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Bedford inquirer. (Bedford, Pa.) 1857-1884, April 01, 1870, Image 4

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From the Now York Tribune.
WHAT I KNOW OF FARMING.
BY HORACE GREELEY.
y ll.—Trees—'Wood-Land—Forests.
I am uot at all sentimental—much less
spooney —regarding the destruct.oo of trees.
Descended from several generations o< tim
ber cutters (for my parental ancestors came
to America in 1640) and myself engaged for
three years in land-clearing. I realize that
trees exist for use rather than for ornament,
and have no more scruple as to cutting tim
ber in a forest than as to cutting grass in a
meadow. Utility is the reason and end of
all vegetable growth—of a hickory's no less
than a cornstalk's. I have al ways considered
"Woodman, spare that tree," just about the
most mawkish bit of badly versified prose in
our language, and never could guess how it
should touch the sensibilities of any oue.
Understand, then, that I urge the planting ot
trees mainly because 1 believe it wiilyiay, and
the preservation, improvement, and extension
of fotests, for precisely that reason.
Yet I am not insensible to the beauty and
grace lent by woods, and groves, and clumps
or rows of trees, to the landscape they diver
sify. 1 leel the force of Emerson's averment,
that "Beauty is its own excuse for being,"'
and know that a homestead embowered in,
belted by, stately, graceful elms, maples, and
evergreens, ' t is really worth more, aud will
sell for more, than if it were naked field and
meadow. I consider it one positive advan
tage (to balance many disadvantages) of our
rocky, hilly, rugged Eastern country, that it
will never, in all probability, be so denuded
of forests as the rich, facile prairies and
swales of the Great Valley may be. Our
winds are less piercing, our tornadoes less
destructive, than those of the Great West. I
doubt whether there is another equal area of
the earth's surface whereon so many kinds of
valuable trees grow spontaneously and rapid
ly, defying eradication, as throughout New-
England and on either elove of the Alleghe
uies, aud this profusion of timber and foliage
may well atone for, or may be fairly weighed
against, many deficiencies and drawbacks.
The Yankee, who has, been aceustomed to j
see trees spring up spontaneously wherever !
they were not kept dowu by ax, or plow, or 1
scythe, and to cross running water eiery ball :
mile of a Summer day's journey, may well be!
made homesick, by two thousand miles ot I
naked, dusty, wind-swept Plains, whereon
he finds no water for fitly to a hundred miles. '
and knows it impossible to cut an axe-helve, :
much more an axle-tree, in the conVse of a
wearying journey. No eastern farmer evet
rcali/.ed the blessedness of abundaut and ex
cellent wood aud water until be bad wander
ed far from his boyhood's home.
No one may yet be able fully to explain
the interdependence of these two blessings: j
but the fact remains. All over "the Plains." j
there is evidence that trees grew and flourish
ed where none are now found, and that
springs and streams were then frequent and |
abiding where uone now exist. A prominent
citizen of Nevada, who explored southward
from Austin to the Colorado, assured me
that his party traveled for days in the bed of
what had once been a considerable river, but
ill which it was evident that no water had
flowed for years. And I heard that, since the
Mormons have planted trees over considera
ble sections of Utah, rains in Summer are no
longer rare, and Salt Lake evinces, by a con
stant though moderate increase of her vol
ume of waters, that the equilibrium of rain
fall with evaporation in the Great Basin has
been fully restored—or rather, that the rain
fall is now taking the lead.
I have a iirm faith that all the great deserts
of the Temperate and Torrid Zones will yet
be reclaimed by irrigation and tree-plautiug.
The bill which Congress did not pass, nor
really consider, whereby it was proposed,
some years since, to give a section of the
woodless Public Lands remote from settle
ment to every one who, in a separate town
ship, would plant and cherish a quarter-sec
tion of choice forest-trees, mgbt to have been
passed—with modifications, perhaps, but pre
serving the central idea. Had ten thousand
quarter sections, in so many different town
ship of the Plains, been thus planted to tim
ber ten to twenty years ago, and protected
from fire and devastation till now. the value
of those Plains for settlement would have been
nearly or quite doubled.
A capital mistake, it seems to me, is being
made by some of tbe dairy farmers of our
owu State. One who has a hundred acres of
good soil, whereof twenty or thirty are
wooded, cuts o9 his limber entirely, calcula
ting that the additional grass that he may
grow in its stead will pay for nil the coal he
ueeds for fuel, so that be will make a net gain
of the time he has hitherto devoted each
Winter to cutting and hauling wood. He
does not consider how much this soil will lose
in Summer moisture, how his springs and
runnels will be dried up, nor how the sweep
of harsh winds will be intensified, by baring
bis hill-tops and ravines to sun and breeze so
utterly. In my deliberate judgement, a farm
of one hundred acres will yield more
feed, with far greater uniformity of product
from year to year, if twenty acres of its ridge
crest, ravine-sides, and rocky places, are
thickly covered with timber, than if it be
swept clean ol trees and all devoted to grass.
Hence, I insist that tbe farmer who sweeps
off his wood and resolves to depend on coal
lor fuel, hoping to increase permanently the
product of his dairy, makes a sad miscalcula
tion.
Spaiu, Italy, aud portions of France, are
now suffering from the improvidence that de- ;
voured their forests ,leaving the future to take
care of itself. T presume the great empires
of antiquity suffered from the same folly,
though to a much greater extent. The re j
mania of now extinct races who formerly peo- I
pled and tilled the central valleys of tbis eon- i
tinent, and especially the Territory of
Arizona, probably bear witness to a similar
recklessness, which is paralleled by our
fathers' and our own extermination of the
inaguificeut forests of White Pine which
barely a century ago. covered so large a por
tion o. the soil of our Northern States. Ver
mont sold White Pine abundantly to England
through Canada within my day: she is now
supplying ber own wants from Canada at a j
cost of not less than five times the price she j
sold for: and she will be paying stil! higher i
tales before the close of this century. I%u- j
treat our farmers not to preserve every tree, j
good, bad, or indifferent, tbat mav happen to i
he growing on their lands—hut, outside of !
the limited districts wherein the primitive j
forest must still be cut away in order that j
land may be obtained for cultivation, to plant I
nnd rear at least two letter trees for every one j
thev may be impelled to cut down. How this j
oiav, in the average, be most judiciously j
uone, I will try to indicate in my next.
HOME F.RST OF ALL.- Let parents talk
much and talk well at home. A father who
is haoitually silent in his own house, may be
m many respects a wise man: but he is not
w.sc in b,s silence. We sometimes see pa
rents, who are the l,fe of every company
which they enter, dull, silent and uninteresl
mg at home among the children. If they I
have cot mental activity and mental stories
sufficient for both let them first provide for
their own household.
Ireland exports beef and wheat, and lives
on potatoes: and they fare as poorly who re
nerve the social charms for companions
abroad, and keep their dullness for home
consumption. It is better to instruct chil-
dren and make tbem happy at home, than it
is to charm strangers or amuse frieuds. A
silent house is a dull place for young people,
a place from which tbey will escape if they
can. They will talk, or think, of being "shut
i up" there, and the youth who does not love
home is in danger.
i Forgers —Blacksmiths,
i I( five and a half yards make a perch, how
I many will make a troul ?
Never wait for anything to turn up. Go and
| turn it up yourself.
Don't take too much interest in the atfairs
loi your neighbors. Six per cent, will do.
j WHY is fashionable society like a warming
j pan ?—Becanse it is highly polished, but very
i hollow.
THE Hariford Courant tantalizes its read
i ers with tbis atrocity : "Have you heard of
! the man who got shot? Got shot? No: how
1 did he get shot? He bought "em."
1 "POX'T believe there's any use in vaccina
< lion," said a Yankee. "Had a child vaccin
uted, and he fell out of a window next day,
j and got killed. '
AT a medical examination a young aspirant
was asked, "when does mortification ensue?"'
"When you propose and are rejected," was
the reply that greeted the amazed examiner.
LADY. "Can you wash and iron ?"
DOMESTIC. "Oh yes, 'm but your place
would not suit me unless you knocked off
j wearing them long Holland dresses of s morn
ing."
Has. JOXE.S, a farmer's wife, says. "1 be"
lieve I've got the tenderest-hearted boys in
the world. I cant't tell one of them to fetch
a pail of water, but tkat he'll burst out a
crying."
j A lawyer and a doctor were walking arm- i
in aim, a wag said to a friend, "these two
are just equal to one highwayman. "Why?"
was the response. "Because it is a lawyer
and a doctor—-your money or your life!"
"Axv seats in the next car?" asked a pas' j
seoger in a crowded car of a waggish conduc
tor.
"Plenty of'em," was the reply; "but," t as
the passenger gathered up his effects prepa
ratory to emigrating) "they are all full."
MAMMA. "Bertie's going the to country to
see the cows and the hens aud the chickens."
Bertie. "Can Bertie milk the cows mam
ma.
Mamma. "No, my my dear: the cows are
too large for Bertie to milk."
Bertie. "Then, mamma, Bertie can milk
the hens and the chickens—can't he maul- j
ma?*'
IN a class of little girls in one ol the schools '
of Boston the question was asked.
'•What is a fort ?"'
"A place to put men in," was the answer.
"What is a fortress, theu?" asked the teach
er.
This seemed a puzzler, until one little girl
of eight summers answered,
"A place to put women in."
Is these days of Woman's Right,
Our damsels' souls are bent
To vows of fond affection plight,
They view love in u bus'nes light—
That bus'ness claim a gent,
For when they're sued by ardent age,
Or by a youthful lover,
Who falters at the final stage,
They weep, upbraid in stormy rage,
Faint, sue and theu recover,
THE following advertisement is from the
Birmingham Post:
"Wanted—a general servant in a small
family where a man is Kept. The housework
and cooking all done by the members of the
family, Ihe gentleman of the house rises
early, but prepares breakfast himself. All
the washing is put out, and the kitchen is
provided with every luxury. Cold meat and
hash studiously avoided. Wages no object
to a competent party. References and pho
tographs exchanged."
Coi' XT BISMARCK recently presented a
faithful but poor secretary with a portfolio
bound like a book, iu which were deposited
five thousand tbalers. On meeting his
secretary next day the count asked bim if he
perused the volume* "Yes, your highness,"
said the secretary, "and I'am waiting the ap
pearance of a second volume with feelings of
the greatest interest." The Count smiled,
hut said nothing. A few days afterward the
secretary received a second portfolio, bound
filled likej the first, and on the title page of
which was the sentence.: "This work is com
plete in two volumes."
THE GOOSE. —Josh Biilingssays the goose
is a grass animal, but don't chew her cud.
They are good livers— about one aker to
a goose is enough.
Bat I don't think if I had a farm of 175
akers, awl paid for, that I would sell it for
what it was worth, just It use it didn't have
but one goose on it. Geese stay well, some
of our best biographers say 00 years, grow
tough to the last.
They are good eating, but not good chaw- 1
ins; the reason ov this remains a profound
secret to this day-
When the female goose is at work hatch
ing, she is a hard bird to pleaze; she riles
clear up from the bottom in a minit, and
will fight a yoke of oxen if they show her
the least hit ov sa.ss. The geese arc excel
leut for feathers, not only to feather their
I nests but other people's.
But they are more sureist about one thing;
they can haul one leg up into their boddy,
aud stand on totber aul day, and not touch
anything with their hands.
How ONE BOY WHIPPED ANOTHER.
—"I'll tell you how it was. Y'ou see, Bill
and me went down to the wharf to fish; aud
; I. felt in my pocket and found my knife, and
it was gone, and 1 said, 'Bill, you stole my
knife-;' and he said I was another, and I said
'Go there yourself;' and he said he was no
such thing: aud 1 said he was a liar, and I
couiu whip him if I was bigger'u him; aud
he said he'd reek me to sleep, mother; and
I said he was a bigger one; and be said I
never hid the measles; and I said to fork
over that knife or I would fix him for a tomb
; stone on Laurel Hill; and he said my grand-
I mother was no gentleman; and I said ho
; dersn't take it up; but he did, you bet; then
j I got up again, and said he was too much a
fraid to do it again, and he tried to but he
i dido t; and I grabbed him, aod threw him
down on the top of me like several bricks;
; and I tell you it beat all—and so did he;
and my little dog got behind Bill and bit
j him; and Bill kicked at the dog, and the
! Jog rau, and I rati after the dog to fetch
j bim back, and didn't each bim until I got
i clear home; and I 11 whip him more yet."
THERE was a clergyman who often be-
I came quite vexed at finding his little grand
children in his study. Oue day one of
these little children was standing by his
mother's side, aod she was speaking to him
of heaven.
"Ma, ' said he, "1 don't want to go to
heaven."
"Don t want to go to heaven, my son!"
"No, ma, I'm sure I don't."
"Why not, my BOO?"
"Why, grandpa will be there, won't he?"
"Why, yes, I hope he will."
"W ell, just as soon as he sees us, he will
come scolding aloDg, aud say, 'Whew! whew!
i j what are you boys here for?' I don't want
> 1 to go to heaven if grandpa is going to be
; there."
QFFICE OF
I?ISK & HATCH,
BANKERS AND DEALERS IN GOVERN
MENT SECURITIES,
No j NASSAI SSKEET, NEW-YOUK,
February 15tb, IS7O.
The remarkable success which tended our
negotiation of the Loans of the CENTRAL PACIFIC
RAILROAD COMPANY and the WssrsßH PACIFIC
RAILBOAO COMPANY, and the popularity and cred
it which these Loans have maintained in the
markets, both iu this country and Europe, have
shown that the First Mortgage Bonds of wisely
locaicd and honorably-managed Railroads arc
promptly recognized and readily taken as the
most suitable, safe, and advantageous form of
investment, yielding a more liberal income than
can hereafter be derived from Government Bonds,
and available to take their place.
Assured that, in the selection and negotiation
of superior Railroad Loans, wo arc meeting a
great public want, and rendering a valuable ser
vice—both to the holders of Capital and to those
great National works of internal improvement
whose intrinsic merit atii substantial character
entitle them to the use of Capital and the conG
| dence of investors—we now offer with special con
dence and satisfaction the
FIRST MORTGAGE BONDS
or THE
Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad Company.
j The Chesapeake an-' Ohio Railroad, connecting
! the Atlantic coast and the magnificent harbors
I of the Chesapeake Bay with the Ohio River at a
I point of roliable navigation, and thus, with the
entire Railroa system and water transportation
oftho great West and Southwest, FORMS THE
ADDITIONAL EAST AND WEST TRUNK
LINES, so imperatively demanded for the ac
commodation of the immense and rapidly-grow
ing transportation between the Atlantic seaboard
and Europe on the one hand, and the great pro
ducing regions of the Ohio and Mississippi Val
leys on the other.
THE IMPORTANCE OF THIS ROAD AS
A NEW OUTLET FROM THE WEST TO TnE
SEA magnifies it into one of national consequence,
and insures to it an extensive through trafllic
from the day of its completion; while, in the de
velopment of the extensivo agricultural and min
eral resources of Virginia and Wcst-Virgiuia, it
possesses, along its own line, the elements of a
large and profitable locJ business.
Thus the great interests, both general and local,
which demand the completion of theCuEAAi-EAKE
AND OHIO RAILROAD to the Ohio River, afford
the surest guarantee of its success and value, and
RENDER IT THE MOST IMPORTANT AND
SUBSTANTIAL RAILROAD ENTERPRISE
NOW IN PROGRESS IN THIS COUNTRY,
Its superiority as an East and West ronte, and
the promise of an immense and profitable trade
awaiting its completion, hare drawn to it the
attention and co-opcration of prominent Capital
ists and Railroad men of this City of sound judg
ment and known integriiv, whose connection with
it, together with that of eminent citizens and bus- i
iness men 'Of Virginia aud West Virginia, IN
SURES AN ENERGETIC, HONORABLE and
SUCCESSFUL MANAGEMENT.
The Road is completed and in oporation from
Richmond to the celebrated White Sulphur
Springs of West Virginia, 2-7 miles, and there
remain but 200 miles (now partially constructed)
to be completed, to carry it to the proposed ter
minus on the Ohio river, at, or near, the mouth
of the Big Sandy river, 150 miles above Cinciu
nati, and 350 miles below Pittsburgh
Lines are now projected or in progress through
Ohio and Kentucky to this point, which will con
nect the CHESAPEAKE AND ONIO WITH
THE ENTIRE RAILROAD SYSTEMS OF
THE WEST AND SOUTHWEST, AND WITH
THE PACIFIC RAILROAD.
Its valuable franchises and superior advanta
ges will place the CID-APCAKE AXD OHIO RAIL
ROAI. COMTAIST among the richest anl most
powerful and trustworthy corporations of the
country; AND THERE EXISTS A PRESENT
VALUE, IN COMPLETED ROAD AND WORK
DONE, EQUAL TO THE ENTIRE AMOUNT
OF TNE MORTGAGE.
The details of the Loan have been arranged
with special reference to the wants of all classes
of investors, and combine the various features of
convenience, safety, and protcction*against lose
or fraud.
The Bonds arc in denominations of
SIOOO, SSOO, and SIOO.
They will be, issued as Coupon Honda, payable
(o Hearer, and uiay be held in that form: or
The Bond may be rcgiatercd in the name of the
owner, with the coupons remaining payable to :
bearer, attached, the principal being then trans- ■
fcrable only on the book? of the Company, unless j
re-assigned to bearer; or
The coupons may be detached and cancelled, ;
the Bond made a permanent Hegiettred Hand, >
transferable only on the books of the Company,
and tho interest made payable only to tbe regis- :
tered owner or his attorney.
The three classes will be known respectively as
Ist. " COI'PON BONDS PAYABLE TO
BEARER."
'■iud. "REGISTERED BONDS WITH COV
PONS ATTACHED."
:ird. "REGISTERED BONDS WITH COU
PONS DETACHED," and should be so designa- i
ted by Correspondents in specifying the class of
Bonds desired.
They have TIIHIT V 7 EARS to run iroin Jan- i
uarv 15, 187 ft, with interest at six per cent per i
annum from November 1, 1879, PRINCIPAL and
INTEREST PAYABLE IX HOLD IN THE
CITY OF NEW YORK.
The interest is payable in May and November,
tbat it may take the place of tbe earlier issues of
Five-Twenties, and suit the convenience of onr
friends who already hold Central and Western
Pacific Bonds, with interest payable in January
and July, and who may desire, in making addi
tional investments, to have their interest receiva
ble at different seasons of the year.
The Loan is secured by a mortgage upon the
entire Line of Road from Richmond to the Ohio
River, with the equipment and all other property
and appurtenances connected therewith.
A SINKING FI ND OF SIOO,OOO PER AN
XI.M IS PROVIDED FOR THE REDEMP
TION OF THE BONDS, TO TAKE EFFECT
ONE YEAR AFTER THE COMPLETION OF
THE ROAD.
The mortgage is tor $15,000,000 of which $2,-
000,000 will be reserved and held in trnst for the
redemption of outstanding Bonds of the Virginia
Central Hail read Company, now merged in the
CHES.WSAKK AND Onto.
Of the. remaining $13,000,046, a sufficient
amount will be sold to complete the road to the
Ohio river, perfect and improve tho portion now
in operation, and thoroughly equip the whole for
a large and active traffic.
The present price it 90 and accrued interest.
A Loan so amply secured, so carefully guarded,
and so certain hepeatter to command a prominent
place among the favorite securities in the mar
kets, both of this Country and Europe, will be at
once appreciated and quickly absorbed.
Very respectfully,
FISK & HATCH,
Ba liken.
| P- b. —Wc havo issued pamphlets containing
| full particulars, statistical details, maps, etc.,
which will be furnished upon application.
is- \\ e buy and sell Government Bonds, and
| receive tho accounts of Banks. Bankers, Corpora,
j t ions, and others, subject to check at sight, and
j allow interest on daily balances
! feb2ssm.
Q R K AT
REDUCTION
IN
PRICES
ONR G-OODS
10 CLOSE OUT
WISTTER STOCK.
■3
BARGAINS F 0 11 CAS II
A, S. CHA.UKIt A CO.
Hjaa'7o
TV/"IIAT EVERYBODY WANTS I
EA* E RVBODY'S LAWY E 1;
Ann
HOOK OF FORMS.
BY FRANK CROSBY, Esq.,
Mumt.cr of the Philadelphia Bar.
ENLARGED AND THOROUGHLY REVISE!'.
% S. J. VANDERSLQQT, E*q.,
Member of the Philadelphia Par.
608 pp. l2mo. La to Style. $2.60.
THIS UNEQUALLED BtJrtK concerns tko
property, business, individual rights, and boeial
privileges of every one, and affords a fund of lc£i!
knowledge that to many will make it worth is
weight in gold. The simplicity of its instructions,
the comprehensiveness of its subject, the accura
cy of its details, tho facilities afforded in its pr
fect arrangement, and the conciseness and attrac
tiveness cf its stvlo, as well as its cheapnets,
make it the most desirable of all legal hand- books.
No effort or expense has been spared in adapting
it thoroughly to the times, and affording in it He
most rcecnt and useful inform*..on.
IT COXTAIXS THE
Constitution of the United States,
With Amendment:
General Bankrupt Lairs.
With Amendment/:
Pension Laws,
With Necessary tornu:
Internal Revenue Laics.
With Stamp Duties;
Post- Ojlice Regulations,
With Postage Rates;
Etc., Etc^,..
TOO ETH Eft WITH THE
LAWS OF ALL THE STATES,
IN BEGAKD TO
Acknowledging Credits, Naturalization,
Administrators, Debts, Notes,
Affidavits, Deeds, Obligations,
Agents, Divorce, Partnerships,
Agreements, Dcwcr, Patents,
Alimony, Kxehango, Penalties,
Appeal*, Executors, Petition?,
Apprentices, Exemption, Powers,
Arbitrations, Guardians, Pre cmptions,
Assignees, Hotels, Receipts,
Assignments, Landlords, Releases,
Awards, Libel, Rights,
Rills, Liens, Blander,
Boarding, Limitations, Tenant.--,
Bonds, Marriage, Vessels,
Carrier?, Master?, Wards,
Codicils, Minora, Wills,
Copyrights, Mortgages, Etc, etc.
Vi IT 11
Plain and Mmple Instructions to Everybody lor
Tiansactingtheir Business According to Law;
the Legal Forms Required for Drawing up
the Various Necessary Papers; and
Useful Information in Regard to
the Government of tho Uni
ted States and the Vari
ous .State Govern
ments, etc.,
etc. •
AGENTS WANTED.
LIBERAL INDUCEMENTS are offered to
agents everywhere. This work is the most com
plete of its kind ever published, and presents ex
cellencies that commend it to all engaged in the
affairs of every-day life. Every Farmer, Bu - ue>-
.Man, Tradesman, Laboring Man, Politician,
Property Holder, Bankrupt, Professional Man,
and overy OLC having a Family, will find it inter
eating, instructive, valuable, and full of inform
ation.
pirse nd lor uur Large and liandsiuic Sixty
four page Catalogue of nearly One Thousand
standard and choice works Its character through
out is such as to command the confidence of all
experienced canvassers, and the approval of the
public.
SINGLE COPIES of Everybody's Lawyer sent
to any address, postage paid, on receipt of price.
For terms to agents, and other information, ad
dress
JOHN E. POTTER & CO.,
PUBLISHERS,
614 and f.17 Sansom Street,
-Sfcb.lm PHILADELPHIA
/NALLERY OF CELEBRITIES.— We will
VT send. postage paid, the card photopraphs
of any of the following literary and political
celebrities, to any address, at the rate of 15
cents each.
Horace Greeley, Sir Joshua Reynolds,
W ende'l Phillips, Queen Victoria,
Henry Ward Bcecher, John Bright,
Bayard Taylor, Benjamin Disraeli,
Oliver W. Holmes, Robert Burns,
Hon. W. Longfellow. Talleyrand.
Washington Irving, Baron Humboldt,
Ralph W. Emerson, Ledru Rollin,
Wm. Cullen Bryant, Sir Walter Scott,
Wm. 11. Prescott, Kembrant,
George Bancroft.. Goldwin Smith,
.las. Russell Lowell, Ole Bull.
General Scott, Dr. Jluhlecburg,
Henry Clay, Martin Luther,
Natban'l Hawthorne, Bishop Simpson,
Mrs. Stowe. All quiet along the Po-
Edgar A. Poe, tomac.
Kembrant Pea'e,
This will aQ'ord every person au opportuni
ty of making for themselves a gallery of cele
brated men and women at a very small co.-t.
No more pleasant pastime can be afforded to
your friend than looking over an album filled
with photographs of the distinguished charac
ters of the past and present. Enclose the
money in a letter, giving the names of the
photographs you desire and direct to
LUTZ & JORDAN,
(INQUIRER Book Store) 1
Bedford Pa.
4 DMIMIB*RATORIB JTOTICK—Latten ot
-TV administration having been granted to the
subscriber by the Register of Bedford county, on
the estate of Nathan Robison, late of Southamp
ton township, deceased, notice is hereby given
to those indebted to said estate to make immedi
ate payment, and those having claims against the
same will present them duly authenticated for
settlement. HIRAM ROBISON,
11 fel>- Executor.
A GOOD INVESTMENT.— A howtr. and turn
lots for tale in the toicu of I/opetrell.
The subscriber at private sale lots No.
31 and 32 in the town of Hopewell, Bedford
county Pa. There is a good TWO STORY
PLANK HOUSE erected on the one lot. The
two lots adjoin each other and will be sold separ
ately or together to suit purchasers. For further
particular-, address the snbscrilier at Bed Curd Pa
nostf JOHN LUTZ. '
rpHE BEDFORD HOTEL
- 1 - FOR SALE OR RENT.
The subscriber now offers t v is well kaown hotel
for Sale or Rent. Possession given at any time to
suit purchaser. The bui'ding is in good repair,
having just been thoroughly re-fitted. Fur rurth
er particular? apply to
JOSHUA J.SHOEMAKER.
26novtf Bedford IV
pOR SALE.
Two dwelling Houses with valuable lots'apnur
tenant thereto, in Boydstown. Terms easy. in
quire of
J. W. LINGENFELTER
Soct.tf Bedford, Pa.
EVERY THING in the BOOK and STATION
LRU line for sale at the Inquirer Book f-tore.
pdinnnl,
!., 1864. S. 0.
C O N S T IT! T 1 O N
BITTERS
THIS BEST TONIC AND
11 T HENGTHE NING B IT TE U S
IN USE.
| Also, a most delightful and exhilarating
MEDICINAL BKV K R AG B.
A wine glass full of CONSTITUTIONAL BIT
. TERS three times a day, will be the best
preventive of disease that can bo used.
CoNSTIT UTI o N BITT KH S
CURE
: WSrEPSIA, INDIGESTION, COSTIVENESS,
; ptvents FEVER AND AGUE, and all Billions
Diseases. They are the
Stomach Bitters of the Age.
They are prepared by
SI WARD, BENTLEY St CHENEY.
DRUGGISTS, BUFFALO, N. Y. • j
S., B. A C., also prepare the
A LIS MA FOlt TIIE 11 A I It, !
Which is the best
Hair Ae-torer, Ilenewcr, and llair Dressing in
in the market. It prevent? Baldness,
frees the head from Dandruff,
and thoroughly eradi
cates all diseases
of the scalp.
Sold by all Druggists. 30apr
! L I S M A,
THE BEST
HAIR RESTORER AND REN EWER
IN THE WORLD!
Restore- gray and faded Hair to its ORIGINAL
COLOR, removes Dandruff,
CUBES ALL DISEASES OF THE SCALP,
prevents BALDNESS, and makes the hair grow
Soft, Glossy and Luxuriantly.
ALIS 31 A I S TII E BE S T
The Cheapest, and most satisfactory
OF ANY A RTI CL E IN US E,
and should lie used by every one who admires a i
BEAUTIFUL HEAD OF HAIR.
Put up in two sites: Small (8 oz.) $1.00; Large.
(12 oz.) $1.50 per Bottle.
EACH BOTTLE IN A NEAT PAPER BOX j
SEWARD, BENTLEY & CIIKNEY, j
Druggists, Buffalo, N. A*., Proprietors. They are
also proprietors of
SEWARD'S COUGH CURE,
a splendid article for
C O U G II S, COLD S, B It 0 N C II I T I (■,
and all diseases of the
THROAT ANI) LUNGS.
SOLD BY' ALL DF UGUISTS. 30apr
, g E W A U D S
COUGII c U K E,
A SAFE, CERTAIN AN!) SPEEDY ( UltE FOR
COLDS. COUGHS, ASTHMA. BRONCHI
TIS, HOARSEN L S, CROUP. INFLU
ENZA, WHOOPING COUGH. IS
CI PI EN'T COS SUM PTIOS,
AND ALL DISEA ■ US
OF 1 HE THROAT
AND LUNGS.
This COUGH CURE has been tried for years, and
the experience of
THOUSANDS WHO HAVE USED IT
in the diseases above enumerated, have pronoue
ed it to be a
SAFE AND RELIABLE MEDICINE;
and at lest ONE BOTTLE should be kept in every '
family as a ready remedy. Don't neglect a ic
vere Cough, or thr-iw away money on worthless
medicine.
PRICE 50 CENTS PER BOTTLE.
PREPARED BY
SEWARD, BENTLEY & CHENEY, j
DRUGGISTS. BUFFALO, N. Y,
who are also Proprietors of the Celebrated
CONSTITUTION BITTERS St ALISMA.
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS. 50npr i
READ! READ!! READ!!! 1
Middle ton's Wonderful Pain Curt:
A sure remedy for Rheumatism. Neuralgia, Lum
bago, Growing Pains, Sprains, Bruises, Stiffness
I of the Joints and similar diseases.
This wonderful remedy is composed entirely of
vegetable ingrodients. There are no injurious ,
substances used in its manufacture.
For assurance of its excellent properties, read I
the following certificates:
BEDFORD, May 18,1869. This is to certify that
1 have used Middleton's Liniment for the Rheu
matism, which I had in my right shoulder so bad
that I could not get my hand to my head without
great pain, and after a few applications was en
tirely relieved. L. F. DART.
BEDFORD, May 1, 1869. Mr. Middlcton: Dear '
Sir:—Mrs. Bowser was in much suffering for
some four weeks with Rheumatism, and got some j
of your Pain Cure, and the first night I applied :
it it eased ttiopain; and after keeping on using it j
for two weeks she was restored to health. I feci ;
it to be my duty, as it is a pleasure, to write this !
recommendation lor the benefit of others.
JACOB BOWSER. j
Bin FORD. May 16, 1869. Mr. W. W. Middle !
tor: Sir—l procured a bottle of yuur Liniment j
for Rheumatism, and it gives me great pleasure I
in raying that after using it for two days, my :
rheumatism was completely relieved. My sister I
was suffering, at the same tiuic, with luflamatory I
Rheumatism in her right hand and wrist— after
using it for several days she was relieved. I con
aider it the best remedy I ever heard of.
JOHN KEEFE.
BEDFORD, May 21, 1860. This i., to certify !
that I have used one bottle of Midd'.eton's Lini
| inent, for Rheumatism, and think it a good cure, j
and would recommend it to all persons thut are
1 afflicted with the abeve disease.
AUGUSTUS GARVER.
BEDFORD, May 26, 1869. Mr. .Middlcton: Sir— I
I procured one bottle of your medicine and used '
: one-half of it for Rheumatism, which effected a i
permanent cure up to this time. I eannot hesi
tate in saying that it. is tiie best remedy I ever >
I used. A. B. CARN.
BEDFORD, May 8. 1869. I take great pleasure !
in giving my testimony to the value of 'Middle
ton aII onderful Pain Cure." I have been a roar
: tyr to Rheumatism. Fur two months previous to i
Feb. 21 th. last, I was suffering intensely with pain I
i so severe, that during all that time I hail not one !
night of comfortable sleep. I could not put my i
hands to my face, could not comb my own hair,
. nor feed myself; but after having the Pain Cure ;
applied once, I found relief enough to give mo
! comfortable sleep, and with its steady use, I con- j
tinned to get better, and now at the end of ten i
i wee its from its first application, I have com para
| tively tree use of my hands, sleep well and ran ;
attend to business. It has done me more good ■
; than all other medicines I have ecir used put I
1 together, and I cheerfully give this certificate of i
'lvalue. ELI M. FISHER. !
BEDFORD. April 11, 1869. Mr. YV. IV. Middle
ton: This is to certify that I was taken with Rheu
matism, in my right shoulder, oa the evening of j
the 9th inst., so that I was unable to raise my '
hand to uiy face. I got some of your Pain Cure i
and applied it twice, and was entirely relieved, j
I would recommend to every one who suffers with
Rheumatism to give it a trial and bo cured.
Yours Ac. A. F. MILLER.
BEDFORD, May 17, 1569. Mr. Middlcton: Dear
Sir—l have used several bottles of your medicine
in my family, and find it to be all 'vou claim for
it. Yours, truly, JOHN HAFER.
BenroßD, May 13, 1869. This is to certify that
I have used "Mlddleion's Pain Cure," for Khcu
matism, and was very much benefitted by it.
JOHN HARRI3.
This excellent PAIN CURE is prepared only
by W. W. MIDDLKTON, Bedford, Pa., to whom
all oraers for the medicine should be addressed.
4june'69:ly
ptercUmimiSu
QITIZENS' CO-OPERATIVE j
MUTUAL
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
OF BEDFORD, PA.
Incorporated, March, 1869, Ipj Special Act
of the Legislature of Pennsylcania.
This company is organised on the Co-Operative
Mutual Plau.
The membership fee is graded according to the
age of the applicant, and is lower than other mu
tual companies.
The payment of the Inembcrshipjfee entitles the
member to a life policy.
Kvery member in this company has a vote in
controlling the funds of the company, and has an
equal share in the funds.
The amount of money paid is so little that every
ouo can insure.
This Company is purely"a HOME Company.
OFFICERS :
Hon. SAMUEL L. RUSSELL, Prest.
J. R. Dl HBORKGW, Vice Prest.
li. F. K ERR, Secretary.
0. 15. SIIA NNGX, Treasurer.
DIRECTORS :
J. M. Snot* A sen, J. 11. YVILLIAII?,
T. 11. Lvo.vs, J. YV. DicKßßsu.a,
D. K. ANDERSON.
Gen. Agent, YV. A. EDWARDS.
Circulars, Pamphlets and full particulars given,
on application to the Secretary of the company,
or to YV. A. EDWARDS,
mar,l'6U9yl Gen. Agent, Bedford, Pa i
Agents wanted in every County and :
j Township in the State.
|OT AND Alt D PERIODICALS FOR 1870T j
Republished by the Inonard Scott Pub- j
Uthing Co., New York.
; Indispensable to all desirous of being well inform- !
ed on the great subjects of the day.
1. THE EDINBURGH REVIEYY.
This is the oldest of the series. In its main j
features it st.'H follows in the path marked out by
i Brougham, Jeffrey, Sydney Smith, and Lord Hoi- 1
1 land, its original founders and first contributors.
: 2. TIIE LONDON QUARTERLY REVIEW, :
! which commence- its 12Stb volume with the Jan
uary number, was set on foot as a rival to the '
EDINBI RCH. It resolutely maintains its upposi- j
tion in polities, and shows equal vigor in its liter
■ arv ilcpaitment.
3. TIIE WESTMINSTER REVIEYY
has just closed it? 92d volume. In point vf liter- •
arv ability this Review \< fast rising to H level
with itß competitors. It is the advocate of polit- !
[ ical and religious liberalism.
4. TIIE NORTH ERITISII REVIEW,
now in its 51 st volume, occupies a very high po- j
sitian in periodical literature. Passing beyond i
the narrow formalism of schools and parties, it 1
, appeals to a wider range of sympathies and u I
i higher integrity of conviction,
i 5. BLACKWOOD'S ICD IN BURG MAGAZINE
was commenced 52 years ago. Equalling the
Quarterlies in its literary and scientific depart- j
ineuts, it has won a wiiie reputation for the nar- }
ratires and sketches which enliven its pages.
TERMS FOR 1370.
per annum
For any one of the Reviews $4.00
For any two of the Reviews 7.00 " ;
For any three of the Reviews 10.00 "
For all four of tbo Reviews 12.00 "
| For Blackwood's Magazine 4.00 "
1 For Blackwood ac.d any one Review... 7.00 u
For Blackwood aud two of the Reviews 10.00 **
For Blackwood and three of the Reviews 13.00 "
For Blackwood and the four Review?.... 15.00 "
Single Numbers-of a Review, sl. Fingle nuin- j
| hers of Blackwood, 35 cents.
The Reviews are published quarterly; Black- j
wood'? Magazine is monthly. Volumes commence |
in January.
CLUBS.
A discount q{twenty per cent, will be allowed to !
clubs of four or more persons, when the pcriodi- !
j cal? arc sect to one address.
POSTAGE.
The POSTAGE -j n current subscriptions, to any
part of the United States is Two Cent# a number, ;
to be prepaid at the office of delivery. For back
numbers the postage is double.
PREMIUMS TO NEW SUBSCRIBERS!
New subscribers to any two of the above period
: eals for 1870 will be entitled to receive, one of the i
I "Four Hevi'xce" for 1539. New sub scribers to
all the five may receive Blackwood or two of the
tieriewt for IBfi9.
BACK NUMBERS.
Subscribes A may, by applying early, obtain back
sets of the Review? from Jan. 1865, to Dec. 1869,
and of Blackwood's Magazine from Jan. 1866, to j
Dec. 1869, at half the currant subscription price.
*.2% Neither premiums to Subscribers, nor dis
j eonnt to Clubs, nor reduced prices for back num
bers, .*an be allowed, unless the money is remitted
direct to the Publishers.
No premiums can be given to Clubs.
I The January numbers will be printed from new
type, and arrangements have been made, which, ;
it is hoped, will secure regular and early publica- i
j tion.
; THE LEONARD SCOTT PUBLISHING CO., j
140 Fulton St., N. Y.
'■ The Lro.vAr.D Scorr Prßt-isnixo ConrAxy
. also publish the
FARMER'S GUIDE,
to Scientific and Practical Agriculture. By Hen- ;
ry Stephen?, F. R. 3., Edinburgh, and the late
| J. P. Norton, Professor of Scientific Agriculture
jin Yale College. New Haven. 2 vols. Royal octa
' vo. 1600 page? and numerous Engraving?. Price,
$7. By mail, post-paid, $3. ltidec
no TO T II E SIGNOF THE
BIG SAW
AND SEE A FULL STOKE OK EVERYTHING
IN THE HARDWARE LINE
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
; BOUGHT FOR CASH. AND YVILI, BE SOLD i
AS LOW AS FAIR DEALING YY'ILL
PERMIT.
MY DESIRE IS NOT ONLY TO SELL GOODS,
BUT TO SELL CHEAP AND GIVE
SATISFACTION.
The stock consists in part of—
CARPENTERS' TOOLS,
AXES, FORKS, SHOVELS,
RAKES, HOES, BRUSH AND -
GRASS SCYTHES, SNATHS.
j LARGEST ASSORTMENT OF CUT
LERY IN BEDFORD.
IRON, STEEL,
CARRIAGE FIXINGS,
THIMBLE SKEINS,
HORSE SHOES,
AXLES, SPRINGS,
LOCKS, LATCHES, HINGES, ]
SCREWS,
NAILS, (all kinds,)
GRINDSTONES A FIXTURES,
SADDLERS' &
i CABINET-MAKERS' HARDWARE.
OILS, PAINTS, VARNISHES,
YVINDOYV GLASS, (all sizes,)
SOLE-LEATHER,
UPPER, CALF-SKINS,
MOROCCOS, TOPPINGS,
LININGS, LASTS, AC.
LAMPS, SHADES,
PORCELAIN DO.,
BEST COAL OIL.
| LANTERNS,
rOWDBR, SHOT, CAPS,
SAFETY-FUSE,
HUBS. SPOKES, FELLOES,
SHAFTS and POLES complete.
BUCKETS, TUBS, CHURNS,
ICE-CREAM FREEZERS,
j BRUSHES, BROOMS, DOOR-MATS,
OIL-CLOTHS,
CHILDREN'S CARRIAGES.
FLOYY'ER POTS,
VASES,
HANGING BASKETS,
VALISES,
BARN DOOR ROLLERS and RAIL.
PICKS AND MATTOCKS.
ROPE OF ALL KINDS.
, T - M- LYNCH.
Bedford, June 4.
MARBIAGB CERTIFCATES.~On hand and
for sale at the Inquirer office, a fine assort
ment of Marriage Certificates. Clergymen and
Ja?tices should have thorn.
gty soads, &t.
TO CASH BUYERS!
BEAD AND SPEAK OF IT!
CME SEE AND BE CONVINCED
G. li. 08TKB k CO.
(Q .
Arc now receiving their uiual enten
five and well assorted
STOCK of NEW and DESIRABLE
WINTEB GOODS,
And are now offering
j-j UNPRECEDENTED BARGAINS
m T0 Q
H CASH BUYERS!
: (ij BRING ALON;YOUR CASH CD
; and we will guarantee to SELL you |_|
| GOODS as CHEAP as the same MAKE, "
J STYLE and QUALITY can be bad in ~
0 CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA.
; o ~ d
U DON'T FAIL TO CALL
£-{ and get ported on the
CASH PRICES; T?J
before you buy
IT WILL SAVE YOU MONEY.
Bedford, Nov. 18, 1869 .:3m
1 s^aca:jlus hsvo OJL
y EVV GOODS
JUST RECEIVED AT
|J. M. SHOEMAKER'S Bargain Store.
! >^ T EW GOODS
JUST RECEIVED AT
IJ. M. SHOEMAKER'S Bargain Store.
| VIEW GOODS
JUST RECEIVED AT
J. M. SHOEMAKER'S 'Bargain Store.
j
GOODS
JUST RECEIVED AT
J. M. SHOEMAKER'S Bargain Store.
1 MEW GOODS
JUST RECEIVED AT
J. M. SHOEMAKER'S Bargain Store.
EW GOODS
JUST RECEIVED AT
J. M. SHOEMAKER'S Bargain Store.
I Buy your Dry Goods. Groceries, Clothing, Hats, j
Boots and Shoes, Queensware, Leather, No
tions, Fish, Tobacco, Ac., at
J. M. SHOEMAKER'S Bargain Store. J
Boy your Dry Good's, Groceries, Clothing. Hats, |
Boots and Shoes, Queensware, Leather, No- j
tions, Fish, Tobacco, Ac., at
J. M. SHOEMAKER'S Bargain Store. !
| Buy your Dry Good's Groceries, Clothing, Hats, |
Boots and Shoes, Queensware Leather, No
tions, Fish, Tobacco, Ac., at
J. M. SHOEMAKER'S Bargain Store, i
i Bny your Dry Goods, Groceries, Clothing, Hats, I
Boots and Shoes, Queensware, Leather, No
tions, Fish, Tobacco, Ac., at
J. M. SHOEMAKER'S Bargain Store. ;
Buy your Dry Goods, Groceries, Clo'hing. Hats, i
Boots and Shoes, Queensware, Leather, No
tions, Fish, Tobacco, Ac., at
J. M. SHOEMAKER'S Bargain Store, j
; Buy your Dry Goods, Groceries, Clothing, Hats, |
Boots and Shoes, Queensware, Leather, No
tions, Fish, Tobacco, Ac., at
J. M. SHOEMAKER'S Bargain Store, j
| If you want BARGAINS go to
J. M. SHOEMAKER'S. |
If you want to SAVE MONEY go to
J. M. SHOEMAKER'S.
Bedford, Pa., June 11.
MOVED
TO THE
OOLON'ADE BUILDING
MILLER & BOWSER
HAVE REMOVED TO THE
COLOXADE BUILDING
and offer great bargains in all kinds of goods in
order to reduce their stock beforo making spring
purchases. They have on hand
DRY GOODS,
READY MADE CLOTHING,
FANCY NOTIONS,
COTTON YARNS,
HATS,
CAPS,
BOOTS,
SHOES,
GROCERIES,
QUEENS WARE,
TOBACCO,
CIGARS,
BROOMS,
BASKETS, WOODEN WARE, &c.
Look at some of their prices:
CALICOES, 8, 10,12, 15, 16.
GINGHAM, 121, 15, 18, 20.
MUSLIN, 10,12, 14, 15, 18, 20.
CASSIMERKS CLOTHS, SATINETT and
LADIES SACKING at very low prices. Ladies,
Gent's and Misses Shoes, Sandals and Overshoes
in great variety. Men's, boys and youths boots ;
best Coffee, Tea, Sugar and Syrup at market
prices. Feed and Flour lor sale here at all times.
We invite all to call and see the goods, and com
pare prices, beforebuyingyourgoods. Our motto
is, short profits.
TERMS —Cash, notes or products. aplS 68
goofciS
TII E I NQ'DTR K R
BOOK STORE,
opposite the Mengel House,
BEDFORD, PA.
The proprietor takes pleas ire in offering to the
public the following articles belonging to the
Book Business, at CITY RETAIL PRICES:
MISCELLANEOUS BOOKS:
Dream Life,
Reveries of a Bachelor,
Bryant's,
Htlleck's,
Jean Ingelow's,
TuppeUs,
foe's,
Milton's,
Whittier's,
Longfellow's,
Ten ney son's.
Bayard Taylor's,
Walter Scott's,
Wadsworth's,
Grey's Poems,
100 Selections:
X wo M fcrri*re?
The Initials;
Pheenixiana;
A. Ward, bis Book;
Nasby's Letters;
Dictionary of Quotations;
Macanly's England;
Homespun;
Kathrina;
Bittersweet,
Enoch Arden;
Tent on the Beach;
Snow Bound;
Country Living;
Companion Poets;
Tom Brown at Rugbjr,
Baker's Secret Service; and many others.
NOVELS:
Miss Mulbach's.
Dicken's (26 cent edition,,
Marrayatt's,
Sir Walter Scott's (25c edition],
Miss Ellen Pickering's,
G. W. M. Reynold's,
Eugene Sue's,
Alexander Duma's,
Sir Edward Lytton Bulwtr's,
D'lsraeli's,
Wilkie Collin's,
George Sand's,
Mrs. Henry Wood's,
Wild Western Scenes,
Widow Bedott Papers,
Cax ton's,
Mrs. Caudle's Curtain Lectures,
Guardian Angel,
Pendennis,
The Newcomes,
Young America Abroad,
Robinson Crusoe,
Initials,
Early Dawa
Major Jones' Courtship,
Charcoal Skeret. -
j Travels of Major Jones,
Ac t i ■
BIBLES, HYMN BOOKS, AC..
i Large Family Bibles,
Small Bibles,
Medium Bibles,
Lutheran Hymn Books,
Methodist Hymn Books,
Smith's Dictionary of the Bible,
History of the Books of the Bible:
Pilgrim's Progress, Ac. Ac. Ac.
1 Episcopal Prayer Books,
Presbyterian Hymn Books,
SCHOOL BOOKS:
ABC Cards,
Primers,
Osgood's Speller,
Raub's Speller,
Osgood's Ist, 2nd, 3d, 4th, and sth Reader?,
Brook's Normal Primary, Normal Mental, Ele
mentarj, and Normal, Written Arithmetics,
Mitchell's New First Lessons, New Primary, and
Intermediate Geographies,
Brown's First Lines, and Fuglilii Grammars,
Warren and Mitchell's Physical Geographies.
Lossing's Common School History o f the Unite
States,
Webster's Pocket, Comnrt* and Una
bridged Dictionaries,
; Cleveland's Compendium ot English Literature,
Cleveland's Compendium of American Literature,
: Cleveland's Literature of the 19th Century,
| Coppee's Academic Speaker,
; Sergeant's Standard and Intermediate Speakers,
f Young American Speaker,
1 Western and Columbian Orator,
i Schoolday Dialogues,
! Nortbend's Dialogues,
j Exhibition Speaker,
i American School Dialogue Book,
| Payson, Dunton, and Scribner's Copy Books, Not.
'• 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7, Ac.

TOY ROOKS.
Cinderella,
Mother Goose,
Old Mother Hubbard,
Little Red Riding Hood,
The House that Jack Built,
' Grand Father Goose s Rhymes, Ac.
STATIONERY
I Congress, Legal
. Record, Foolscap,
Letter, Congress Letter,
Sermon, Commercial Note,
Ladies" Gilt, Ladies' Octavo,
Mourning, Frrnch Note,
; Bath Post, Damask Laid Note,
Cream Laid Note, Envelopes, Ac.
BLANK BOOKS.
i Day Books, Ledgers,
Account Books, Cash Books,
Pocket Ledgers, Time Books,
Tuck Memorandums, Pass Books,
Money Books, Pocket Books.
INKS AND INKSTANDS.
Barometer Inkstands,
Gutta Percha,
Cocoa, and
Morocco Spring Pocket Inkstands,
Glass and Ordinary Stands for Schools,
Flat Glass Ink Wells and Rack,
Arnold's Writing Fluids,
Hover's Inks,
Carmine Inks, Purple Inks,
Charlton's Inks,
Eukalon for pasting, Ac.
PENS AND PENCILS.
Gillot's, Cohen's,
Hollowbush a Carey's Payson,
Dunton, and Scribner's Pens:
Clark's Indellible, Faber's Tablet,
Cohen's F,agle,
Office, Faber's
Guttknccht's, Carpenter's Pencils, Ac.
PERIODICALS.
Atlantic Mcnthly,
Harrier's Magazine,
Madame Demorest's Mirror of Fashions,
Eclectic Magazine,
Godey's Lady's Book,
Galaxy,
Lady's Friend,
Ladies' Repository,
Old Guard,
Our Young Folks,
Appleton's Railway Snide,
Nick Nax,
Yankee Notions,
Budget of Fun,
Jolly Joker.
Phnnny Phellow,
London Punch.
Lippineott's Magazine,
Riverside Magazine,
Northern Monthly,
* Waverly Magaxiite,
Ballon'z Magazine,
Gardner's Monthly.
Harper's Weekly
Frank Leslie's Illustrated,
Chimney Corner,
New York Ledger,
New Y'ork Weekly,
YVilke's Spirit of the Times,
Harper's Bazar,
Every Saturday,
Living Age,
Pen and Pencil,
Putnam's Monthly Magazine,
1 Arthur's Home Magasine,
■ Oliver Optic's Boys and Girl's Magazine sc.
1 Constantly on band to accommodate those who
want to purchase living reading matter.
Only a part of the vast number of articles per
taining to the Book and Stationery business,
which we are prepared to eell cheaper than the
' cheapest, are above enumerated. Give us a oall.
We buy and sell for CASH, and by this arrsnge
-1 ment we expect to sell as cheap as roods of this
class are sold anywhere.
LUTZ A JORDAN.
Juae 19, IB6S.

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