., to day. Both were badly mangled. The woman
died soon after the accident, and the man Is not ex
pected to recover.
KILLED BY A TRAIN.
Boitox, April 14, 1*74
An unknown man, while walking on the track of the
Boston and Albany Railroad, near Cottage Farms
station, waa run over hy an Inward bound train this
evening and Instantly killed.
FOG ON THE HUDSON.
PoronKtsrsis, X. Y., April 14, 1874
A heavy foe on tbo river to-day has caused serious
detention of steamer*
The Drew, bound north, landed her passengers at
Yonkcrs, and passed here fourteen hours behind
time.
The passenger propeller Miller landed her passengers
at Fort Montgomery for New York.
Tho passenger propeller John I* Hasbrouck reached
here from New York fifteen hours behind ttme.
Tbo fog has now cleared away.
FLOODS IN MICHIGAN.
Detroit, April 14, 1874
A special despatch Bom JCnst Saginaw says the entire
country below there is inundated, and great damage
has been done. The tracks of both the railroads
below the eity are under water, only two trains get
ting through.
A freshet at Midland has done a great deal of dnm
age. A number ol people have been compelled to leave
their houses, and a large amount of lumber and shin
gles has been swept away.
MIDNIGHT WEATHER REPORT.
War DsrARTMSXT, I
Orrtc* or tiih Cnisr Sigxal Ornmit,J
Wahhixutox, April 15?1 A. M. )
Probabilities.
For Saturday In the South Atlantic States rising
barometer, northwest winds and cooler, clear weather
will prevail.
For theGulfStates northwest winds backing to south
erly, cooler, followed by warmor, clear weather, with
rising, followed by stationary barometer.
For Tennessee aod the Ohio valley, tho nppcr Mis
sissippi and lower Missouri valleys, rising barometer,
westerly winds, warmor and clear weather, followed by
southwest winds and falling barometer In tho North
west.
For the lake region, rising barometer, westerly
winds and cooler, partly cloudy, weather.
For the Middle and Kaslern States, southwest, veer
ing to northwest winds, cooler, cloudy and clearing
weather, with rising barometer.
The Mississippi River will fall at Memphis, but rise
above that point.
Cantlnnary signals continue on the Atlantic coast
froui Cape May to Portland
THK WEATHER YESTERDAY,
The following record will show tho changes In the
temperature for the past twonty.four hours, In com
parison with the corresponding date of last year, as
Indicated hy the thermometer at Huduut's pharmacy,
Herald Building:?
1*74 1874 1374 137C.
8 A. M 33 40 8 30 P. M.... oil 70
6 A. M 33 40 8 P. M 40 68
0 A. M 3d 80 OP. M 43 83
12 M 43 84 12 P. M 42 80
Average temperature yeaterday OCX
Average temperature for correspond!ug date last
year 41 Jg
MUSICAL AND DRAMATIC NOTES.
Mr. Theodore Thomas bass splendid programmepre
parcd for his extra symphony concert st Stclnwsy
Ball on Faster Monday.
Mr. George F. Brlstow has a concert st Chlckertng
Hall on May 0, at which the Harlem Mendelssohn Union
will sing "Athalle."
It is rumored that Mr. Adolph Ncuendorff, the emi
nent director of German opera, will be the conductor
of the New York Philharmonic Society next seaeoo.
central Park Garden will be opened for the summer
on May 1, by Major Downlng's orchestra, assisted by a
double quartet of vocalists, a serenade brass band aod j
an Immense chorus.
The Yokes lauitly are stopping at the Metropolitan
Hotel, and will commence an engagement on Monday
at tbo Areh Street Theatre, Philadelphia, under tho
management of John P. Smith.
MBS. JERSEY'S DEATH.
The remarkable circumstance* surrounding the
deatn of Mrs. Jane Jersey, beside exciting a great deal
of interest In this oily, hare thrown the people of
Rockland county into a fever such as they were In at
tho lime of the murder of If rs. flujus at NanueV For
some time It was believed that Dr. Gerard ft Ham
mond, who died a few days after the news of tlio
death of Mrs. Jersey was received, was Instrumental
In bringing about that result, and bod committed sui
cide to escape tho punishment which would follow tho
discovery of his crime. That hypothesis Is now proven
to have been false. All tho evideuco given at tho ln>
quest as to the cause of Dr. Hammond's do.tth Indi
cates that event to have resulted from tqioplcxy,
caused by tho continuous use ot hydrate ui chloral. It
Is also proven that upon the day that Mrs. Jersey
started upon bor journey on the ricatuer
Cuba Dr. Hammond was In the village of .
Spring Valley, in attendance noon patients,
and that on the day ot the lady's death ho was a gue>t
at a dinner In the house of one of the wealthiest and
most respected residents of Katuapo township. Thus
the hloi cast upon iba character ol Dr. Hammond im
mediately after his death has been removed. Hu is
proven not to havo been the person who bought Mrs.
Jersey's ticket lor the voyage to Port Itoyal, ami who
represented himself on tho steamship Cuba as "Dr.
Hamilton." Who ana where, then is the reputed Doctor i
Hamilton? A detective engaged to lind him wrote to I
bia employers on Wodnoiday that "the Doctor, 1 think, I
la now not lar eway from tho City HalL" In concluding |
his letter the detective says, speaking ot the Doctor
and the money ($7.MX)) taken Irom tho person ol Mrs. j
Jersey:?"I leei certain that I can put my baud on and j
produce the person who was on the steamer and at- .
tended Mrs. Jersey as 'Doctor,' aud II you instruct mo I
to do so will undertake Ik What good result would ,
follow from It I cannot say. No conviction could bo had
lor murder, because, tho body being burled in the sea, I
llicra Is no proof possible that murder was committed, i |
ant satmlled that that person took the money. How |
much prospect there Is that be bas it now or could bo !
made lo produce it you can judge as well as I."
The present theory of this mysterious case is that .
Mrs. Jersey, coming lo this city, becatno acquainted
with some unscrupulous iwrsons who soon learned that
she was possessed of a goodly sum of monoy. Her now
and unscrupulous acquaintances upon learning ol her
intention to go to Florida via Port Koyal determined
to possess her funds lor their own, and this determina
tion was lulillled through tlio death of the unlortunale
woman on tho steamship Cuba.
This theory will never bo tested, however, unless
tbnt detective arrests Dr. Hamilton.
OBITUARY.
HOHE.V F. CLARK.
This gentleman, a moit prominent and wealthy resi
dent of Jersey City, died on Thursday afternoon In the
sixty-first year of hIs ago. Ho was a native of West
chester county, and at tbo ago of nltioteen entered Into
tho dry goods business In New York city. Thirty
years ago be went to Jersey City and succeoded so well j
111 business that ho acquired n valunble tract of real
estate and retired. He was a member ot tho Hoard ol !
Aldermen from I860 to 1870 and was President in the |
hitter vear. He was also eloctea for two terms to tho I
lower house or the Legislature. He was also a director
of tbo Stato Insurance, International Trust and other
compauies. His luneral will tuko place on Sunday.
GEORGE F. HORN Ell,
a well known Boston (Mass.) lawyer, died suddenly
yestorday morning at his residence in Rrookhno. no
was apparently In good health, but while making his
preparations to come Into Boston was taken suddenly
ill and expired within fifteen minutes. He was about
sixty yours of age, and leaves a widow, two sons and
four daughters.
A FEMALE IMPOSTOR.
Superintendent Walling received information yoster
dny (hat a young woman calling herself Kdlth (Jwynne
Is going about the city collecting money from chari
table persons on the pretext of being tbo agont of the
Young Women's Christian Association. She exhibits
a forged letter of authority from tho treasurer of the
Aeseciatlon.
A PROBABLY FATAL FALL.
I.ast night, wbllo Mary Governs, an old lady of sixty,
residing at No. ft'Jd East Fifteenth street, was putting
up the shutters of her store, she fell backward Into an
open cellar, breaking both legs and sustaining severe
Internal Injnrtcs, Irom which she will probably dlo.
She was romoved to Bellevue Hospital.
HOTEL ARRIVALS.
Baron do Sant' Anna, Portuguese Minister at Wash
ington, la at the Hotel Brunswick. Judge Walter Q.
Grcsliatn, of the United States Diatrlct Court for Indi.
ana, la staying at the Fifth Avenue HoloL Congress
man Benjamin A. Willis, of this city, arrivod at tho
Windsor Hotel last evening trom Washington. Pro
fessor K. Loom I a, of Yalo Collego, is roaiding at the At,
Nicholas HoteL Judge Lafayette S. Foster, of Con
necticut, is sojourning at the Kverott Hoiiso. United
States Diatrlct Jndgo William J. Wallace, of Syracuse,
la at the Hoffman House. Congressman IL H. Hat born,
of Saratoga, is registered at the Gllsoy Houso. Judge 1
H. D. ltice, ol Maine, and John H. B. Latrobe, of 1
Baltimore, aro at tho Fifth Avenue Hotel. A. D. ;
Barber, of Utica, is umont the lata arrivals at the
Metropolitan Hotel Arthur Cheney, of Boston, la at j
the 31. James Hotel. Senator Fraoklin W. Tobey, of
Port Henry, N. V., and George M. Pullman, of Chicago, I
are at the Windsor Hotel.
IF YOU ARF. CONSUMPTIVE GIVE HALE'S
Hnerr or lloaitHorito ash Tak a trial.
PIKE'S Tootiiacmr. Drop. cure in one minnte.
A. ?FOB F.LF.GANT AND FIRST CLASS HaTS GO
direct to the manufacturer, KSI'ENKCilEID, 118 Nssssa
St.
A.?BENNETT BUILDING.
KIRK PROOF.
LOCATED OS NASSAU. ANN AND FULTON 3TH.
UANDSOMELY AND WELL HEATED OFKfCBN
TO LET ON VKRV REASONABLE TBRMA.
SUITABLE FOR
LAWYERS, BANKERS AND INSURANCE OFFIOB9L
APPLY ON TIIB PREMISES.
A.?USE WISTAIt'S BALSAM OF WILD CHERRY
for roughs and cold*. and lultrr no mure.
A.?SILVER AT PAR AND KNOX'S SPRING STYLE
nf gentlemen*. IIats, Jn.t Introduced, ere two event. ol cur
rent Importanre. Bur your Mats at 21J Broadway, or his
Fifth Avenue Hotel e.tsbllshmrnt.
ATTENTION.?THE ELEGANT .SM.K ELASTIC
Tat'SS, .old only by ELASTIC TRUSS COMPANY. twa
Broidway. Worn rit.T night end day. Soon permanently
eurea aevereet nipt ares.
DAVID'S SPRING STYLE OF GENTLEMEN'S
IIats are ready for inspection and aale at hla aslearoont
21 OH. Broadway, near Iliiane ft.
SODA WATER" APPARATUS* FOR ^MAKING ALL
Aerated Reverages. JOHN MATTHEWS, lat sv. and-Mtb
it.. New York.
WIGS, TOUPEES, AC.?G. RAUCHFUSS, PRACTI
col Wlgtneker, 44 Ka.t 12th at., near Broadway, New York
$3 HATS, $1 DO; SILK HATS, $.1 80, WORTH $0
(line Derby*). 13 New Charcot, apstairs.
SEW PUBLIC ATlSfflk
"i N "ATTUACTlV'ft" CONTKN'ts.'
RECORD OF TUB YEAR.
RBCOND NUMBER READT TO DAY.
containing, among one hundred and seventy other attrac
tive nrticlca, the following points ol apectsl interest
The Moody and Snnkey Kevivalift., wltli an ecru rat e|y
prepared ecroniil of their wonderlnl encceeeef In England
end America to the preaent day.
The llahcoi'k Trial, with Judge Dlilnn'a Charge, Ac.
Charlotte I'luhmu. Her life, career and death.
Solving ol the heeler Date tliia year.
PartiralaT. of the Great Klra Ir New York, Febresry 8.
George Tlrhnor'a Yl.lt to l,ord Byron.
Lite and LplMira of Horace Bn?hn?U.
Rooaevell'a Valentine to Mr*. Croly (Jennie Jane).
Death of John For.ter, the Historian.
Polygamy In ('tall?how and what It Is.
President*of me United State., and their certain fate.
Truniliuir. r'.Miite Pilgrim's Pr.igreaa.
Man a great Failure. Moody'a Remarkable Sermon.
or i " ' "
Diary or ell important Aet. and Debate. In I'ongre.a,
Thing, to be laughed at. (nun the Detroit Free Pres., and
Amerlci
other comic American paragraphia
Wldder tlreen'a Laat Word., and other popular humnrona
and pathetic I'oema.
Altogether the rirhe.t collection of entertaining fact and
Action ever pretented at one time between the cover, of a
magatlne.
Beautifully printed, with a auperto new ateel portrait of
Moody, the Hevlvaliat. ?.?Price AO rents.
A MO JL'ST PUBLISHED,
TIIB ONE FAIR WOMAN.
A faaclnatlng new novel by Joaquin Miller. One of the
moot poeth al romance, ever written. The ocene. laid
chiefly on the ahnrea of the Mediterranean, end abounding
In oictaraaone aketchea of Italian life In <tenon. Naplea,
Rome. Milan, Como. Venice. Ac Beautifully printed, with
1 "? ? ' ?tm? ?
exquisite ornamental Initial lettera, of Egyptian and Pom
peiian deaigna. ?.?Price (2.
THE TWO BARBARAS
A capital new novel by Grace Mortimer, whoa# abort
orle. have been to Immeaaely popular In the beat weekly
ipera. ?.?Price $1 M.
OUR CHILDREN.
An Inatrnctlve new l>o>k for parem* end rnardlant: amid.
Ing them in the delirate and dlAlrnli reapon.ihiliile. of rear
ing yonng people, physically end mentally. U, Dr. A. K.
Uaraner. '.?Price f?
Nearlv ready.
ONE NIGHT'S MYSTERY. A new novel, by May Agnee ,
Fleming, author of "Guy Karlaronrt's Wife."
ABA-WEED. WHAT WE SEED, AND PARODIES BY I
JOHN PAUL.?Two comic hook., by 0. II. Webb ("tbe i
tunny man ol tbe New York Tribune."!
G. W. CARLKTON A CO.. PabRabere.
Medlaou square, New York.
PUBLISHED?IN POCKET EDITION?"SEC
tl und Lite." a treatiae explanatory of the raawt. with In
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Hpirtta, Nervoua Bxhau.tlun. Muvolar Debility and Pre
mature Decline in Manhood; prlee .V* Add re., the anthor.
Dr. B. DE K. CURTIS, *>7 Watt Xtd at.. Now York,
Record of thr year.
second number (May) ready to-day
Aopplted by TUB AMERICAN NS* A COk
JJMi
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TffYBtTimF&vffSii fV?ifgK'~
HARPKVS
NEW MONTH 1-V MAGAXINI
F)K MAY. 1876,
contelnc.
THE wnEELER EXPEDITION IN SOUTHERN COLOr
RADO.
Willi fifteen illustrations.
MNEMOSYNE: A SONNET. HjrJohnO. Sax*.
CARDINAL MEPHISTO. ~~
With portrait of t?a-s*r Borgia, alter Bapbaal'i pletara Ip
the ralano Borghese, Borne.
MARTY 118. A Poem.
TIIE MICROSCOPE.?(Concluded.) By ProfeMor Sams*
LoekwiA
Willi seventeen Illustratloni.
TIIE ROMANCE OF TIIE HUDSON. II. Major Andrp
lly Benson ,1. Loaning
Willi fifteen ilium ration*.
J I'ST IN TIME. A Story. By Frank Laa Benedict
OAKTII. A Novel. By Jnlian Hawthorne.
MODERN DWELLINGS*: THEIR CONSTRUCT JL
DECORATION AND FURNITURE.?(First P( u.f
By II. Hudson Holly.
Willi nineteen illustrations.
TO MY MAPLES. A Poem.
OLI) PHILADELPHIA.?(Seei>nd Paper.) By Rebaee*
Harding Davis
With eighteen illustrations.
TO A A'lOLlN. A Poem. By t'ella Thaxter.
NAOMAN: A LEGEND OK THE HUDSON. By Bishop
Cleveland Coxa.
With three illustratloni.
RATS. A Story. By Harriet l'reacett SpofTnrd.
ALIFLAILA. An Kaatern Story. By Bdward Era rat)
Hale. ;
OARRIKLT.O AND ADRIANA. A Dramatic Sketch (hith
erto uupiibllshed). By Barry Cornwall.
DANIEL DERONDA. By George E'.lot Book IILwt
Maidena Choosing.
EDITORIAL "DEPARTMENTS.
Easy Chair. I Sclent itle Record.
Literary lioconl. I Historical Record.
Tbo Drawer.
Thia lancinating number, containing over eighty beanllftil
Illustrations, conclude* the Kilty.second volume of HAR
PER'S MAGAZINE. Among ita principal attraction*
are
Book III. of George Ellot'e Serial Story, "Daniel De
?,nda."
The conclusion of Rebecca Harding Davis' interesting
or on "Did Philadelphia.'' (Profbselv Illustrated),
"le commencement or a aeries of Iflstrated Paper* on
,, ousehold Art, by II. Hudson Holly, the well known archi
Pcl.
Brilliant short stories by Edwnrd Everett Haln, Harriet
prescoit SpufTord and Frank Leo Benedict.
1 Illustrated Papers on Major Andre and Southern Colorado.
Poems by Bishop Coxe, Celia Thaxter and John G. Same,
?"A Dramatic Sketch, by Batry Cornwall, never before pnb
,. shed.
" in the June number will be commenced a new Serial
K tory. by the nnthor of "John Halifax, Gentleman," tail
zied '.The Luurel Bush, an Uld-taehioued Love Story."
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STARTI-INO KKVKLATIONS.
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The popular science monthly,
(Established May, 1872.)
conducted by Professor E. L. YOUMAN8.
CONTENTS POR MAT.
I. Society and Organism. By Herbert Spencer.
It. Haminers and Percussion. By Rev. Arthur Riga, K
A. Illustrated.
111. Prepossessions for and against the Supernatural. A
Criticism of Dr. Carpenter. By J nines McCoeio
LL. D. ? .
IT. Lectures In Electricity. By John Tyndall, P. R. &
II. Illustrated. _
V. Recent Geographical Progress. By Chief Juetlea
Tt The MoUnoka of the Rocky Moontalna By Brum la.
gersoll. _ . . _ _
Til. Character and Work of Lleblg. By J. L. W. Tbndi
chum, M. D. . _
Till. Oaroltno Lucretla IlerscbeL By Elltu A. Toumana.
II. fllnstratlon. _ _
IX. Award* at the Intrrnetional Exhibition. Report el
Hon. N. M. Beckwlih. ^
X. Recent Advances in Telegraphy. By R. Rlordaa. Da
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XI. Conaclence In Animals. By 0. J. Romanes, M. A,
K. L A _
XII. Air Gems and Hponlaneons Gensratlon. By ft
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XIII. Sketch of Dr. Austin Pllnt. Jr. With Portrait.
XIV. Editor's Table: The New Departure at the Centea.
Dial Exhibition?Judge Daly'* AOdrem Iho
"Aesdemy" for Americans.
IJterurv Notices: Klake's Unseen World aud ether
Essays?A Short History of Natural Balance?
KienardaonM Diss sets of Modem Life?Kleral
I lernralions for the Dwelling lions*?Memoir and
Correspondence of Caroline llerscbel, Ac.. 4%.
MleeollanyUnheelthlneas of New House*?New
Tanning Process?The Economy of Vsgeteriaa
Ism?Anelent American Civilisation?Climatology
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THE GALAXY
POR MAY
ROW RBADT.
CONTENTS ?
PLAYERS AND PLAY-GOERS TWBRTT-PITB TEARS
AGO. By Jnbn Thornburr.
THK WIDOW. Hy W. C. Klam. ? A ?
A PLEA KOR A PATRIOT My Manas A Caeey.
MADCAP VIOLET. By Wllllaw Hlach. author of "A
Princess nf Thuls,'' Ac., Ac.
CONCEPTION. By P.dgsr Kswegtt. ? .I?.
WAR MEMOIRS Wasthe Battle of Bull RuaaNatloaef
Disaster f By General O. A. Caster.
AZTEC MTTHOLOtlY. _ .. .
REMEMBRANCE By John Godfrey Beue.
BARBARA'S OUTING. By TheadereW^ -
TiflWCftWrgSSsoixja ****** **?*?.
A GOOD HAUL. Prom toe Prsaeb of Pedro Aataaw m
Alarcnn By 8. la. . ... ?
PHENOMENA or BLEEP. ByJuulmsHeuriJIrrwaa.
SEEKING A I/OCT ART. |y Richard Great wall*.
IIIs PathRR'8 BOR. By EdgsrEawoell.
DttirT WOOD. By Philip Oafilbet.
HCIKNTIPIC MI WELL ANY.
CURRENT LITERATURE.
KKBULA. By th* Editor.
ailELOOB A to, mtM

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