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The sun. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1916-1920, March 03, 1918, Image 9

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THE SUN, SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 1918.
M4
VARIED GRIMHINS
COLLECTION OH VIEW
Pnlndnps Will Bo Sold nt Auc
tion in Anderson Galleries
on Tuesday.
Oil) WEST TOINT SHOWN
Unnsunl Sea rieco by lnncss,
'Off ilm Coast of Corn
wall," a Feature.
n,o ralntlngs collected by the late
John P- Crlmmlns arc now on public
view In the handsome new galleries at
Anderson's and will be sold there at
auction Tuesday. Tho collection Is a
varied one. with old masters, old family
IKirtralts. examples of the Barblzon
ohool, modern French find modern
American work'. Including an unusual
tpeilmen of tho work of the greatly
esteemed (ieoree tnnoss.
Thlt Is Innefl's "Off the Coast of
.vimiiBtl" nalnted when the artlut was
In the maturing of his power. In his
sixty-second year, ana u wan purenawu
l.y Mr. Crlmmlns nt tho lnncss sale. It
Is a sea niece, with alt the wild atmos
pheric moement of a sudden squall on
. rwltbnund const, and shows ft'hermcn
In small boats beating through tho mtrf
for a hazardous lanaing. it is roousi
In manner, with more than a suspicion
in the technique that the artist when
pontine the picture wa challenging
Couture.
There are two Corots, one with the
tonventlonal pearly tones and feathery
foliage of this master, and tho other
picture with romantic tendencies show
ing an Imposing castle in Iombardy.
Th flnst came from the f. P. Avery col
itctlon, and the second from the 'Math
lessen s.tle. A email Diaz shows
' Ladies Ilathlng In the Woods," draped
lather moro heavily than tho ladles who
now do our Greek danclni? for us, and
yet tint eo heavily as our ladles who
jo batlilnc. Perhaps "Nymphs Bathing
In the Woods" would be a more suitable
title.
Mr Crlmmtn was fond of what are
failed story pictures, and In addition
t.i the "Visit to the Baby" and "Feeding
thn Favorite" (hound), both by Mun
);. ther Is the "Sonr," by Francisco
Dombco ; FIrmln-Olrard's "Flower Girl,"
C I,. Hlbera's "Italian Quarter, Purls,"
arid eMTal Parisian episodes by Beraud.
One shows on amusing party a gencr
';on ago In a small and crowded salon.
The second shows the same peoplb on
their besit behavior. Just coming out
'rom mas In the old Church of Si. Phll
"po rtu Rnule. The Bonntnston church
'nterlor, with Its Imposing procession. Is
almost a story picture, too.
Other works are a bright and striking
!ew of West Point in the early days,
by Asher B. Durand ; "Oaks Old and
New," by II. W. Banger; Rembrandt
I'eale's portrait of "Charles Carroll of
Carrollton." and the "Pet Kitten," by
ieorie Henry Harlow.
$335 FOR A GINGER JAR.
Iloirmnn Oriental Art Sale Fetches
7,50.-.. 50 Altogether.
The sale of the Chinese porcelains
relucted by A. F. Bowman of England
srvltd yesterday In tho Anderson Gal
leries with a total for tho collection of
t",l5j.sn.
Among the principal prices were: n.
P. Hlnsham gave J3SS for No. 267. a
:h'len-lung ginger Jar. decorated In
rrange and gold ; K V. Hammond paid
1135 for No. 43S. an Imperial K'ang-hJl
amphora In white, with peachhloom dec
orations, A. Nlchfleld bought No. 4C2, a
men porcelain bowl, for $170, and H.
S. Itubtns paid 1125 each for No. 461
anl No. 463, bronze figures of gods In
rtr.or.
CHAIRS SELL AT $5,100.
Total at the Hearn Art Sale Now
Beaches a7r.7,.1.10.
A rr of tapestry arm chairs. No. 1232,
''i all tho prices In yesterday's sale of
tf; George A. Hearn art sale at the
,olIen'R of the American Art A.svia
!or going to V,. B. George for u,10fl.
Thffn chairs were In the I-ouls XV.
'ty!e, wPh glided frames and covered
with Beauvals tapestry.
Another set of similar gilded chairs
hat ncr covered with Beauvals tap
:stri, No. 1231, Sflld to Miss R. H.
uorent agent, for J 4,360. Miss I.,orenz
"o pave $1,523 for No. 1230, a tapestry
til gilt wood settee; J1.30O for No.
i::5, u pair of hergerps In tho Louis XV.
HCRWNr. At Seattle, Wash.. February
f. HI!, to I.leut. and Mrs. Iywls
rr-lr.". Fourteenth U B. Infantry.
son. Iwli Pfrrlns 4th.
DIED.
ALEXAVWin On Thursday. February
" 19t. at his rrsld'nce. 1C0 Con
rt . it ,t,ng. vr Washington,
n r nrlr-rw Chtrl'a T Alexander.
l Purgeon U. P. Army, la the
'thty.f.tth ear of his
' "m. rt nt Wet Point, N. V.
BHAIni!I) Amelia V., on February SS,
11 . lf of the late I.e Boy Brtlnerd.
f'rvt'fi at her late residence, 45 Main
'r.t, Oranre, N. J., Sunday at 4 P. M.
I.-.terment at Portland. Conn , Mon
"!v Hartfnrd and Mlddlatown, Conn.,
rar-e-s please copy.
EfV. ,t Nack, N. Y.. Friday. March 1
"14. fornellus Buya, In the eighty-fou-ih
s.ar of hl age.
rwn.r; service at his late residence,
Vnnrh a Point. South Nyack. on Pun
' the 3d Inst., at f.tft. Train leav.-s
City at IS: IS via Erie n. A.
l''eate emit flow ers.
CI:.VT':u At Pasadena, Cal.. on Thura
1y February ;i. J918, Henry Living.
ton oinx'-t son of the lute Henry
Mlirtliret t.lvlfiir.tnn Cenlvr
BM.T'itt- In reeksklll, N T., February
-' Pr Arthur !!. Klllott. ared 70 years.
I j-ti Sunday 2 P. M.. Iteformed
h h. eorner Bowna nd Amity
r.et, Klushlnc. I I.
'' '-II At 5 Vst Fnrty-se,cnth street.
"rono, son of tho late Joseph Kallsh,
"d brother ft IJr. Blchanl Kallsh
nd Mii, Annlo Kallah.
'n'-rment March 1 In family plot. Green
Wood
KKTBA Tylee Henry, dearly beloved
husbonl of Emily Tompklna I.a Fetra,
on Saturday. March 5.
rubral Tuesday, March 6, at I P. M.,
irom nis late residence. Bouth NyacJc,
V. Train leaiei Krle station. Jersey
' ty at l;2 P. M,
MEVI.En Thomas W., aged H yemra.
Services "TUB FUNERAL CHUllCII."
Broadway, fllaty-slith (treat (Frank
CamDbsll'a). Mond... 11 a. u
ItOfKKU.L. Clayton, on Friday, March
I'll, at 390 West End avenue, son
of John Clayton and Carolina Burton
Hockhlll and beloved husband of
i.van.'.lns Hockhlll. In his flfty-sev
'Olh icar.
Sr Ue. n church of the Heavenly
Hot, til fifth avenue, Monday,
'rch 4, at 1 o'clock.
CNDBKTAKKKS.
.;,;,. FRANK CAMPBELL
style, and 91,000 ?or No. 1816, a pair Of
bronre statuettes called 'The Ilocclian
ten." 1'. W. Krench A Co. R-avo 12.600
for No. 12f,5, a panol of French renais
sance needlework, anil Duviin Hrna.
))Rld $1,7fi0 for No. 12C5, ntiother panel
ut rrencn petit point uliowln the "Clod,
doss of tho Hunt Receiving a Ilonr'a
Head on a Salver."
The day's total wan $42,223, making- a
total ko fur for the urt objects of $15.1.
206, and for tho nalo l?r,7..1.1fi. At the
concluding- ei!slon to-mnrrow afternoon
me miniatured, snuffboxes, ancient glass
and ceramics will b Bold.
MISS FARRAR SINGS
IN 1ME. SANS-GENE'
Superfluous Vivacity of Or
chestra Mars Some Passages
at Metropolitan.
Giordano's "Mme. Sans-Gene" was
brouuht forward at the Metropolitan
Opera House yesterday afternoon for the
first time this season. An audience of
good sue welcomed tho work and burst
Into vigorous applnuso at the sight of the
French flag and the Found of tho Mar
seillaise. There also was approval for
the- efforts of the principal singers, who
were for tho most part those heard last
season In the same opera.
Miss Farrar was onco ngnln the wash
erwoman who became n duchess In a
court of brief existence. It Is a role In
which she exhibits some of the best
qualities of her dramatic art and there
aru passages which sho sings with
warmth and communicative vltnllty. In
tho first net not a little of her singing
wns marred by the energetic style of
inc orchestra, over which Mr. Papl pre
sided with superfluous lvaclty.
Mr. Martlnelll seemed to be Incited by
the spirit of the orchestral doings to
unwonted efforts and his singing In the,
lirst act depended largely on math
strength. Hut thins went with moro
moderation as the performance ad
duced. Tho reception 'of .Ifme. Son
Grne had its usual success and the
scenes In which Mr. Amato figured as
Xapolcon were well done. Mr. Althouse
as A'fcpper7 and Mr. de Scgurola as
Ft.vchct were tho other chief singers.
PABLO CASALS AT BEST.
Artistic sleantr of Performance at
Recital Gives Delight.
Tablo Casals, tho Spanish violoncel
list, gave his only New York recital of
the season j estcrday afternoon nt Aeo
lian Hall. This was the distinguished
artist's only Individual recital here since
his return to America three years ago,
although ho had made many appear
ances as soloist with orchestra or In
Joint concerts.
His programme contained Handel's
Sonata In U minor and Sammartlni's In
(5 major. Bach's C minor Suite for 'cello
alone, the Boellmann "Variations Sym
phonlques" and, for tho final group, an
"Air" and the "Petite Chanson" of
Jean Hure : a "Spanish Dance," by
Granados, and the "Allegro Appafsion
ata" of Salnt-Sacns.
Mr. Casals again gave rare delight by
the artistic beauty of his performance.
Ilach number in turn he played with
marvellous tonal purity, a masterful
technic and a polished and authorita
tive style. Some unusual enthusiasm
was aroused among his many hearers
by his delivery of the Sammartlnl bo
nata, and following tho Boellmann vari
ations he had to give an encore. Gran
ados's Spanish dance the audience tried
long to have Mr. Casals repeat, but In
vain.
MAX ROSEN PROMISING.
Vonthfnl Violinist Shows n.th
".'rrmth and Temperament.
The youthful vlollnlrt. Max Ilwen, w.ns
heard In n recital at Carnegie Hall yes
terday afternoon. The opening number
was the Cesar Francl; sonata for vlnlln
and piano, in which the assisting
musician was Oliver Denton. I-tlo's
"Symphonic Kspagnolo" and Borne
shorter pieces wcro also on the list. The
nudience wn of good site, although all
the seats were not occupied.
Further hearing of Mr. Bosen confirms
prcvlius imprchsiuns. Tho boy has a
substantial talent. If nothing else re
vealed It his warm, although not always
pute, Pne would do so. Hut there also
are evidences of temperament In hln art
and elements of muslcl mshlp which
might readily bo de eloped Into .some
thing of very solid worth.
But tho conviction grows that the
youth has come beforo the public too
soon. It Is possible that force of cir
cumstance"' rather than choice operated
In tho matter, but It Is ft pity that Mr.
Hosen could not have waited. Moro
itudy under the capable master who
taught him hi much should make a
really excellent violinist of him.
WILT-EKE IN FINE TONE.
Hnsslnn Orrheatra Pleases 'With
S mplionlea nt Carnegie.
Tho Russian Symphony Orchestra-
Modest Altochuler, conductor, gave Its
fourth subscription concert last eve
ning In Carneglo Hall. Wlllem WI1-
leke. violoncellist, was the soloist.
The prc'rammo comprised the third
part of a symphony heard for the tlrst
tlmo In New York by Gllere, which Is
entitled "Ilia Murometr.," as based upon
tho legend of a Husalnn court hero of
the samo name; a concerto for Velio
and orchestra, heard for the first tlmo
here, by, Gulllaume Jeral, with a cadenza
by Mr. Wllleku; Glazounoffs suite, "The
Middle Ages"; Rlmaky-Korsakoff's tono
pictures, "Christmas Eve In tho
Ukraine," and Rachmaninoff's "Rusblan
Easter," arranged by Mr. Altschulor.
The orchestra played tho symphonic
numbers by Clllero very well. As de
scriptive music It Is pleasing nnd
effectively scored. The Jeral concerto
proved to bo an Interesting addition to
'cello music. It Is written In a simple
but Interesting musical stylo and It con
tains plenty of melody. Mr. Willcke
performed tho work admirably.
(icorce Von I,. -Meyer Still Very 111.
Boston, March 2. The Illness of
George on L. Meyer, former diplomat
and Cabinet olllcer, iiintlnued to-day to
be a smircH of anxiety to his family
and friends. Dr. Henry Jackson, after
visiting the patient this morning, said
that he retrd more comfortably Inst
night but still was In a serious con
dition. WILLS AND APPRAISALS.
Men. JAMES S. DUFFY, died February
13; estate of $3,000. divided by nephew,
the Bov. James 8. Duffy, and niece. Acnea
Duffy. The Ilev. John I llolfcrd is
executor.
rwJuraiimtam'XsV
Hoarnlag
Hotia
37S Fifth Ave.
During alterations
Temporarily located
it 377 ( djeinkic building)
' Doatoo Copley 8i.
BANCROFT, HISTORY
WRITER, DIES AT 86
Produced 3t Volumes Dealing
With Countries of Amer
ican Continent.
STARTED TO WRITE AT 10
Produced "Retrospection" Af
ter JIo Had Reached His
Eightieth Year.
San Francisco, .March 2. Hubert
Howe Bancroft, famous American his
torian, died to-day at Walnut Creek,
twenty mile east of thin city, aged SO
year.
Having achieved fame for his writ
ings, and holding a place among the
foremost historians of tho world, Mr.
Bancroft enjoyed tho distinction of hav
ing been almost everything else before
he entered upon the task of compiling
the history of tho western stretches of
both American continents.
Mr. Bancroft was born In May, 1532.
but, accordlivr to his own statement,
when he was forty years old he not only
never had written a book, but he did not
know how to begin the writing of oven
the simplest manuscript. Neveitheless,
during all those earlier yenrs of his man
hood tho desire to preserve tho story of
the upbuilding of the Western States of
tho Fnlon was taking shape in his mind.'
in the meantime he had begun llfo with
little nchoollng, worked first as n farm
hand and then as a tannery lioy near
(,'ranvllle, Ohio, where he was born.
From tho tannery ho Journeyed on to
Buffalo and obtained a place In a book
store. That position marked tho turn
ing point In his life, for It was there
that he educated himself.
In ISTiG Mr. Bancroft went to the Pa
cific coast and made his homo In San
Francisco. He opened a bookshop there
and became deeply Interested In stories
told to him of tho early history of Cali
fornia.
Ho conceived the Idoa of writing a
history of the State, and began collect
ing books, minuscrlpt and flies of
ipwspapcrs. In ten or twelve years
they had numbered thousands. In 1871
be turned his book selling business over
to othors and set himself to tho tak of
making the long deferred use of his his
torical collections. He employed assist
ants anil made many experiments. Fail
ure was tho general result. He wrote
twenty-five reams of manuscript onco
and threw It Into a furnace as worth
less. A card Index system of Mr. Bancroft's
own devising eventually proved success
ful. He trained and employed hundreds
of assistants. In the meautlmo he had
learned to write.
Mr. Bancroft had selected Peru as the
subject of his first historical effort and
decidisl the history ehould begin with tho
Spanish conquest. With the work half
finished he rejected It and delved Into
the myths and legends of the mysterious
peoples of thn American continents run
ning hick to the Middle Agos. From
this resfarch work he marshalled the
fncts and theories of his "Native Ilaccs
of the Pacific. States." 1
Mr. Bancroft estimated that the work
expended upon that on book represented
the task of one man toiling seven day.s a
week for fifty yearw. Subsequently Mr.
Hancroft worked until ho hail produced
thirty-four volumes, comprising tho his
tory of the Pacific coast States and
countries from Alaska to Argentina. In
recent years ho had contented hlmelf
with occasional writing, producing "P
trospei Hon" after ho had celebrated his
eightieth birthday.
lie went to Mex'ro with a corps nf
nsitant"i In 1 S S3 and spent mouths
there. The result was a new history of
Mexico, issued In 1314 Ills library con
tained over cn.000 volumes.
CHARLES S. THORPE.
Charles S. Thorpe, prominent G. A. H.
member, died Frldty In his home. 452
Forty-eighth street, Brooklyn. "Col."
Thorpe was born in Warren. Ohio, sev
enty jeirs ago ami ser(d with the
lOCth Regiment of Ohio Volunteers
through the civil war. For thirty-seven
years he was chief engineer and super
intendent of thn old Fourth National
Bank Ilullding, Nassau street, Manhat
tan. "Col." Thorpe was for many years a
member of Tammany Hall and belonged
to Day Star Lodge, No. 79S. F. and A.
M., and Manhattan Chapter No. 1S4, It.
A. M. He leaves a son, Charles S.
Thorpe, of tho department of manage
ment of Abraham & Straus. Masonic
and Grand Army services will be held
this afternoon. Burial will be In South
Amboy, N. J.
MRS. JEAN BROOKS GREENLEAF
RooiiESTF.n, March 2. Mrs. Jean
Brooks Grecnlcaf, -widow of Col. Hal-
lert S. Greenlear, mcu nero to-uay, agwj
86.
Mrs. Greenlenf was a close associate
nr Cain, It Anltinne In flie narlv ll.'iVS
of the surfrago movement and was
ptestdent of the State Suffrage organiza
tion from 1S90 to lb06 She had re-
slilcd In Kocnestcr aim t asnuigton lor
tlic past tiny years.
ROBERT A. KUTSCHBOCK.
Funeral services will be held nt 2
o'clock to-morrow In .the Chapel of St.
James, Cathedral of St. John tho Di
vine, Amsterdam avenue and 112th
street, for Robert A. Kutsohbork, as-
-BARGAINS i
For the Expectant Mother in
Maternity Apparel
Lane Bryant n
In tho
1 A BARGAIN BASEMENT
Dresses 2.25 to 29.50
Coats 7.50 to 24 JO
Corieti 2.45 to 7.50
Suits 12.95 to 32.50
Skitt. 1.95 to 7.85
Negligees .95 lo 9.50
latest stjlri-Kflcctlvely conceal comllllou
Kqually satisfactory when figure Is normal-
SPECIAL FOR THIS WEEK
Middies, Smocks,
Oalatra. Khaki Twill.
Ileacli Cloth, I.lnen, Wool
Batiste, Wool Flannel and
Bilk Faille. AU specially
designed for the maternity
figure, sffth ample room
for expanslun, Homo
tllghtly nulled.
75c, 1.15(o3.95
Lane Bryant, 21-23 W. 38th St., N. Y.
1
elstant general attorney of the New
York Central Itallrond Company, who
died after an Illness of only a few
days In Mount Sinai Hospital Thurs
day. Mr. Kutschbock was an active prac
titioner of tho New Tork bar for nearly
forty years and was widely known
throughout tho State. He was contin
uously employed In the law department
of tho New York Central Railroad, for
thirty-four years.
Mr. Kutschbock was born In Sher
burne. Chenango county, N. Y In 18S4.
lie leaves a widow.
CLAYTON R0CKHUL.
Clayton nockhlll, B", a prominent
commission merchant, and formerly
honorary Consul Oeneral here for Bul
garia, a post to which ho win appointed
by King Ferdinand, died Friday In his
home, SH0 West Knd avenue, after a
short Illness. Mr. Hockhlll waa senior
member of the exporting firm of Hock
hlll & Vletor. After having been grad
uated from Columbia University, ho en
tered commercial fields and soon estab
lished world wide connections, which
made hint American agent for many
prominent Kuropean nnd Oriental houses.
Kvenlunlly he was designated as Bul
garian Consul Oeneral, but resigned that
commission In IVeembor, HUG. He was
an enthusiastic yachtsman and a mem
ber of the iDowntown and the Drug and
Chemical clubs, tho Asiatic, and many
other societies.
Ills first wife was Mary Folsom Hudge
of New Yotk. Later he married Miss
Kvnngellno Smith, daughter of James
. Smith, also of this city. He had an
extensive country cst.nc at Greenwich,
Conn.
JAMES PORTER ROOT.
CitiOAdo, March 2. .lames Porter
Root, a first cousin of Bllhu Boot and
one of the lending figures In .he con
vention which nominated Abraham Lin
coln for the Presidency, died to-day of
nurns suneica last nigiit when ho fell
asleep while smoking, sparks Igniting
his clothing.
Mr. Hoot was S7 years old and for
five years had been a resident of a home
for the aged. He was born In New
York nnd came to Illinois In 1834, es
tablishing a reputation as a skilled at
torney and an orator of talent. He was
chairman of the Republican National
Committee when Garfield was elected
President.
CORNELIUS BUYS.
Cornelius Buys, long a resident of
Brooklyn, died at his home on Voorhls
Point, South Nyack, N. Y on Friday
evening, after ni. Illness of several weeks.
He was born In Amsterdam, In the Neth
erlands, in 1834, and at the age of 14
camo to this country, where he had a
long and succesaful business career. He
retired In l!n7 and left the city to reside
In Nyack. Ho Is survived by his widow,
Mrs. Sarnh V. Buys; his daughter, Mrs.
Stephen F. Voorhees, and by two sons,
Herbert A. and Arthur F Bujs.
WILLIAM HENRY GREENH0W.
Horneix, N. Y March 2. William
Henry Greenhow, for nearly nftv years
editor and publisher of the Jiiily Tribune
here, died last night in his winter home
in Miami. Fla.
He was ! years old and a former
president of the New York Associated
Dallies, and an offlccr of the State edi
torial Association. The body will bo
brought to Hor'nell for burial.
DR. EDWARD M. RICHMAN.
Dr. Kdward M. Biehman, 4K. a founder
of the Newark Private Hoslptal, died
yesterday of heart trouble In that Insti
tution. He wad born in Philadelphia,
was a graduate of the Vnlverslty of
Pennsylvania and had practised medi
cine In Newark eighteen ears. Ho Is
survived by his wife.
MRS. LEEDS DENIES MARRIAGE.
Say She AVna Not AVeilded to
GrerU Prhicr.
Pnis. March 2 --Mis William It
Leeds, who is In Montreuv. Switzer
land, has authorized nn absolute denial
of reports of her marriage to Prince
Christopher of Greece, youngest brother
of Cnnsiantlne, the deposed Kins. Mrs.
Leeds stales that she has no Intention
of being mirried to Prince Christopher.
Tho Daily Skrtrh of London said last
I month that Mrs. Leeds had been mar
I rlej to the Prince She is the widow
of one of the lenders of the tin plate
Industry of America, from whom she
inherited alsiut $1 4.000 000, She Is a
daughter of the late llllain c. Stuart
of Cleveland.
Pnenmnnln Deaths Inerrnae.
An Increase of thirty-five deaths from
pneumonia during the week which ended
nt noon yesterday over tho previous
week was shown In figures Issued by Dr.
Charles F. Bolduan of tho Department
of Health. Thero were 1,78 I deaths from
all causes, 347 of which were caused by
ptiuemonla, while In the previous week
312 deaths from th disease were re
corded In the 1,570 deaths from all
causes.
Dr. Shair flnlta na lllmlra Head.
Et.MtliA. N. Y March 2. Dr. John
Baloom Shaw yesterday tendered his
resignation as president of Elmtra Col
lege and It was accepted. Continuing 111
health compelled Dr Shnw to take a
prolonged period of absolute lest.
3.H.Si till inq $t o,
Offer for Monday
The balance of our high-cost
Gowns and Wraps at mere frac
tions of their former prices
THIS IS AN UNUSUAL OPPORTUNITY FOR
THE WELL DRESSED WOMAN TO PROCURE A
SMART GOWN OR WRAP AT VERY LOW COST.
Gowns
&
Dresses
at
Evening
Wraps
RED GROSS HOUSE
NEARLY COMPLETED
First One Built Is at U. S.
Bnso Hospital No. 1 in
Bronx.
The flmt of a series of Bed Croes
houses built for the use of convalescent
soldiers will be opened In tha Bronx In
the next week. It Is located at United
States Military Hospital Company 1,
sometimes known as Columbia Base Hos
pital. Tho structure Is built In the form of
a Greek cross, one wing of which Is oc
cupied by a glass theatre to be devoted
to motion pictures1 or other entertain
ment. Another wing la a sun parlor,
where tho convalescents may rest; the
third Is devoted to a diet kitchen and
tho fourth to a reception room where the
men may receive callers.
In the centre of the building Is a large
auditorium, 100 feet by 100 feet, where
the soldiers may sit nnd smoke, listening
to music or reading. It will also be used
as a writing and lounging room.
I'nch of the convalescent hospitals wilt
be under the supervision of an Assistant
field director of the Bed Cross, who will
have a staff, including among others a
Y. M. C. A. man who will have charge
of the amusements. A stenographer will
also be provided to write letters for the
soldiers. The hospital at Camji 1 pton
Is nearly completed, and contracts have
been let for similar structures at Camp
Dlx and Camp Merrltt
MRS. HUTT0N LEFT NO WILL.
Dnngbter Itccelrea 9411,480 and
Husband f205,740 of Estate.
Mrs. Franklyn L. Hutton, who was
Miss Hdna Woolworth, a daughter of
1. W. Woolworth, left no will when she
Cied suddenly in her apartment at the
Plaza Hotel on May 2, 1917, It developed
yesterday,
Mrs. Hutton left a net estate of $617,
220, according to tho transfer ta,x ap
praisal filed yesterday In the Surrogate's
ofT.ce from the ofllce of the Deputy State
Comptroller. Her gross estate amounted
to $6:.2,t,fiS. It Included $3,157 In cash
and $46,938 worth of personal property,
which Included Jewelry to thn value of
20,155. The most valuable of these ar
ticles was a string of teventy-ono pearls,
appraised at $12,000.
The Jewelry also Included a platinum
chain set with pearls, with a diamond
and emerald pendant, worth $1,700; an
emerald ring surrounded by diamonds
valued nt $1,300, and a marquise dia
mond ring valued at $1,000. The house
hold goods, rugs, draperies ami silver
are appraised at $26,283.
She owned 3.000 shares of the com
mon stock of F. W. Woolworth A Co.,
worth $39.1,750 ; 1,600 shares of the pre
ferred stock of the same company, valued
,it $198,400, and the accumulated divi
dends on the shares, $6,000, making a
total of $.',9R,150.
Her husband, Frank Hutton of E. F.
Hutton & Co., 61 Broadway, receives
$205, 740, and her daughter, Barbara,
who was 4 years old when her mother
died, gets $41 1,480.
Included among the moro valuable
household articles are a iouls XVI.
parlor suite of five pieces, worth $2,500;
an Aubusson tapestry panel valued at
$1,500. and a pair of Cnlnese vases
alued at $1,000.
i $1,000,000 LEFT BY ARENTS.
Widow Gets SOO,000 nnd la Made
Iteaddnarjr I.egntee.
Property estimated to be worth $1,-
OOO.f.OO Is dlsiioscd of in the will of
l.eorge Arents of 3S West Flfty-s( cnth
street, who died February 22. by his will
filed for probate at the Surrogate's of
flc yesterday. The document was dated
October 29, 1914. He was retired and
was the father of George Arents. Jr.,
president of the Columbia Dredging
Company.
Mrs. Annie A. Arents. the widow, gets
the Fifty-seventh street home nnd
contents. $200,000 In cash, and l made
residual y legatee. Mrs. Arents. George
Arents. Jr, nnd the Fanners Loan and
Trust Company are named as executors.
To tho son goes J200.000 In cash In
a specific1 bequest. Dorothy Humphres,
a granddaughter, i.i given $100,00".
Similar sums go to his sister-in-law.
Mary Waller lMy, and his nephew, Ixiuls
Glnt It. Voung. J. H Gillespie. Mr.
Arents'.s secretary, received $s,000,
A tiust fund of $100,000 Is provided
for his niece, Kdna Young Benchley She
ris to receive the Income for life and the
prlnclp.il Is to go later to her daughter,
Grace Dietrich. The education of, his
grandson, Geoigo Arents 3d, Is provided
for by another trust fund of $100,000.
Joan U. Arents, Grace Arents and
Minnie K Young, three sisters, each re
ceives $i0.000. The widow, son and
granddaughter. Dorothy Humphreys, ate
also to receive the Incomes of trust
funds, the principal to go to Mrs. Arents
as residuary legatee.
Dr. Manning; .Stays at Upton.
At the request of the officers at Camp
Upton and of the War Commission of
the Episcopal Church, and with the ap-
pruwil u, inn ivmi , i 11,1111 volutin,
the Rev. Dr. William T, Manning will
continuo his work ns chaplain at Camp
I'ptou for an indefinite period. Accord
ing to tho first arrangement. Dr, Man
ning's term of service was in end
March 1
For Street, Afternoon and Evening
including imported models
Formerly $95 to $225
'35 $55 '85
Of chiffon velvet and metallic brocades
richly trimmed with fashionable furs
Formerly $175 to $850
'95 to '495
OLD PRINCETON CLUB
IS CLOSED FOR GOOD
Yalensiant Share in Festive
Ceremonies at House.
Gathered about the entrance of their
old headquarters In Oramercy Park the
members of tho Princeton Club, to
gether with their guests from trie Yalo
Club, nnng "Old Nassau" as the lights
were turned out, leaving the oUl man
sion In darkness, and the front door
was locked by Major Francis O, Lan
don, '81, who threw away tho key. With
this ceremony the Incidents of nn old
era wore closed last evening, and until
the Princeton Club feels that It Is nhlo
to build Itn now clubhouse It will share I
the quarters of the Yalo Club.
Tho evening's programme consisted of i
a general Jollification, a few sparring
matches, several numbers which were
"put across" by some of Broadway's
fnvorlte song birds and short Impromptu J
speeches. "Big Bill" Kdwards acted as
mnster of coremonlea, and his remarks
were by no .means the least amusing !
part of tho entertainment.
Ihte to the falling off In membership
of both the Trlnceton and Yalo clubs
from enlistments In the various branches
of the United States service It was nec
csiary to work out some scheme of con
solidation, and tho merger was the re
sult. Officially the consolidation will take
place on May 1, but unofficially It
started last evening, when the two clubs
got together for tho last tlmo In the
old clubhouse and forgot their sorrows
In the festivities.
NOTES OF THE SOCIAL WORLD.
An exhibition and salo of lacem re
contly imiiorted from occupied Belgium,
will be held at the Arden Gallery, 599
Fifth avenue, for two weeks beginning
on March , for the benefit of tho lace
makers and to encourage nnd maintain
tho lace Industry In Belgium. The sale
will be given under the auspices of the
Commission for Belief in Belgium.
Among the patronesseet are Mmes. Her
bert 1 Satterlee, Robert Bacon, A. Gor
don Norrle, Philip M. Lydlg. Bdwln
Gould, Hugh D. Auchlnclot-a, Arthur It.
Scrlbner. IS. Henry Hnrrlman, IXmglas
Robinson, John Henry Hammond, Allen
Wardwcll. Charles Stewart Smith and
Samuel It. Bertron.
Adolph Lewlsnhn will give the us of
his ballroom at his home, 881 Fifth
avenue, for a concert on tho evening of
March 14 for the benefit of tho Ameri
can .Bed Cross Auxiliary No. 320.
M'rKha Elman, violinist, will play. Tick
ets may be obtained from Mrs. Simon
Frankel, 46 West Elghtv-slxth street
Count del JValle do Salazar, Consul
General of Spain In San Francisco, and
Countess del Valle arrived In town yes
terday, and are nt the Blltmore.
A fashion show for the benefit of men
blinded In war will be held to-morrow
afternoon In the smnll ballroom of the
Plaza. Among the patronesses are Mrs.
Edmund L. Baylies, Mrs. F Gray Grls
wold, Mrs. William D. Sloone, Mrs.
Howard G. dishing. Mrs Otto II. Kahtt.
Mrs. Charles It. Marshall, Mrs. John'T.
Pratt. Mrs. Charles H D!tn and Mrs.
Douglas Rohlnson. During the exhibi
tion there will be singing and dancing
bv professionals.
"Dr. and Mrs. M. L. Rheln of 3S East
Sixty-first street, announce the engare
ment of their daughter, Mir llnth Van
Wyck Rheln, to Lieut. Commander
Edmund S. B. Brandt. P. S. N., son of
Mr. and Mrs. Randolph Brandt of Mont
clalr. The engagement Is announced of Miss
Mn-rgaret Currle Florance, daughter of
Mrs. Edwin Florance of Elizabeth, to
Smith Farley Ferguson of this city, a
son of the late Dr. Hvorard Ferguson
of Troy. Miss Florance l,s a grand
daughter of the late John Owen Stearns
of Ellraheth. Mr. Ferguson was grad
uated from Yale In 1914. and Is a mem
ber of the Yale and Fnlverslty clubs.
Annour.cemct has been made of the
engagement of Mls Geraldlno Brown,
daughter of M-. and Mrs. Gerald R.
Il'own or Englewood, to En"lgn Welles
ley Laud-Brown, Naval Reserve Flying
Corps. 1'ns.ign Laud-Brown Is a son of
Mrs. T J. Laud-Brown of Englewood.
He is now nt the Naval Air Station,
Hooka way Bech
Mr. and Mr William AUdley unite
f South Orange have announce! the en
gagement of their daughter. Miss Eu-
dalla Glenn White, to i;n.sign otto umii
Ixihrke. Naval Wmtion Corps Mr.
Lohrko was grndunted from Williams
Collee and received his education at
the Boston institute of Technology. Ho
Is now stationed rt I'ensacola, Fla,
Nicholas .1 Revil of 505 West 114th
srtreet has announced the engagement
of his daughter, Mis Margaret Lydun
Beville, to John Ravmond Mitchell, son
of tho late John J. Mitchell of this city.
Nnvy Lrugne U for forks.
Mrs, Herbert I Satterlee of tho com
forts committee of tho Navy League
has issued an appeal for Knitted gar
ments, especially socks, to be Inundered
and delhered to tho New York head
quarters In 50P Fifth avinue. She sug
gests that these garments. Instead of
being thrown away should be sent to
the committee to help In Its efforts to
conserve wool.
ANNOUNCEMENT EXTRAORDINARY
"A VERITABLE MUSEUM OF TREASURES"
The American Art Galleries
MADISON SQUARE SOUTH, NEW YORK
The Famous
Stefano Bardini Collection
The majority of the important objects of the Great Bardini
Collection having already crossed the Ocean In safety, we are
enabled to state that the Unrestricted Public Sale will be
held under our Management during the early part of April.
Professor Bardini, who is recognized the world over as the
Greatest Expert on the Ancient Art of Italy, has consigned
to us what is conceded by High Authorities to be the Most
Important Collection in Italy and unapproached by any
heretofore exhibited or offered for sale in this country. It
is composed principally of
Objects of the Renaissance, that Golden Age of Italian Art,
and includes many colored Stuccos and Term Cottas; Works
of the Delia Robbias; Majolicas; Marbles of both the Classi
cal and Renaissance Periods; Bronzes; and Furniture which
date frcm the 13th Century to Napoleonic Times, and a num
ber of Tapestries of extraordinary Artistic Quality. The
whole forming a Collection of such importance and merit ns
to warrant the undersigned in stating that the disposal of
the same will prove to be
The Most Important Public Sale Ever Held in America
A DE 1XXE IM.VSTRATT.D CATAI.OOVi: COMrUXEli UT KXPIIRT AtTTHOUITV WILL UK I LItMSIILK
TO APPLICANTS AT FI K IMH.I.AHS EACH.
NICHOLS FOSTER.
Mian Alma B, Foster, daughter of
Mrs. N. Foster of BOO West Wlat street,
was married to Lieut. Cllvo McKlnstry
Nichols, U. S. It., yesterday afternoon
in Notro Dame Church, Mornlngslda
Drive and 114th street, by the Rev. John
Dooley. The bride wore a gown of white
georgette crepe and a tulle veil, and
she carried a shower bouquet of white
mm
TO-MORROW AFTERNOON AT 2:30
AT THE AMERICAN ART GALLERIES
Madtnon Square South, New York
CONCLUDING SESSION
Of The George A. Hearn Collection
ON FREE PUBLIC VIEW
BEGINNING TO-MORROW MONDAY)
AND CONTINUING UNTIL THE DATE OF THE PUBLIC SALE
AN EXTRAORDINARY COLLECTION OF
GRAECO-ROMAN, RAKKA, PERSIAN, HIS-PANO-MORESQUE
FAIENCES, ITALIAN
MAJOLICAS, PERSIAN AND INDIAN
MINIATURES
EPYPTIAN, PTOLEMAIC, SIDONIAN,
ROMAN AND ARABIC GLASS, GREEK AND
ROMAN BRONZES, RARE RUGS
AND OTHER OBJECTS OF RARITY
BELONGING TO THE EXPERTS
Messrs. Kouchakji Freres
NEW YORK CITY
TO BE SOLD AT UNRESTRICTED PUBLIC SALE
At the American Art Galleries
ON FRIDAY AND SATURDAY AFTERNOONS
OF THIS WEEK, MARCH 8TH AND 9TH
BEGINNING EACH AFTERNOON AT 2:30 O'CLOCK
Catalogue written by Mr. F. Kouchakji, with an Introduction by Dr.
Ciustavus A. Ktspn. ami illustrated by halftone and color re
productions will be mailed on receipt of ono dollar.
ALSO
American Paintings
COMPRISING THE
Finished Pictures
LEFT BY THE AMERICAN ARTIST
THE LATE
Walter Clark, N. A.
TO BE SOLD AT UNRESTRICTED PUBLIC SALE
BY DIRECTION OF
MR. ELIOT CLARK, A.N.A., AND MR. DAVID SANDS, Executors
At the American Art Galleries
ON FRIDAY EVENING OF THIS WEEK, MARCH 8th
BEGINNING AT 8:15 O'CLOCK
Calalopue mailed on receipt of fifty cents.
ALSO ON VIEW TO-!
TO BE SOLD
EVENING OF MARCH 5TH AND
AFTERNOON OF MARCH 6TH
THE LIBRARIES OF THE LATE
HON. TEUNIS G. BERGEN,
ANTIQUARIAN AND
GENEALOGIST, AND
VAN BRUNT BERGEN
OF BROOKLYN, N. Y.
COMPRISING IMPORTANT
MANUSCRIPTS, MAPS AND
SURVEYS OF KINGS COUNTY,
NEW YORK,
STANDARD SETS AND
AMERICANA.
The Sales Will Be Conducted by
MR. THOMAS E. KIRBY
and Ills assistant. Mr. Otto flernrt, nt the
AMERICAN ART ASSOCIATION, Managers
Madison Sq, South, Tntrance 0 I'.. SJO Strpfl, rr York.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION WILL BE FURNISHED BY
The American Art Association, Managers
Madison Square South, Entrance 6 Eait Twenty-third St., New York
sweet peas. Her only attendant was .
Mrs. Wlnslow Manley Bell, Jr.. who
wore a costume of apricot colored taffeta,
combined with blue tulle and a hat
to correspond. She carried a basket of
lavender peonies and Ward roses. '
Frank H. Hoffman was best man. The
ushers wero Albert Cavanath, John IK
Dougherty and It. Bosenswlg. A re
ceptlon followed at the homo of Mrs.
Wlnslow Manley Bell, Jr., 41 West
Eighty-second street.
MORROW (MONDAY; ,
TO BE SOLD
. AFTERNOONS AND EVENINGS
' OF MARCH 6TH AND 7TH
, NOTABLE LIBRARY SETS
IN FINE BINDINGS
ART BOOKS AND AMERICANA
INCLUDING THE LIBRARIES
OF THE LATE GRANT B.
SCHLEY OF NEW YORK CITY;
THE LATE GILBERT M.
PLYMPTONOFGARDENCITY,
L. I.i AND PAULINE LUTZ OF
PITTSBURGH. PA.
TOGETHER WITH SIR WAL
TER SCOTT'S STOOL FROM
HIS LIBRARY AT ABBOTS
FORD, AND KING GEORGE
THE THIRD'S PRAYER BOOK.
i

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