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The Columbian. (Bloomsburg, Pa.) 1866-1910, May 26, 1866, Image 4

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TRUST AND REST.
Kjorr not, poor nonl j white doubt nnd fenr
Disturb thy brcnt,
Tlic pitying niiKcls, who con cr
How vnln thy wild regrot luiul bp,
Bay trnt nnd, rest.
rinti not, rmr wlirntp, hut calmly wait ;
His choice In IdM ;
Whllo blind nnd erring In thy night,
llli wisdom, seen mid Judges right, ,
So trust ntul rest.
Strive not, nor struggled thy poor might
Cnti nei er wrest
Tlio meanest thing to servo thy will
AH power IsHlsnlone,; beRtlll,
Ami trust nnd rest.
Desire, not s thy relf-Iove Is strong-
Within thy breasts
And yet Ho loves thee, better still,
Bo let Htm do His loving will,
And trust nnd rest.
What dost thou fenr? His wisdom reigns
Supreme, confessed
His power Is Inflnlto; His love
Thy deepest, fondest drenms nbove
Bo trust nnd rest.
AGRIOULTUEAL.
YagetnlilM.
Vi:aKTA'ni,F, nlthoupli deficient In
Bomo of tho nutritive properties which
characterize, nnlninl food, are, noverthe-
lea's, mi Important clement In dietary
owing to the largo quantity of potash
they contain. Bo Important is this fact,
that a system of dietary In which fresh
vegetables wcro excluded would not
only entail tho loss of a very agreeable
addition to our repasts, but, carried to
excess, would bo productive of those all
mcnts to which tho crews of vessels In
long voyages wero formerly subject
Now-a-days no vessel undertakes n long
voyago without being supplied with
limo or lemon Julco ; potatoes, cabbages
carrots, and turnips are pressed into
email spaco nnd rendered equally porta
ble. With fresh nlr, nnlmal food, nnd a
fair amount of vegetable nourishment,
scorbutic affections are unheard of. Hut
if n deficiency of cither of these requl
Bitcs of health arises, skin complaints
arc of common occurrence, to say notli
Ing of tho wretched stato of health of
which such appearances arc but tho out
ward sign. Therefore, without abating
the proportions of nnlmal food which
are usually considered necessary, it is
important so to blend animnl and vege
table nourishment that, by their joint
effect, tho balance of health may bo
maintained. Albumon, fibrin, gelatin,
cosoln, nnd fat arc generally found In
nnlmal food; while sugar, starch, glu
ten, and salts arc especially met with in
vegetables. Speaking on this subject, in
liis lectures on food, Dr. Lankcslersays;
"You may find half a dozen children
all exposed to the danger of scarlet
fever; two take it; one dies, nnd the
other four nro free; but the two that
have caught the infection lmvo lived in
such n way that their blood has readily
taken in tho contagion, nnd the ono Hint
has died has got into a condition which
lias produced death. Again : Four men
shall bo travelling outsido an omnibus;
ono mny get acute inflammation of the
lungs, another bronchitis, and the other
two shall como off free. Was it the rid
ing outsido the omnibus that caused the
two to fall ill? No; it was tho state of
their blood. They had lived somehow
irregularly; their bodies had been de
prived of their proper constituents.
Jlenco the importanco of attending to
these subjects thoroughly, not getting a
little knowlcdgo of them, but a knowl
edge of what Is necessary to the feeding
of children and tho feeding of men."
This knowlcdgo is at all times of im
portance; nnd it is especially so to those
who aro anxious to escape tho maladies
to which the recurrence of Winter ren
ders every ono more or less liable, and
to thoso who arc no less anxious to avoid
tho long doctor's bill which in many
familias is also of annual occurrence.
In tho Winter everything In tho form
of fresh vegetables is extremely dear,
and most people, from overlooking the
importanco.of vegetable diet at that sea
son, aro sparing of Its use. In tho Win
tor, howovcr, fresh vegetables should
not bo considered as mere luxuries, but
as positive necessities; when they aro
iu Duiwuu ii pruuuui. nuuseiieoper win
inako them enter largely into tho suppl,
of tho table.
Grass jLnnil How to Improve It.
IP you ask this question of many
larmers tho only reply will ho break ui
and sod down afresh. Others will hosl
tato beforo giving this uniform answer,
Tlioy will insist on looking at the land
first, or at least will wish to know what
is tho matter witli tho present grass crop,
Is somo part of tho field mossy or bog,
gy ? or does It grow certain coarse grass.
cs, which imllcato tindtto moistttroat the
bottom ? If so, their eyes will bo open
ed, and thoy will reply, in medical lan
Kiiago, that " underdrawing is lndictv
ted." Nothing does tho land need so
much as this; nothing will do it mate
rial good until this is first attended to,
Ploughing and manuring will bo nearly
nil useless, so long as tho land is clogged
with surface water. If this is not tho
trouble, they will inqtilro whether foul
weeils have got possession, to tho exelu
slon of wholesome grasses. If not, but
tho trouble is simply an impoverish
ment of tlio surface by long cronpln
thoy will ndvlso to scarify tho Hward in
tlio Full witli a heavy harroy, tearing
up tno mosses, ami disturbing tho soil a
mile, bo-tliut It will receive fresh seed
Then thoy will sow from ten to fifteen
quarts per acre of clear Timothy and
Ited-top, in equal parts, and cover tho
samo wiui u light luu-row. Wo should
liavo said,- too, thoy will apply tt good
coat of old manure beforo tho seed-sow
ing. In this way, repeating tho manur
ing onco In two years, many a meadow
or pasture ean bo brought up to a high
Btato of productiveness. If, liowover,
tho land is infested with white daisy,
dock, or thlstlo, tho only way will bo to
hrealc it up tJtoroughly, cultivate It five
years with crops nnd grain, and finally
boed down again. Mnnurhig-shotild go
along with this cultivation, of course,
When seeding down bo not sparing of
need, but uso half a bushel of Timothy,
and tho samo of Red-top. If Red clov
er Is desired, it should not generally be
towed until In the Spring, us it Is apt to
Winter-kill, if our farmer Is n pro
gressive man, perhaps lie will inquire
whether tho grass crop could not be Im
proved by irrigation. Wo bellevo that
much is tr bo realized from this praetlco
during tho next generation.
Asparagus.
Do not cut from a bed loss than threo
years planted. In cutting earo Is re
quired not to injuro tho plant, or the
buds that still remain dormant. Slip
tho knife down between the shoot ami
tlio plant, and cut with Its edge slanting
from tho plant. That which is sent to
market is put in bunched six or eight in
ches In diameter, tied with a string near
tlio top and bottom, nnd tho lower ends
cut square. Keep moist to prevent wilt'
iS.
RISKS OF GREAT EATERS.
uur.AT caters never live long. A vo
racious appetite, so far from being a
sign of health, Is n certain indication of
disease. Somo dyspeptics nro nlwnys
Hungry, nnd feel best when they are eat
lug; butns soon ns they have finished
eating thoy enduro tortures so distress
lug In their nature as to make the tin
happy victim wish for death. Tho ap
petite of health is that which inclines
moderately to cat when eating-time
comes, and which, when satisfied, leaves
no unpleasant reminders. Multitudes
measure their health by tho amount
they can cat ; and of any ten persons
nine aro gratified at an increase of
weight, when, in reality, any excess of
fatness is, in proportion, decisive proof
or existing disease, showing that tho ab
sorbents of the system nro too weak to
dischargo their duty ; and tho tendency
to fatness, to obesity, increases until ex
istence is a burden, and sudden death
closes the history.
Particular Inquiry will almost unva
ryingly elicit tho fact that fat persons,
howovcr rubicund and Jolly, nro never
well, and yet they are envied. While
great eaters nover live to an old nge, and
nro never for ti .single day without some
"symptom," somo feeling sufilclently
disagreeable to attract tho mind's atten
tion unpleasantly, small eaters, those
who cat regularly of plain food, usually
liavo no " spare fiesh," are wiry and en
during, and live to an active old age.
Remarkablo exemplifications of tiieso
statements aro found in tho lives of cen
tenarians of a past age. Galen, one of
the most distinguished of tho ancients,
lived very sparingly nfter tlio aire of
twenty-eight, nnd died in ills hundred
nnd fortieth year. Keitgern, who never
tasted spirits or wine, and worked hard
all his life, reached a hundred and eighty-five
years.
Jenkins, a poor Yorkshire fisherman,
who lived on tho coarsest diet, was one
hundred and sixty-nine years old when
ho died. Old Parr lived to ono hun
dred and fifty-three; his diet being milk,
witey, sninu-ueer, and coarse bread. The
favorite diet of Henry Francisco, who
lived to ono hundred and forty, was
tea, bread nnd butter, and baked apples.
Ephraim Pratt, of Shutosbury. Sins..
who died aged one hundred and seven
teen, lived chiefly on milk, and even
that in small quantities; his son Mi
chael, by similar means, lived to ono
hundred and threo years. Father Cull,
n uouiodisc clergymen, died last year
at tho age of ono hundred and five,' the
main diet of his life being salted swine's
fiesh (bacon), and bread made of Indian
meal. From these statements ninogen
eral readers out of ten will jump to tho
conclusion that milk is healthy, as aro
oaiccd apples and bacon.
These conclusions do not legitimately
follow. Theonly inference that can safely
bo drawn is from tlio only fact running
through all these eases that plain food
nnu a nio 01 steady labor tend to a great
nge. As to tlio healtlifulnessnnd life-pro-
'"K"K qumuios oi any article or diet
named nothing ean be inferred, for no
two of tho men lived on tho samo kind
of food; all that ean bo rationally and
safely said is either that they lived so
long in splto of the quality of tho food
they ate, or that their instincts called
for n particular kind of food, and tho
gratification of flint instinct, instead of
its perversion, with a life of steady labor,
directly caused liealthfuliiess nnd great
longin oi nays. Wo must not expect to
live long by doing any ono tiling which
an old man did, andomittlngnll others,
but by doing all ho did, and that is.
Work steadily, ns well as eat mainly of
u particular uiaii.
ven," or view the fond parent hang over
Its beauties, and half retain her breath
lest she should break Its slumbers, with
out n veneration beyond nil common
feeling, is to be avoided In every inter
course of life, and is fit only for tho
sliatluw of darkness and solitude of the
desert.
It Is perhaps the privllego or woman
only to extract the sting of grief from
others, by the gentlu patience with
which she i taught by nature to set the
exaniplo of meek endurance. Her first
step lir the career of duty Is generally
by the bed of sickness or of buffering.
'J here she hushes helpless infancy to re
pose, nnd to tho Infirmity of ago sup
piles the sweetness of cheerful patience.
It is her province to smooth tho angry
passions ; to allay the violence of intem
perate man ; to divert or sooth tlioquer
ulousness of peevish, fretful tempers.
It Is hew, In fine, to be a peacemaker on
eartli ; and let her not disdain tills, her
allotted career, nor ever swerve from it.
It has not tho promlso of tho world's
beatitudes or glories, but It is blessed,
and It is glorious nevertheless ; and oh I
above all, let not thoso who ought to
cherish and foster these gentle virtues
endeavor to stifle or eradicate them by
substituting in their stead tho excite
ments of frivolous vanities, and the
empty cares of dissipation.
FOR YOUTHFUL READERS.
MATERNITY.
Woman's charms aro certainly many
and powerful. Tho expanding wo Just
bursting into beauty lias an irresistible
bewltclilngncss ; the blooming bride, led
triumphantly to tlio hynicntat altar,
awakens admiration and interest, nnd
tlio blush of herchceks fill with delight;
but tho charm of maternity is moresub
limothan tltese. Heaven has imprinted
on tho mother's faco something beyond
this world, something which claims kin
dred with tho skies the angelic smile,
the tender look, tho wnklng. watchful
eyo which keeps its fond vigil over her
siumDcring babe.
Thro aro objects which neither tho
pencil nor tho chisel can touch ; which
poetry fails to exalt; which tho most
eloquent tongtio in vain would eulouizo;
nnd to portray which all description bo
comes Ineffective In tlio heart of man
lies tho lovely picture; It lives In ills
sympathies; it reigns in his affections;
ins oyes iook round in vain for such an
other object on tho earth.
Maternity ecstatic sound! so twined
round our heart that it must ceaso to
throb ero wo forget it ! 'TIs our ilr.-.t
lovo! "lis part of our religion! Nn-
turo has set tho mother upon such a pin-
imno miu our iniant eyes and arms are
first uplifted to it; wo cling to it in
manhood; wo almost worship it in old
ago. Ho who can enter an aiiartinoni.
and behold tho tender babo feeding upon
as iiioiuer s noauty, nourished by tlio
tido of liru which flows thioiiuh her iron-
erous veins, without a panting hoaom
and grateful eye,, N no man, but a moil
hter. lie who can approach tho cradle
of sleeping Innocence without thinking
tllllt "nl' S.11,,1, Ij 41... i.tr..-
... .- iwiLH,i,,JM UI JU'il-
Tlir Poor Musician,
One beautiful .Summer day there was
a great festival in tho largo park at
Vienna. This park is Killed by the
people the Prater. It 13 full of lovely
trees, splendid walks, and little rustic
pleasure-houses. At the timo of which
I am speaking there wcro pcoplo there,
some young and some old, nnd mnnv
strangers too. And all those who were
there enjoyed such a sceno ns thoy had
probably never beheld before
He that ns it may, the Prater was almost
covered with crowds of pcoplo. Among
tho numbers wero tho organ-grinders,
beggars, and girls who played on harps,
There stood an old musician. He had
onco been a soldier, but his pension was
not sufficient to live on. Still ho don't
liko to beg. Therefore on this partlctr
lar festival day he took his old violin
and played under an old tree in the
park. He had a good faithful old do:
along with him, which lay at his feet.
nnd held nn old lint in his mouth, so
mat passers-by might cast coins into it
for tlio old man.
On the day of the festival which I
liavo now mentioned tho dog sat before
him with tlio old hat. Many pcoplo
went by and heard tho old musician
playing, but they did not throw much
in. I wonder tho pcoplo did not irive
him more, for he was truly a pitiable
object.
His faco was covered with scars re
ceived in his country's battles, and ho
wore a long gray coat, such as he had
kept ever since ho had been in tlio army.
He even had bis old sword ).v hU nlde.
and would not consent to walk the streets
without his trusty friend with him. Ho
bad only threo fingers on his right
hand, so ho had to hold the bow of his
voilln with thcne. A bullet had taken
off tho two others, and almost at the
samo time a cannon ball had taken off
his leg. Tlio last money ho had had
been spent, in buying new strings to his
violin, and ho was now playing with all
his strength tho old marches ho had
so often heard when a boy with his
father.
Ho looked sad enough as ho saw the
multitudes pitss by in their strength,
youth, and beauty; but whenever they
laughed it was like a dagger to his soul,
for ho knew that on that very evening
lie would have to go to bed suppcrless,
hungry as he wa, and lio on a straw
couch in a little garret room. Ills old
dog was better off, for ho often found a
bono hero and there, to satisfy his hun
ger.
rt was fate In tiie afternoon his hones
wero uko tne sun, they were both going
down together. Ho placed Ids old vio
lin down by his side, and leaned against
tree. 'I bo tears streamed down his
scarred cheeks. Ho thought that none
of that giddy throng saw him, but he
was much mistaken. Not far off stood
a gentleman in fine clothes, who had a
kind heart. Ho listened to tho old mu
sician, and when ho saw that no ono
gave him anything, his heart was touch
ed with sympathy. 1 lu finally went to
tho dog, nnd looking at tlio hat saw only
two copper coins in it.
He then said to tho old musician,
"My good friend, why don't you plav
longer V"
"Oli," replied the old man, "my
dear sir, I cannot ; my poor old arm Is
so tired that I cannot hold tho bow ; be
sides I lmvo had no dinner, nnd havo
nuio prospect ot supper."
Tho old man wiped his feeblo hands,
j-iiu Kinu gentleman with whom lie
talked resolved to aid him as best ho
couki. no gave him a pieco of gold,
and said, " I'll pay you, if you will loan
mo your violin lor ono hour."
un," said tho musician, this pieco
ui miHiey is worth more than n half
uo;:en out iiddies liko mine.'
Ing gentleman was playing for tho poor
man, but none knew who ho was.
lly and by tho people ln-gan to tlrop
money Into tho hat, mid tho old dog
seemed delighted to receive so many
pieces of gold for his master. Tlio cir
cle of hearers became larger and larger,
liven the coachmen of tho splendid car
riages begged the people. Inside to stop
and hear tho music. Gold, silver, nnd
copper were thrown Into the lint by the
old and young. Tho old dog began to
growl. What In the world could bo the
matter'. One gentleman, as ho dropped
a large piece of money into the lint, had
struck him on tlio noo, and ho came
very near letting the hat nnd money fall.
Hut it soon became so heavy ho could
not hold it any longer.
" Empty your hat, old man," said the
people, "nnd we will fill It again for
you."
Ho pulled out nn old hnndkerchicf,
nnd wrapping the money in it, put It
into his vlolin-bng.
Tlio stranger kept on playing, and tho
pcoplo cried out, "Uravo! bravo!" In
great Joy. He played first ono tune and
then another even the children seemed
curried away with rapture. At last lie
played that splendid song, "Uod bless
tho limperor Francis!" All hats nnd
caps Hew off their heads, for tho people
loved their limperor. Tho song finally
came to an end. Tho hour was ended,
and the musician handed back the vio
lin to the old man.
"Thank you," said lie. "May Ood
bless you!" and ho disappeared in tlio
crowd.
"Who Is he? Who Is ho?" said tl
people. " Where does ho como from ?'
A person sitting in ono of the coaches
replied that he knew him. " It is Ale.
under Boucher," Mild he, " tliegreat vio
linlst. It Is just liko him ; lie saw that
tho old man needed help, and ho dote
mined to help him in tho best way he
could."
The pcoplo then gave three cheers for
Alexander llouclier, and put money I
tiie old man's hat. When ho went homo
that evening ho was richer than lie had
over been before. When he went to his
bed ho foaled his hands and prayed that
Clod might bless good llouclier,' so that
When ho should get to bo an old man
he might havo good and kind friends.
Now I believe that there were tw
happy men that night in Vienna. Of
course tho poor old musician rejoiced
now that ho was out of want ; but of more
value to him than all his money w
the consolation that somebody had nrov
ed a friend to him. For it does us nil
good to know that wo havo friends, if
iney aro oi no lartncr advantage to us,
There was another who was happy, and
unit, was the good Alexander llouclier,
How could he go to bed thnt night witl
out thanking Clod for putting it into li
heart to bo kind to the old, fricndle.-
starving soldier?
tend to men who play (at) studying
they want thoso who work nt It. You
may work up to as high or low n stand
ard ns you please; but there must bo no
falllngoff. our little accomplishments
athletics, poetry, music, all done pretty
well, with which you liopo to set off
your feeble scholarship, will only bodes
plscd, and you will bo recommended to
confine yourself wholly to them, and
give up all idea of scholarship, or else
drop theiii.
"Never mind," said tho gentleman,
I only want to biro it an lumr-.o
" Very well; you can do what you
will," said tho owner.
Tho gentleman took tho fiddle and
lioiv In bid luiiwl ii ,, ,
' '"""i im men said 10 tlio
man, "Now, my mate, you tako tho
money, and I will play. I am milt..
nuio puipiu win give us something."
Now was not that a sinimliir m,,i.
cal association ? Thoy had Just beeomo
acquainted, nnd Immediately entered
Into an arrangement to work together
for tho public. This strango gentleman
began to play. His mato looked nt him
with great wonder; ho was so stirred
thnt he could hardly beliovo that It was
his old violin that such beautiful sounds
camo from, livery note was liko a
pearl. Tho first pieco hud not hpin fin.
Ished before tho people, observing the
strango slghl and hearing such wonder
ful music, stopped a moment in curiosi
ty, livery one saw that the llue-Joo!;.
WHAT A VOLCANO IS LIKE
Tin: imagination could almost In some
tilings exaggerate the hurnliiL' of n irrc
warehouse into the eruption of n vol
cano; tho flames and the sniok-n nn
there, and at tho moment when the roof
talis in, tho perpendicular burst upward
might, give a faint notion of the manner
In which tlio liro shoots from tho crater
nnd though there is no equivalent for
tno cioio column of stones which
thrown up in tho latter case, tho beams
cast hither and thither might distinctl
suggest the stray blocks which, instead
of falling again into tho gulf, aro hurled
outsido to distances sometimes small and
sometimes great. Hut that for which i
common if res there Is no analogy, how
ever remote, Is tho regularity witl
which the phenomena repeat themselve
a regularity which suggests the Ide
that there is a great system of arteries
within tlio earth, filled with ruiinin
fire in place of blood,and that ono of tho
iirtencs lias been eaten into by tlio nro
gross of some horrid superficial tumor,
and that with every pulsation of the
great heart of tho mountain its life
spouts fortli through the wound,
blood through tho cartorid artery of a
man. A certain amount of fire, a cor
tain number of stones, always issue from
thecrater; hut oncou minute sometimes.
sometimes oftener, a great gush leaps
lor several hundreds ot feet into thoair,
witli hardly any warning to tho eve. and
sinks as suddenly again. It is then that
tho larger stones aro dNgorgcd, In the
miust ot a crowd of lesser ones, whlcl
play up and down in tho flamo liko the
balls of which street-acrobats keen five
or six in tho air at once. If, however,
these gushes tako place without much
notice to tho eye, they nro preluded nt
least to tho ear by a hoarse roar, liko that
made when ilanio is horno along in n
confined spaco by a flerco draft, except
that it includes besido a noiso which is
indescribable, but which declares itself
at onco to bo that of the stones its they
grind against ono another in their help-
less rush to thesurface. Tho samo noise,
but with nothing of volcanic vehemence,
can oo neani when tlio stones of a beach
aro drugged about by angry waves.
STUDENT LIFE AT CAMBRIDGE.
Tin: llfo of a Cambridge student (savs
I'.vcrctt) is a hard one. It is no path of
uowers; still les a bed of roses. Tlio
scholars at Cambridge tiro hard-working
men, laboring for dear llfo lo obtain
prizes and honors offered, perhaps in tho
rauo oi ono to every llvo competitors,
Among thoso men there Is no nlaco for
dabblers or dilettanti. With many of
uiem incir livelihood as sclioolmasters
or clergymen depends on their success
in scholarship; with others their early
Introduction into law or Parliament:
and with all of them, that Is, all the
;ooU ones, it is a real paramount busi
ness, tor of all things an linglishuian,
and especially a Cantab, detests a .lurk.
of-all-trndes a student who does a little
classics and a llttio mathematics, a Ilttlo
rowing or a Ilttlo debating. If such u
man, if any man, after taking up tlio
regular studies lu tlio nl ace. hoL'lnn in
flag or fail, his private tutor will unhesi
tatingly inform him somo day that their
WIT AND HUMOR.
OitfiAK-fintNDints' device One good
turn deserves another.
Which runs tlio faster, heat or cold?
Heat ; because you can catch cold.
No man can solve the mysteries o
life, but every man of common senso ean
perform Its duties,
A man who got drunk at an election
said It was owing to his efforts to put
down " party spirit."
A San Fuancisco editor says that
when ho thinks of Ireland's woes his
heart "goes pity Pat."
Yot'xn gentlemen who would prosper
in lovo should woo gently. It is not
fashionable for young ladies to take in
dent spirits.
"Comi:, Rob, what did you clear by
your speculation?" said a friend to Ids
companion. "Clear," nnswered Rob,
With a frown, " why, I cleared my pock
!.
It is far easier to detect error than to
discover truth ; ono lies on flic surface
and can bo easily discerned ; tho other
lies deeply hidden, and few aro able to
find it
Old age Is never honored among us,
but only indulged, as childhood Is ; and
old men lose ono of tlio most precious
rights of man that of being Judged by
their peers.
ahi" said a conceited young par
son, I have tills forenoon been preach
ing to a congregation of asses." " Then
that was the reason you called them be
loved brethren," replied a strong-minded
lady.
Hoiini: Tooick returned his income at
sixty pounds a year; the commission
ers said they were not satisfied. Homo
looke, in reply, said ho had much more
reason to bo dissatisfied with the small
ness of his income than they had.
A cj:i.i:ih!atj:l composer wrote to a
friend, requesting the pleasure of his
company "to luncheon; key of 6."
His friend, a thorough musician, inter
preted tho invitation rightly, and camo
to tlio composer's house for a luncheon
at one sharp.
A .man got tipsy and indulged in a
night's sleep in a country grave-yard.
On opening his eyes in tho morning, lie
noticed the motto on a grave-stone:
" He is not dead, but slccpeth." "When
I am dead, ho remarked, with great de
liberation, " I'll own up, and have no
uch statement as that above my car
cass."
O.vn of tho daily papers says:' "On
Sunday last John Travis, the notorious
pistol shooter and sporting man, eloped
from Saratoga with a daughter of a gen
tleman oi that place, wlioso age is re
ported about fifteen." If tho gentle
man's ago was only about fifteen, how
very youthful his runaway daughter
must be !
Tim misery of being called noon sud
denly to make an extempore speech was
once got over by a noted English math
ematician, who delivered himself in
this fashion : " Gentlemen, a morbid do-
sire for originality prevents mo from say-
inis is tno proudest moment of
to
my life,' and it does not occur to me
say anything else."
An ancient colored woman at Chatt:
nooga, ascertaining where tho Freed
man's Rureau was kept, called tho other
day and astonished tho clerk by her con
lidential disclosure, to wit: "I hnv
como lor my bureau, now give mo
pretty big ono with a marhlo ton :
ivo a withstand at home, but it is too
-mail to put my fixin's in."
unti;i; ooyswent bat h nr in one nf
tno streams near Oil Creek, tho other
nay, and when they came out they wero
so greasy that they could not stay i
their clothes. As fast as they slippe
them on they would slip oil' again : and
unu oi mem, in a heedless moment, nar
rowiy escaped slipping out of his skin
On reaching homo, their parents being
uAiccuwgiy irugai, wrung them out and
.xtracted about fifteen callous of oni
on irom mu threo bovs.
A JJ0WN-KASTi:ii lately went to see
Macbotli,"and gave tho followiniras hi
notion of tho tragedy: "After haviii"
witnessed tho performances, from what
could make out of tho nlav. I don't
think Macbeth was a good moral charac
ter; and his lady annealed to have ox
ceedingiy looso notions of hospitality
which, together with an unpleasant hah'
it ot talking to herself, and wnlklm-
..i t . .
uuuiu tvi ciemme, must make her a do
eidcdiy unpleasant companion
An orator, in appealing to the "bono
and sinew," said: "My friends, I am
promt to seo around mo tho hardy yeo
mnnryoi tho laud, fori lovo tho airrlcul.
tural interests of tho country ; and well
may l lovo them, fellow-citizens! fori
as born a farmer; tho haimlest davs of
my yoiitn wero spent In tho neaceful
avocation of a son of tho soil. In fact,
to speak figuratively, I may say I was
uorn between two rows of corn I"
pumpkin, by thunder!" exclaimed an
inebriated chap Just In front of thostage.
day or two silicon young hid v from
the country rodo into a town " to do a
little shopping," and after hitching her
nor.-o tin tno square, entered ono of the
most fashionable dry goods establish-
ments, and seated herself on a stool by
tho counter " to wail her turn." A mii-
went or two nfter sho was annroaoliod
by ono of the-polUo young clerks of llm
ootnbiishment tuul addressed is follows:
u am no longer engaged, Mlss-is any
one-waiting oji youV" Rhislilng ln.
moderately, tho tlunsel. after somo lies-
TOSIil'H RlliUlil. & II. H. FISTiiR,
(bcttu Wend, Wlesl A Krvlll,)
InqiortcrA niul Jobbers of
DIIY OOOPH,
No. 17 North Tlilnl Sheet,
riillmlclntitn.
1 USSIiLl
A WOODRUFF,
Wholesale Penlcrs In
TOllACCW, CI'fAftK, I'HT,H, Ac, Ac,
Nn. I I North Third Street, nWc Mnrltit,
rhllmlcliihlu.
JOHN C. YEAtlHU it CO.,
Wholesale Ilenlers 111
HATS, OAl-H, HTItAW (I001W, AND
IiADIIM-KUltS,
Nil. 2i7 North Third Hired,
l'ldlmlclphlii.
Q D. RORBINS & CO.,
IHON MnilCHANTS,
Norllicnt rot tier of Second nnd VlnoHlrcelH,
1'lilladeliihl.i.
g L. RliTTLli,
with llfHH, DUNN A CO.,
DIIY GOODS,
No. 411 North Third Htreet,
l'htladclphl.i.
JjUUSHMUTH, RROTIIKR & CO.,
W1I0I.KS.YM-: T0I1ACC0 DHALIUIH,
No. 151 North Third Street,
nve doors below Hate.
Factories, Nos. SSI and 2i Qturry Htreet,
l'hllmU'lihla;
J V. LAMRIiRT,
with HONS, BIIOTT A CO.,
Importer nnd JolilxiBof
CI.OTHH, CASSI.Mr.IlKS, VKSTINOH, Ac,
No.WI Market Htreet,
Philadelphia.
JUNOliiHCII & SMITH,
JKII.IXAI.K OUOCKUH,
No. I I North Third Slreet,
. Philadelphia.
rjMIK INION IIOTIiL,
Arch Btrect, hetween Thlul nnd Fourth HtreeN,
Philadelphia.
CimiSTA WKUKlt,.
rroprletors.
T'l VliRNON IIOTIiL,
Noi. JI7 nnd 110 North Becolid Htreet,
Philadelphia.
j). ntiAiit.
gT. CIIARLKH HOTEL,
on thi: i:tmoriiAN plan,
Nob. 00,02, CI, mid CO North Third Mrccti,
ltwrei Jfntket nnd Afch Btrcetn,
I'hllndi-lphlii.
CMAM.WJ KLi:CKNKII,
Manager.
Q.IRARO HOUSE,
Corner of Ninth nnd Chestnut StrctK,
rhlladclphlft.
It. W. KANAO.V,
Proprietor.
yATSON & JANNEV,
Importcra nnd Jobhern of
BHiIv AND FANCY DltUSS) 000DH,
HHAWI.1, Ac,
No. KIMnrkot .Street,
Philadelphia.
J A. HENDRY,
HureeHsor to Hendry A Harris,
Maniifaclurerntid Wholemilo Dealer hi
HOOTS AND 8H0IX,
No. .V, North Third Btrcut,
Philadelphia.
J H. LONOSTRETII,
I'APniMIANGINa WAHKHOUSK,
No. J2 North Third Street,
Philadelphia.
Q W. RLARON & CO.,
Manufacturers of
OH, CLOTHS AND WINDOW SHADES,
Warehouse, No. 121 North Third Street,
Philadelphia.
jy M. MARPLli,
NOTIONS, HOSir.ItY, GI.0VKS, AND
FANCY OOODS,
No. 5.1 North Third Street,
Philadelphia.
piIGiNIX STOVE DEPOT.
HIIATr.RS, IUNGFS, AND ST0VF-S,
Wholesale and lletall.
PATKNT ANTI-DL'BT COOKING ST0V13.
VULCAN II FATF.It,
for heating two or more room.
PAULOU, COOKING, IiAUNDUY, HKATINO,
and every vai lely of hTOVF.s.
JOHN I. HESS,
No. ni!) Noilh Second Street, Philadelphia.
nlttMrw.llr... ...Ill J ,.. . I
. V, T ,1,,,limi '"t nation, replied! "No, sir, I came in
term, 'ihy tutors have no time to id-alouc on tile old uiaie."
TOHN E. FOX & CO..
ft
STOCK AND KXCIIANOK IinOKKIW,
No. II Soulh Third Street,
Philadelphia.
HFLVIi: AND IIANK-NOTHS,
ALL KINDS OF STOCKS AND I10ND3
liouuht and Mildoncouiujlsslon. Attention given
to collections on all ncccsMlile. points.
JEXXEDY, STAIRS it CO.,
WHOLIXALi; FISH DF.ALKItS,
No, m and Ifc! North WharvcH,
Philadelphia.
QHARLES II. MARl'LE,
Importer nnd Dealer In
llltANDIIX, WINKS, GINS, LiqUOItS,
WINK IHTTKItS, Ac,
No. IS North Third Street,
nhovc Arch, west side,
1'hlladclphla.
JJ V. l'ETERMAN,
with Iiiri'INCOTT A TItOTTF.n.
wholksam: aitoctrts,
No. 21 North Water Street,
and No. 50 North Delaware. Avenmi,
1'hlladclphla.
Q.EORCIH II. RORERTS,
Importer nnd Dealer In
IIAKDWAItli, CUTI.KItY, CIUNS, Ac,
No. nil North Third Htreet, nliovc Vine,
Philadelphia.
JJEXJAMIX OREEN,
Dealer In
CARPLTINOS, WINDOW SHADIX,
Oil. CLOTHS, MATS, Ac,
No. .11 North Second Street,
Philadelphia.
J 1 HEARD,
wllh IiIPPINCOTT, I10ND A CO.,
Manufacturers nnd Wholesale Dealers In
HATS, CA1-S, FUItS, AND HTHAW GOODS,
No. 413 Market Street,
Philadelphia.
JOWE, EUSTON & CO.,
Manufacturers and Wholosftlc, Dealers In
COTTON YAHNS, CAIiPKT CHAINS,
DATrS, WICKS, TIK YAItNS, COItDAOK,
I1U00MS, WOOD AND WILLOW WAUK,
LOOK-G OLASSUS, CLOCKS, FANCY IJASKKTH,
TA11LK, FliOOIt, AND CAllltlAOK
OIL CLOTHS, Ac,
No. W) Market Street, south side,
1'hlladclphla.
J II. WALTER,
Late, Walter A Knuli,
Importer and Denier in
CHINA, GLASS, AND QUEUNSWAUIJ,
No. 2;)l North Third Street,
between nnco nnd Vino
Philadelphia.
JOYAL & ROYER,
Successors to
CHLllKltT, ltOYAL A CO.,
WIIOLKSAI.K DItUGCIISTS,
Inilioiters and Diilcrs In
luiuus, MimiciNISt, SPICKS, PAINTS. OILS
GIiASS, DYF. STUFFS, Ac,
Nos.iMlnnd 311 North Third Street,
Philadelphia.
JJAUliX, ROYD & CO.,
iajm.iiis.sion MERCHANTS.
LEAF
nnd Wholesale Dealers In
AND MANUFACTURED T0I1ACCO,
SKOARS, Ac,
No.tllNoithThlrd htreet,
Philadelphia.
Consignors can forward their stoik "In Hand."
...ivjvi. piv-jK,j ma iou ujiiicu mates lax.
2STA11JSIIE1 17!3.
JORDAN A lillOTHKIt,
WHOLE-SALE: (IIloCEItS,
nnd Denlers In
SALTPETRE. AND IIIUMSTOSK.
Nu 31 Niu Ui Third HUtul,
1'hlladclphla,
jpLLER A HOST,
Successors to FninUlln P.Stltzer A Co.,
Importon and Wholesalo Dealers In
LIQUORS, WINIX, Ac,
Nos. OQnnd 112 North Third Street,
Philadelphia,
W, 11. ICOONS, Agent,
llloonisluiii;, IM.
"yilUM h, MADDOCK it CO.,
Dealers lu
FINE GROCEItlES,
No. 1IJ youth Third Street, opp. GiTO'd Hank.
I'luhulWphla.
JVSTARLISHED 1820.
JOHN REAKIRT A CO.,
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS,
nnd Denlers In
CHEMICALS, MEDICINES, PATENT MEDI
CINES, SPICES, PAINTS, OILS.
WINDOW GLASS,
VARNISHES, DYliS, Ac, Ac,
Southeast corner of Third nnd Callowhlll fits.,
1'hlladclphla.
JRMRRUSTER & BROTHER,
Impoiters nnd Jobbers of
HOSIERY, GLOVIX,
SHIRTS AND DRAWERS,
IIUTTONS, SUHPENDHItS,
HOOr SKIRTS, HANDKKRCHIFS,
THREADS, SEWINO SILKS,
TRIMMINGS, PORTE M0NNAIES,
HOArS, PERFUMERY, FANCY GOODS, AND
NOTIONS GENERALLY,
Also Manufacturers of
ItltUSHIiS AND LOOKING GLASSES
nml Drtilers In
WOOD AND WILLOW WARE,
BROOMS, ROPES, TWINJX, ju
No. 300 North Third Htreet, nbovo Vine,'
I'hllndelphln.
QOTTRELL it AYRES, "
Wholewdo Dealers !
FISH,;HEIK,Ar,c.,
No. 100 Nut m Wharves,
weond door nbovo Arch Street,
1'hlladclphla.
"DAHCROFT ,
it CO..
Importm nml Job&rs of
STAl'LE AND FANCY PRY GOODS, CLOTIISV.
ii'.itl'Js BLANKETS, LINES.
WHITF. OOODS, HOSIERY. Ac
Nos, 1U3 nnd 107 Mnrket Street,
Above Fourth, north Hide,
1'hlladelphla,
J-J W. RANK'S
v. JIOI.KSALKT011ACCO, SNUFF, AND
CIGAR WAREHOUSE.
No. Ikl North Third Shuet,
l,t'tw.','''.clli'--nMiina.o(.,(westi,ld(!,
PldlltflqlpJdn,
JOSEPH S. DELL,
.luimifactu rer of, m WUplf wl0 Denier In
CLOTHING, CI.()THS, CAIJIEUKS, AND,
VESjTI.NCK)
No,Noith,lhlidlRJr,epl,
I'lillndclphU.

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