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The sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1916-1920, April 02, 1918, Image 4

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THE SUN,
HJN, TUESDAYrRlL 1918
1115 1
m 1
MURPHY TELLS
HYLAN MAYOR'S
JOB IS ENOUGH
Tammany Chief Suggests
He Let Others Pick Out
Man for Governor.
BOSS SILENT ON HEARST
Hints Leaking From Private
Dinner at Seashore Show
Tension Over Tolicics.
SLAIN AS BETRAYER
OF BIG GAMBLERS
Continued from Firtt rag.
eve of the day when he u to tell Dis
trict Attorney Whitman all about the
Rambling- situation In New York. The
coincidence and the curious, ramifica
tions of the Cohen killing atlmulated
tlirlr work, and cave rise to rumors
which In a few hours had explained the
murder by no less than four distinct
motives, amonr which not the least In
teresting was that Cohen knew some
thins about German propaganda In this
city.
District Attornay Swann, Inspector
Cray, In charge of the detective bureau,
and Inspector Tunncy of the Domb
Squad, ridiculed the German theory.
Mr. Swann said he could gee no motive
but the dominant one of fear by the
Ramblers that they were to bo betrayed
by one who knew alt their secret.
Coming on the first day of the week
In which the John Doo Inquiry Into the
gambling situation was to be resumed
nn Investigation that has been produc
tive of glittering tales of play for high
slakes such as have been seldom tol In
tho city, the murder had all the more
significance.
Cohen was not a cheap Rambler any
more than he was n cheap burglar. As
a burglar he had had no equal In the
city, for he was a lone wolf who worked
by himself and who had only one con
viction to his credit, the latter In the
days when he was young and hail not
thoroughly learned hla trade. As a
gambler he ran one of the biggest crap
games In the city, and In games run by,
other men he lost thousands of dollars
In a night, for, like moat men who run
games, he had the disease as strongly as
any of his victims.
Cohen's Two Nature nerealed.
But the Cohen known to Mr. Smith,
the Assistant District Attorney, as a
disgruntled loser longing to get even
with those who had trimmed him In
crooked game, and th.o-Cohen known-to
the underworld as the resourceful and
daring burglar who never squealed In
his life, seem to have been two entirely
different men, and It Is hard to recon
cile them. Ills gambling ability to keep
a- straight face preserved his reputation
as a good loser to his friends, and It
was enly to Mr. Smith that he was re
vealed In his moment of sullen and re
vengeful weakness.
Mr. Smith met Cohen about a month
ago, while the gambling expose was In
full operation. He told Mr. Smith he
knew something about gamblers and
would like to talk with htm, and that
night Mr. Smith met him at 103d street
and Broadway. A loss because of a
crooked wheel was rankling In Cohen
t then, and he told Mr. Smith he wanted
to "turn over" the men operating that
game. He had won In the first play
$250, but when the game was shifted to
Charles F. Murphy, leader of Tam
many Hall, and Mayor John F. Hylan
had a heart to heart talk at Atlantic
City on Saturday night It was Inspired
by Alfred E. Smith. President of the
Board of Aldermen, who arranged a lit
tle dinner party In a private room at the
Hotel Traymore. Grover A. Whalen, the
Mayor's private scpretary, also was pres
ent. The possible candidacy of William
Randolph Hearst for Governor on the
Democratic ticket and politics connected
with the municipal government were the
two principal topics of discussion, ac
cording to a report that reached thej
City Hall yesterday. The Mayor was
beck, but refused to Indicate In any way
what was said at the Atlantic City meet
to. Chief Murphy Talks Plainly.
It was tne first time Mr. Murphy has
had a chance for a long talk with the
Mayor since he took office.
According to the accounts the Tam
many boss was extremely frank. Ho
Inferred to tho many kind things said
about William Randolph Hearst by the
Mayor In his famous letter from Palm
Beach and to his constant efforts to
boom the candidacy of the editor. There
were Intimations, It Is said, that the
Mayor had a pretty big Job to handle
as Mayor of New York city and he
could well afford to leave the selection
or a nemocraiia candidate lor uov
ernor to others.
The Mayor, report goes, strongly de
fended what he had done, said that Mr.
Hearst, In his opinion, would make a
fir?"? fndate Jor Governor, "nd he tll roulette whef.i tnat was lost and
rams broka uiu and ha want away
cleaned out
80 did his friend Joe Sulach, or Joe
Erllch, as he Is better known. Just who
left the club with Cohen the District
Attorney wouldn't tell If he knew, but
somebody went home with him, and was
probably with him when he telephoned
Mr. Smith that he would tell all he knew
the next day about the gamblers who
had trimmed him.
Mr. Iwaas Takes m Hand.
As soon as word reached Mr. Smith
and Mr. Swann that Cohen had been
killed they hurried to the apartment
house. They found that he had lived
until tho police got there, but was un
conscious and not able to tell who shot
him. Mr. Smith looked at the body and
cwlni to'somo working of his mind
which he wouldn't explain last night he
told his men to go and find Sam Schepps
and And htm quirk.
That Is how tho Imperturbable Sam,
black silk ribbon to hts eyegtasscs and
sputtering Indignation, happened to be
held all day In the District Attorney's
office, and questioned. He was let go
llnally on his promise to bo around If
wanted.
But there was little emphasis placed
on this alight connection between the
Leslie case nnd the, murder by Judgo
Swann and his assistants. They were
convinced' that If they could find tho man
to whom Cohen paid $50 Juat before he
was killed a grim little Incident they
would find that he was an agent of some
band of gamblers who were frightened
over coming disclosures and frelghtened
badly.
They learned that Cohen had been
telephoning to Stuyvesant 5773, the Cafo
Itoyal, a little place at 18S Second ave
nue, when ho was shot, and found there
that the man on the other end had been
Jack Fisher, a waiter. Cohen had asked
for two friends and Fisher was about to
tell him that they were not there when
Cohen was tumbled off his chair by the
shots. Then they began to hunt for
Joe Zulach, but Zulach could .not tell
them much.
Finally they went back to the Crim
inal Courts llulldlng and there Sam
Schepps was brought In. He didn't know
anything about It, not a thing, and had
merely met Cohen a few times. Of
course he knew May Leslie and admitted
that sho had been a good friend of his.
Three checks of 1310 which weie found
In her apartments made out by her to
Schepps were In payment for jewelry,
and Schepps said she was a good customer.
San
Schepps Indignant.
Intended to do what ho could to further
his caure. The Mayor denied that the
letter sent to department heads Just be
fore ho went to Atlantic City threaten
ing them with removal unless they dis
played more efHeclency was an attempt
to bring the Tammany leaders around
Into line. Mr." Murphy expressed him
self strongly on the subject, declaring.
It is said. thit such tactics could not
be successful. '
Mayor Insists on Rein- Boss.
The Mayor's critics say that he got
bout all he wanted before he mado his
recent stand ngalnst extravagance by
ordering all tho department heads to
withdraw .requests for increases of
salary. It has since developed that Mr.
Murphy sent word to the Tammany com
missioners to stand pat on their requests.
This was one of the reasons why the
Mayor In his latest letter Intimated that
he was the boss and he wanted his in
structions carried out or he would know
why.
All efforts of the Mayor to learn the
attitude of Mr. Murphy toward Mr.
Hearst wero unsuccessful, It Is reported.
At such points In the conversation the
Tammany chieftain laped Into silence
and permitted "Al" Smith to lead the
talk Into other channels. City Hall gos
sips say he has been doing some serious
thinking lately as to what might happen
If he should help to boost Mr. Hearst
Into the Governor's chair and the editor
and the Mayor should form an alliance
against Tammany.
COAL PRICE IN DOUBT.
Iacal Dealer Do 'ot Knew What
Redaction to Make.
tn tho absence yesterday of Itecve
Schley. County Fuel Administrator, who
Is In Washington. New YoTk coal dealers
were not Informed whether or not they
would be required to reduce the price
of domestic and ttcatn size coal 30 cents
a ton.
An order last month by the Federal
Fuel Administration set yesterday as
the day when prices must be reduced.
Since the order there has been granted
by the Interstate Commerce Commission
an Increase to the railroads of 15 cents
a ton for all coal freighted. The coal
dealers were unable to discover whether
to reduce their coal prices and In addi
tion pay the extra railroad freight or
only to reduce the price of coal 13 cents.
A ruling by Mr. Schley will be asked.
$800 more. Cohen said he didn't mind
losing, but he liked to lose fairly.
A week later he told Mr. Smith of a
game that was going on, and soon after
told of others. None of these tips worked
out well, and nothing came of them, but
Mr. Smith says It was because the games
were not running on tho nights they
wero visited by his men or for other
reasons easily explained. He had no
doubt that Cohen was keeping faith
with him.
Later ho admitted to Judge Swann
that their relations had been more Inti
mate. But as for any connection be
tween the arrest of his friend Ieslle and
tho killing of Cohen why, the Idea was
ridiculous, ho sputtered.
,When he was lined up with a young
trucking contractor with whom he had
been talking In front of his Jewelry shop
at Forty-seventh street and Seventh ave
nue, when Detective Flnan found them,
and who was later released, Sam's Indig
nation was beyond bounds.
"They merely brought me In here like
a lilt of rltilion to lend color to tho cao,"
he said. "This Is n. nice arraignment."
Zulach. Udney. the elevator boy, and
Charles Zink of 7S St. Mark's place, who
was with Cohen In the crap gamo when
It ended, wero all detained ns mnterlal
witnesses.
Cohen took too many chance In his
communication" with Judge Swann nnd
Mr. Smith, was their belief last night
and tho gamblers learned In home way
that ho was about to tell all he knew
., ... .. , ... 1 Mr. Smith had warned him again and
Revelations to Mr. Smith. aBnn U) 0;lrefuV hut apparently he
"Why, one day he called me up and j paid little heed,
said he hud something to tell me." Fald "When he telephoned to me this
Mr. Smith, "but while we were talklns 1 morning he told me ho had Fomothlnp
the Tihone clicked and he refused to nay -
nnv more because be tou-ht the Hie I
iiad been tapped. He said he was sure
somebody had learned In this way what
he had been telling and so tho plans
had been spoiled, and he didn't want me
to think he wn double crossing me. I
believed him and had reason to do so,
for he gave me good Information. Thero
were three men In particular he was
after, big men In the gambling game,
and two others he promlred to deliver
who were almost ns blr. They had
trimmed him badly."
Cohen helped Mr. Smith and District
Attorney Swann with other Information
also. Somehow he learned a good deal
about the apartment on Riverside Drive
which was raided March 13, the t-part-ment
where men were being taken by
women and relieved of most of their
money where one man lost (20,000 In a
night
One of the women arrested there was
May Leslie, whose right name Is Carrie
von Schlll, a friend of Sam Schepps of
Rosenthal fame, the same Sam, who
with Brldgle Weber, Jack Rose and
Harry Vallon aided District Attorney
Whitman to convict Cliarles Becker of
Rosenthal's murder. And what Cohen
learned of this affair he told Smith.
That was the situation up to Sunday.
Cohen went automoblllng with his wife
that afternoon and In the evening went
down town to play craps In a game near
Forty-fourth street ana Sixth avenue.
He stayed there until 5 o'clock, when the
good at last, and that he would meet me
this afternoon at Fifth avenue and
Thirty-sixth street," said Mr. Smith.
"Somebody learned of it He had como
to my offl.ee several times and had
wanted to come to my homo and
tell me of things he had learned, but J
told him he had better not I told him
to say all he wanted to over the tele
phone, but not to visit me."
"Why, his ltfo wasn't worth a cent If
the Ramblers learned of what he had
been doing." broke In Judge Swann. "1
had a man with mo for three hours tho
other night giving me names and ad
dresses and bums of money lost In
gambling houses, and when ho got
through he told mo his life wouldn't be
worth a Is If his namo got out TK6
tumblers have gunmen now, Just as they
have always had."
That was tho story of Cohen, tho hard
loser and squealer which the District
Attorney had to tell, but when It reached
the places in the underworld where
Cohen was known the dcnlxens wouldn't
believe It. He was too good a sport to
ever squeal, they said, and then told
why. Tho Cohen they know was per
haps tho cleverest burglar and one of
the best gamblers tho town has known.
They first knew Cohen when he
started out as a pickpocket and was ar
rested. Then he turned burglar and was
sent to Jail, the only term he served,
fourteen years ago. Since then he has
been arrested many times, but always
managed to wiggle out of the scrape by
his consummate cleverness. He worked
alone, and no one knew of his many
burglaries except himself.
Ho was a crafty little man who stole
only from the very wealthy and who
aided the poor. Perhaps the homes of
the wealthy appealed to htm ulao be
cause they offered the most numerous
and valuablo bits of loot things which
could be taken away easily and quickly
converted Into cash, and In this way he
Is supposed to have mftde $100,000 a
year. With his money he opened 1
gambling house In St. Mark's place, now
closed, and became one-third owner of
two more, one of which was operating
when he was killed.
nobbed Illchi Gave to Poor.
Cohen's apartment on Ninety-second
street was unusually well furnished, and
at times ho gava his wife as much as
$1,500 a week. He only paid $75 a
month for the apartment, but recently
he had told his wife he was doing well
and they would move Into another and
much more expensive place. He had an
automobile of good make and kept a
chauffeur, who wore livery, something
of which Cohen was Inordinately proud.
And when he heard of people who were
needy he gave to them freely. At the
time he d'e'd eight families were living
on his bounty.
Ills nerve was cast Iron. When he
began his career he was an arrant cow
ard, but by schooling worthy of a bet
ter causa he mastered his fear, success
gave him confidence and he became so
daring and skilful that ho was a thorn
'11 tho side of the police. So quickly
could he work thnt It Is told of him
how when he had lost all ho had In a
game of stuss ho would leave for n
time and go back with money which he
had noqulred by a swift foray Into
somebody's bedroom nnd pocketbonk.
Ho was known to do this several times
In one evening, and one n'ght made his
way Into a house In which a man and
his wife were wide awake and got off
with every bit of money they had.
Another time Cohen worked his way,
by mistake. Into the apartment of friends
who were sitting about talking, nnd the
next day told them of what ha had done
and related the conversation to them.
Tlio and many more stories of
Cohen, or Harry the Yot. as he was
known to the underworld, were told of
him last night by the men who refused
to believe he wai a squealer.
FOUNDED 1856
V0LLER0 SENTENCED TO DEATH
He
Led Gnnar That Killed
.Men In Brooklyn.
Ale-ssanclro Vollcro, leader of
Two
the
Navy street gang In Brooklyn that mur
dered Charlie irbrlacco and Nick Morello
In a gun fight In Brooklyn two years
' sro. was sentenced to die In the electric
chair May S by Justice Cropsey In the
Supreme Court yesterday. He was con
victed by testimony of Ralph Danlollo,
one of the pftmr.
Carmelo JIuhso, another gunman, was
sentenced to a life term by Judge Roy In
the County 'ourt. llrooklyn. Russo
ktlled Joseph Vltctto December 4, 1915.
Values of Unusual Interest
Cordovan
Low Shoes
$6.00
Sample Shoes, $4.75
All Leathers
Russet & Black Low Shoes
$5.00
HOTF.LS AND RESTAURANTS,
sill Hotels and Ilettaurant AdvrtlA im
TWK BUS Comply With th Order$ of tk4
unixtl rtatrm rvvti Auminiwtmjion.
141b Street near Fourth Avenue
JS'JUSTWtSTOlDWAVl
P1IC V MNl MCR
'HEN it comes to testing fabric and
tailoring serviceability, boys are in
the vanguard their clothes must
possess quality and stamina we
know it, and we are careful to embody the
required strength in the materials and
sewings of all our boys' clothes but we
never lose sight of the importance of
sightly design. Our boys' hoes with in
destructible toes and soles conserve shoe
expenditure.
Everything boys wear and a
barber shop for their exclusive use.
Brokaw Brothers
1457-1463 B ROAD WAX
AT FORTY-SECOND STREET
mm
MGNETIC
SERIES
four yeb.f& of 5uccess,with
imitemittinpibflcient effort;
have finally produced this
car of abundant power"
distinguished beauly, refined
eleghncte and Thousand Speed?
80 Mote Power
Make a joy of Kill climbing
Demonstrations hv appointment
Phone - 898 Circle
OWEN AVAGAT ETI C
Aiofror ShXes Cofpor'ariorw
Bfobdwbi txt Street-
HILE I don't claim to be
Jack, the Giant Killer, I have
eaten seemingly unbeatable mar
ket conditions. How? By laying
in a heaping Reserve Stock of
Woolens last year. My Suits at
$25 out-value any values 1 know.
I could get more for these Woolens, because they're worth much
more to-day, but I'm satisfied to put the customer's profit above
profiteering. My body-gracing fit, thoroughbred style and per
sonal attention. You deal with the Big Finger, not the little toe.
Army and hay
Officers' Uniforms
$30 to individual
measure
s2ivihan. , Army
And NavyToilor
Broadway at 39& St
20 Years On This Comer
AMtmSMKNTS.
AMl'RKMENTA.
AMU8KMENT8.
MERICA'S FOREMOST TlfEATHf AND 1!1T I NIK.ll THE DIRECTION OF
SAM. H. LEE nmiRKRT, INC.
WINTER CAPnPM E.R.Mt.TcMly..
1 Thr.. A H.t.
mmoHsnmv
R0 DHURST ThM- w. or n-wsy. K. s.
I ro A J J.Hhubm't Malel Mull I'rodurt'n.
WAYTIME
Chrli lutTTll. I'ncty Who I A- Wm Nnrrlv
44Ul ST. WJ"" ROOF THEATRE
Fb.Vryant SI.Ev.8 4.VMts.To-m'w&Hat.2 30.
Polltrly ludacloun: witty. .Urtltng." Ilmld
A PAIR OF PETTICOATS
ronudr hv f?rrlt ll.mvirf
llh Norm.n f ror Uur. Ilnoc Cr.
ASTOR 6thAHwy. Rvm.R:IA.Mu.lAt
naivn To.m'w(Pop.P'iA8t.2:ls.Tlin
7
mi.
WUY MARRY?
I Uy Jane Lynch WIHUnu. I
I Nal f. Goodwin I
Edmund Dtmt Eatelle Wlnnood I
I Nlilly Hull Ernmt l.awford I
V Urntrlte Hrcklry I.olil Hnbli
Beginning MON., APR. ft. Seat. Now.
CL.hTCN 1 I" "! FANCY
CRAWFORD j "i'hn-' I FREE
Harry Conor. Marllynn Miller. Hav Kaynmnil
34TH ST Thea.. near ll'way. tn. s.U.
ain ai. $i.;,o Matinee To-morrow.S. 15.
WM.
HODGE
u. in itr 1
A CI'RE FOR
CUHtHLKH.
W. 4H fit. Etea. m 2l.
Mata. To-m'wA Hat
iKSiA PLAYHOUSE
15? LITTLE
TEACHER
's'Wiih"" M..RY RYAN
C. re teat
Comedy .Dramal
hlnre "ine
Muflc Maater
1 1
"i.Asr 7 ri.Mr.s"
Nazimova 'WwiiVD'ck"
Nfnr . Avr. S'lledila Oal ler." Beata Now
CI VlfnilTU S8t.W.ofHay.Evea.s in.
rLimUUinMta.To-ffi-wo.8at.at2 JO
CASINO
Iie1il-nlna
A. II. WOOD, rreaents
TO-NIGHT
At
ft .20
AN AMERICAN ACE
flv I.. I. farter. .
A IlIO PATRIOTIC MELODRAMA AT
PATRIOTIC PRICES KOc TO 1.50.
Flrat Matinee To.mnrtow.
48TH ST. TO-M'W EVE. A,T
T,,l: MAN w,, STAYED AT HOME
Fatnoua "Pny" Drama Star Caat Inrludea
Amelia Mni;hn,KatnerlneKfirlrrri,Charlotte
Ivew.Alhert Hrown.A.fl.Van Hvren A othera.
Matlnera Thuraday and Hatunlay 2.18.
Dl mil 4Vh St.. W. of M'way. R-a.1.30.
Mallneen To-m'w it Sat. 2.30.
Comedy by
Frederic and
Fanny Ilatton
THE SQUAB FARM
LONGACRF WEST ah ST. Eve
LUnUAVnt.M,. TnVw(Pop.
YES NO
1 tirl W,io
Evening s-20.
ANat.2,-20.
with
CHRTSTAI.
(ERNE, JANET
IIEECHER.
flmnl t't.
PRINCESS ift' St..nr.B'wy. Eva. 8 20.
.. . . N,,',, To-morrow A Sat.? 20.
BOOTH 4-''n w- of H'wav. hvc. 8.30.
v 1 ' ' Mat To-morrow ft Sat. 2 30.
The Stuart Walker Co. In Tarklnf ton'l
omertv of (ilnrloua Youth,
Maine uiotfj ?,'!th' nr-i 8 M- Mat.
w II way. I To-morrow 10.
EYES OF YOUTH
With jane C.UF.V and Original Caat.
jpP&Si. SHUBERT-';ris.s.
SS Mata. To-m'w A: Sat. 2. 13.
OZMBAIUtfMORE
In'ACMll-CVBCJ Tin a
TRnjHW.M,.! popper he ad
nPT 4a St., E. of ll'way. Krea. at N XJ.
W Mata. Tom'w (Pun I A Wat. a JK.
Till: SKtHONS
FLO-FLO
NKNSVIIIIXAI.
MISH U. HIT.
c
0MEDY IS1-
VITli-lV Mat Thitr jV Mat .ts.t.
MARY SHAW
unpnern imi s. w. o(i ay. tn..2o
MUllUaiiU Mata.To-m'w P.,p.,& Sat 2:50.
Oilier .Mnrof'a I nnel'lng Sem.it Ion
LOMBARD I, Ltd.
with LEO CAK1III.1.0
RICCFHT HIT IN NEW tllltK.
OInUnUMllup TiKlay. 2.V- and SOc.
"THE GIPSY TRAIL"
10EWS 7th Av.-mV.oXa?!-
WM rftl I IFR "NOTHING BUT
WWI. bULLICn THK TRUTH."
" i. HF.RNARH MI4W.
Al'ltll. Kth YOHMkA In
bal.OMF. Iiy orarWIMo.
JITAtiltAPII'S Hiupendout
ruaiogiai ni r.nipej a world
.MIIIUUI. DOOM.
IIIMHFI K-
I'eraoml appairani-ei of Rrapey
it both performance to-day.
I wjrH"J.BATHK.42d8t.
I, I KM . or umaiway.
. . " '"Mata-a:.. Ev. 8.30
Mata.25-r.0-73n-te.SM AunilavH Kv 2Vl,it
NINETEEN MONTHS AGO
f). W. Griffith set foot on the sIwivn of France and prepared to ta'e
the first scenes of his latest and greatest production "HEARTS OF
THO WORLD."
Aided by the officials of the British and the French armies, Mr.
Griffith, his camera man, his assistants, and his players, moved for
ward until within actual sound of the roaring of guns and the bursting
of shrapnel shells. Here, with grim war as a background, Mr. Griffith
began the filming of the sweetest LOVE story ever told.
Herewith death on every side and destruction in the air, Mr.
Griffith unfolded upon the screen the eternal and nevcr-dving story
of a great love which could not be destroyed.
Mr. Griffith, with the in;enuity and genius of the greatest master
director in the world, utilised the wonderful pictorial background of the
Great War as a scenic sett'ng for his drama of LOVE.
Here were real trenches, real battles; real war soenes, taken amid
the fire and smoke of conflict: here were no moving picture "supers,"
such as one sees in a studio picture, but real, flesh and blood, soldiers
of France, of England, fighting with their last drop of blood in defense
of civilization; the only "supers" ued were German ;-oldiers, prisoners
of war, filmed back o' the firing line, tickled to death they were in such
good hands with D. W. Griffith to direct them
'I his superb and magnificent production, Mr. Griffith's greatest
achievement, will lie shown at the l-ort-fourth Street Theatre be
ginning FRIDAY NIGHT. APRIL 5th.
A private invitation presentation for officers of the United States
and the Allied Armies will take place on Thursday night, April 4th.
but NO TICKETS WILL Bh SOLD FOR THAT PRIVATE SHOW
ING. The sale of seats to the general public begins TODAY (TUES
DAY) MORNING at Two presentations (dailv at 2:10 and 8-10) will
lie given after the FIRST PUBLIC PRESENTATION FRIDAY
NIGHT.
'I he presentation of "HE RTS OF THE WORLD" means the
beginning of a new epoch inthe woHd of artistic productions.
IMgnrU) WILLIAM ELLIOTT. F HAY COM8TOCK, MORRIS OKST, Managers.
The., fizd. n ll'way.
Tel. RMIO Cnlr. F. 8.
Matl.To-m'w.ft Hat. at 2
TTI1 MOUTH MATINEE TO.
in munin morrow to it
The Mont Ooeolla,flalltll,Cllrul,Mal,
nJHrent,EnthralllnaKaa1nailnc and Huperb
Stwi'tarlo Fver Known In History of Statri'
A .Muilml Hth1 ol Hie JSo III Its
2d Year al Ills Majesty's Theatre. I oudon.
Fronomlc Frlrea: Orch ll.nO.ia.Dreaal'Ir.
lie. II; Hileony. 76-.V" Fain, fin lc. NI-2.V
AlwavaSPOOr eat all! AO. Wcl.Ml 2'.r-l
ON TOP OF
CENTURY THEATRE
OPENING NEXT
THURSDAY EVE., APR. 4
Mean. Elliott, Comalork A Cleat Announce
MIDNIGHT REVUE
(Performance Starta at WM V, M )
raeerUKifsi
!;; AT THE VS"S;.
Ilia-flHIPPODBOHE
HIPPODPOHE
GREENWICH VILLAGE J'Jkatre. i, . a
KAa.8-41,. Ma, Sat. 2.nnh: r'S",4"o'
PAN YOUNG SHEPHERD A
.""perlal Popular
Mat. To-day
,10r, SI.
)II.F.kl.rill MIIINSIF. MtfOV lIH,"
A I A f "I. "" an t ulne anil
, . r. .
Il'WAY A 47 HT
DallyMata.tile.il
W Bl B.' 1." ' 1
KlVERSIDE
R'WAY A Ull Ml
BROOKLYN AMUHKMENTH.
4 A H A J 1- A t'nllnn Kim
9 I HH tel. Main I Ml I.
Mat.
Rally.
rfSWwo. THE TEMPTERS Jtf,VH
KWJT UB.aj I BIG CONCERTS '4
I
IVOLI
ll'wnv. aQl.h.
2O,30.ftO..r- t
fS i " . ""'
lllonnle Thornton.
PAT ROONEY.MARION
BENT & CO, Ialy
llmnen.MarkftWalVcr.nn
I ALTO
iiU. alU, III),
'Tlltf Bl VI ln .
?? .. n,l' omclal
l!,'.a,,.'5n.wr Melnrea.
IIIVOI.InitfllKSTUA.
HARM. Hal In-1 ho
lnmll Skeleton.1'
Soloists ami HIM.TO
one lllTKA.
-II
AMtTSBMZNTfl.
NEW TOBK'B LKADINO THEATRES AND gPCOESSEg
CUVmP Rroadway. 40Bt. Krea. 8:1. .
tmr,nc Mata. To-m'w A Hat. 2:1R.
SMARTEHT AND REST ACTED
COntDIOrTIIEIEAR
ETHEL
BARRYMORE
THE
OFF
CHANCE
OF.W. rflHiN Thea., H'y. 4.1 St. Kta.K-m
M. WWidll Mata. Tn-m'w (I'op.) A 8at.
IlfXfON!
"IT IS A MIT." Kve. Stin.
CHASES BLUCS!
A sure cure is
SICK-A-BEO
The biggest LAUGH
maker in town !
Jt a Baaamwrnar B'way A 40 8t.
Baa A I I W THE HOME OF
LAlfillTFR
Kvna. 8.J0. Matlneei Wed. A Sat. 2 30.
POP. MAT. TO-MOR'W, 50e to
COHAN & HARRIS
A FUNNIEST AMERICAN COMECT
O- PECENT YEARS
TAILOR-HADE HAN
v.lrh CPANT MITCHELL
NlvW AMSTERDAM ,f
E. 8:111. Mat. To-m'w A Sat. a'l
I'rliTa 6()c to Is.oo.eicept Nat.Nigbt 12 vj
KUW A ERLANGER'S
RADIANT NEW
MUSICAL COMEDY
.'IHltlBi
inwrs.1;
mum
"limW,'l""''""'l"""'iil7
in ii
..Jl'" Comedy by Jemrna
.,' H. Jerome, hook i.yr eabY l..
f Rennold Wolf. Mualr hy LouU '
A. Illraeh. Sren,1 bv L'rhan
sbTJ T"TMTJ
aaiii M iiilll
IUI llKUVL NEWArKHRSinni
-atoe nw nmMn TxiArmt wtt4w'
HENRY MILLER'S SW,
Tel. Bryant 7410. Kv. R:20. Mta.Thur.A Rat.
'The Fountain of Youth"
LIBERTY w"t 42 8tw', Kvenlnms 30.
- aiata. i o-m wu oi
l'o.)AHat.a au.
GOING
The Atlatlon Mimical Comedy Sennatlan.
UP
TJieTALK
F TNI
OWN
VANDERBIITwVW
PHONE IJ
Mata. Ttaura. & Sat. 3 :30.
DAVID B F.I. A SCO prmenc
TIGER ROSE
Harris
T0NIGHT AT 8:30 R ptHnc
TIIEATHK. 42tl I
U-. of D'wav. Mata. I
To-m'w A Sat. 2 30. 1
BT 0 J S.BBLSsV'
.awBRiaij wea (popi s r '
BELASC0 S?t44n?t' KnlnM0
IIAflU bKLAHi;U n
POLLY
WITH
A PAST
"Ihe moat absorbing and
Ifnlficant, and one of the
bat acted playa of the current
eaion." Arthur HornMvx. 7 hn
ire Mawi'in.
MAT. TO-MORROW 50 to $1.50
HKI.MONT Theatre (ll't'MM; in. n,
4"ih Ht.. K. or ll'way. Phone llrvant 4k
CARTER., MAGICIAN
Kt. at 810. Ved Thiira. A Sat. Mt
CR ITER ION&V.J;T.?f
Laurette Taylor
In a newrntredy by OIIAPPIIUITCG"
J. Hartley Manner nArnntSS
et Friday Aft. MI TAY1.0H In SnecUl
at 2:l.',.iwit Nowi8hakeoarean Matinee.
REPUBLIC Sitzi-wi'SJR-
llkl VUklU Pop.PrleeMat.lo.m'H
GLOBE
Mnu.WeH.
O'UANTBRN" n(iSt.
I'OPn.AH PRICE MATINEE TO-M'W.
Thea.. C'ol. Clrrlo. E m. s 20.
Matlneea To-m'w A Sat. s 'in.
Military -Natal Melodrama
PARUH
BEDROOM
BATH
Florence floor
John CuraWtarrf
PARK
f DAYS LEAVE
w PRICES 25c fK, 75s $1, $1.50.
Nn Trenrh feenea No Horrors.
Mir a mo iion pu n UK.
ELTINGE
HESS
W. 42 St. Tv-nlghl h :io.
Mata. Wed A hat. 2 :io
Pop. Price Mat. Tu-m'w.
BEFORE
PLEASURE
With It.itnev
Bernard and
Alexander
f.ut.
METROPOLITAN WWl SUNDAY EVE., ARRIL 28, AT 8:30
VIOLIN KKC1TAI, HY SfllA
H EIF ETZ
I FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE FAMILIES OF JEWISH SOL
DIERS AND SAILORS WHO HAVE JOINED THE COLORS.
SEATS Nf W CN SALE AT METROPOLITAN CPERA HCl'SK.
MADISON SQ. GARDEN Ijnill
Twice Rally 2 !." and K 1.1. Ifj II WW
)oorM Open Hour Earlier.
GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH
Ijithusiastically Proclaimed the Mo$t
Stupendous, OriKinah Novel Circus
New York Has Eer Seen!
MONSTER ZOO FREAK oNtiKKSS.
Aduilsston to eMirythlntf, lnrluillti4 '"'lis,
tk'. to S2.7A. accorillnf to location.
WAR TAX INt'I.l I1KI)
I'HII.DHICN under twelve, hair irlre nil
Malt . eicept Sat., to $1.00 Real anil uer
IIII INCH I li'KK r Ol I k i:s:
lehlKh Valley Ticket Offlre. ll .iv .V 2,
t., It. 11. Macy A Co. and (iIiuIhI llro.
METROPOLITAN
O I' K It t
ii i i' I-
I el. at R. Rarblere dl Hlilalla. liarrlen'M
He l.tici.f'artl.Manlonix. Malatitta (on l'pi
Thuri. Spnrlal Mat. Ill to .-) t j thin
I Murln. Mat 'vnauer, Rtinrtelhia aru, n.t
I HcKurnla. Kuvnaael. (,'cin.l iapl
1 lium. at k is. Toara. Karrnr, Anlen Im'
cottl.Mal.iteata.Hixiil.Haila. ( 'ontl .Moramnnl
I Krl. at H. Double Dill. Nhailewl. Ilraslaii S in.
Hnlliis llr.w.-.! I l.U fl.t ...Ii j i.
......... .,... nHliiiUH-. V nullum, It'll II
I'lare f'oniio. (ialli. Ilontlgllo. Ilartlk t'omli
Moutetia ami Moranionl.
Sal. Alt. at Purltonl. !!arrlento. IV-iiil
I..l7nn. Mel Marrionct. ( 'i.ml Mnrnm
Sal. at 8 30 17.1c to $3), Amore del tre He
Muzlir Martlnelll. Atnato. Dldiir, Hadi. ( on
illlrtor. Moriinzonl.
Net Miiu.m s is. Sana-Gene. Farrar M-'ln
clll.Aniato.Althouet'Kiirola Cond, l'an
IIAHDMAN l-l VMI rKI)
BALL
In aid or the
Stage Women's
War Relief
Lnder the auaplcoa or tho
SIXTY CLUB
SJfffioM HOTEL ASTOR
NEXT SAT. o'fi.orK'f. m.
TICKETS f .1. to be had at tho office or
the managing committee. 1ttom lugj.
Aeolian Hiiddlna, 33 W. 4Sd St, or al
Ihe lmtM Club, 130 W, 4ath St. or
at the Friars -luh. lOfl W 4!th ft or
at tho Htagn on:en'a War Itellef. No.
360 Mh Ae., Tyaona McHrldfs,
Hoii-i, aioo and SAO.
CONCERT tiik PLAZA HOTEL
Thursday, April 4th, 3 P. M.
.Mr. till l lltl KM'IMI. tlolonrrlllit
Vfll-knoan In I'arln. and
Mri. KOH LOW. Sonrano
In the IntertatlnK pnram are aect
m-Mcro!rros of Satnt-Saens, Faure. ( h M
Mdor. I.eroua. Magnet. F l.t rnrt.'i'
lloKers and Itlrhieond. Ticket nn on
ale at Plara Hotel. I'rlce !,vi.
THE
New Choral
MM ir.T I
Owing to the unusually Intricate
mechanical detail of tho production
Charles HnpMna announroa that tho
premiere of Hubert Osborne's odd new
comeuy
a a
APRIL
9 f
will be alien at the I'CNCIl A JI KV
IIIK.A1KF. nn Saturday Ktrnliic. nt
H.30 In lieu or To-nlKht Seats purclia.ed
ror To-night will be hunored for Saturday
Kvenlna,
Sat. Mornlnn 11 IBs Sam's Marionettes.
A VIEUX C0L0MBIER"(1 , ; ,h,,
To-nliht s-30. "La Pals Cher Sol";
BB' "le lestatnent du I'ere l.eleu";
"La Chance de Frencolae."
SPt.ClAL ANNOUNCEMENT!
Commencing Tuesday, April o.
HKASON IN F.Nfll.lflll
EDITH WYNNE MATTHISON
In a New CnmiMv
THE ARMY WITH BANNERS
lly CIIAUl.F.S HANN KF.NNF.DV.
Peat Hale To-morrow. Mall Orders Now,
KAISER
The Beast of Berlin'
S Time Itally. :30.
4:30 Ht0. Mats. !.1-.u-75c.
Now
Etenlngi tie to $1.00.
nROADWAY Theatre, at 41st
t.
LOl'IS KOKMMEMCII. Cond.
THCRS. KVC... Al'RII. 4 lorneale Hall
Verdi's Requiem
.'ni.n.ts i no, .lium ir, n
Arthur llurkrlt Arthur Mlridleten
Tickets Ht Hot Office K Ililni Lore 1 S '
MiviNF, F.i.iiorrs i iir win
YVETTE GlilLBERT
so;s or iiAt'iiri.iitF. m w
l.SI' RFCIT4I.S
Frl. aft., Apr. 3. nnd sun Kir.. Kpi
Tickets at llol Cldlce. Knahe run
Carnegie Hall, This Afternoon at 3
1.4 r ciianci: ro in.sit
ROSA RAISA
AftHsitfti by
R I lYl I N I
Seats Now lit
Hot IHHre
Carnegie Mall. Prl. Aft.. April . it 1
MINII RECITAl M4IIHKII
MATZENAUER
FRANK 1.4 FOKOi; 4 1' I III'. I'HM
Peats lloiOfllce.Mm.Haenn'IAJomM i-teinm
.Nh lurk Salon
Modern French Painting
Vanderbllt Kesldeure
77 Fifth Aen in
For tho Flelh f of
Disabled French Soldier
Daily II A M tn in r M
Adudlon .Mc TucmIh . v
Twice Dally
t-i s li
(aOLUMOIAVlV.h
U"roST0NE-K"prLLARDm
Popular
rl.vi.
M4RV 4.4ICIIF.N In
'I he Splendid Sinner'
Final Kp. ".Depth of the
Sea." oirand Orch.
GARDEN THEATRE V&fX;
Vaudeville ue iMxe 'hiVf! M
Mls F.dlth W'stine Matthlson, Mr 1'islrn in
Cordob.t. The t'oinedv club, Cnim.mro lilnnev
anil others In "As You LlWo It," "Moonshine '
etc.
Under th auspices of Manhatlan Courcll.
Illrl Cinuts.
Tickets .'.O els. to M..V1 at (llrl Scout Oftlcc
10 K. 4.ld Ht., at theatre on day or iicrrorinimv
Arollnn Hall, Sat. F.iic., Apill n. .n
I.sl I'lsno lie-Ual This lesson Ml! Il
LEVITZKI
M'lll MA.SN.CIIOl'IN FroKis m
Mm. DANIEL MAY1.II llild. i'i "
"MY 4 YEARS
IN GERMANY"
K:tn Mftta. :ui. iMr-m c to l.'.n.
KNICKERBOCKER l 'r ""J
B Ambassador
GERARD'S
ATTENTION, ASSOCIATE MEMBERS
ST. CECILIA CLUB.
THF. riNAL PIMVATI' ii'- r"
TAKKS I'LACF, AT Till: WAII" I-
i fi'.si4v, Amu, sk ttvii, s iii r
Arollnn Mall, Frl. Fie.. 4pr, M .u
Mill. IN UK. MAYO
CITAI. 11V WHIU
TH'KF.TS AO,. TO
J.'.Oilat llit nillea Now
WADLER
4F.OI.MN HALL. Weil.. Apill ID
HI nil .ii
KFi IT M ,
9KATH ,V
ALMA REAL

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