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Bedford inquirer. (Bedford, Pa.) 1857-1884, June 25, 1869, Image 2

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BEDFORD, PA„ FLIDAT, JUSE2S, 1860
STATE TICKET.
GOVKRSOR.
JOHN W. UEAKY.
. subject " Ibe dceisin of the State Convention.)
lIMTKICr TICKET,
SRSATO*.
0. SHANNON MULL IN.
Subject to the (leeisin of the Diet. Conference.)
AOtSIO' V.
J. H. lONUEXECKER, Esq.
sab t the uecUion of the Dist. t n crmce.)
(OrVfT TH KtT.
PWTHt'SOTiRT,
j. W. LIN'S EN FELTKR, Esq., ofKtJf.-rd Bor.
>HF.nirr,
WILLIAM DICERT, of Re.lforu T r.
TRF-ASf Ff -L
WILLIAM PHILLIPS, of Bedford Twp.
COUMISSfOSt Ti f
J \MESI INK, of HopT-e l Twp.
f>,OV. IMBKUT'K.
EMANUEL J. DIEHL, of Cokraia Twp.
CO B'ltl'.
DK. A. 8. SMITH, f St. Clair- 'itlc Bor.
ti niTon,
JOHN P. WILLIAMS, of South Woodbery Tw|>
M HO ARE YOUR IUIENDS?
The Gazette instead of 'laboring for the
best intcre-t# of tin cons.tv i- advocating
free trade to the best of it - ability. Bedford
county is rich in iron ore and coat Capi
tal and cntcrpri-e alone are wanted to de
velop her resource#. Under the ftvn-able
influences of our present protective p li-v
it .i manufactures have been stimulated and
amwand extensive furnace hasjust been
erected at Rid llesburg and is about ready to
begin work. The Johnstown Iron Company
has bought the Lemnos property near
Iljpeweil and proposes to -una railroad
through Morrison's Cove to some po'nt on
the Brea-ltop road near Hopewell and erect
furnaces in th it n-.-iehborhood. Other par
tie? fire project ins sinii ur enterprises in va
rious parts of the county. The same story
roi-ht be repeated of every county in the
State. Preparations are making 'or all
kinds of industrial and manufacturing en
terprises, and especially for the matiufac
ture of our great staple, ir< ;t. Justa-tbere
i- thus placed before not only our own
county but the whole State a brighter
prospect than ever be! rc of materia) pros
perity, coppetheadism would adopt free
trade, throw our laboring men out of em
ployment, destroy the markets for our far
m rs, stop our manufactures, leave our iron
and coal lie undevt loped, unus-d and tin
profitable in our mortmains and send to
England to buy the iron that we can make
at cur own doors. It i- the hi-tory of i! it
party for half a century, that it has bated,
fought and persecuted Lone r, free, in'e
pende nt labor and c-mkavur. d to substitute
therefor the enforced labor of the pauper
and the slave. It Las ever ken the party
o; > pu • -pron 1 ari- oar.iey an f n w that
slavery is abolish' 1 and the tease lord- im
poverished, it seeks na'urally an alliaae-r
with a British aristcracy who gain their
wealth an 1 influence by forcing English
j a up- rs to labor for the pittance that barely
suffices to kcrp ill rra from starvation. To
t! i- .-am degn 1-d erudition would it bring
Amerie nlal or. T • this end its efforts are
new put forth and for this purpose it now
advocates free-trade. Ho who wishes the
Aociiean ial or r to be reduced to ih-
Jcvi • i -r*rr ftsrtrprnrsen rrs an atter
of course support this free trade party.
TilK CHI .Mis K QUESTION.
Aw predicted some months ago. the
Chinese question is already eliciting sj ir
ite i discussion. The que.-'i<>n is orof tin
highest importance and wo Lope to ,-ec it
d - -u--:d in a spirit of 1. not inquiry and
investigation. \\ fiat moral, r era! or po
ire .1 n ul'.- may Cow from the introduction
'd thi- new element in'o on- p ipu'atinn is
a quc.-tion for the ca in at. t ■ ;r u con
sideration of the Philan ! . -j-i-r, • P L'hiln,-
| pher and tba Stati man. H.i • - work
lor the churches. Ihe christian ri igiin is
tli" foundation cf lie highest type of modi rn
civilization ar to the chu.vhes we mr.-t
I" \ for our greatest ad in . - minting and
controlling the v ast flood of humanity that
will soon pour in upon us from the over
flowing population cf P.mari Chun. An
open bible aud f eeschi . > must h<> < u
iuaiu reliance fur lit ting t! em lor u-cfubjt>s
and lwl .hi.: n-Wp. Ist th • churches
gird them-iv ; < ,i t; work. Let those
who marshal the creai army of teachers pre
pare for active, vi, ,rous w ,rk. With these
as pioneers the .Statesman will fi ; <1 his te.-k
a comparatively easy one. The ercat itu
portanceof the ai l of the church in thi
work will he s.en when we remember, that
the moral law is the foundation of all Un
laws of Christendom. Where will he the
hind ne force of these laws among a race that
recognize no God, but worsh'p ido's? l'i on
our ability, therefore, to emvert th se
pe'peat lca.-t to an acceptance o r the
fundamental doctrirc of the Christian re
ligion. will depend our iow.r to control and
govern tlu.ni under our laws. Th us the
work of the church become* of th first and
highest importance.
, T,,E DIFFERENCE -The Stat-aud United
State- taxes have ail teen reduced while
the debts have been reduced annually under
lb-publican management, but come home to
Bedford county under a pure copperhead
ru'.e and you find taxes and debts both in
crested. \ct copperheads prate about Rc
publican extravagance and a-k to be plae d
in power that they may show their ,-ktli in
managing the public finances. The Poor
House management has given the people ot
thi- county a practical demonstration of cop
perhead finan ierirg that they will not for
got as long as they aw haded down wrb
taxes. or the jr. ,en they do not desire
any further exhibition or copperhead finan
ciering. It is too costly.
THE Cuban cause grows more hopeful.
Ad the filibustering cxj-eJiiions from the
States have landed saf ly and joined
c "ban army. Several of the later en
,' U ' !K3 ! ive resulted in decided victories
or the insurgents by which they have L-en
ucb enc uragej. while the Spaniards have
0"" proportiooati ly di-heartened. The
n°eff. ir, c h ° Ua ! Ud S,at constitute
- ' , i - • rec, rive eonfidt-tic- to the
native troops and am a terror to the Span
havi,! g come off victors in every en
gagement. The patriots n ,
-%<**) to av.a in r ! ro "'
cenfideet of sped, lujTV'sp™
1: Irc neb Liberals regard the recent eke
tion as s ure proof that their cause is st-uiddv
ga.mng strength, but deproo-.te any n vqiu
tiomry demonstration, P'efhrriug that un
inistakeaole public sentiment should compel
th! peaceful conces,i„n 0 f „ m Jn; |if( ra ,
govern nent. Whether the Empire will
1 Bid to the people * wishes or , , v e them
to violent t nie alone will teO. r
JUDOE SHABSWOOH as we predicted has
declared the Registry Law illegal and un
constitutional. The moment we learned
that he had determined to have the question
brought before himself at jVm 7' tus, in
stead of awaiting a full bench according to
the agreement of the counsel, we considered
thi* decision a foregone conclusion. Judge
Shrrswoo 1 waselectedby coffec-potM allac'cs
frauds and he is determined that the fuciii
tics for similar crimes shall not be destroyed
by legal enactment. Coppcrhcadi m has
but one hope and that is in fraud, and J udge
Shavswood will nt allow any nice consider
alio,is of Judi.-i :1 duty to stand between hint
and any law that strikes at the !u-t hope of
modern Democracy, ballot box stuffing and
frau-luh nt naturalizations.
SEVERAL hundred clerks have teen dis
charged from the various departments tt
Wa-hiugton in the past week or two. It is
a herculean wotk to cleanse the.:c Augern
-tablesof the worthless lumber that accu
mulated there during the reign of Andy
Johnson copperhead ism, lut President
Grant and hi- cahinet.are vigorously prose
cuting the task ai d bid fair soon to have the
various depaitmeots reduced to the most
economical working force. The retrench
ment and reform polity will be fully carried
out. Its influences are already exUn-ively
feh in the icduction of expenses.
IN Linca-trr county at the recent Repub
lican delegate eh ction 4000 votes were cast.
Of the six members of the last Legislature
from that county, but one. Senator Billing,
felt was ton initiated. He opposed c-vety
#ch> me of ciirrcpfion and extravagance in
ibe last L-gi.datwre and well deserves to be
returned. We sincerely hope that many
other di-tihts will do as Lancaster ha#.
Let faithless and corrupt n.cn ho left at
home, and we will soon have a dill rent
kit: ', of l-gi-lati-n at Harrishure.
SENATOR JOHN SCOTT, of Huntingdon,
Pa., was a guest at the banquet given in
hou rof Ex-Gov. Curtin in Philadelphia
and made a speech on the occasion, which
is said to have been the speech of the even
ing. The Philadelphia Bulletin s'a'es that
I he made a no-<i favorable impression, and
| that the distinguished I'ennsylvaniani prei
ent ie't • -cat pride in their new Senator,
who ranks as one of the ablest men of the
State.
THE British house of Lords have had
quit • an exciting debate on the Irish Church
bill, Toe n< 1 ility 1 >ok upon it as a sure
precursor of their downfall and therefore
; dght it fiercely, But the more intelligent
of them finding its passage a noccs-ity are
inclined to pa.-# it in a modified form, there
by at 1 a#t prolonging their power and
g,ac folly yielding what they cm no longer
retain. 11 publieani #m i< making itself felt
even in cot!; native England.
CorPEBIfEAtHSM and British Freetrade
go hand in hand Th- y arc r.ow making a
fierce attack upon every sj e ies of Ameri
can imlustry. Even in 15. rtn-ylrania Cop
perli- ad'sm is making an open fight against
the protf ctive policy of the government,
which keeps our manufacturers of every
kite' in operation, affords remunerative cm
: ployment for our people and a market for
theii - reduce.
FLORIDA RATIFIES THE AMENDMENT. —
Information has been received at Washing
ton that the Fifteenth Amendment to the
Constitution of the United States was rau
fled by lsitli Houses of the Florida L-gi-la
turc o i Tuesday last. The vo:e in the As
-18 against x. This make# 11 '-'r;e'wcSrUiiiVfi
Stat'- that h-t- ratified including Indiana.
THE li-t is-ue of the State Guard , pub
fished at Harruburg, contains the following
announcement:
"Until fuither notice, and J'. ;- the purpose
j of making other bu-iness rrranremenfs, the
public-timi of the State Guard will be sus
j ponded with this issue.
"FORNEY FC KAIU MAN.''
i We uml er>tsmd that the paper will make
, -
I its apt e s nee again at tn earv uay.
THK M T-.THOMSTS are voting overwhelm
ingly i'sfavor of Lay Delegation. Method
ism will gain greatly by the change. The
time ha-< gone by in this country when the
clergy can arrogate tcvthemselves complete
control of the manager)! n*. of religious af
fairs.
MAttstiAf, SERRANO has been appointed
•egc;.t cf Spain but his appointment has
not met wiili the cordial approval ol the
j liberal [ ariy. It is feared that trouble may
j occur on the occasion of hi- installment.
GFNEKAT. GRANT vi-ited Boston and at
! tended the Peace J<-, hut did not alow
i himt-c!! to he entrapped into making a
! tpeecb.
THE Peace J ubilee at lfest u was a -pi. n
i did sue; e.-s in every respect.
G ou> ro d in New York on Saturday at
156.
Ex GOVERNOR CI RTAIN sailed tor Rus
sia on the 1 .th sn-t., from New York.
The Peace Jubilee.
BOSTON, June 19.
Crowded as was yesterday's concert at the
coliseum, it was nothing com pan d to the
ala-o-t iacu'culable mass of human being*
assembled thereto day. It is estimated that
: to-do 'a as-emhly numbered fully 50.000,
and we should say this is rather oil ler than
over-rated. In fact so great was the ru-h
that shortly after 3o'cclock it became neces
-arv to elo-e the doors and refu-e admit
tances to all comers after that time.
I have been iufonned that the receipts of
yesterday, exclusive of season tickets, were
; 8 *1,900. II so, and Ido notdoubt it by any
means, today's receipts tout have been
over *100,009. There was fully ten thous
aud people refused admittance, even with
tickets. In short, so crowded was the
coliseum, that, to u-c a popular expression,
[ yo-I IHI d not drop a pin.
li e heat in the galleries was almost in
j snip ,! labia, although the building is excel
| enuy ventilated, Many ladies fainted, and
I it was with the utmost exertions that they
cou.d be removed fiorn the budding thrpugh
the colosal mass of human br ings,
J HE New \ ork Lcriuu;/ Pott presents the
fa .owing interesting figures : The I'i.ited
States have an area of 3,578,3m-' -nmire
miles, or 2. it Ml, 170,880 acres'; nearly n
aero !or cve.v dollar of the national ileht
The population of 1860 was 31,444,321 h
was then computed by the u,us Bureau
that the mean annual increase of population
is three per cent., and that the United
Rtaews woul l probably contain in
1870 a population of 42,323.432
1880 a population of. 50',450,231
1890 a population of. 77,266 989
iWJO a mi illation of. 10t)'.30. r >!Bo2 i
the last number is greater than the pres- '
ent population of Great Britain, France, 1
IT; a u and 1 russia togethi r,'and far grta'er {
than any cumber of civilized people ever
yet united in one nation. Yet with this i
population lire United Slates would have
but twenty-eight inhabitants to the -quarc
nri E—less than one third ihe present densi
>" the population of New York State,
which is nearly ninety-four to the square
wile.
PARIS trades to the figures of 5,009,000,-
0 0 francs a year, gives em ploy meat to 600,-
OH I work people, and pays 2,000,000,000
francos in wages. There are 4WJO gold
smiths and .jewelers, who annually DISPOSE
0f'300,000,000 francs' worth, Ac., Ac., and
the slightest political agitation i.tfio's all
this people and all tbii wealth.
rnoa RRW VORK.
Heath of Henry J. Kaymontl.
NEW VORK, June 19.—The death of
Henry ,T. Raymond has made a great sen
sation in the newspaper world. All the
•jspera offer feeling tributes to the memory
of a tuan who was an honor to the profession
of journalism.
On Thursday afternoon Mr. Raymond ac
eompanied by one of bis daughters, visited
Greenwood Cemetery, where be designed
purchasing a lot lor the interment of a
member of his family who died lat spring,
leaving the cemetery, he returned to Tin
Time* office, on Printing House square,
where he rcuiaiaed until about six o'clock.
At t list hour he went to his residence No.
jl2 West Ninth street. After tea he re
mained in the house until nine o'clock,
when lie went out, as he said, to take a short
walk. As nearly as can be ascertained,
he returned home at about eleven, and, af
ter locking and bolting the door, was seized
with apoplexy, and fill to the floor.
In the early morning, at about 3 o'clock,
the sickness of one of the children caused
several of the family to ri#e, when the groans
and hard breathing of Mr. Raymond were
beard. On going to the hall he was found
laying on his lace, still breathing, but un
conscious and in great agony. He was at
once removed to his room, and several
physicians were summoned, who pronounced
bis disease apoplexy. Every iffort was
made to revive him, but without avail, and
about 5 o'clock death ensued. The time for
the funeral is not yet announced.
The Tribune says: —In the death of Hon.
HENRY J. RAYMOND, Editor of The Xnc-
York Time*, the I're-s of our City has lost
one of its ablest and most eminent member#.
Mr. Raymond, after graduating with dis
tinction at the University of Vermont, came
directly to this City in the Autumn of 1840,
and was employed on The X>tc-Yorker, for
which he had wrifen with force and spirit
while a student. THE TRIBUNE was started
the next April, and Mr. Raymond held the
second place on its Editorial staff from the
outset until the Autumn of 1848wlien he re
signed it to accept a like i ositicn on The
Courier and Enquirer, which he likewise
r< I riquished alter a few *y p ars; visiting
Europe with his family, and being repeatedly
elected to the Assembly ol our State, where
of he v as in the second term chosen Speak
er. He now sta; tt d The Time*, of which
be was from the first sole Editor, though
well served by a-s ; stants. He was chosen
Lieutenaut-Governor of our State in 1854
and ek ctcd to Congress from our Ylth
District iu ISO 4. Mr. Johnson in 1807
nominated him for Minister to Austria,
but the Seuate did not confiim the selec
tion.
Mr. Raymond's official career, though
enticing ability, did less than justice to his
comprehensive knowledge and rare in
tellectual powers. Never so positive and
downright in his convictions as his country
men are apt to be, he was often mi.-judged
as a trimmer and time-server, when in (act
he spoke and wrote exactly as he felt and
thought. If what he uttered to-day was
not in full accordance with what he said
yesterday, the difference evinced in his essay
was a true reflection of one which had pre
ceded it in his mind, lie saw both sides cf
■t coutr vett, d is.-us, and, if one of them
seemed the ju.-ter to-day, the other might
nevertheless command his preference to
ut irrow. This mental constitution or men
tal habitude i rare with us. and he would
have b eu more favorably judged as a
jounralidtor politician in Great Britain than
in this country.
Mr. Raymond would have ranked in En
gland as a "Liberal Conservative," and
would have followed the flag now of Glad
stone, then of Lord Stanley, occasionally
siding with Robert Lowe, and again with
lleresford Hope. He was sincerely favora
ble to Liberty, Reform and I'rogress; he
was no less sincerely averse to rash or vio
lent changes, and ausious that Progress
should be regular and equable, never shock
ing a prejudice nor fluttering a timorous
Lreast. It is perhaps uulortunate, but none
the less true, that giant wrongs aud strongly
fortified abuses are not thus to be overborne.
There were probably others who evinced
greater ability in some special department;
but, regarding journalism in its broadest as
prcts, we doubt whether this country has
known a journalist superior to Henry J.
aJ se ruing critic, a skillfur feTc'o' ami
compiler of news, as well as an able and
ready writer. There was nothing in the
whole lanee of newspaper work that he
could not do well, and (what is of equal im
portance) with unhesitating promptness,
ilc was never too sick to work when work
ha<l to be d"tie, aod always able and willing
to do any amount ot labor that the exigency
might require. Others may have evinced a
rarer faculty, which some might term geni
n ; ; but Mr. Raymond embodied talents
that have rarely been surpassed.
Genial, unasiming, and thoroughly in
formed ly study, observation, and travch
Mr. 1 laymond was a delightful companion,
and his society was widely courted and en
joyed. A thoroughly capable and effective
csov i. he has fir years shunned public
speaking whenever it could be avoided, find
ing enough t" do without it, and having no
decid d love for the sound of his own voice.
Snatched away >o suddenly in the prime of
life and in the midst of its activities, his
(1 a'h ms.ki.sa void that will not easily be
fi.i id, while hi-, widow and children are call
ed to umrn a los at, once astounding and
irreparable.
Serrano, Urgent of Spain.
( Marshal Franciso Serrano, Duke tie la
Torre, recently chosen H gent of Spain by
j the Cortes, took the oath of office yesterday,
the lHth. _ The Marshal is well advanced in
years, having been boru about the beginning
of the present century. He acquired a va
tied military experience in the war of inde
pendence, and gradually rose to the highest
rank in the army of Spain. In 1843, when
he assisted in bringing about the fall of Es
partero, he first took a prominent part in
the political troubles of thecountrv. After
the restoration of the Queen mother to the
throne, he entered into a coalition with oth
ers to overthrow Oiozaga. Soon after the
marriage of Queen I-sabella. in 1846, he ac
quired an influence over the royal mind
which occasioned differences between the
King eon sort and herself, aud caused some
.-caudal. The Ministry of the Duke de So
tomavcr, which attempted to destroy his in
fluence, was overthrown by him. while that
of M. de Salamanca, which he supported,
v .del to the storm of public indignation
which assailed it. Altar this Serrano turn
ed liber;:!, apd just before the accession to
power of Narvaes, accepted the captaincy
General of Granada. Having been impli
cated in a rising at Sarragossa in 1854, he
was exiled, but returned during the revolu
tion of July in that year, and became an ac
tive supporter of the O'DODDCII and E-pate
ro Cabinet In the rupture which followed
H-twu-n these two, he sided with the for
mer, and having been nominated Captain-
General of New Castile—an appointment
which placed Madrid in bis power—in the
coup d'etat of 1856 he played into O'Don
nell s hands, and in the same year was cre
ated Duke de la Torre. In 1857 he was
sent as Ambassador to the Court of France.
In 1859 he was appointed Director and Col
onel General of artillery, and in June, 1865,
Captain General of Madrid. The promi
nent part which he has recently taken as
one of the leading spirits of the revolution
which expelled Isabella II from the throne
is still fresh in the minds of the people.
A CORRESPONDENT of a Chicago paper
writes : "Did it ever occur to you how Gen.
McDowell has lived down the odium incur
red by the first Bull Bun defeat and appears
to have maintained a growing pOplarity in
tli e army and among the powers that "be?
I hose who knew bun intimately assure me
that he is a model of a soldier, unselfish and
brave, and one of the truest friends. It is
perhaps owing to these virtues that liisstar,
like those of other Generals who were un
fortunate at the commencement of the war.
has never set. He neither drinks, smokes',
nor indulges iaspirituous liquors, which t in
be said oi only a very few other military
men. *
SOUK a Kile pated Democrats contend that
the negro is not tiic equal of the white man.
11 the following doesn't prove that he is, we
want to know what will: Henrv Law a
negro just committed to jail at Huntsvi'lle
Texas, stole last winter more than stiOo'
and while on the way to the penitentiary
stole from the Sheriff's pocket the evidence
of his conviction. After this was recovered
he escaped from co-todv and was tidy
captured after nearly a car's search. When
found he was attiied in female apparel
Oiilrnge by Minor*— Superintendent
Nearly Killed.
About twelve o'clock on Friday night a
mob of a hundred and fifty desperadoes,
known as "The Buckshots,'' entered the
hotel at which Mr. Charles Henderson. Su
perintendent of Buck Mountain Coal Com
pany, boardod, and demanded that he give
up ids arms and make certain confessions
relative to the discharge of several men who
belonged to the gang.
Without waiting for a reply, his revolver
was snatched from his hand and a murder
ous blow dealt him. The wounded man
sprang from bis led and was se'z d by the
infuriated crowd and stabbed and pummell
ed until he was insensible. Even then he
was held upon his feet by his assai antr.
while his head, breast arid shoulder- were
gashed am.in and again wiih their knives.
His wife endeavored to ward off the blows
by shielding his head with her dress and
such portions of the bed clothes as she
could wrap about him. But the savage
brutes thrust her aside, and lifting their
victim hurled him headlong down stairs.
Then they followed and stood him against
the wall while their companions beat biiu
again with tbeir clubs and muskets. After
this they threw him upon the floor and
stamped opon him, when they left biui for
dead.
They then turned their attention to Mr-.
Henderson, and firmly held her in a chair
while the persona! effects of the Supeiin
tendent were ransacked. When this booty
was secured they proceeded to the other
hotel and maltreated several other gentle
men. Then they utarchod out of t rwn to
ward F.ekley, where their operations were
continued. Mr. Henderson was beaten to a
jelly and cannot recover.— Maud. Chunk
Gazette.
Explosion of ti Ilebel Shell.—Narrow
Escape ot Workmen.
It is generally kuown that Chatles Carr
purchased, not long after the war, a large
number of rebel guns, some of them of itn
mense eallibre. These guns were broken
up and the iron ruu into tome useful ma
chinery.
For the purpose of breaking this massive
iron into pieces, an immense drop comes
down with tremendous force. For the pur
poses of safety from any particles that may
fly off, hiding places arc prepared for the
wotkmen, from which a spring is pulled.
The workmen wero engaged yesterday
upon a very large gun, which carried a 28
pound bill, it was found to be loaded with
two balls, which were taken out, but it con
tained besides these something else, which
was supposed to be a ball; not being able
to extract it, it was placed under the drop.
What was the surprise and consternation
of every one to hear an explosion of the
most terrifie character, which was heard all
over the city. All the men in the ettsb
lishment left their work and ran to see what
was the matter.
The first thought was as to the safety of
the men at the drop. They were found ail
safe in their hiding places. The windows
in the immediate vicinity were shattered,
and entirely carried awa v. Upon inresti
gation it was found that the piece had been
loaded with a shell. — Trenton Emporium.
THE Examiner Richmond, Va. -ays of
Hoofland's German Bitters. This is the
season of all others in which this Bitters,
now so renowned, is found so beneficial.
Added to the ingredients which make this
Bitters both diet-tic and tonic, are the
qualities which invigorate the debilitated
system, remove langu tr and depression, re
store the appetite, and impatt a healthy ;-c
tion to all the functions of the body. Tie
mother and housekeeper should never he
without it, and the traveller who pack- his
trunk or portmanteau for the Springs,
should class among the necessary articles a
few bottles of Hoofland's German Bitters.
He will find it an invaluable medicine in the
hour ol transient derangement of the system,
which is likely to befall any one in this
climate, and especially during the Summer
season. It is pure, free Irom all intoxicating
liquors, and for that reason the most
strictly temperate need not hesitate to use
it, personally, or in their families.
Hoofland's German Tonic Is a com
bination of all the ingredients of the Bitters,
with pure Santa Cruz Rum, orange, anise,
Ac. It is used for the same diseases as the
Bitters, in csscs Alcoholic
of rare value, and most agreeable to the
palate. Principal Office, 631. arch St.,
Phi'ad'a, Pa. Sold everywhere.
THE Philadelphia North American , upon
the subject of the boot and shoe liade, say.-:
A t-ireful estimate made in 1807 showed the
value of the boots and shoes produced here
annually to be about five millions of dollars,
being in exec--of the value of the produc
tion at Lynn, Ma-s., the great headquar
ters of the \ ankee boot and ,-ho't trade.
Still the cheap work of the New England
makers was in ,-tteh demand in this market
that tiie solos of our wholesale dealers in
Philadelphia annually amounted to ten mil
lions of dollars of Yankee make alone, and
the aggregate trade of both home sird east
ern make at fifteen millions of dollars.
§nv gVtlvnl foments.
WORD TO
CON S U M 1' T 1 V E S.
Rein*, a phort antl practical treatise on the nature,
cause.., and symptom.* of j > uluiuuary t oil. u>nfitiuM,
lironchitiu, and Aethnta; and their prevention,
treatment, and cwre l>v inhalnfinn. Sent by mail,
free. Add rem y. VAN IH.MMELL. M. D„ 16
West Fourteenth St., N. Y. ]Sjuncl2m
riliiis is no lib .MI; I 0 '
A By sending 3a cents, with age, heig! t, color
of eyes and hair, you will receive, by return mail,
a correct picture ot your future huHbnnd or wife,
with name and date of marriage. Address V,'.
FOX. I'. 0. Drawer No. 24, Fultonvillc, N. Y.
18junelvr.
Q HEAP P A~I NTINO.
( 160 lbs of the PKCORA UOMI'A-
I 4 NY'S COLORED PAINT (costing
- ( $12.50; v. ill paint as much as 650
3 j lbs. of Lead, and wear longer. For
COST ( particulars, address S. BOWEN,
LEAD. ' Sec y., No. 150 N: Fourth Street,,
t Phil'a. ISjunelw
AGENTS WANTED FOR THE
REST ROOK OF THE PERIOT,
WOMEN OP NEW YORK;
Or, The I'ndcr World of the Great City.
The most startling revelation of modern times.
New York Society I n masked. "The Aristocra
cy, ' "Women of Rleasorc," "Married Women,"
and a!l classes thcroughly ventilated. 50 Illus
trations. Address at once
The New York Rook Co.,
lSjunelw H5 Nassau St., New York.
WANTED FOR
SECRETS OF THE GREAT CITY.
A work descriptive of the VIKTI'ES, and the
VICES, the MYSTERIES, MISERIES and
CRIMES ef New York City.
It contains 35 fine engravings; and is the Spi
ciest, most thrilling, Instructive, and Cheapest
work published.
ONLY 82 50 PER COPY.
Agent* are meeting with unprecedented success.
One in Marbleborougb, Mass., reports 38 subscri
bers in a day. One in Luzerne Co, Pa., 44 in a
day. One in Meridea, Ct, 68 in two days, and a
great many others from 100 to 200 per week.
Send for Circular* and see our terms, and a full
description of the work. Address, JONES
BROTHERS A CO., Philadelphia, Pa.
I'nblished in both Knylish and German.
18june 4w
jgE CAREFUL
WHAT MEDICINES
YOU TAKE.
hen you are exhausted by over-work of head
or hand, and feel the need of something invigor
ating, don't drink whiskey nor any intoxicating
thing, whether under the name of Bitters or other
wise. Such articles give just as much strength
to your weary body and mind as the whip gives
to the jaded horse, and no more. Alcoholic stim
ulants are injurious to Nerve-health, and are
ALWAYS followed by DEPKESiIXG REAC
TION.
DODD S NERVINE & IN VIGOR ATOR
is TOSIC and OKNXLE 8T IM C L A N T
which it NOT attended by KEACTION. What
it gains for you it maintains. When it refreshes
body or inind, it refreshes with natural strength
that comes to slay. We are not rceommen>lfng
teetotalizm in the interestofany faction; but long
and extended observation teaches us thai he who
resorts to the bottle for rest or recuperation, will
find, as be keeps at it, that he is kindling a fire
in his bonea which will consume like the flames
of perdition. Turn from it Take a tonie that
will refresh and not de&troy. Dodd'a Nervine is
far sale by all Druggists. Jl'riee One Dollar. Sae
book of certificates that accompanies each bottle,
lfjuntdw
Natnre is the Great Physician.
This is now admitted, by the medical pro
fession as a fundamental principal of healing
science. It is wisely provided by the human
economy that whenever anything is wrong
iu the physical system the natural forces of
the body are brought to bear to expel the
disease. The great aim, therefore, is to
strengthen the natural powers. This has
been kept in view by the skilful compounders
of HOSTETTER'S STOMACH BITTKkS,
which -operates to give fresh vitality to all
the organs of the body. The effect of this
medicine ti|>on the stomach, the liver end the
kidneys, is prompt and decisive. The pa
tient, who is wise enough to rprit, drugging
and try the bitters, soon feels as if he had
taken a new lease of life, and as he continues
the use of the article, he is overjoyed to find
the streams of health com sing through his
frame. It is prepared with great care, and
its component parts are entirely vegetable,
[t is free from the objections so otten urged
against preparations of the kind. As A MKJI
n .u. AUKXT it lias no equal, whim its pleas
ing flavor and healthful effects have made it
a general favorite. It is free from all prop
erties calculated to impair the system, and
its operations are at once mild, soothing and
efficient. All who have used HOSTETTBR's
STOMACH BITTKIiS attest its virtue;, and
eon. fort s.
Even those who are in the enjoyment of
perfeet health frequently have need to have
recourse to tonics as preventives of disease.
We are never too well armed against the
assaults of "the ills that flesh is heir to." In
heulth or sickness this tonic cannot be Jtukeu
regularly without giving vitality and elas
ticity to the system.
MAKKKTS.
June 21.
There is no essential change to record iu
the flour market. The sale.-, to day mostly
comprised small lots of superfine at [email protected]
per barrel; extras at $5.50(2.6.75; three hun
dred barrels spring wheat extra family at
$5.75(3.0.-'-0; four hundred barrels Pennsyl
vania do. do. at SO; one hundred barrels good
Ohio do. do. at $7.50; one hundred banels
good Illinois do. do. at $7.75. and one hun
ared and fifiy barrels fancy at $0.25 np to
$10.50. Rye flour is very quiet, with sinsll
sales at $0.25. In corn meal no transactions.
We quote Pennsylvania and Ohio nominal at
four dollars.
The wheat is very dull and the demand is
mostly confined to those lots for the supply
of the local millers ; small sales of red at $l
- 1 00 ; 800 bushels Pennsylvania amber
at $1 54; 1,000 bushels good Indiana atr-ber
atsl GO, and 500 bushels fancy Michigan $l
- Rye is held at $1 30. Corn is verv
quiet; sales of 2,000 bushels yellow at 04c ;
high mixed at 00c, and mixed western at 87(3)
83c. Oats are steady at 740',70c for western.
Whisky is advancing, with small sales at $1
fr-1 05.
Itt.
l M M E R K E A D I X G .
II UR D k II OV G II T()N ' S
LIST OF CHOICE BOOKS.
i N'OTK.—Any book published by 111 RD A
j HOUGHION, 159 Broome street, N. V., will be
: sent by them, postage prepaid, on receipt of the
advertised prices.
I. BREMBB. Life, Letters and Postfcumus
Works of Fredrika Bremer. Edited by her -is
ter, Charlotte Bremer. Translated from the
Swedish by Freda Milow. In one vol., crown
t Svo. Cloth. $2.
'■We have quoted so much from this charming
volume that we have no room f--r turtle r ip.o ta
j rions. but i-. is a bo ik to be rcn-I."—Examiner*
2. THE OPEN POLAR SEA. Popular edition.
By Isaac I. Hayes, M. O. With niuc iilustra
tior.s on wood, and a map. 1 vol., po-t 8 to.
Cloth $2.50. Fine edition, embellished with six
full-poge illustrations, drawn by Darky, White
and others, from Dr. Hayes's aketehes; three
full pnge charts: tw i.ty-eight vignettes, and a
fine portrait of the author, engraved on steel.
1 vol., Bvo. Price ss7£: ha > /-emlfs6.
'•What we have uwid of Dr. Uaye's book will,
wc trust, send ir. iuy re-idors to it- pages. The
Doctor's heroism i? remarkable, and h" well de
serve- to be bracketed with the lite Dr. Kane in
PES AND
-PENCIL. By Felix O. C. Darley. With 15
full-paged and 74 .mailer illustrations an wood.
A ut-w editi m with three additional \ ignettes,
*nd prin'ct r - tened paper. In 1 v01.,-Ito.
Price in cloth, 5 1.50; cloth gilt, Si: morocco, SB.
"Fndoubtodlv, Mr. Dsr't-y istbebest draughts
man in the Doited Stats; and judging him by
what he baa here done, ho can have no superior
anywhere. His design? arc engraved hv accom
plished artists in the i.est style of art, and taking
lh--e. together with his own entirely natural and
unaffected deacripti n of what bo saw abroad, wc
know of no similar production which we should
lie wining to recommend so unrc- -r vediy.'*—/'oa
ten C'.m irr.
4. OLD ENGLAND: IScenery, Art and Peo
ple. By Jnme j M. Hop pis Professor in Yale
College. I vol., IStoi. Price
"This book ha?the advantage of concisely and
emphatically pointing out m.my comparatively
neglected objects of Interest end source-? of infor
mation and pleasure. 'Old England* is just the
book for the departing traveller to put in nis pock
et to refresh his memory and make suggestive his
tour. — Boston Trun*cript.
5. ITALIAN JOURNEYS. By William D.
Howeils, author of "Yanetian Life." 1 vol.,
crown Bvo. Trices 2.
i "There is no writer of travels in our dty so >im
' file, sincere, enjoyable and profitable"— Brooklyn
j Cmion.
"It is not so much what Mr. HowclUse ? as
what he ignores that gives hi? readers the son**,
: when they have finished bis book?, of having
I hewn lingering over a charming narrative"--
j lion ion Pott.
' VENETIAN LIFE; Including Co mrncrc ill,
Social, Historical and Artistic Noti e of the
Place. By William P. Howeils. 1 vol., crown
Svo. Price, extra cloth, $2.
! "It is Venice directly presented to tlu-imagina
tion, steeped in its own peculiar atmosphere, so
that we ?ce what the writer sees, share hi? erao
• tione, and are made the companion of hi? walk?,
, rather than the reader of his pages."- Ronton
j JJaily Transcript.
7. REMINISCENCES OF EUROPEAN TRAV
EL. By Andrew P. Pcabody, D. P., LL.P.,
Preacher to Harvard University. Price $1.50.
! "On art, architecture, law?, manners and socle
| ty, his critiei?m? are discriminating, kindly and
: often original: and the volume contain? more in
formation, less spite and more solid sense, than
! many of far greater size aud pretension."—Satvr
i day Jieriew, London.
10. TWO THOUSAND MILES ON HORSE
BACK. Santa Fe and Back. A Summer Tour
through Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado and New
Mexico, in the Year 1866. By Colonel Jas. F.
i Mcliuc. 1 vol., crown Bvo. Price $2.
"He is a good traveller, and, combining the dis
! ciplined mind of a student with the training of an
j array officer, is well qualified to give an opinion
upon what be observes. His mode of travelling
> ha? furnished him with excellent opportunities
for careful observation and with great variety of
adventure in the prairie."— Standard, Xetc lied
ford, Mass.
9. THE HAND-BOOK FOR MOTHERS. A
Guide in the Care of Young Children. By Ed
ward It. Parker, M. D. A new edition. In one
volume, 12 mo. Cloth, $1.50.
"The volume answers authoritatively all the
questions which mother? are continually asking,
and remove? the painfnl doubts with which tbey
are continually troubled. It is indeed of such
■ great practical value, aud meets so general a want
that there would seem to be no reason why it
should not ba considered a necessity in every
family.'*— Boston /Jaity Transcript.
10. WOMAN IN PRISON. By Caroline 11.
Woods. In 1 vol., 16tno. Cloth, $1.25.
Mrs. Wood's record of the life of a Matron in a
State Prison, is unadorned fact.
11. TIIE DIARY OF A MILLINER. By
Belle Oti? (Caroline H. Woods). In a volume,
16mo. Clotb, $1.25.
"A smart milliner could tell many a fine story.
A smart milliner is 'Belle Otis,' and that is just
what she does. Her narrative has all the vivaci
ty and piquancy which belong to woman. Now
it sends a keen shaft, and then follows a sally of
exquisite humor."— Albany Express.
12. ESSAY* ON ART. By Francis Turner Pal
grave, late Fellow of Extter College, Oxford,
tine vol., itJm'i, red cloth, gilt tops. Price,
$1.75.
"Mr. Palgrave's canon? of art are eminently
catholic, fret, from any tendency to sensatiooal
ieta: paid, though bis example? are confined chiefly
to the current emenations of British culture, and
his style of expres-ion is such as carries the
weight of authority."— Boston Post.
13. TIIE ART IDEA ; Sculpture, Painting and
Architecture in America. By Jame? Jackson
Jarves. 1 vol , Ifiino, cloth. Pricesl.7s.
"The volume deserves the careful study of in
telligent amateurs of art; and, whatever difference
cf opinion it may call forth, its details will bo
found of rare interest and full of instructive sug
gestions."—,Vew> Yaric Tribune. juneli
y ALU AT! LK P R KM IUM S .
SEW AND GOOD BOOKS.
Having for four years past labored to improve
and enlarge the Isyirmtrt and to eo fill it with
the lateet news that our people would have li:tie
or no need of any other paper, wc have found that
one of the chief difficulties in our way has been
that of getting a sufficient number of subscribers
to pay the expenses neccsisrily incurred in mak
ing a county paper what it ought to be. Though
the laticißßii has a larger number of subscribers
than any other paper in the oonnty, it still has
but little more than half what it ought to have to
justify us in the outlay necessary to keep it up
to the standard at which wc have eteaaiiy aimed.
The Isqvmea will continue to be the exponent
and advocate of a thorough-going Republicanism,
and of retrenchment, economy and reform in the
administration of the afTuirt of county, state and
nation. It will also, as usual, contain a larger
amount of late news and carefully selected gener
al reading mutter than any other paper in this
Congressional District.
An important political campaign it just about
to begin, involving the election of a Governor,
Supreme Judge, State Senator, Member of the
Legislature, and a full county ticket. The State
and District ticket* are of the highest importance
us there will be a new apportionment made at the
next Session of the Legislature. With such an
important campaign before us, it is highly desira
ble to put the IsgciCEß in the hands of every
Repoblican in the county. We therefore call up
on our friends to help us put it at once into the
hands of as many of our people as possible. As
a further inducement to exertion we have conclu
ded to offer the following desirable
PREMIUMS:
For on© new pubscriber and $2.00 in advance, we
will give one natuber of Scott'e novels. 20 cent
edition.
For two new subscriber* and $4.00 in adrance, we
will give one number of Scott's novels, 20 cent
ed., and one number of Dicken's, 25 cent ed.
For three new subscribers ami $6.06 in advance,
two NOP. of Scott and one So. of Dickens.
For four new subscribers and SB.OO in aivanoe,
one copy of "One Hundred Selections," bound
in cloth, or four Nop. Dickens
For five new subscribers and SIO.OO in advance,
five NOP. Dickon's works, or one copy of Ten
nyson's or Burn's poeuis, worth $1.25.
For six new subscribers and $12.00 in advance,
one copy of Diamond Dickens, Longfellow or
Whittier. w -rth $1.50.
For twenty new subscribers and $40.00 in advance,
a complete edith-n of Dickon's works (25 vols,
bound in paper.)
For twenty-five new subscribers and $50.00 in ad
vance, one large family bible, bound in best
morccco, full gilt.
For thirty new subscribers and $60,00 in advance
one copy of Webster's Unabridged Dictionary,
illustrated edition with 3000 engravings, and
worth $12,00.
The above premiums are offered for new ad
vance paying subscribers. Dicken's works are
made the standard fur premiums, but we will sub
stitute any book on the shelves of the Inquirer
Book Slot t of the corresponding price whenever
desired. Parties unable to raise clubs large
enough to entitle them to a copy of the bible or
dictionary will be allowed the premium for the
number they do raise, and can have either of the
above books by paying the difference.
JOHN LUTZ,
tf. Editor and Proprietor.
j |OUSK FURNISHING,
HARDWARE GOODS kc.,
JOHN F. BLYMYER has opened a full
stock of
HARDWARE,
HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS,
WOODEN WARE,
BRUSHES,
PAINTS,
NAILS,
GLASS,
OILS,
SIB JEM AKKK'S FIN DING S,
BUILDER S HARDW AllE,
OIL, POCKET BOOKS,
COAL OIL LAMPS.
COAL OIL,
SADDLERY,
CUTLERY,
BUCKETS,
CHURNS,
TUBS,
Ac., Ac., Ac., Ac., Ac.,
He hopes, by strict attention to business,
anl fair prices, to merit a share of Public
patronage.
.S-ore in same room as occupied by 15. M.
BLYMYER A Co., as a STOVE AND TIN
STORE.
9apr
HUNTINGDON A RROADTOP RAILROAD
. On and after Monday, May 21, 1869, Pas
senger Train* will arrive and depart as follows;
VP TRAINS. now* TRAINS.
Xpress Mail. STATIONS Xprei* Mail.
P.M. A. M. *A. M. |P. M.
LK5.55 Lg 840 Huntingdon, IARIO.IO AR4.20
6.02 5.46 Long Siding 10.02 4.12
H. 17 9-00 McConnellstown 9.46 3.55
0.24 9.07 Pleasant Grove, 9.37 3.18
6.40 9.22 Marklesburg, 9.22 3 32
0.56 9.3S C'-ttfce nan. 9.03 3.16
7.03 9.46.K0ugb A Heady 8.55 3.09
7.is 10.01 c o vc, 8.40 2.55
7.24 10.0", Fisher's Summit 8.36 2.51
an 7.41 10.20 Saiton, LKS.2O 2.26
814 10.4 Riddlesbnrg, 746 2.08
8 23 10.5" Hopewell, 7 38 2.00
842 11. 10 Piper's Run, 717 1.40
9 02 1 1.29 Tatesville, 6 56 1.20
9 19 11.45 Bloody Run, 6 40 1.05
AK9 26 AR 11.52 Mount Dallas, IXT Sajul.OU
1.E7.50 LB 10.30 Saxton, AR 8.05 AR2.25
8.05 10.45 Coalmont, 7.55 2.10
S.lO 10.50 ; Crawford, 7.50, 2.05
AR8.20 .VR 11.00 Dudley, LE 7.40 LE1.55
Broad Top City.
May 24, '69. JOHN M'KILLIPS, Supt.
IRE RAILING, WIRE GUARDS,
For Store Front*. Factories, Ac. Heavy Crimped
\Viie Cloth for Cleaning Ores, Coal, Ac. Heavy
Screen Cloths and Coal Screen?, Wire Webbing
for Sheep and Poultry Yards, Paper aMaker?'
Wires, Brass aud Iron Wire Cloth Sieve?, Painted
Screens, Ornamental Wire Work. Every infor
mation by addressing the manufacturers-
AM. WALKER A. SOYS.
12febly No. 11 North 6th St., PHIL'A.
"VJ" OTICE TO TRESSPASSERS.
J.l All persons are hereby notified that the laws
will bo rigidly enforced against all parties found
huntiog, fishing or otherwise tresspassing upon
the lands of thy subscriber?.
HERBERT SHOEMAKER,
W.M. OTT,
ABRAHAM WEISEL,
JOHN STONE,
lljuncJt JOSIAH KOOXTZ.
ALL KINDS OF BLANKS, Common, Admin
istrator's 6nd Executor's, Deeds, Mortgage?,
Judgment Notes, Promissory Notes, with and with
out waiver of exemption, Summons, Subpoenas
and Execution?, for salo at the Inquirer office.
Nov 2. 1866
DICKENS* NOVELS, full sets, at 25 cents
per novel, at the Inquirer Boos Store. 11
EVERYBODY i want of WALL PAPER ex
amines the stock at the Inquirer Book Store
Hi KINDS OF MISCELLANEOUS BOOKS
J.JL furnished at the Inquirer Book Store.
VERY BODY can be accommodated with
JLi WALL PAPER at the Inquirer Book Store.
A SPLENDID ARTICLE of Blank Deeds
on the best parchment paper, for sale at the
nquirer office. c
"" F
fjp H E OIiEAT
ZINGARI BITTERS.
.4 Safejilooel Purifier,
.4 Splendid Turk,
A Plcaxant Beverage,
A Certain Cure and
Preventive of % Discascx*
The ZINGARI BITTKUS are compounded
from a prescription of the celebrated Egyptian
phpeiciao D|, Cnr.orsi s, who after years of tryd
and experiment, discovered the Zinyarini Htrb—
the moat remarkable vegetable production, the
earth, perhaps, baa ever yielded—certainly the
inoet effective in the cure ot disease. It, in com
bination with the other valuable properties of
which the ZINGARI BITTERS is composed,
will cure
Dyspepsia, Fun and Ague, Bilious Fever,
('hoik, Colds, Bronch.it>*, Consump
tion in its first stage, Flatulency,
Nervous Pel, Hit//, Female Com
plaints, Rheumatism, Lh/x
--entery, Acute and < 'hronk
D iarrh <> a , Cholera
Morbus, Cholera, Ty
phoid
* Fever, fe
ver, Scrofula,
Diseases of.
the, Sidneys
Habitual Costiceness, Ac. <fr.
In the Prevention and Cure of the above dis
ease*, it ha* never beeD known to fail, as thou
sands of our most prominent citizen* throughoa
all parts of the country, will testify. Let the af
flicted send lor circular containing testimonial,
and certificate* of those who have been cured after
their case? have been pronounced hopeless by our
best physicians.
PRINCIPAL DEPOT,
F. RAHTER & CO.,
No.fi X. Front St., PHILADELPHIA.
RECOMMVXDED Br
Ex. (Jov. David R. Porter, of Pennsylvania.
Hon. Robert J. Fisher, " "
Hon. Edward McPherson, " "
Hon. Joel B. Danner, " "
Hon. We. McSherry, " " and
others.
JzSr Send for Circulars
ljfeblyi
S4O STITOH! STITCH! $37 50
40 first class SEWING MACHINES given
as premiums for $37 50 worth of subscrip
tions for WOOD'S HOUSEHOLD ADVO
CATE, a fnwt class Family paper, at 75 cents.
ALSO •
TICK! TICK! TICK! TICK! TICK!
American Watckea worth $32, given for
S3O worth of subscriptions. Also
sl2 DICTIONARY. sl2
Webster's Unabridged Dictionary, worth
sl2, given as premiums for sl2 worth of
subscriptions. Also
1 SIOO SUNDAY SCHOOL SIOO
SBO LIBRARIES SBO
Large or small, to be selected from 400
volumes of the very best Books published, and
given as a premium for an equivalent amount
of subscription.
Also several other premiums equally liber
ai. The ADVOCATE, (formerly called the
Prospectus,) contains 16 large pages, and
aims to promote Knowledge, Virtue, and
Temperance. It has been enlarged and im
proved three times in 27 months. Send for
specimen copy. Address S. S. WOOD,
2apr3m P. O. Building, Newburg. N. Y.
ER' S SARSAPARILL A,
FOR PURIFYING THE BLOOD.
The reputation this excellent medicine enjoys,
is derived from its cures, many of which are trrly
marvelous. Inveterate cases of Scrofulous disease,
where the system seemed saturated with corrup
tion, have been purified and cured by it. Scrofu
lous affections and disorders, which were aggra
vated by the scrofulous contamination u. til they
were painfully afflicting, have been radically cxr
ed in such great number? in almost every section
of the country, that the public scarcely need to be
informed of its Tirtues or uses.
Scrofulous poison is one of the most destructive
enemies of oar rare. Often, this unseen and un
leu tenant ui me urgameut uunciuitucs me con
stitution, and invite- the attack of enfeebling or
fatal diseases, without exhibiting a suspicion of its
presense. Again, it eeeus to breed infection
throughout the body, and then, on some favorable
occasion, rapidly develops into one or other of ite
hideous forms, either on the surface or among
the vitals. In the latter, tubercles may be imd
denly deposited in the lung? or heart, or tumors
formed in the liver, or it shows its presence by
eruptions on the skin, or feul ulcerations on some
part of the body. Hence the occasional use of a
bottle of this Sarttparrilla is advisable, even
when no active symptoms of disease appear.
Person? afflicted with the following complaints
generally find immediate relief, and, at length,
cure, by the nse of this SARSA PAR ILL A; St.
Anthony'* Fire, Rose or Erysipelas, Tetter, Salt
Rheum, Scald Head, Ringworm, Sore Eyes, Sore
Ears, and other eruptions or visible forms of
Scrofulous disease. Alto in the more concealed
forms, as Dyspepsia, Dropsy, Heart Disease, Fits,
Epilepsy, Neuralgia, and the various. Ulcerous af
fection* of the muscular and nervous systems.
Those painful diseases. Rheumatism and Gout,
when caused by accumulations of extraneous mat
ters in the blood, yield quickly to it, as also Liver
Complaints, Torpidity, Congestion or I nil a mat ion
of the Liver, and .Jaundice, when arising, as they
often do ; from the ranking poisons in the blood.
This Sarsaparilla is a great restorer for the
strength and vigor of the system. Those who
are Languid and Listless, Despondent, Sleepless,
and Troubled with Nervous apprehensions or
Fears, or any of the affections symptomatic of
Weakness, will find immediate relief and convin
cing evidence <>f its restorative power upon trial.
Prepared bv DR. J. C. AVER A CO., Lowell,
Mass., Practical and Analytical Chemists.
Sold by all Druggists everywhere.
finovly B. F. HARRY, Agent, Bedford.
A. M - ,S04 ' s - 2-
CONSTITUTIO N
BITTERS
THE BEST TONIC AND
ST It EN G T IIE XI NG B ITT Elt S
IN USE.
Also, a most delightful and exhilarating
MEDICINAL BEVERAGE.
A wine glass full of CONSTITUTIONAL BIT
TERS three times a day, will be the best
preventive of disease that can he used.
COXSTIT UTI o X BIT TEIt S
CURE
DYSPEPSIA, INDIGESTION, COSTIVENESS,
prevents FEVER AND AGUE, and all Billions
Diseases. They are the
Stomach Bitters of the Age.
They are prepared by
SEWARD, BEXTLEV & CHENEY.
DRUGGISTS, BUFFALO, N. Y.
S., B. A C., also prepare the
ALI SM A FO it THK II A I It,
Which ia the best
Hair Restorer, Hcnevrer, and Hair Dressing in
in the market. It prevents Baldness,
frees the head I'roin Dandruff,
and thoroughly eradi
cates all diseases
of the scalp.
Sold by all Druggists., 30apr
S. M'CAMANT JOHN KI.UOTT D. T. CALDWELL
J. M. HARPER WILLIAM STOKE.
rpYRONE PLANING MILLS.
McCAM AN T, ELL IO T T A CO.,
Manufacturers and Dealers in
Sash, Doors, Blinds, Flooring, Brackets,
Mouldings, Stair Bailing, Mastering
Lath, Shingles, Common and
Fancy Jlckcts, Frame StuJT,
AND A L L KINDSOFL UMBER.
Tyrone, Pa., March 19, ISSthmfi
JJ END E RSON'S
FRESH GROUND EXTRA FAMILY FLOUR,
on hand and for sale by •
Jfioetly O. R. OSTER A CO.
MARRIAGE CERTIFCATES.—ON hand a. i
for sale at the Inquirer office, a fine assort
ment of Marriage Certificates. Clergymen and
Justices shou'd have them.
§tl ©state.
rpWO FAKMS AT PRIVATE BAJ.R
NOW IS THK TIME TO BUI CHEAP RE\R
ESTATE.
A FARM IV MORRISON'S COVE.
A SPLENDID FARM WITHIN TWn MILKS
OF BEDFORD.
The subscriber will tell at private rale, on
very reasonable term*, and at reduced price*, th<
following described, very valuable na) estate, rii
A TRACT OF LAND situated in Morrison's
Cove, about one mile from Lafayettesville. and
four mile* from Wooiibcrry, in Middle Woodberrv
twp., containing 102 acre*, more or lew, about 4 .
acre* cleared and under fence, with one and a
half story log house, log bam, blackemith *hop
and other out building*, adjoinng lands of Jackson
Stuckey on the east, Christ. Kocbon-lerfer on the
north, John Keagy on the we*t, and Ignatiu-
Brant's heir* on the south. This can be mad.-
one of the neatest and most pleasant little faru,.
in the Cove with ve-y little expense. There is ao
abundance of water, plenty of fruit and splen-l: i
timber upon it—all that i* necessary to make i:
desirable.
ALSO.
A MOST EXCELLENT TRACT OF 1 Iv
STONE AND RIVER BOTTOM LAND, wi
two miles of Bedford, containing 22S acres, ~t
l/.O acres of which are cleared and in a high sate
of cultivation and Ibe balance welt timbered.
There are excellent new building* erected thereon
with a well of never failing water at ibe door.
There are two orchards of choice fruit upor. i\
7a acres of meadow, (River Bottom) can He cult,,
vated with trying expense. The upland ii in a
good state offultivation, well set with clover a:, i
under good fence. There is sufficient timber up n
it to pay for the farm several time* if thro* n in:
the Bedford market. Apply to
J. K. DIRBORROW, Attorney at Law.
7maytf Bedford Pa.
I Y'ALUABLE TRACTS OF
LA ND F O It SALE.
The subscribers offer at private sale the follow
ing valuable tracts of land, vi*:
No. L The undivided half of a tract of lan i,
containing 227 acres, situate on the south-cut
side of the Broad Top Mountain, lying partly in
Bedford and partly in Fulton county, and ad
oining lands jo Samuel Danner, James Brir,-
hurst and Wishart'e heirs. TWO VEINS OF
COAL, one 5j feet, the other (1} feet in depth hav
been discovered on this tract.
No. 2. A tract of2.'iU acres near the a', IT
joining the same lands, and supp-sed -> , , •
the same veins of coal.
No. 3. A tract of 400 acres, wit. aula
half miles of the above tracts, lying on the North
side of the Harbor across the mountain, well tim
! bored with oak and pine.
May 3,-tf. JOHN Lt'TZ.
; OR SALE OR TRADE.
FIVE lota of ground in Bedford, 80 by 21 ;
formerly part of the Lyons' estate.
Two tracts of 160 acres each within three miles
of a depot on the Pacific Rail Road back of Oma
ha.
A tract of bottom land timbered and prarie
two miles from Omaha City.
One third of 7,000 acres in Fulton Ccuntv Pa.,
including valuable Ore, mineral and timber land
near Fort Littleton.
Over 4,000 acres of valuable ore, coal and tim-
I ber lands in West Virginia.
j ALSO, Twenty-five one acre lots, adjoining the
- Rorough of Bedford, with lime stone rock for
| kiln or quarry on the upper end of each.
Also, 320 acre* of land in Woodbury eo., lows.
80 " " Franklin ■' lowa.
100 acres adjoining Bedford, with house, bar: .
Ac , known as the "Amos farm."
Also, a farm of 107 acres in Harrison twp.
I Also, Six acres near Bedford, with 2 houses,
i stable and brick var J thereon.
0. E. SHANNON,
| June 21,-tf Bedford, Pan.'a.
AT PRIVATE SALE.
.1 PARE OPPORTL'SITY TO MY t
HOME.
The subscribers will sell a number of lots ad
joining the CHALYBEATE SPRING PROP
ERTY in Bedford township,
AT VERY LOW PRICES.
On two of them dwelling houses have ahead j
been erected. This is a splendid opportunity t
buy a cheap and most desirable home, as the lot
lie immediately opposite the Chalybeate Spring
Park, on the road, and not more than 120 yard:
from the Spring, at the following low prices:
1. One-half acre lot with dwelling house and
other out-buildings, garden and fruit trees, an
the best of water convenient, at S7OO, cash.
2. Half-acre lot SIBO, cash.
3. Half acre lot SIBO, cash.
4. Half acre lot $1 SO, cash.
5 and 6. Half acre lots with dwelling house,
brick yard, garden and fruit trees thereon t r
SBSO, cash.
7. Contains three acres covered with fru '
trees, and in a good stato of cultivation, adjoin
ing the above lots, for SSOO, cash.
Any person desiriog to buy a home, a few
yaids cut of Bedford, will find this offer worth
serious consideration.
JOHN LCTZ;
mayS.tf Real Estate Agent, Bedford, Pa.
JpRIVATE SALE OF
VALUABLE REAL ESTATE.
The following lot of ground, situate in the town
of Duncanwille, Blair co.. Pa., fronting on Main
street (or Turnpike) 75 feet and extending bark
ISO feet, more or less, and baring thereon ereccd
a large two story BRICK HOUSE, with base
ment and kitchen, and good cellar, frame Black
smith and Wagon-Maker's Shop, frame* stable
and other out-buildings, with fruit of different
varieties on the lot. This would be a good stand
for a Tavern or Boarding House, being conveni
ent to the Rolling Mill and Nail Factory, and tho
Railroad. Tho House is in good repair and very
pleasantly situated, with water at the door.
Also, A lot of SIX ACRES, near the Chalybeute
Spring, one mile from the town of Bedford, with
a Log House thereon erected. Adjoining lands
of Cbenowtth, Amos, Shannon and others.
Also, 14 acres of Timber Land, adjoining the
Colfelt farm, and convenient to good roads.
For further particulars apply to
JOHN LUTZ.
IsqcißEß Ovricf.
or J. G. BRI UAH A.M.
lSdectf Bedford. Pi
JjIARM AT PRIVATE SALE.
The subscriber offers at private sale a good
farm of 102 acres, lying on the south side of Dry
Ridge, within 2j miles of the line of the Bedford
and Bridgeport Railroad, adjoining lands of Jos.
Ling, Leonard May, Peter F. Lehman, Esq., and
others. The improvements are a two story LOG
HOUSE with kitchen attached, a log barn and
other Outbuildings. The land is well watered
having a good well and two never failing springs-
There is also a fine young apple orchard of 100
bearing trees, besides cherries, plums, peaches.
Ac. Sixty acres are cleared and under fence and
the balance well timbered with white and chestnut
oak. A large quaneity of Chestnut oak bark can
be cut on the land and find a ready market, as
there are several tanneries in the neighborhood.
For further particulars address ABEAM RITCUEY,
West End, Bedford Co., Pa., or
JOHN LUTZ,
19feb.tf Bedford, Pa.
A FINE FARM FOR SALE IN DUTCH
CORNER!
NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY CHEAP'
The subscribers will sell all that fine farm ;u
Bedford township, containing ISO acres, !)• of
which are cleared and under excellent fence, and
the balance, 95 acres, well timbered, adjoining
lands of Charles Uelsei, John Schnebly, and oth
ers. The buildings area two and a half -*'"*?'
LOG HOUSE and BANK BARN, with otter
out-buildings thereon erected. Water it, every
field, with an excellent Saw Mill seat. A splen
did apple crchard also thereon. Price $4OOll
TERMS: One third in hand and the balance in
three annual payments with interest
JOHN LUTZ,
June 21. 1867:tf Real Estate Agent.
NOTICE TO BUILDERS.—The contract for
the erection of a new Sehool House at Wal
nut Hill iu Bedford twp , will be let at public
sale on the ground, on Saturday the 3d day
July, 1849. Plan and specifications may be seen
on day of sale. By oider of tbc Board "f School
Directors. THOMAS GILCHRIST,
18june3t Secretary.
HARPER'S WEEKLY, HARPERS BAZAB,
FRANK LESLIE, CHIMNEY CORNER,
and all other Illustrated papers for sale at the
Inquirer Book Store.

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