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The Columbian. [volume] (Bloomsburg, Pa.) 1866-1910, June 23, 1882, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83032011/1882-06-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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dolunH5ai.
tMt0MB,ADYuSrconnio7da"tcS.rT
ImiipiI HVHdy, every Friday atornliid, nt
BLOOMSBURCl, C0M7MIIIA CO , Pa.,
ATTWODOtXAM per year. To subscribers out ot
ft. B
ir-No pnncr discontinued excent ntthn am inn
("O'liomm, (till II (ill III 1 Ullllllft'l) HI
iblishcrs, until nlUrroarntfcfl aro paid, but
offices must bo paid forln advance, tmlfss n rtiion
Blblo person n OoImnblA oountr assumes to W
tho subscription tluo on (lemnha. ' A
l'OSTAon lis no longer exacted from subscriber
In f lin Miintv.
lyiowiiu . iiui luo nuuourio u sianipost
tfflPMDlliat hAMAlrl fnrlnm Uakm ....... Z.?7l
JOB PlilN'JMNG.
TlicJobblnff Department ottlioCor.nnBUN Is rcrr
J?,?ip.lcm: n?i'.SV ? .JoP VTinl,n will compare favor
WVl il'l10'. lolirK0 cities. All work dono on
short notice, neatly ana at moderate prices.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
T 13. WALLEH,
' ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Office In 1st National Hank batldlnr, second floor,'
iiio.uuvi wiiiuiiKiiu vuruur ui mam unu jwar-
k siruuu, itioumsuurif, 'a.
TT U. FUNIC,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
IltoovisBuaa, Ti.
Office In Int's Building.
q n. & W. J. IWCKALFAV,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
III.O0M8BC11O, PA.
Offico on Main Street, 1st door below Court House.
JOmpfrOMllK,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
1 IlMKMISBtJItfl, 1'A,'
omce over Schuyler's Hardware Storo.
p W.jMILI.Eu y , ';
ATTOItNEY-AT-LAW
Ofllco Injllrowcr'sbulldlng.setondlloorlrodm No.l
j Bloomaburtr, Pa,
B.
FftANK ZARR,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Bloomsburg, Pa.
omco corner of Centre- ana Main Streets. Clark's
' v
Uutldlnff.
can bo consulted In German.
EO.'K. ELWELIi,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
NEvicoi.cMBiiK.I)PiLPiNa, Bloomsburtr, Pa,
Member of the Unhid States Law Association,
collections made In any part of America or Eu
rope. '
pAUIj E. WHIT, ' '
Attorney-at: Law, "; ,
ODIco In doi.DUBUN Bmtnmo, itoom No', 2, second
tloor.
BLOOMSBURG, JPA. r ;j ;
QUY UACOnY,
ULOOMSBUllO,
OfllcolnH.J. Clark'3 Bulldlnif, second floor, first
dootWjhQfoft.T J ;i Ml
Oct, s, 10.
JOHN C. YOCTJM, , t
Attorney-at-Lawi
CATAW'tSSA. PA.
Offico In building formerly occupied by II. J. licc
dcr. Member of tho American Attorneys' Associa
tion. Collections mado In any part of America.
Jan. s, 1832.
A K. OSWALD, " .. -
" ' ATTORNEY-AT-LAW; i
Jackson 'Buildihg,,.Rooms 4,nnd 0. .
Mayo, ".'- -fj'ixV 'BEIl'WICK.PA.
W" II. IUIAWN,
" ATTORNE Y-AT-L AAV.
Catawlssa, Pa.
Office, corner of Third and Main streets.- )t'
S. SK0RB, ' ' 1 B.'WINJ'SKSTEliN.
Notary Public
KNORR & AVINTERSTEEN,
A ttornoys-at-Law.
Offico In 1st National Bank building, Bccond lloor,
first door to tho left. Corner et Main and Market
streets Bloomsburu, TS.'
SSfPeniions and Rounties Collected.
J" II. MAIZE,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
AMD
JUSTICE OP THE PEACE.
Offico In Mrs. Ent's Building, third door from
Main street. May w, mi,
M. L. EYERLY,
ATTORNKY-AT-LAW,
Catawlssa, Pa.
o..cctlons promptly mado ana remitted.
Office opposlto Catawlssa Deposit Bank. m-sa
A
L. FRITZ, Atlorney-at-Law. Office
, in Colcudian Building, Juno S4, '31.
T BUCKINGHAM, Atlorney-at-Law.
Jfti.onico, Brockway's Building '1st floor,
BToomsburg, Pcnn'a. may T, 'SO-t f
t4. BARK LEY, Attorney-at-Law.
. Offico lu llrower'a bulldlntr. snrt storv.liooms
4S0 ....
JB. McKELVY, M. D.,8urReon and Phy-
slclan, north sldo Main strcet.below Market.
TQR. J. 0. BUTTER,
PHYSICIAN &8D110EON,
Otuco, Ntrtli Market street,
' Bloom'sburg, Pa.
DR. WM. M. REHER, SurRoon anil
Physician. Offico corner of Hock and Market
struct.
T It. EVANS, M. D., Surgeon anil
U . Physician, (Office and Itcsldcnco on Third
street.
MISCELLANEOUS,
Q M. DRINKER, GUN & LOCKSMITH
Sowing Machines ana Machinery of all kinds ro
ptlred. OriKA Uoi'sx Building, liloomsburg, Pa.
AVID LOWENBERG. McrrJimt Tailor
Main St., above central Hotel.
"y II. HOUSE,
DENTIST,
Rf.ooMsiiuitii, Columbia CAunty, Pa.
All styles of work done In a superior manner, work
warranted as represented. Tkktu Kitiuct
kd without Pain by the use of Gas, ana
free of charge w hon artificial teeth '
uro Inserted,
onico over liloomsburg Banking Company,
lo be open at all fwurt during the day.
Not, ts-ly
EXCHANGE HOTEL,
W. R. TUBBS, PROPRIETOR
BLOOHSEUItQ, FA,
OPPOSITE COUIIT HOUSE.
Large and convenient sample rooms. Bathrooms
hot and cold water.and all modern conveniences
rR. I. L. 11 ABB,
PRAOTIOA'L DENTIST,
Main Street, opposlto Episcopal Church,
Blooms ourg, Pa,
ir Teeth oitractod without pain
. Oct. 1. W8.
JAMES REILLY,
Tonsovlal Artist.
Isairalnat his old stand under EXCHANOE
HofEUand has as usual a FIItsT.CLASS
BAHBEUSIIOP. Ho respcottully solicits the
patronage of hlsoldcustomersand of the publlo
Bouerauy, jaiyn.'so-u
fAiNwiuan'r a co
WHOLESALE GROCERS,
Philadelphia.
teas, bvuul's, coffee, su0a11, molassls,
iici, sricis, BiciiiB foci, ic, ic,
N. E. Corser;sicond and Arch streets.
lv Orders will receive prompt attention
O.E.ELWELTj,
J.K BITTENBENDEIt, J "'P"''0"'
SPRING AND SUMMER OLOTHINO.
-)o(-
A. J. EVANS,
The uptown Olothfer, has Just received a flno lino
of New aoodVand Is prepared to make up
SPRlNfe AMID SUMMER SUITS
Pot Men and Boy In tho neatest manner and La
test styles.
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS,
' Hatsi Gaps. &o,
A!RX?!P.n btLa- Call and Examine. EVANS
BUJCK Corner Mala and Iron streets,
B00MBB17RO, pa.
PliUIVIBIIMCr,
CJ-AS PITTIMG,
STOVES AND TINWARE.
,:o:
Has purchased tho Stock and Business of I.. Ha
gcnbuch.and Is now prepared to rtoallkmds of
work In bis line. I'httnhlnir And flan trntintr &
specialty. Tinware, Stoves,
In a great variety. All work done by
EXPERIENCED HANDS.
Main Street corner of East.
ULOO.MSIIUKG, PA.
N. S. TINGL.EY.
Announces to tho public that ho ts prepared to
do all kinds of
Custom Tailoring.
promptly and at. reasonablo prices. Now ts tho
season for a
NEW SPUING SUIT
And Tlngley's the piaco to get a proper fit.
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
shop ird floor Columbian Building, 'Main street.
BLO.OMSBUIieiPA.
M. C. SLOAN i& M;
BLOOJISHURGJvPA.
(T Manufacturers of
CAR
RRIAGES,
BUGGIES, PHAETONS,
SLEIGHS, PLATFORM WAGONS, &C.
i ' V ' ' i fi t'
Flrst-clos3 work always on hand. .' ' .
REPAIRING KKA TLYl)Ok
Prices reduced to snWthe timei.
"W. EC. CAETEB.
. '
CONTRACTOR & BUILDER,
DRAWINGS
. :
SPOIliCATJlp,FpU BUILDINGS,
ruRWiaHHP.
Jobbing of all kinds promptly attended to
All 5voik warranted to givo
Batisfaction.-
feb'sd 'si-urn
AND
PAPER HANGING,
WM. F- BODINEi
IUON ST., BELOW SKCOND, BLO0MH1IUU0, Pa.
is prepareu o uu oil kiuus L . .
K0VSX3 FAZKXXfO
Plain and Ornamental
PAPER HANGING,
BOTH DECOKATIVE AND PLAIN.
All It I ml N ol'FiiriiKuro nutnlrcd
ami iiiutlc ns good aw now.
NONE BUT FIRST-CLASS WORKMEN KMPr
LOVED.
Bstimatos IVIado on all Work.
WM. F.B0D1NE. .
BLQOMSBURG PLANING MILL
:o.
Tho undsrslirnnd lnvlnir nut his 1'lanlnz Mill
on Ilallroad htreet, In ilrst-eiasa condition, is pro
pared to do all kinds of work In uu line.
FRAMES, SASH, DOORS,
BLINDS, MOULDINGS,
FLOORING, Etc.
furnished at reasonable nrtcea. All lumber used
li well seosoued and nono out skilled workman
aro employed,.
ESTIMATES FOE BUILDINGS
furnished on application. Plans and speclflca-
uons prepared oy an expenenceu aruugumuiau ,
CHAIU.ES KRIJO,
lllOOlllHblll 1'U.
Bt F. SHABPLESS,
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
NEAE L.i; B. DEPOT, BLOOUSBUEO, PA.
Manufacturer of Plows, Stores and all kinds of
Casilucs. Largo btocV1 of Tlnwaro, Cook Moves,
ltoom Moves, Moves for hoallui? btori'S.school
houses, churches, tc. Alo, Urge stock of ro
palrs for city Btovcs of all kluds.w holesulo and i el all
.such as Fire Brick, Urates, Llas.f eutres, Ac.stovo
Plpu, Cook Hollers, pldeis, Cake Plaits, Largo
Iron Kettles, Bled Solos, Wagon Hoses, all kinds
of Plow Points, Mould lioaidh, Bolts, Plaster, Salt,
' r-J'UAA i MAiMUUi, A-C.
-g Y. HAIIT.MAN
nciAMbnta tun. iuuwiui ,
AMKHICAN INSUltANCH COJU'ANIKS t
Lycoming of Muncy Ponnylraula.
North American of Philadelphia, Pa.
rrankiin oi
PeimsMvanla of i "
Farmers of York, Pa.
Hanover of New Yoik.
Manhattan of New York.
unice on -Market mivui, no, o, ihuuiuouuh;.
oct. im, m.ly
1
AtiHN'UY. Mover's new building. Main
ireet, Bloomsburg, Pa.
T Assets.
Mtna Insurance Co., of Hartford, Conu, f T.ois.SM
Iloyal of Liverpool , is.goo.ooo
tancasuiro lu,u.,w
l'lro Association. Philadelphia 4.1(15.1 IT
PboJiilx, of London M'H,
lxinaon s i.nucasuire, oi i.ugiuuu.. . i,iu,iv
Hartford of Hartford s.m.OM
Springheld Flro and Marino 8,os'4,sU
As tho aicacies are direct, policies aro written
for the insured without any delay in tho
ouice at Bloomsburg. oct. M, 'sutf.
IKK INSURANCE.
CIIllISTIAN V, KNAPP, BLOOMSBUUQ, PA.
BUITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY,
HERMAN FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY.
NATIONAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY.
UNION INSURANCE COMPANY.
Thce old couroBATiOKs aro well seasoned by
agoandi'iuxiKSTSDand have never yet had a
loss settled by any court of law. Their useu
aro all Invested in soup BKCvairusand are liable
to the harard of via only.
Losses rxoumr and iionistlt adjusted and
paid as soon us determined by Cukutun F,
UMirr. smut Ausmt ivv Aujcarua Ulookj.
BIIKH. Pi.
The people of Columbia oounty should patron
ize the agenoy wbero losses if any are settled
ana pam or ooa oi meir uwu uuiibub.
PIlOMllNUbS, KUU1TY, FAIR DL'ALINU,
lie
UMTpivs Notice.
Columbia county.
Ainoni tho records of .tho Court-'of Common
Plaas of Columbia county It Is,- Inter a'la, thus
contained!
In the mattir of tho pro.") ,. 'Anol now May lath,
ceeds arising from tho sale 1 188). on motion of E.
or the real estate of A. M fill little, J(. Bucking
Ilupert, J ham appointed
auditor to mako distribution of the prooeeds rh
Ing from tho salo of tho real ostato of A. .M. ltupcrt.
Bv THIS Court,
In pursuance of tho duties of his appointment
the undersigned will meet all parties lntcro-Md
In tho distribution of thenbOTofi'iidatbls omce
In liloomsburg, on Friday, tho 7th ;day of July, A'
D. 1682, at ten O'clock In tho forenoon, at wliloh
time and plaeo all persons having claims against
said fund muit appearand present the same, or
bo debarred fromcomln?ln on si Id fund.
It, BUCKINGHAM,
mvyi.4iv Auditor.
J. J.
CARPETS
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
J. W. RAEDER,
BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURER,
PAPERRULER
AND
GENERAL BOOK BINDER.
It LANK ROOKS OF ALL DESCRIP
T10NSMADE TO OR DEI!.
PERIODICALS ROUND IN ANY DE
SIRABLE STYLE
J. IV. Il.tEDUR,
110 & 112 W. MAEKET STBEET,
WILKES-EABRE, Pa.
HA. 111. V i
:.
h
9 o
o
0 r
H
Q
it I'djJ- t
C. 33. SAVAGE,
DUiLKK IN
EilvorvViro, Watehos, Jowolry, Clocks
All kinds of Wntches, cicktand Jewelry neat
ly repaired and warranted,
may wts-tf
BROWER
BLOOMSBURG, PA., FRIDAY, JUNE 23,
POETICAL.
THE TIME MAY BE.
IV JENNIS JOS 13 CONSlNOITiM.
Tlio time may come when t shall fmlo
From out Uiy life, a loaf decayed,
That drops from off tho lld-wood tree,
Nor leaves a trace tho eye may sec.
Whcro It had hung In summer's pride,
Ileforo it withered, drooped and died,
And whcro nnother budding spring
To tako Its pl.ito a leaf w 111 bring.
The tlmo may bo when I shall glldo
A noonday's shadow from thy side,
.lust llko the ones tho heavens cast
On stream, where lleoey cloudi havopati
Ono moment seen, and thon they arc sot
Their lender outlines all forgot i
And so thy memory, llko n dream,
May pass from of thy life's fair stream.
The tlmo may como when I shall pass
From out thy heart, as o'er this glass,
Before mo now, my hand or faco
I may withdraw, nor leave n trace,
To tell that onco I lingered there,
Where others como to smllo inoro fair,
To charm tho heart, that now to nc
Is moro than heaven o'er cm bo.
The time may In) when I shall go,
A melted flake of fallen snow
A morning's mist a meteor driven
Arros the vv Inter's midnight heaven
In darkness lost, vv here still may Rhino
Tho brighter star o'er paths of thino -That,
vyhen my eyes aro, closed In dust,
Will light again to tryst and trust.
Tho time may be when I shall fade
From out thy thoughts all things aro mado
The creatures of an hour and death
Tho end of all. Ah I vain tho breath
That pleads for aught to stay or savo
One human hope from out tho grave
W here I must go and be forgot
To sleep In some neglected suoL
SELECT STORY.
GOOD TOE NOTHING.
Crash went the bunuttful cut-glass
vase on the stonu slepc, and down nt
the (eet of thu culprit lay the crushed
roses amid the glittering ruin.
"Oh, Maud !'' cried a low, griuved
Voice.
A while robe, dainty and perfumed,
Unshed through the open door in angry
haste, and pained beside the gingham
drss of thu culprit.
"I knew it!" retorted a high-pitched
voice in calm despair. ''Eacli (lay sees
my opinion of you verified, Kathleen.
You are not to be trusted !''
"Surely, Maud, you do not think I
purposely broke your vase V asked tho
gill in gingham looking halt-proudly
at tnc angry lace ot her elegantly-clad
companion.
iUainl bevcin sluuggetl lierslioulilers
shu had learned how from her French
master; and with her head on ono side,
the action gave her quite a foreign air,
she thought.
"What matters it whether you dill it
purposely or not 1" fcho retorted con
temptuously. "Those great, awkward
hands ot yours are torever doing mis-
ni'f they ate truly good for nothing!
Kalhlceii looked down at her brown
hands, and smiled sadly.
"True," shu said, as aim bent down
and gathered up the lovely rosei, that
seemed to cling trndcily to the lithe,
brown lingers "true, good for nothing
as things count in your world, Maud ;
but we aro not at the rmt ot timu vet,
and my record mav read differently,
then."
"What nonsense ! You will never bo
ladylike or graceful, m do your best
with your own virtues! cried iUaiul,
angrily, as tho proud, quiet manner of
the other betravid a natural dignitv
she could not imitate. "Put the loses
n another vase, and clear awav that
iibbish."
Kathleen was lookinj; at the broken
glass with n glad relief in her face.
"1 can mt'iid tins, Uoiism Jlauil, she
quietly said ; "and it can bo used with
safety."
"It will take gentler lingers than
yours, laughed .Maud, coolly, "lint do
as you mease. Unly, Kathleen' siio
paused at the door, looking back over
icr shoulder "you neeiln t thuiK it
worth wlnlo to appear to night. Mam
ma think three unmarried daughters
snllicient to enteitain the guests with
out"
"A noitionless niece of her dead hus
band's'' quietly interrupted tho young
girl, with a far-away smile. "I under
stand, Maud. Don't think I shall regret
it. I do not like good for nothings
any moro than you do.
Maud slumped her loot angrily.
"At least the new doctor is good for
something !" she cried, eagerly, betray
ing her own tactics lor the evening.
"an he should oe, to till the position
lie assumes. 1 trust he has more ambi
tion than vanity, or the poor of Ciilford
will suiter.'
Kathleen carried the vase within
doors, and though she was quick at
rc):.rtee, there were lu.us nono tho less
in her gray eyes, and a wistful pain in
her heart.
Hut hhc quickly completed her task
of nriaiiging tho table anil llovveni, be
sides nu nierons little touches ol fruits
and ices, without which tho effect
would have been marred, if lift to the
one clumsy servant, or the indolent
daughters of the house.
When nil was done, shu felt fieo to
seek her own pleasure on that lovely
In mi evening. And a strange, pleasure
it was for one so young!
She took down a broad brimmed hat
from ils familiar liaiigiug-plaoo behind
thu kitchen door it was needed too
often in her dally duties-. to rest idly
beside her cousins'" on id hall rack
nud in her simple gingham dress, with
its neat, white collar, hast"iied quickly
through thu back gaiden out on to (he
highway, and took tho road lo the vil
lage. "Tho now doctor I" sho pondered.
"And how ho has disappointed me. I
did hope that a clever, earnest physi.
ci fin would come to Gilford, and help
tho poor folks, and instead wo havu a
fashionable, gay young man, who fro
quenls lawn parties nnd flirts with silly
girls. Oh, if 1 who only a man,"
Kathleen was mossing n muddy
patch in thu road ns sho arrived at this
wish, and making a quick spring to the
dry sldo of tho load, tiiriud her nuklu
with a sickening pain and fell prostrnlo
upon the grassy bank,
"Oh, dear! Maud is right, after all,"
sho moaned, m despair, half comical
and yet painful withal, "Two miles
from thu village or home, on a by luno
. t r .
very iew iieqiit nt, nud unauio to iuovo
with a sprained ankle,
And after summing up her position
Kathleen Hist laughed, then cited.
"Poor old granny!" sho sobbed,
"Shu will think I havo deserted her.
and sho is so poor and ill, with no ono
to care for her but mo, nnd now I can
not go to her."
"Perhaps I can help yon," said a
pleasant voico from tho bank above
her.
"I don't know " sho began dubious-
"Well, there's nothing liko trying,"
laughed tho man on tho bank, nnd
down ho catuo with a flying leap to her
side. "What is it! Ilroko anything,
ch 7"
Kathleen had to laugh, ho was bo
pleasant and breezy.
"Oh' no i only twisted my ankle,"
sho said, shyly.
"Only! Humph! You aro used to
making light of great matters, I seo."
And to Kathleen's horror down ho
dropped on his knees, nnd coolly took
possession of her foot.
"So much for wearing a low shoe,"
he said, half angrily, as ho looked at
the active little foot, clad in an Oxford
tie, and then deftly untied it and drew
it off.
Kathleen grow indignant and red.
"You need not trouble yourself M
sho began.
"He still! I am a doctor, young lady,
and know what sprains mean," he
coolly retorted, moving tho foot so
gently, though her lips quivered with
tho pain.
A doctor! Kathleen looked full at
him in astonishment. Not tho now
doctor, surely!
"You arc going to spoil two engage
ments for mo this evening, with this
foot, young lady, so you must repay
mo with obedience. At ono place,
music, laughter and bright smiles await
me, to welcome mo to my now home ;
and the other, a poor old woman is
waiting to thank mo for looking up my
poor, the first thing after I take posses
sion of my practice."
His frauk eyes met the conscious
gray ones looking so eagerly at him.
"You speak of my homo and my
poor old Woman 1" she cried out, glad
ly. "Oh, I am so rejoiced you aro good
for something!"
IIo laughed heartily.
"Which you doubted. And so you
were going to seo the old woman when
this happened f Then you are
"Kathleen Severn," said thu
fjiri,
quietly.
"Doctor Odcar Ware, at your service,"
retorted the cheery voice, nud its owner
doffed his hat. "Now, Miss Kathleen,
I know all about you, for Granny Duff
is uarrulous, and as vou are used to
obedience I expect you to mind mo
now. My horse is at the blacksmith's
across the field, where I left him to bo
shod, while I came over hero to gather
wiui roses ior a sick lau in uio village,
and while I go aftor him, you must sit
still and wait for me."
Kathleen started, Would hu drivo
home.
"Oil, but you must not!" sho pro
tested, in terror.
"Very well. Then I'll leave you ait-
tiny in thu mud, waiting for a deliverer
moro to your taste," said the doctor,
coolly, rising from his knees.
Kathleen felt her eyes droop with
sudden pain.
"Thank you!1' she said gently, with
a sadness in her voice that mado him
look at her.
"I will accept your help since I must."
"I am used lo helping myself, hu: at
last I am useless.''
'I am glad to bo tho first tooffei'jou
holy in your weakness," said the frank
voice, gently and then away he sped
acioss tho field, leaving Kathleen dazed
with sudden ideas and emotions, yet
Inughiui; low and shyly.
In a slioit while tho doctor appeared
on the road, driving n light wagon be
hind a strong brown horse, which ho
drew up before the mud puddle, nnd
sprang down lightly beside the young
girl.
He raised her by her hand on to ono
foot i shu put tho other down carefully,
winced, turned pale, and. before she
knew what next would happen, she
was caught up in a stioug pair of arms
nud lifted high above the mud into thu
wagon.
"There!" said tho cheery voicv, as
the self-reliant young man took up the
reins. "Your foot is all right, Miss
Kathleen. It is only strained a little;
and by tho day after to-monow you
may try another jump.
Kathleen listened shyly; sho was
feeluift emotions so now and strange
that silence sei'ined to protect her from
herself, and tliinuuhuut the drive home
sho could only listen and rejoice at the
bravo natlue ol the new doctor.
Oneo only she spoke, to ask him to
drive in thu back gate and through the
bain yard, so that lier entrance might
not be seen from the house. Then, as
ho left her at the kitchen porch, and
gave her a little glass buttle, with the
direction lo apply it to her foot until
tlu pain ceased, shu raised her eyes and
said:
"I am glad you have come hero Doo
tor Y niv. ho many sad hearts need
you."
"Hut not bravo ones like yours i lie
isked, sharply.
"Even I," sho softly said, as she
tinned away.
Kathleen uruw moio cheerful as the
mouths went by, for her earnest, help-
lul nature lvioiced that there was now
another to caro for and assist thu poor
and sad hearted in the village,
A great pndu grew in her as she
heard her cousins condemn the new
doctor as loo deuiocraliu and hard
working to suit their idlo tastes: and
her eves nud lips grew biiuliter each
day as souiu new talu of his cheery
kindness came to her through village
gossiu,
Thov met but seldom, and then only
r i i.... ir...i
iv iew vvuiiis were niieriii ; nut iviiiu-li-en
felt tho need of oven those few
words, and knew thoy helped her.
Ono day n letter came. Sho was not
surprised , it seemed to her as if tho
timu must como when his nature would
claim hers, and alio was tremulous
with proud jov,
Ho spoko oi their first meeting.
"Of that task were enamored my fingers, I ween
For they llngeied full long u'ir tho fetteis of
thoen."
"Sko smiled me her thanks, and turned from the
spot
With a look In her cjcsl no ir forgot;
For It betmed to bay, In langUkgu too true,
'Thou'st fettered thy hcuil lu tho string of my
Bhool'"
"Good for sonicthinir nt last 1" said
Kathleen, softly, as ehu told her talu to
her aunt and cousins; and in the grtftt
light that beamed iroui tho grey eyes
they ftlt their Hellish natures shrink
ami giow pitifully small.
1882.
Old Mag. The Hag.
ONB OF A I.UIOK FAMILY OF BEMI
SAVAflUS IN SULLIVAN OOtlNTV,
NF.W YORK.
Threo hunters from
tho Western
Now York,
ust across tho
Delawaro river from
lero, report tho find ng of tho body of
a woman who has been missintr from
Z h?,T,it. ? r 8" i'1' .T y r 8GV;
oral months. I Icr death was a most
horrible tragic ono and a fitting end to
a strange hfc. Her name was Marga-
,M I Anl'ltl... ..1 . .. aim, I. .........
-UK -Ulllllll Ulill BIIU v its KIIUVVU
throughout the country ns "Old Mng,
the hug." Sho was one of a largo
family of half-savage people known its
the Do Groatses, tho llinkses, tho
Henions and the Conklings. This
family is said to number about three
hundred nnd fifty men, women and
children, than wfiom n moro degraded
lot of people it would bo hard to find
in the United Stntes. They dwell in
small caves and cabins in tho wooded
hills, of Sullivan county and on tho
semi-cultivated slopes of Orange coun
ty. Their living is made principally
by stealing, hunting and fishing with
nets in forbidden streams. Somo fow
of them aro expert weavers of willow
baskets, which they carry to tho near,
by towns nnd sell. These pariahs
frequently visited Pennsylvania with
loads of baskets, which they Eold to
the farmers and country merchants at
tho cross-roads stores. Tho cash pro-
tnni! ,l,"-su,. b T 7 "
turned infn wlnslrnv nnd f nlinn,r nwl I
1 r .1 I . :1 ,
... . " is J i 1
buu yuiiii-u nviu us uisamuiuu nun
loaiidoucd
to vice as tho men. Thov
also planned robberies and depreda
tions of all kinds, and every basket-
uni.,,. ....... : t. r..ti" .i i...
;. ?. i ,
Kill. Uliuu UU1119, UUIUlvUII-lJUUnS .1(111 1
upon barns, chicken-coons and
cellars. The people are familiar with
every inch of ground in the Delaware
Valley and thev can easily hide them
selves in tho mountains nnd raanaco
to escape tho officers of tho law.
The Conklings are of Indian de
scent the Seneca breed, thoy claim
and they bear all tho facial marks of
their ancestors, while, their habits
aro even more indecent and less cleanly
than those of their savaixe ancestors.
They inter-marry exclusively and no
divorco is necessary to separate man
and wife if either party desires such a
separation. The results of this defi
ance of tho laws of physiology aro
evident in the forms of their children.
Many of them aro idiots, somn aro
born without ears, some without limbs,
and there is one singular being, now
living, it is said, in a lonely hut near a
lnko on the western edco of Sullivan
county, that would bo moro of an ac
quisition to Itanium's show than "Jum
bo" was. This being has neither nose,
eyes nor cars, and only two teeth can
be toiuid in its head, while its feet aro
clubbed and its hands resemble the fins
of a big fish more than human mem
bers. Yet this singular creature lives
and seems to enioy life. A Monticello
hunter, David Iloyle, who often goes
to that part of tho county fishinir, has
seen this "what-is it" eat raw fish, raw
potatoes and even raw skunk meat
with evident relish. 1 ho mother of
this monstrosity is a woman six feet
seven incites hi height, and her litis-
nd is her own undo. Tho mother
as quite a decided moustache and
L-ard, whilo the father is but three
feet eight inches high, hair-lipped and
hunchback dwarf.
Till! liL'KKX 01' THE HANO.
Sui;h is the race or family to which
Old Mag, tho hag,'' belonged, and
among this tribe of savages she was
regarded as a sort of a ouecn and
treated with as much deference as
gypsies pay to their sovureign. tsho
was reputed to havo been the seventh
aughter ot a seventh daughter' and
was, in consequence, believed to be en
dowed with tho magic power of curing
in sorts ot diseases and bono iractures.
She was also a fortune teller of great
kill. Her nppenrauco was very sin
gular. Shu was nearly six feet nine
tidies in height, her skin was saffron
ellow, her hair long, coarso and black'
ns a raven s wing, and her chin was
covered with a beard at least threo
nclies in length. Sho adopted a reg
ular Indian costume nnd lived alone
n her small cabin on thu shoro of Bier
Pond, just on tho edge of tho great
cranberry marshes of Sullivan county.
tier house was constantly besieged bv
itv people from Now York and Phila
delphia, who were summering in
ullivuu nud who came to havu the
future revealed to them by this won-
erful fortune teller. She made lots of
uouey and knew how to savo it
Sho
never spent a cent, except for liquor,
and ono of her peculiarities was that
ho would never allow any human
being to sleep in her cabin, not even
one of her own kindred, and thoso of
the "tribe" who visited her always
went prepared to sleep out of doors.
I'liero was annually a gathering of tho
whole family and thesu convocations
wero the wildest oriies im:imimhl nnd
mnru than nun innmhnr nt tlu rrvi.nl
family has been missing after the long J1"1 pressing it iu a ball poised it carn
debauches in some lonely cabin or cave J"11)' 0VU1" lmi "0"th below. I
n tho rooks.
Old Mug" was last seen alive sev
erai moiiius ago, mid was then as
frisky as ever and as full of whiskey
as usual, uno or two weeks alter
that onu ol the llinkses remarked iu
tho county post oilieo near where Mag
lived, "Jiag nam 1 1 hum no more, an
I shiidii t wonder cf shu was dead.
One of the bystanders nfterwaiils made
a tup lo her cabin aud found it deserted
Un tho enithern Hour in oi;o corner of
the room lay a half bushel of walnuts
and chest mils, a smoked hum and a
string of red peppers, whilo near at
linnd hung the dead and decayed body
of a fox with tho skin still 'on. No
signs of old "Mag" weio to be found
nnywhero and search was mndo every
where, but without success.
01.1) MAIl's IIKATH.
Some time atterwaid the threo hunt
ers iirst reierrcn 10 wero chasing a
bear throiiirh a swnmn nl.nnt tvvn inilnj
irom tno 0111 cabin where ".Mag" lor-
mei- v iveil. Ono of the hnntuin slin.
lied on what he Htinnnei.d nf (Irst in lw.
a round stone, but which proved to bo
a human skull still covered with natch.
es of bloody skin nnd hair. At onco
11 wns surmised that, the skull u-nu fhm
of old "Mag." tho peculiar shane
01 ner neaii corresponding to tho
shape of the skull. They then set
to work to find tho remainder of tho
body, when suddenly their dog com
menced uarwuig nirioiisiy under a
chestnut treo 011 tho hillside. Hun
THK COLUMI1IAN, VOL. XVI, NO 25
COLUMDIA DBMOOItAT, VOL.Zt.Vlj SO Id
hing to the snot, thev discoveicd that
the dog had scented a partly-decayed
human body. It renuired but a brlof
examination to convince them that tho
remains of "Old Mae. tho hair." lav
beforo them. She had climbed the
treo to shako down some nuts, proba
bly. When near the top tho liml;
'. i HiI0 fti .lUmnw. nf H,!hv W.t
a , i i .r.. ......
ca,1hl l body as slio fell, and one
in.,f ..t:... v : ,i. ....... ..!...
through her body,
death must have
,
impaling her. Her
been instantaneous.
i uear or some other carnivorous
nniinal had gnawed nway her feet and
hands, which hung nearly to tho
ground, nnd it was undoubtedly a boar
that had torn her head from the body
. . . .
and carried it into tho swamp.
Among the Do Groatscs, llinkses
and Henions tho news soon spread, nnd
mey gathered in tun lorcu to attend
Mag's funeral and dispose of the body,
which had been conveyed to the cabin.
It was on it Saturday afternoon that
at least two hundred of these hnlf
savaco men and women assembled nt
old Mag's cabin and held a wako over
tho mangled body. They indulged in
drunkenness and wild omies for two
whole days, and finally, on the Mon
day following, at midnight, they de
parted, after having set lire to and
totally destroyed the cabin. What
became of tho old woman's body is
more than any one can tell, for it is
ono of tho customs of tho Conkl'intr
" "" '
tribe to leave no trace of the grave of
.. . . o ....
0,lu 01 lllt!11 members. J'iila. Tunes,
The Pension Swindle.
The following from a correspondent
of tho New lork Sim serves to show
., . , .,,
wiiai enormous sums uio pension bins
Aro reaching
lho amount proposed to bo appro
iriatcd for pensions in tho ponding bill
is siuu.uuu.uuiJ. Tins will mako a
grand total in four years of $310,2.59,
UUU,
Under the representation that it
would coBt $20,000,000, Congress
passed tho arrears act. To show how
traudulcnt were the representations, it
is only necessary to snv that tho act
will cost tho country, hrst and last,
S750.000.000. Of this sum by far thu
larger part will bo a dishonest pay
ment. Tho swindle is going on and
growing. The pension system is a
stupendous swindle, systenuzed and
worked with perfect thoroughness.
In 1879 tho sum was 833,121,000.
which has grown with exact regulari
ty till it has reached $100,000,000.
what it will yet como to bo there is no
telling, only that so long as the present
policy lasts it will continue to grow,
notwithstanding tho vague promises
that alter a whilo there will be a dun
inution
It is at this point that the Treasury
is unguarded, and no one seems moved
with a resolute determination to guard
it. To oppose pensioning tho soldier
is to commit the unpardonable sin.
lint it is not to pension the soldier tho
money is paid for. It largely goes to
thoso whom it was never intended
should be paid pensions. Tens of
thousands of persons all over the conn
try aio drawing pensions obtained on
essentially fraudulent grounds. Go
almost where you will, sound, able-
bodied men arc regularly drawing
pensions tho legitimate result ot the
system tinner winch mu uumiics is
conducted. A very considerable part
oi the vast amount annually appropri
sued must be sheer iraiul besides
largo amounts to those who aro not
justly entitled to it unless it be said
that whoever served in the war should
have a pension. Bad as the principle
:.. i.!..t. - .i.... .
is uu vviiiuii uic appropriations arc
mane, it is vastly worse to havo u
aggravated by incompetency, or worse,
iu tho execution. The late Couintiss-
ioner llentlv maintained that a large
part of thu pensions allowed were
triudulpilt. The frightful increase of
itself suggests such a probability. No
real attempt is proposed to be mado to
remedy tho frightful evil. Thu idea
seems to bo that "lho boys" aro en
lined to navo a cnanco at the over
flowing treasury, and the Commission
er appears to bo disposed to nitertero
as little as possible with them. The
sentiment of generosity toward tho
soldier has been and is still being gross
ly abused.
What made a Minister Laugh,
"Well, brethren," said a Maine min
ister to some of his fellow evangelists.
"1 ,inve'" W:1S guilty of laughing in the
pulptt bit once. Some veats ago I
kail in my congregation nu old "nrm
who universally went to sleep in
church and snoied very loudly through
out lho entire sorvice. Ono Sabbath
morning, glancing in his direction I
saw him as usual, with his head back
L'"J,jying a nap, aud right above him in
llu &ry a young man was rolling a
''""S" '1"'"' of tobacco around in his
mouth. As I looked ho took it out.
became so interested in tho proceeding
that I forgot to continue the sermon.
but. stood watching the young man.
With a wicked smile ho took careful
aim and dropped it squarely into the
oiii mairs mouth, with a gold In li
tho sleeper utarted up and with a face
red as a beet rushed from tho house.
1 ho people no doubt were horrified.
. J . . .
but 1 could not have kept from laugh
ing if a sword had hung over my hea I
to tall, the old man did not come
back for several Sabbaths, and when
10 did he changed his sent ami remain
ed wide awake."
Ono of the latest wonders of tho day
is boxed lightning, always ready for
use, from rocking a cradle to riinnin
a train 01 cars, it is eaued me i-auro
Electric Accumulator, It coiibists of
mates ot lead, perforated with small
holts, covered with red lead nnd sheets
of parohmeiit hud over the plates,
They aio then sowed up in cloth bags,
l""1-1" m"uuu a" vieuuio
generator, and slutted, so to speak
With lightning. A doi'.eil of those
l,m,e-i m' lml lllt0 n ,,ox IcM ban two
,ucl square, nun it is ready tor use,
11 w 0,V" necessary to connect tho
nines wiui wnes, nun tno eieeuieiiy
losses oil in a steady current as last as
wanted. Tho power can bo preserved
for any length of timo and any amount
of force can bo obtained. As there is
no wasto of material the plates can 1
used over and over indefinitely. What
are wo coming tot
1M
one Inch fa no
Two Inches ..... 3 00
Three Inches 4 00
Foar Inches IP"
Ouartff co'jmn.. 0 W
llalf column low
One column 80 oo
2M
400
BOD
too
800
1100
2i0
.111
(.100
BOO
700
003
1000
17 00
30 0")
M
t.lOO
800!
1100
is ro
iseo
men
M0J
lr
MOO
1100
180M
SWOO
25 00
MOO
loo or,
stent. nnvrtiM-menU must be paid for txrfore Insert"
vf.n.i-A.,..Aiurv.A.it rtfltrthip miAnerir. Iran-
ed mcptiI. wiiern nnrites have accounts.
. tegnl advertisements two do;w tw Inch for
mreo insertion, ami nv mui i .........
Insertions without refcrenco lo length.
ETCctilor'tAilmlnlslrator;s,andAii(lUnrtnptice8
threo dollars. Must bo paid for whenlnserted. ,
Transient or Ix-al notices, ten cents ft line, regu
lar advertlscimnta halt rales,
catds tho 'Ilustncss Directory" column, cms
dollar cor for each line.
Tho Tough BiU of Beef.
Thcro is an old saying to tho effect
thnl a French family will live on whatan
American family will throw away.
Whether or not this bo accurately true,
thcro is at least a foundation of truth
in it. Whilo there is a great deal of
good housekeeping in this country,
there is a great deal thnt is wasteful,"
and consequently unsatisfactory. It is
in tho matter of not getting tho full
worth of their money out of tho meats
they buy that many of our housekeepers
como short of their privileges. This
has much to do with lho present high
prices of meat, and especially ofb6i!f.'
An ox appears to havo considerable
meat on his bones. Hut if any body
unaccustomed to marketing will stand
near tho butcher for an hour or two ho
will be astonished to seo how few very
desirablo cuts there aro and what a
largo proportion there is of meat whicli
nobody wants, except at a great redtio-,
tion from regular prices. Tho chief
tronblo is thnt most people have not
learned how to cook tougher parts so'
as to mako them tender. In fact thcro
are many so-called cooks who have
hardly any other idea of cooking ment
than to subject it to a process of slow
tortute, which makes it tougher every
minute it is near tho lire. Persons who
thus cook in vain might as well buy
the tough parts as the tender ones.
Many of these pcoplu know as little
about marketing as they do of cook
ery. A professional cook lecturing recently
on the subjectof meat for the bousuhold
told her women bearers that thoy mado
a mistako in not using tho tougher
pieco of meat, as theso pieces when
rightly cooked contain moro nouiish
ment than thoso which aro more gen
erally in demand. Thcro isa little
secret in this connection which is not
generally known by Americans, or if
known is not as widely practiced as it
might be. Steam will do much which
broiling, toasting or oven boiling are '
poweilcss to do for meats. It penc- 1
trates tho fibre where nothing clso can'
tako effect and reduces to tenderness
pieces on which other mothods of cook- '
ing have little or no effect. Steam is ns
easily applied as hot water or fire.
There aro all manner of appliances for
steaming every description of food. "If
a housekeeper will learn to make dainty
aud appali.ing dishes out of theso bits
and parts of meat whicli aro despised
and thrown away it will have its effect
on the comfoits of home and on tho
price of meat as well. l'hlla Times.
A Dinner Excuse.
Apologies for poor dinners aro gen
erally out of place. Hut when a lady
has a forgetful husband, who, without"'
warning, brings homo a dozen guests to
sit down to a plain family dinner for
threo or four, it is not in human nature
to keep absolute silence. What to say,
and how to say it, forms the problem.
Mrs. Tucker, tho wife of Judge Tucker
of Williamsburgh, Ya., solved this
problem years ago. She was tho
daughter or niece (I am not certain
which) of Sir Peyton Skipwith, and
celebrated for her beauty, wit, easo and
grace of maimer. Her temper and tact
were put to tho proof ono court day,
when tho judge brought with him the
accustomed half-scoro or moro of law
yers, for whom not tho slightest prop
arntion had been make, thu judge hav
ing quite forgotten to remind his wife
that it was court day, and she, herself,
btrangu to tell, having over-looked the
fact. "
Thu dinner was served with elegance,
and Mis. T. made herself very charm
ing. Upon lising to leave the guests to
their wine, she said: "6011110111011, you
have dined to-day with Judge Tuoker ;
promise mo now that you will all dine
' to morrow with me."
This was all her apology, whereupon
iu gentlemen swore that such a wife
as beyond price. Tho judge then ox-
aiucd thu situation, and thu next day
lero was a noblo banquet.
Moral : Never worry a guest with
tologies.
A Dakota Yam.
"Yes, sir." resumed the Dakota man,
as a crowd of agriculturists scateil them
selves around a liltlo table; "yes, sir, '
e do things on rather a sizable scale.
I've seen a man on one of our big farms
tart out in tho spring and plough a
furrow until fall. Then ho turned
around and harvested back. Wo havo
somo big farms up there, gentlemen. A
trieiid ot inino owned 0110 on which ho
had a mortgage, aud tho moitg.igc wns
luo on ono end betoro they could get
it recorded on tho other. You seo it
was laid off in counties." Thero
was a murmur of astonishment, nnd tho
Dakotn uiaii continued : "I got a letter ,
from a man who lives iu my orchard,
aud it had been threo weeks getting to
tho dwelling house, although it had
travelled day and night." "Distances
are pretty wide up there, ain t they !
inquired one. "lleasonably, reasona
bly," replied the Dakota man. "Aud
the worst of it is it breaks up families
so. Two years ago I saw a whole
family prostrated with grief. Women
yelling, children howling and dogs
barking. Uuo ot my men bad his camp
truck pakcod 011 suven four-mulo teams,
and ho was around bidding every body
good-by." "Where was ho going ("
asked a Gravesend man. "lie was go.
ng hnlf-vvay across tho farm to feed
the pigs," replied the Dakota man.
"And did ho ever get bock to his fnni-
ly again " "It isn't timo for him yet,"
1!.. I .1. T . .1.
epiien tuu j-mkihu man.
NKAltl.Y A 5U11ACI.I:.
E. Asenilli Hall, Binghnmpton, N.
, writes: "I suffered for several
months with a dull pain through left
lung nnd shoulders. I lost my spirits,
npiietito and color, nud could with dif
ctilty keep up nil day. My mother
ociired some liurilock Blood Bitteis.
took them as directed, and havo felt
110 pain since liret week nftcr using
thein, and am now quite well," Price
Si, 00.
Gold fish inhabit tho Delaware, bulow 1
Eastern, in largo iiumbers,and are often :
taken in tho nets of hherinan. ' "
IIUIlATOII.llOOH.
E. Baloh, Eigin, 111., writes : "That
after trying a dozen of patent liniments,
without relief, for n rhoumntio nnd Miff
knee, 1 feel I havo "stiuck oil at laM,"
for after using thieobottels of Tho'nias'
Eclcctric Oil, 1 am prepared to say it
is the btst application I over used.

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