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The New York herald. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1840-1920, August 01, 1876, Image 5

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CABLE NEWS
From All Parts of the
Old World.
THE TURCO-SERVIAN WAR.
Further Confirmation of the Recent
Turkish Dftfoat.
A COMPLETE ROUT.
Servia Invaded.?Victories
for the Turks.
The Relations Between Turkey and Greece
Growing More Onsatisfactory.
THE EXTRADITION QUESTION
The English Parliament To Be Prorogued?The
State of Trade.
EDUCATION IN ITALY.
The French Radicals and the Jesuits?The
Attack on the Latter Abandoned.
THE WAR IN TURKEY.
ITJMORS or A TURKISH BUOCBSB OVXB TUX
SERVIANS?REINFORCEMENTS FOB THE DBFKATED
TURKISH ABUT.
London, July 31, 1870.
A despatch to Router's Telegram Company from
Bemlln says a rumor is current there that the Turks,
after routing a Servian detachment at Pandiralo. have
marcbod on Krojugewatz. If this is confirmed Saitschar
and the Servian position on the Timok River are
seriously threatened. Three regiments of Egyptian
Infantry, one cavalry regiment and two batteries of
artillery have started for Mitrovitia.
TBS TURKISH DEFEAT REAR XEDUH?THEIR
SUPPORTS ANWIHILATKD.
I/ondo.v, July Si, 1870.
A correspondent of the Timet telegraphs from Kagusa
laying:?'-I have perlectly trustworthy information
that the Turks in the engagement on Friday near
Med an numbered 12,000. They were driven to Podgorttza,
lost two guns, and their supporting battalions
were completely annihilated."
THE OSMAH PACHA WHO WAS CAPTURED HOT
OSMAN THE CORPS COMMAHDEB COMPLETEKISS
OP THE TURKISH BOUT.
London, July 31, 1870.
A special despatch to the Timet, as well as despatches
to other journals, say that the Osman Pacha who was
captured at Urblzais not Identical with the Osman
Pacha who commands the Turkish troops against the
Servians,
Out ol sixteen Turkish battalions which were engaged
at Crbiza tour only reached Bilek. The battalions probably
average under 400 men each.
EBBVIAN SEPARATION FOB AN OUTBADE ON THE
AUSTRIAN FLAG.
London, August 1, 1878.
Recently the Servians flrod upon a passing Austrian
Steamer In tbe Danube, for which Austria Immediately
demanded satisfaction. An investigation followed and
to-day advices are received stating that the oommander
of the Servians who were guilty of tho outrage haa
been dlamtesed tbe service.
DISCUSSION IN THE ENGLISH HOUSE OP LORDS
ON THE EASTERN QUESTION?EARL GRANVILLE
FAVORS SELF-GOVERNMENT FOB THE TURKISH
PROVINCES?ACTION OF THE COMMONS?MR.
GLADSTONE SPEAKS IN FAVOR OF SZLF-GOVBRNMENT.
London, August 1,187&
Id tbs House ol Lords lsst evening there wss a dls
the government should ho ready to support meaanros
1 or upholding the treaty of 1856. Karl Granville questioned
certain acta ot the Areign Office, and expressed
himself in favor of sell-government in the Turkish
provinces. Karl Derby, the Foreign Minister, replied.
He said the future policy of the government would be
to onter Into no doubtlhl scheme. Tho motion was
negatived.
.ACTION OF THE COMMONS.
In the House ot Commons, Mr. Jfruce, referring to
the outrages in Bosnia, moved, as the opinion of the
Bouse of Commons, that the government should attempt
to secure equal treatment to those of various religious
ander the authority of the Porte. Mr. Forsyth
movod to amend the motion to the effect that the Sclavonic
provinces be guaranteed good government irrespective
of race or creed.
MR. GLADSTONR'S SPKKCU.
Mr. Gladstone favored the amendment. In bis
Speech he censured the government respecting the Andrassy
Berlin memorandum. He hopod that the Inquiry
Into the alleged atrocities In Bulgaria now
making would be an actual inquiry, and that Europe
would act in concert Self-government was necessary
in order to bring about a solution ol the difficulty.
DISRARLI FAVORS XOR-INTERFRREN'CR,
Mr. Disraeli justified the government Re favored
non interference In the Eastern troubles When It became
necessary the government would assist In the
pacification ot the provinces.
At length both the motion and the amendment were
withdrawn.
THE ACCOUNTS OF THE CIBCAS8IAN HE VOLT
ZXAOOBBATED?VON KAUFMAN AND BAZAIXZ
AT THE SEAT OF WAR.
Lornox, August 1, 1878.
The Xnos' Pesth despatch assorts that the story of
the revolt of the Circassians In tne Caucasus is exaggerated.
KACERAR AXD RAZA1XE AT Tltl BEAT OF WAR.
The Timet' Berlin despatch says it Is stated from
Sclavonic sources that the Russia General Von Kauf an,
well known as the conqueror of Khiva, is going
te the Servian camp. Kx Marshal Bazaine, ot the
French army, directa the Turks at Svenitsa.
tilKSaTIMNO RlLATlOXS RKTW ERX TtRKRV AND GREBCK.
The TUegraph't Vienna special says tbe relations between
Turkey and Greece are reported to be growirg
ore doubtful. Decisive action is expected at Athena
HAFIZ PACHA ENTKB8 SERVIA AND DEFEAT8 TEE
SERVIANS?A GREAT BATTLE IN FROQRE6S?
FT1BTI1ER TURKISH SUCCIRSER?AUSTRIA DETERMINED
TO ANNEX BOSNIA?A NEW SULTAN
TO BE PROCLAIMED.
Loxrox, Anguat 1, 187&
The Standard this morning liss a special despatch
trora WlJdln, which says that Harts Pacha entered
lervia en the 2?th of July. AtGranseada ho encoun?red
4,000 Servlsna.
Alter a lour hours' fight the Servians fled, leaving
any killod. Haflz I'acha joined Ahmed Kyoob Pacha
it Derbent on the aoib, where lio again atlsckod the
lervians. A great battlo occurred, which raged all day.
Che result Is not known
axotiucr TtraKisn spccmh.
ThaTnrks under sulcimun Parhn entered Servla, near
htndirola, wbero they encountered eight Servian hatlerles,
with twelve guna Alter a sharp battlo the Ser.
vian? (led. throwing away their guns. The Turks conlL
It cue their advance.
1 Sixty Russian officers are expected nt Nlssa to enter
the Servian army.
At'STRIA TO ASHIX SERVIA.
The Standard'i Berlin special statas that Austria
NEW YORE
teems determined to tnnex Bosnia. Count Andrassy
admits the necessity of the policy. Russia will object.
It le believed that Russia has rosolvod to be unrepresented
at Constantinople.
TUB rOKTE TO ISSUB PAT KB *0X IT.
The Standard'? Constantinople telegram says the Issoe
of paper money Is to begin immediately. The
measure is regarded with dismay.
A XBW SOT.TAM TO BK PROCLAIMED.
The Standard't Vienua despatch says the abdication
ol the Sultan is Imminent. It Is expected that Abdul
Hamid will be proclaimed to-day.
A SERVIAN COUKCIIj OF WAR.
Paris, Angust 1, 1870.
The Sair't special telegrams say a counoil of war was
held yesterday at Alexinats. Prince Milan, Prime Minister
Rlsttch, Generals TchernayelT and Irnich were
present The object was to determine spon means of
action.
wam aimra ttjrket and Greece normabt.e.
Paris, Angust 1, 1870.
La Prtite says that Greece proposes to address a
note to the Powers expressing fear that she will be
unable to resist war with Turkey. The outrages of
the Basht-Baxouks contribulo to tho agitation.
GREECE AND TURKEY.
DESIRE OF THE OBECKS TO BE PREPARED FOR
XXEROENCIES.
IxixDOff, July 31, 1870.
despatch to Router's Telegram Company from
Athens says the opposition newspapers accuse the
government of leaving the country In a defenceless
state. They disavow any desire for an aggressive policy
toward Tursey, but claim that Greece should be placed
In a position to Inspire tho respect of her neighbors.
GREEK EXCITEMENT OVER TURKISH ATROCITIES?THE
RELATIONS WITH TURRET ASSUMING
A SERIOUS ASPECT.
VlENXA, July 31. 1870.
The Tagblatt says the atrocities committed by the
Bashi-Bazoults in Tbessaly and Epirus have created
such a sensation throughout Greece as to rendor tho
maintenance of neutrality difficult. A later despatch
says the relations between Greeco and Turkey are assuming
an inereasingly serious aspect.
ENGLAND.
THE REPORTED SETTLEMENT OF CIRCASSIANS
Ef THES8ALT?PARLIAMENT TO BE PROROGUED
AT AN EARLY DAT.
London, July 31. 1870.
In the House of Commons this alternoon Mr. Disraeli
stated that the Grand Vizter of Turkey bad In
formed Hon. H. ti. Elliot, the British Mlnistor, that tut
statement that the Porte Intended to settle Circassians
In the provinces bordering on Greece was unfounded.
Mr. Disraeli announced that the government would
withdraw the Prison and University bills, and says
that he hoped to prorogue Parliament within a reasonable
tlma
PARLIAMENT TO BE PB0R03UED ABOUT AUGUST
16?TBI LOUD LIEUTENANCY OP IRELAND.
Manchester, July 31, 187&
The Guardian says:?"It Is understood that, according
to present arrangements, Parliament will be prorogued
on the 16th of August"
Tho Guardian also says:?"It Is understood that the
Duko of Marlborough has retnscd tho I.ord Lieutenancy
of Ireland, and it la rumored that Baron WharnclifTe
has accepted It"
RELATIONS WITH DAHOMEY?A BLOCKADE DECLARED.
l.ONDOX, J Uly 31, 1970.
In the House or Commons ibis afternoon Mr. Jamea
Lowtbor, one of tbe under secrefcrles lor tbe Colonial
Department, in reply to a question by Mr. Wilmot,
aald that be waa unaware of any intention on the part
ol the Bntleb government to attack Dahomey.
Tbe blockade of the porta of Dabomey waa declared
on the 1st of July.
THE BISHOP OP MEATH COMMITS 6UICIDE
WHILE BUTTERING PROM DELIRIUM.
London. July 31, 187&
The Timet this morning says:?
"The Right Hon. and Most ltev. Samuel Butcher, D.
D., P. C., Biabop of Mealh, who baa been auflering
from congeatlon of the lungs and bronchitis, becarao
delirious while hia attendants were temporarily absent
Saturday morning. Upon returning they lound the
door locked. When tbe door was burst open the
Bishop was found on tho floor In a pool of blood, with
a razor beside him. A slip of paper, on which waa
written the single word "Mad," lay upon a table. The
Biabop was speechless when found and expired shortly
afterward.
THE EXTRADITION DISCUSSION TO COME UP
BEFORE PROROGATION.
Lokdos, July 31, 1870.
In the House of Common* this evening, Mr. Disraeli,
in reply to a question, stated that the discussion on
extradition was impossiblo this week, owing to the
pressure of business, but the prorogation would not
take place without lis being brought forward.
WEEKLY REVIEW OF THE GRAIN TRADE?CHOP
PROSPECTS SATISFACTORY?rRBSINT STATE OF
TRADE DISCOURAGING.
Losoo.x, July 31, 1870.
The Mark Lane txprf$t tbls ereuing, In Its regular
weekly rerlew of lb* British corn trade, says crop
prospects both at home and abroad are satisfactory.
Wheat cutting will be general during the second week
in Augnsi Cereals in Scotland and Ireland are maturing
almost too rapidly. The present state of trado is
no doubt discouraging. Should adverse weather prevail
during the barvost there will be considerable alteration
of opinion concerning the future course of
prices The firmness at Liverpool and London
after the recent rains Is a aufflcient
prool of thia The local wheat market
has shown more activity daring the
week?a farther decline of a shilling per quarter
templing millers to operate somewhat less sparingly.
Flour has been so tnauimate lately Hut many millers
are working short boura Oats have declined under
heavy auppliea Indian corn teems proof against any
decline, the onormoue consumption absorbing tbe large
Imports. Grain afloat is steady. The cargoes off the
roast baring dwindled, holders have shown more firmness.
In some cases a slight recovery teas occurrod.
THB PRICE or S1L.VKB.
Lownojr, July 31, 187&
Silver to-day is quoted at 50d. and tbo market Is flak
SILVER AT AM8TZRD \M.
Losnov, July 31, 1876.
The market price for sliver at Amsterdam has risen
from 90 to 93 guilders per Kilogram.
FRANCE.
THE MOTION TO EXP FX THE JESUITS ABANDONED.
Paris, July 31. 1874
M. Casse's motion in the Chamher of Deputies, looking
to the enlorcement of the law of 18'J8, for expelling
the Jesuits from the country, has been abandoned.
ARRANGEMENT TO PROROGUE THE CHAMBERS.
Paris, July 31, 1878.
M. Ordvv will conTer to morrow with M. Dufaure reI
speeling the suggestion of the leaders of th*f.oftto
prorogue tbe Chambers on tbo 8th of August till the
6th of November.
ITALY.
PROJECT TBOVIDINO EOn ELEMENTARY EDUCATION.
Roiik, July 31, 1878.
Upon the reopening of tbe Chamber of Deputies the
government will Introduce s bill establishing elementary
education.
WLISKEY CON3PIKATOK RELEASED.
Mii.wacskr, July 31, 1878.
Jscob Nunnemschsr, who was convicted of frauds In
connection with tbs revenue, whom the President recently
pardoned, was released from prison to-day on
paying a fine ol (10,000 and the cost ot three trials.
: HERALD, TUESDAY, AT
THE MURDEROUS MOLLIES.
A JUBOB IN A BECENT CASK BHOT AT?TATAL
VIOLENCE AT A CAVP MEETING.
Potts villi, Pa, July 31, 187ft.
In spite of the fact that In tho jail* of Mcnuylktll and
Carbon conntiei there are eight Mollies convicted of
murder and awaiting the gallows, tbo fiendish aptril of
the murderoue organliation does not appear to be completely
CuW 0(1.
On Saturday night last, while a citizen of East
Mauch Chunk, named Miller, was seated In bis own
house be was fired upon by some person concealed in
the shrubbery, and the bullet grazed his head.
Miller was one of the jurors who convicted Alexander
Campbell of murder In the first decree recently, for
complicity In the killing of John P. Jones. The attempt
on his life was undoubtedly made becauso of his
part lu finding the verdict, and shows that the Mollie
Maguiree arc not easily wenned from their habit of
aveugtng their quarrols by nfurder.
FATAL KXCOPMTKR AT A CAMP MSSTIXO.
This afternoon a gang of about a dosen young Irishmen
from Honey brook intruded upon a camp meeting
of the Evangelical Association at Quaquake, in this
couniy. The preaidlug elder ordered them to be seated.
A policeman, sworn in under a recent law, attempted
to eniorce the order and one of the Irishmen threw a
knilo at him Irom his sleeve. The polieeman. with a
cocked revolver in one hand, clubbed the whole gang
out of the meeting with the other band.
Alter they had gone several yards they turned and
fired three shots at the officer, who Immediately returned
the Ore, iatally wounding James Haggerty, of
uoneynrooK, wno 11 oniy aooui tguteen years oia.
Several of the ruffians were Arrested. Fearing
further trouble word wm sent to Tamaqua for police
aid.
BLOODY AFFRAY.
MUBDKBOU8 ATTACK BY TEN QUABBYMEN ON A
FAMILY?TWO MEN LIKELY TO DIE TBOM
THEIR WOUNDS.
Rrockviu.k, Ont, July 31, 1878.
The residence of. Watson Mallei, on the back road,
four miles from HammoDd, N. Y., was attacked by a
gang of tcu men from the Hammond stone quarry on
Saturday evening. Mrs. Mallet's screams brought her
husband and two woramen from a field, whon a bloody
conflict ensued, during whicn John Sly and Anthony Huskins,
tho workmen, received numerous deep knife and
pitchfork wounds, from the effects o( which they will
die. Mallet, after eevero handling, escaped to the
wooda. The roughs remained all night in his yard.
Two of them were arreeted in Hammond, one In Alexandria
and one In ltockvllie to-day. The remainder
left here by the tug l.awrenco to-duy. Telcgrama for
their arrest have beon sent to Capo Vincent
SHOOTING AFFRAY IN KENTUCKY.
TWO BBOTHEB8 KILLED IN A FIGHT GROWING
OUT OF A FAMILY FEUD.
Locisvilli, July 31, 1870.
A bloody shooting affray occurred in Franklin county
on last Saturday, tho particulars of which were received
hero to-night Three brothers named Hetrod,
while reluming from a barbecue at Frauklort,
were overtaken by James, Andrew and
Aleck Scott, Goi rge Horrod, William Penn and
Sam Ayers. The latter party rode ahead and
procured arms, after winch ilicy waited for the Hcrrod
brothers, and an engagement with pistols and shotguns
took place, resulting In the death of Kiloy Horrod, and
the uul wounding Id tho breast and lace or Levi
Herrod. The pariiea have since been arrested. The
affair was caused by an old family teud.
LYNCH LA.W IN MISSOURI
A CHIMINAL TAKEN FROM JAIL AND HANGED
BY TBI AVENGERS.
St. Loris, July 31, 1870.
The Globe-Democrat's Leavenworth special says-?
"Raphael Williams, a colored man, committed a QendUb
outrage on Mrs. Davis, a while woman, at her
house at Camden Point, Mo., last Thursday night. He
was arrested the next day and lodged In Jail at Platte
City. This morning about 120 armed men entered
Platte City and pasted pickets around the Jail, to
prevent interference bv tiio citizens, while five members
ol the party reused tho Sheriff, whom they
seized and forced'to deliver the keys or the cells. A
deputy sheriff unlocked the door of Williams' cell,
when a rope waa placed around bis neck and be waa
dragged to a tree near the depot, where he was
liaoged, after whten the mob quietly dispersed.
When the body was cut down by tbo Coroner a
placard was found piuned to it, stating that owing to
tho inelllctency of the laws of Missouri providing lor
the punishment of such malefactors. the "Avengers,"
who number among them some ol the oldest and most
respectable citizens ot Platte county, had deemed It
adnsable to take tho law Into their own hands and administer
the Jusllco tho case so richly deserved. Mrs.
Davis was III at the time of the outrage and now lies
at the point ot dea b.
PINCHING THE SIGNAL SERVICE.
EFFECT OF CONGRESSIONAL ECONOMY UPON THE
SIGNAL SERVICE?A NUMUEB OF STATIONS
CLOSED TO-DAT?THE WEATHER MAP DISCONTINUED?THE
STATION AT NEWPORT SAVED
FOB THE PRESENT.
A very significant reduction of the Signal Service
will take place to-day. Tbla reduction hna been Imperative
consequent on tho diminution of the appropriation
by Congress, and which la relerred to In the
Message of the President. It will he seen by tho following
communication of tho observing sergeant of
the Weather Observation Office In this cily, that today
the force of men will be reduced and the publication
of the dally weather map discontinued. Tho despatch
from Newport, given lielow, shows that at tba
last moment orders have been received to defer for a
time the breaking up of the signal station there,
BCDCCTIOKH IK TRa KK!V TORE OFFICE.
War I)f:r aktmkst, 1
Wkathrb Orskrvatiox Officr.
EurtTABl.K Bl-ildimo. No. ?2(> Hkoadwav, r
Naw York Cirr, July 31. lM7fi. j
By reason of a reduction made by Congress in the appropriation
asked for by the Chief Signal Officer for the support
of our service on its present beets, and ot the lore# ot
mea in the corps as formerly allowed, a number of stations
ol observation will be discontinued to morrow. At this
station the number of reports received will be considerably
less and the publication of the breather map entirely discontinued.
This statement it rendered necessary on aeeonnt of the
nnmher of comnbtlnts received y this office et the proposed
change Irom the business men of New York.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
IIIKAU J. PENROD,
Sergeant Signal Servlee, V. S. A.
THE NEWPORT SIGNAL OFFICE.
Newport, July 31, 1878.
The following despatch was received at the Signal
Office to-night:?
Washikotok, D. C., July 31, 1S76.
Serjeant U II. FOSTKU, Signal Officer. Newport. K. f.
Delay action lu reference to breaking up station until further
orders. II. W. HOWOATE.
This action has beon brought about by I'ntted Statos
Senator Anthony, who, upon receiving numerous
letter* from thia port protecting against the removal of
the office, and showing up Its Importance here, called
to see the Chief Signal Officer and the Secretary of War
and laid the case boforo them. The last observation
was to barn been taken to-night, and the olllcor intended
to have left immediately for Washington with
the property of the government in nan at hie office.
Mariner* will he pleased to learn that there is at least
a possibil'ty of the retention of the station at this welcome
harbor for thoosauds of coastwise vessels during
the yesr. #
MIDNIGHT WEATHER REPORT.
Was DsrARTMixT, l
Omca or th? Catsr Sioxal Orricam, J
Wahiiixotox, August 1?1 A. M. J
Probabilities.
For Mew England and the Mlddlo States cool, pertly
cloudy weather and light northerly to easterly winds,
with slowly rising barooietor.
For the South Atlantic States light rains on the
coast, followed by clearing weather during the day,
northerly to westerly winds, rlamg barometer and low
temperature.
For the Gulf Stales, Tennessee and tho Ohio Valley,
clear or fair weather and light northeast to sontbeast
winds, with slowly rising barometer, and stationary or
slight changes in temperature.
For the lower lake region, generally cool weather
will contlnno with light variable winds, and rising
barometer.
For tho upper lake region, the Upper Ifisalsaippi
and l<ower Missouri valleys, clear or partly cloudy
weather with local rains In^ tho extreme northera
portions, easterly to southerly winds, slowly rising
temperature, and stationary or slowly falling barometer.
The Central Mlesitslppl, Cumberland and Bed river*
will continue to fall.
TIJE WXATHEB YSSTXRDAT.
The following record will show the change* In the
temperature for lb* past twenty-four hour*, In com- I
par son with the corresponding dale of laat year, aa indicated
by Hi" thermometer at Hudnut'a pharmacy,
Hr.RAi.ii Building: ?
1R76. 1878. 1876. 1176.
3 A. M "I f>'i 3.30 P. M.... 83 69
0 A. M 71 M Of. U 76 68
9 A. M 7 a 08 0 K M 76 68
13 M 70 67 1 'i V. M 71 66
Average temperature yesterday 66
Average temperature tor corresponding date last
year T
TGUST 1. 1878.?WITH SU
inE CUSTER FIGHT
A New Story of the Little Big
Horn Massacre.
ALLEGATIONS OP A GUIDE'S TREACHERY.
%
The Indians .Warned and Enabled to
Prepare an Ambush.
WTiMTlNIi INUIUENTd UD' THIS BATTLifi.
Evidences that White Men Were
with the Redskins.
Bismarck, d. t., July 31, 1870.
A letter written by a sergeant In the Sixth Infantry,
dated Yellowstone lib pot, July 16, has the
following Interesting points In relation to the Custer
massacre. You will note a new theory of
Custer's attack and defeat which Is at least plausible;
but to the letter:?
TUB SERGEANT'S LETTER.
The Impression prevails here, as well as above,
that Custer was given away treacherously by a halfbreed
guide he had with him, by the name of Billy
Cross, and every circumstance, so far as ascertained,
tends to confirm the impression that this
guide had an understanding with tho Indians beforehand,
and treacherously led Custer's command
Into
A SNARE,
where they were all massacred, with the exception
of one Crow scout and two guides, named respectively
Ulrard and Jackson. Cross, with the Indian
scouts that came from Lincoln with Custer, derf.pfl
thn immmanrl ahnrt.lv nftar t.hn IWrht. tiAcmn
and Doming was heard of them until they came
into tills camp, about 160 miles?four days' travel?
from the scene of conflict. Ilad they joined Gibbon
or &eno, the latter of whom was in close proximity
and the former no more than twcnty-flvo or thirty
miles away, and informed the one or the other ol
Custer's situation the lives of at least some of the
brave men who periled might have been saved.
AKRlVAiioP TUB GUIDES.
They came in two distinct parties. Cross and one
party about two o'clock in the afternoon of the listli
of June, and another party of about nine or teu
more, leading surplus ponies, In about live hours
after. When their dliferent stories were compared
they were found to want harmony in several very
essential particulars. Most of the Indians' cartidge
frills were lull and none of them had expended more
than two or three rounds. This, in connection with
their
CONTRADICTORY HTOllIKS.
created in the miuds of many, myself among; the
numt>cr, doubts us to their courage and honesty
toward Custer on this' occasion, and 1 for one
find it dinicult to eradicate this impression from my
mind. Most all of them are mere boys, and ono of
them gave evidence the other day that he was dellcient
in courage, and ho is doubtless a fair criterion
by which to judge the whole. Parties who hare
arrived from Terry since with despatches inform us
that the men who were fortunate enough to escape
this dreadful carnage, the Crow scout especially,
charge these Indians with cowardice, and say they
ran away at the beginning of the tight.
CROSS' BSPORT TO CUSTER.
They also say that the night before the light this
Cross was sent out to scout and reconnoitre and was
gone teu or eleven hours ; that he returned in the
morning and Informed General Custer that the village
was a small one and he would encounter hut
very little difficulty In obtaining an easy victory.
Custer, who is said by his men to be very impulsive,
without first satisfying himself as to the truth or
falsity of the report, mounted his command and gave
the command forward. The command came In sight
of the village within an hour aud a half and he then
gave the order to charge it, which was gulluuily
done, but no resistance was met with until they arrived
on the other side of the village location, when
they received a terrific volley, which put an end to
many a noble fellow's existence, and the troops then
found themselves In the centre of a large camp of
many villages and completely surrounded by the red
devils.
INDIAN PREPARATION FOR DEFENCE.
At this spot the grass and brush were found tied
ami knotted so as to Impede the progress of the
horses, and the Indians and some of the villages
were screened from view by a sort of wicker breast
work of willow brush, behind which these red
sleuth hounds of hell could quietly pick off any of
the soldiers without endangering their own precious
hides. All retreat being cut off there was nothing
lor It but to forward. Custer then designated a
knoll for his command to rally at, which they did,
breaking through the bronze wall of savages like a
streak of barbed lightning and gained the knoll,
where they made the last stand, all hands lighting
desperately, as men only can light whose lives are
at stake and where the light became a hand to hand
conflict.
ATROcmits or Tire squaws.
The sqnaws made themselves consplcnous, knocking
In the skulls with a heavy club with a stone at
the end of It, and mutilating in divers other ways,
too sickening too mention, every soldier that fell.
KV1DKNCEH OF treachery.
The breastwork referred to, and the knotted grass
especially, presented every Indication of having been
freshly done, and that the Indians were fully informed
and aware of Custer's Intentions toward
them, and hail accordingly mode every necessary
preparation for giving him a warm reception.
Everybody was scalped and otherwise mutilated,
excepting General Custer and Corporal Tlcmann,
whose scalp was partly off and who had the sleeve
of his blouse with the chevron uplald over It In a peculiar
manner. This enabled a good many
men of the Seventh cavalry, who are
ncre dismounted, to detect one or tne participants
In the light on the Indians' side
in the person of one Kuin-in-thc-Facc, who was in
the guardhouse last winter and chained to a corporal,
also a prisoner at the time. Not even a button
was removed from Custer's uniform, while his
brother aud the rest of the officers were terribly
mutilated.
RKNO'S COMMAND
was several miles away from the scene of Custer's
light, but was not aware of his having been engaged
until after the battle was all over and General (Jlbbon
had arrived with his command to re-enforce
him. To the timely arrival of Gibbon with his
"Dough Hoys" Is due the salvation of Reno and his
command, for they were also surrounded aud lighting
desperately and with very slight hope of ever
coming out alive.
TIIK UBAVKRT OF BKNTKIM.
To the coolness and bravery and foresight of
Colonel Bcnteen, of the Seventh cavalry, at the beginning
of Reno's engagement Is due the salvation
of Reno and the greater part oi his command, lie
now occupies the very enviable position of idol In
the esteem of those who were engaged with him
and came out with their lives.
AN INDIAN TKl'MrKTKK.
One of the wounded of Reno's command, who Is in
the hospital here, says that at one time during the
tight they heard the advance sounded on the trumpet
from Indians; they all rose up, thinking it was
Custer come to reluforce them, and cheered lustily;
when the Indians let forth a derisive yell at them,
tired a terrible volley and made a charge which they
repulsed, as they did several others that were made
in rapid succession.
TTtK INDIAN I.OSS
was very heavy, and it Is said that after the battle
was over, where Glhlmn't and Reno's commands
were burying the killed, they were found piled upOM
PPLEMENT.
corrlwood, so effective was the tiro of the soldiers.
Many more of the Indians were tied to their ponies
and thus their bodies were carried off, and others
were carried away by their friends.
G17N8 BECOMING USELESS.
The cartdnes of our cavalrymen, with ttreeeheB
similar to our Infantry guns, are represented to he
almost useless after the llfth and sixth round has
been flred from them, the spring refusing to throw
the shell, thus necessitating the use of the ramrod
to eject it.
( real complaint Is also made of the cartridges,
many of them having hardly powder enough In
tliein to force the ball from the socket of the
shell.
WHITE MEN WITH THE INDIANS.
There Is quite a number of white men with the
Indians, English having been spokeu In their ranks
plentifully during the engagement. One of the Indians
that was shot by Itcno's men attracted peculiar
attention, and upon going up to him he was
found masked, and upon removing the mask the
features of a white man were disclosed, with a long,
orrav nttfrinrrhal KnuH Vhio InHivlilnui
several times by Gibbon's command, In eh a rue
of small parties of Indians, but they could never get
close enough to him to make his acquaintance, so
they took him to be an Indian sporting a false whisker
for a blind. But when he was pointed out on
the field, dead, they recognized him as the same Individual.
A bugler who was dishonorably discharged
In lstw, from the Second lnftintry, Is said to be with
them, and It Is supposed he Is the one who blew the
call of the trumpet.
general btuboes mot to take the field.
St. Louis, July 31, l?7?.
General Sturges, In command of the post here and
who Is colonel of the Seventh United States cavalry
regiment, applied by telegraph to-day to General
Sherman to be seut to his regiment in the Yellowstone
country at once. Sherman replied that Ids
time here would not bo up till October, and it would
not be convenient to relieve him before that dale.
General Stnrgcs feels very much aggrieved on account
of the attacks which have been made on his
record as a soldier in consequence of his criticism
on Custer's battle, and wants an opportunity to
show his ability us a soldier In the field.
the available foi1ce fob' fiqhtiko the
BIOCX AND HOW IT IS TO BE INCREASED
WHT THE OFFER OF VOLUNTEERS IS DECLINED?THE
BORDER REPRESENTATIVES'
METHOD FOB WHIPPING THE HOSTTLBb.
Wasiiingtos, July 31, 1878.
Aceording to the rolls of the War Department the
outside nurobor of troops which tho government can
place In tho field to cope with the Sioux will not exceed,
all told, 3,000 men, Irrespective of teamsters,
scouts and guides. It Is felt that
this will not constituto a snfhciently strong
force to meot the hostlles, but with the
enlistment now nbout to be ordered by direction of
Congress thcro will be added enough recruits shortly
to swell tho little armv to perhaps 5,000 men; that is,
as soon as the companies are up to the standard of
100 men each.
Notwithstanding considerable effort and many offers
on the part of Keprosentativos from the border States
and Territories, In tho line of furnishing volunteers
to the government for the purpose
ot raising a force able to surely conquer the Sioux, the
President and the War Department have thus far
steadily continued to 6et their faces against tho policy
of doing anything toward accoptlug volunteers. The
difficulty which the government had In tho cases
of unlimited claims made for fighting Indians
by Colorado and Montana is cited
and brought up in resistance to the policy
of employing volunteers. Dot the most serious objection
which the War Department has against the accept,
ance of volunteers is that a divided responsibility and
authority Is established which Is likely to cause both
groat expenso and great confusion. Representatives
from the Territories say the best way to clean
ont the Sioux la to organize, arm and
equip tho frontiersmen and let them take their
own method, simply offering $50 lor every scalp
taken. Mr. Wilshire, o( Arkansas, a member of the
House Commlttco on Indian Affairs, concur In thli
view, and Commissioner Smith, of the Indian Oareau,
says:?
"A live white man Is of more importance than a live
Indian."
A proposition is on foot to mulct the Sioux tribes
with tbo expenses of tho war, to be taken from the
annuities and moneys to be paid them.
ALARM OF THE FRONTIER.
SETTLE BS MOVING THEIR WIVES, CHILDREN
AND PROPERTY EASTWARD.
Washington, July 31, ig7<j.
An ofllcor of the army, who has Just arrived from
the frontier, states that such Is tho alarm felt at the
different milttarv posts, Indian agencies and small
towns, consequent upon lbs warliko movomeuts of the
Sioux, that they have commenced to move their
children, wives, relatives and valuables eastward lor
security. The movement amounts almost toapanio.
CAVALRY TO THE FRONT.
St. Louis, July 31, 1878.
All the cavalry now on dnty in Southern Kansas,
Texas and the Indian Territory have been ordered to
Join General Terry or General Crook and will leavo lor
their destination at once.
ANN ELIZA'S CASE.
Salt I.aik Crrr, July 31, 1878.
This morning Judgo ScbacfTor rendered a decision In
the ess* of Young vs. Young to recover alimony. The
decision reduces the amount made payable by ibo order
of Judge McKean Irom $600 to $100 per month, thus
diminishing the amount Irom $17,600 to $3,000, and
gives defendant thirty days in which to pay the
amount, and provides that in default o( such payment
execution shall issue against Ilia properly. The Court
also decided that the cost of the suit shall be paid by
defendant.
SERIOUS RAILROAD COLLISION.
Maxassas, Va., July 31, 1870.
A stock train collided this morning on the Washington
City and Virginia Midland Railroad with the southbound
mail train, noar Bull Run bridge, smashing both
locomotives, Ave cars loaded witn cattle and shocp, the
express car and two mall ears, and demolishing the
plallorms of the passenger cars.
The pas-ouirers escaped uninjured, but the mail messengers,
Duval, C'arke, Jennings and Bragg, were
shgntly hurt.
N. Van riant, express messenger, was seriously injured.
The engines and firemen escaped by Jumping from
their engines.
Mr. Selcoit, a driver, was seriously injured by Jumping
Irom ine train.
The Southern mails were all saved Intact, hut the
local and Western mails were partially destroyed.
All the Southern trains were delayed several hours
>. ? YJ..... n ?l it, , U Unilrn.H ....
slightly injured.
rho accident will caused by an error of (be conductor
Of the caitle train, who misread bis order* at Mnnassaa.
A .'arte nambcr of cattle and sheep ware killed, and
many more eacaped Into the woods.
AMUSEMENTS.
nrrn atknub thkatbe.
Mr. 8otbern la on* of thoao lucky men that turn
everything Into gold. There waa little to praUe in the
representation of Dundreary laat night. Mr. Daly, the
proprietor of lb* theatre, did not giro to Mr. Sothern
the aupport auch a well paring actor deaerred, and
Mr. Sotbern waa left on hia own resources Mr.
Hothern la a fine actor, but with such a company aa he
had to contend against laat night It waa hard for eren
Dundreary to make anything like a success.
TOlfT pabtobs thfatbb.
A good programme of variety acts waa presented at
this house last night to a largo audience. The enter,
talnment commenced with the well worn farce of ''Who
Stolo Ibo Carpet Bag," and waa heartily received.
Blitz gave hia punch and Judy show, Frank Ueorga
sang a number 01 Irian songs and Charles Diamond w aa
recalled to repeal hi* exceilsnl harp perlormnnce. A
Dutchman's Visit to New York" eonclndad tbo nigbt'a
fan.
KKI.LT A LXOR'S H1MHTBKI.S.
The company over which Kelly k Leon preotdes
seems to be the legitimate sncceetor or poor Dan
Brvant. A magnificent bill Is olferad this weak.
Koily is at his heat In one or Leeocq'a operas, and
Leon, who In hia femate specially has no equal, entirely
exceeds all hie previous representation*. The
company ol Kelly k Leon ia ena that la calculated to
make the general public strongly attached to It, oa account
of tu taenia and variety of antortatnaoat.
. i
5
THE TWO LETTERS.
Governor Tilden. at Saratoga
To-Day.
The Final Draft of the Lettel
Now Ready.
GOVERNOR HENDRICKS AND MS FINANCE POLICY.
Saratoga, July 31, 187(1
Aa aoon u the democratic atumlard bearer. laaan
tbclr letter* of acceptanco the campaign will begin in
earnest, und It la tbc inicnilou of (bo loaders to make
it th. moil vigorous and determined campaign tnak
baa been carried on for twenty years.
Governor Tlidon will givo bia pcraonal attention to
It. .atiApnI ininnffAmant nrifl the mail who will haV.
mora Immediate charge ol (bo details have great experience
In political adaire, and will see that every
available element la utilized to make the fight for reform
signally victorious.
Governor Tjlden Is expected here to-morrow evening
with tbc draft of bis document, and then It will receive
the finishing touches, if any should be noedod. Governor
Hendricks has been busy revising his own letter,
which is now suhgtaaoally finished, and is essentially
in harmony with tbo sentiments of Governor Tlldep,
as forecast in the Hkbald.
governor iikniihicks misrici'reskxtedt
It Is assertod here, on good authority, that what
ever doubt may have arisen In tho public mind aa It
a radical dillcrence between tho financial viewa ot
Governor Hendricks and tho declarations of the plat?'
lor in, hag boon occasioned by a misconception or misrepresentation
of tho Governor's real sentiments on
that question. Home prominent democrats admit
that ho himroll Is partly to hlame lor such popular
misconception, and that it would have
been wiser policy lu him to bnvo been leM
non-committal. Of his policy in that particular
au iulluential member of tho party has vouchsafed the
oxpluuutton that Governor Jlendrickt and Senator Morton
are tho acknowledged leaders ol thoir respective
parties In Indiana. That both are shrewd pollllciaus. ant
lor yours the slrugglo between thein has been to ontail
or preserve ascendency iu the State. There is a largt
.1 ... i?i . . i ... i ??a
CiClllUUi 111 1IU1U |I(I| lira 1U ia<ui vt luuawuu ?uu u<>tornor
Hendricks (ltd nut doom It politic to offend ntk
necessarily bo Imporluut aa element by Inking <
strong a ground Iu favor ol curly resumption 01
specie pay infills as bo couid bavo conscientiousl]
assumed, it deemed dcsiralile, becauso it ii
oue of tho cardinal doctrines of the dcmocratli
party that gold and silver are the only coustilulion*
currency 01 the country and tbu government bus n?
legal rlgnt to issue paper money. There is no pursi
patriot nor sounder democrat than (iovernor Hen.
bricks. It l* reiterated hero tint the only difference ol
opinion tuat bus existed bctwOi Governor llcndriokl
and Governor l'lldcn bus befl as to the necessity of
some action on tne part of Congress, or aiTeasi of tht
democratic House of Kepreseutaiives, looking to a rs>
peal of tbe resumption clause.
IIKN PRICKS' POLICY OP SILKNCK.
Both are opposed to the |>oiicy of forcing resumption
by a contraction of the currency; but woile Governor
Tilden has persistently couieuded tbat resumption
would naturally and speedily follow tbe revival of
trade and commerce, which would result Iron
the advent of a practical rolorui administration, Governor
Hendricks lias inclined to tho opinion that
policy of silence as to a period of resumption would ba
tbe best to restore conll Icnco to the country. When
Governor Tilden wus here he presented Ins own view
ol tbe enso so forcibly that Governor Qeodrlcks has
Ha?n Hwinnittl trt vifllil hia norKfinnl nnlninn nn thai
question. Ho says that Governor Tilden'e vlows, as ho
roud them lnlbe Hkiiald, will suit tno people of ladiana.
TUt ST. LOCI8 PLATFORM.
Governor Tllden, In hi* letter, will demonstrate that
the St. Louis pUtlorm does not pledge ibo parly to Immediate
repeal ol tho date of resumption, but only
pledges it to substitute measures that would lead to
practical resumption at nu early period. He thinks
that, ll'olected, tno policy ol roforin he Intends to carry
out would wive $60,000,000, a year, or perhaps even s
larger sum than that, and that the surplus found thus
created would onabie specie payments to be resumed,
before tho end of tho second year of bis udmintatration.
He thinks forced resumption would create
a panic, and ihui after tho Presidential election shall
ho decided all parlies will laror a repeal cf the clause
flxinu ihe date to resume specie payments He will
put tho financial question so plainly and oxpliculy la
' his letter, it la said, showing the insincerity of the reI
publicans in ctiucttng the resumption clause that tho
people cannot tail to seo the wisdom of bis position?
namely, that a return to spocio payment will naturally
aud speedily follow public prosperity, resulting from
i honesty and' economy In the administration ol the gov
eminent.
TUB CONDITIO* Of THB SOCTIL
I Willi Mfnr-Iim In Ihn frinilltinn nf Ihn Smith flnVC
i ertior Tilden thinks that universal amnesty is Mscnttal
to itio proper anil complete paci.'icalion cl the disturbing
elements in the Southern Mules. Ho believes that
the leading men in Hie South, wbo still remain diafrmn.
cti.sed, should be unconditionally roslored to all the
rights and privileges of citizens, because, acoepling the
Issues of the rebellion, they are better ablo to represent
and guido the pooplo of their 8latns than some ot
the men who influence them now, and at thn
same time the Governor Is tnllexiblo In his position
that tho rights and interests alike of the negro and thn
1 white man should be protected under the law.
i ma lkttkr or liovbr.xor hkxuhicks.
Governor Heudricks' letter will not give much en.
couragetnenl to the solt money men Irotn the tact thai
' he stands squarely on the St. Leuis platlorm on lh?
tlnnncial question as well as on every indicated measure
of relorin.
l04iki50 for a uakkxt.
There are a number of liberal repnblirans born
evidently to aee wtial terms they can make with thn
candidates. Kx-Senslor Trumbull, of lllluois; Gov.
ernor Curtin. of Pennsylvania; J. M. Scovllle, of New
Jersey, and aevoral others ure among those who can
be made to believs that the Interests of the country
and even the porprtuailon ol ropatillcan Institutions
depend upon the election of Tilden and Hendricka if
proper inducements are assured. There Is to be n
meeting ot some of the prominent members of the Liberal
Committee ol 187U at Cliappaqua soon sfter tho *ppe.irance
ot Tilden and Hendricks' letter, when a mnnt.
leato will be Issued In favor ol Tilden and Hendricka
and in opposition to that of Ethan Allen declaring 11
favor of Hayea and Whoeler.
BRISTOW TO STUMP FOR HATES.
Boston, Mass., Joly 81, 187?.
Ex-Secretary Uristow leaves to-day for Vermont,
where be will take the stump for Ilayee and Wheeler,
speaking at soino or the larger places, aud then will
pass a few days in the White Mountain region. He
will finish up his trip lu this acctlon of New England
by a brief slay at East Hampton.
STANLEY.
[From the Omaha Herald, July 27.]
Stanley, the master of all modern African explorntion,
bos been heard from at last, hia latest letters
being dated In April of this year. He has achieved remarkable
discoveries. Including n pale-faced rase ol
men hitherto unknown. If lame is worth anything
Stanley is immortally rtcb, aud his exploits will
reflect enduring honor npon tho Ameriean name and
James Gordon Bennett.
SERGEANT MGIVEN'SWIDOW.
Several prominent citizens of tho Seventeenth ward,
headed by Dr. Kncbel, are engaged tn raising sn additional
sun of money tor th? widow ot the late Sergeaof
McGivon. From proeent appearances their efforts will
be vary succesalal
HOTEL ARRIVALS.
Profcuror Thomas C. Amber, of the Drlllah Celt,
tonnlat Commission, yesterday nrrived at tha Fiftl
Avenue Hotel. Jullua A. Hkilton, United States ConaM
at the City ol Mexico, la at tha AMor House. Pay la
spector Edward Foster, United State* Navy, la at ih?
Union Square Hotol. Ilenry K. Plereon, of Albany, b
at the Hrevoort Houaa. P, A. Cameron, Peruviaa
Consul at 8k Thotnaa, I* at the Windsor Hotel. Lie*
tenant Commander John C. Kennatt, United Statea
Navy, la at the Sturtevnnt House. General John CL
Kohinaon, ol Itlnghamloa. la at tha Coleman Houeei
Judge Allred Yaple, of Cincinnati, and General Joseph
A. Potter, United Simon Army, are at tba Si. Nlcboiaa
Hotel Captain .lames Kennedy, of the steamship City
ol Montreal, is at-the New York Hotel Kx-i ongreesman
Moaea W. Field, of Detroit, la at tha St. Jainea
Hotel Colonel Daniel McClure and Colonel Richard
N. Batcbeldcr, United States Army: Kiehard C.
McCormtok, Secretary at tba Republican National
Committee, and Jobn G. Priest, ol 8k Louia, are at
tbo Fifth Avenue HoteL
THE WORLD OF FASHION AT THE SEA SIDS
and the spas, awara of the advantages of GLENN'S Sourni-w
Sosr as a remedy lor srorl.utlc complaints and an adJnnrt
of ths halli. as a rule Is prodded * it Is It Ladlea aad
gentlemen who are not should obtain it at nnee.
allli.L'S Ham Dva, slack ??r brown, SOeeats.
A.?IKON TRUSSES ARE SUPERSEDED BY THH
Silk Klsitio Truss, sold by ELASTIC TKlIhS COMPANY.
llroadwsr
ELECTRIC "BELTS?FOR DEBILITY IN MEN.
Call orseud (or elrcnlar tnJ. KARR. Kt2 Broadway.
KEEP'S PATENT PARTLY MADE DRESS SHIRTS.?
The rere best, n tor#*i; eaa be finished ae easily at haaamirii;
s handkerchief. 971 Broadway aad Ml Arch sk,
1'biladeipble
mar- (SffAJa fe lie
xNCiSfof?a'nKw trbatibe RXPLAfNtjWT'ffftt*
\J taeceeafnl treeaiuent. seat Baa. Dra. BBOWM A KOJbs
HARD, Re. M West 14th eh

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