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The Columbian. [volume] (Bloomsburg, Pa.) 1866-1910, September 29, 1898, Image 7

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FAMOUS LEES OF OLDEN TIMES.
T1 First of the Family to Come to
Amor let*.
When Longfellow wrote "a thing
for floutß and sneers and Jeerv Is an
American aristocracy" he could not
have meant it in a literal sense. There
are many families in the United States
who can show as illustrious a descent,
and whose achievements in peace or
war would favorably compare with the
renowned families of older nations
were our institutions strained in order
to nurture titles or kindred personal
distinctions. Nor could the poet
have intended that it was a bad or un
becoming thing to have come of good
stock, or to have had famous forefath
ers. As we hope that our own deeds
•hall be sweet and inspiring in other
ages, so we are all In duty bound to
revere the memories of those who have
gone before us. . Burke who uttered
so many wise aphorisms has truly said
on this subject: "he will never look for
ward to posterity who never looks
backward to his ancestors; and their
deeds whether good or evil can never
he a matter of indifference In the life
of a nation."
And amongst those prominent fam
ilies who have enriched the history of
the United States, and whoso records
can never be a subject of indifference
to our people is that of the Lees of
Virginia. The family of Lee is prob
ably among the most distinguished in
martial deeds as well as in point of
antiquity. And as Illustrious public
services will always rate higher than
mere uneventful pedigrees, however
long descended may be the line or
numerous the quarterings, let us see
how the Lees of Virginia measure up
in this Important respect.
The first to whom there is mention
was the Richard Lee of Colonial times,
who was Secretary of State for Vir
ginia. He's said to have been six feet
high with a handsome face denoting
•pirit and enterprise, and which ap
pear to be characteristics that have Im
pressed themselves upon all his de
scendants. In the time of King
Charles he received large grants of
land of Virginia where he died in 16(13
i
or.s\ 'robf.rt k. i-tce.
His son. Major Richard Lee, was sent
to Oxford University, and when he re
turned was appointed Naval Officer for
the Potomac River being succeeded in
that capacity by his son. He was
spoken of by the English Governor as
a "loyal discreet person and a gentle
man of as fair character as any in the
country," the succession of the son
being a mark of esteem for the father.
This son, Thomas, accordingly be
came president of the King's Council
and Commander-in-Chief of the Col
ony and gilayed a rather important
part in the early annals of Virginia.
He negotiated a treaty with the "Six
Nations" or Indians which so advanced
the King's interests that the Queen
Caroline sent him a present of |BO,OOO
on the occasion of the burning of the
family mansion at Stratford. This
was a mark of uncommon esteem, ahd
when Sir William Gooch, the Governor
of Virginia, died, he was appointed the
flrst American Governor of his native
state. He left six sons, whom John
Adams alluded to as "that band of
brothers, intrepid and unchangeable."
They were the neighbors and ths
earliest advisers of Washington whose
home was only one mile distant. When
the famous Westmoreland declaration
sgglnst the Stamp Act was drawn up
the official connections of the Lee fam
ily was severed with England. Four
of these six brothers signed their
sames to the Westmoreland declara
tion and two, Richard Henry Lee and
Francis Llgbtfcot Lee, also signed the
Declaration of Independence. Indeed
this Richard Henry Lee ha 3 a most in
timate connection with the Revolution.
Like others of his family be was sent
to school to England and was eo pain
fully reminded by the sons of England
aristocrats of the Inferiority of tbo col
onists to themselves that he returned
from England a pronounced Republi
can and henceforth resolved to make
his country free. It was he who drew
ap in the Continental Congress the
famous stirring resolution "that these
united colonies are and of right ought
to he free and independent states, that
all political connection between them
and Great Britain is and ought to be
totally absolved." One of his sons
was Washington's Attorney General
and the other was the famous dashing
"Light Horse Harry" Lee. He raised
the Independent corps of light cavalry
which he commanded and which under
the name of "Lee's Legion" became
proverbial for the dash and bravery of
tU men in the Revolutionary War. In
1779 at the head of three hundred men
lie captured the British fort at Jersey
City taking one hundred and sixty
prisoners for which Congress also pub
licly thanked him, and also presented
bltn with a medal and a commission
In the army.
"Light Horse Harry" was renowned
In war but it may not be generally
kpown that he was no less renowned in
.peace and was the author of the phrase
nsed by Washington: "First in war.
flrst In peace and first In the hearts of
his countrymen." which occurs in ths
resolution he moved in Congress in
1799 when Washington died. Colonel
Lee married nls cousin Matilda Lee
and succeeded to the family seat at
Stratford, where, in 1807, General Rob
ert Lee was born.
Another brother of "Light Horse
Harry's" had been sent to school at
Eton. He wrote an anonymous ap
peal to the English nation to deal just
ly and intelligently by the American
Colonies and though the authorship
was never suspected by his fellow stu
dents at the famous English school,
the document was so able a presen
tation of the American case that it
was said to be the production of Lord
Chatham or of Edmund Burke, both
of whom were staunch friends of
America, when to be a friend of the
Colonies meant ostracism from the
drawing rooms of London.
The latest member of this prominent
American family, and beside whose
virtues and historic achievements
those of a Howard or of a Prince of
Conde or if a Flatten of Germany
would be honored by a comparison, is
General Fltzhugh Lee, who has just
been voted the thanks of a Congress
for patriotic services to his country at
Havana.
THE NAMING OF AMERICA.
A Short Sketch of the Mnn From Whom
America Was Named.
The celebration of the four hun
dredth anniversary of the naming of
America will probably bring once more
into notice the claims of Columbus and
of Amerigo Vespucci to the honor of
discovery. At tne ume or the Colum
bian Exposition the controversy a3 to
whether Columbus or Amerigo Ves
pucci was the original navigator raged
in Eeveral learned geographical socie
ties in Europe, while these rival claims
of both were disputed in toto by the
partisans of a third claimant, and a
still earlier voyager named St. Bren
dan. As between the friends of Co
lumbus and of Vespucci honors appeal
to be even. The former is embalmed
in history as the real voyager, while
those of the latter claim that his name
is associated for all time with his
deeds in the very name of the country
itself. The fortune of the name ol
America is not a little singular as an
Instance of the fitness and the power
of a name notwithstanding what thi
poet insinuated to the contrary.
The name of "American" has too be
come the symbol of an originality and
prowess to which not even the majestic
word "Roman" could aspire In its
grandest and most triumphant period.
Great oaks from little acorns grew,
and it is worth knowing that the name
Amerigo was first borne by a poor
Italian whom his biographers dignify
by coupling his birth with the era oi
Lorenzo the Magnificent; that this
name was afterwards given to a single
province of the New World, next
spread over the whole southern conti
nent, then passed to the Northern,
later on became the distinguishing ap
pellation of the whole vast continent
and so grew and expanded until tht
word "American" has some to be uni
versally accepted as the antithesis oi.
everything that related to the tradi
tions of the crowns and courts and
chain of circumstances!
Amerigo Vespucci was born at Flor
ence, March 9, 1451, and in youth was a
studious young man, working out prob
lems of a philosophical character. H*
therefore early attracted attention
even from princes and nobles, and at
the age of 40 years was Induced tfl
settle in Seville.
In his capacity as an officer of thi
city, Vespucci had to draw up a state
ment of the expeditions of Columbus
and was requested by the King of Por
tugal to set out and discover a routs
to the "land of spices" as India was
then called, further south than Brazil.
In his letter to Lorenzo de Medici and
to the Duke of Lorraine he gave an ac
count of these voyages and of the con
dition of the Western World in one ol
which it was said that the torrid zons
Is habitable and Inhabited.
The flrst city of the new world, lis
there also tells us consisted of forty
four bell shaped houses and was buili
on piles In the middle of a lake, the
dwellings being connected togethel
by drawbridges. Some of the inhabi
tants approached the galleons of Ves
pucci in canoes formed from the hoi
low trunk of a tree and after gazing ai
Vespucci and his sailors the native!
paddled hack to their insulated city
with great precipitation. They Boon re
turned, however, bringing with them
sixteen young women and showed a
disposition to get aboard the ships, a
fact which in our fln-de-siecle way ol
looking at matters, would Indicate thai
those on the mainland had met sailors
before, or had at least understood
their habits. Vespucci then sailed eighty
leagues farther along the coast, land
ing occasionally, and at last entering
a sheltered haven, where he was re
ceived with hospitality and he and his
crew spent nine days all having in the
language of our day "a high old time.'
The country seemed quite populous ant,
great multitudes assembled to admire
the dress and complexions of the Eu
ropeans whom th"y entertained as If
they were beings of a superior race.
In short there Is rtuch ground for be
lief that Vespucci was the discoverer of
the mainland while the cjedlt of first
seeing the Islands of the W®t Indies
probably belonged to Columbus.
The relative claims to the distinction
of flrst discovering the west has caubad
a bitter contest over the character and
exploits of Vespucci, who the haughty
admirers of Columbus claim was only
a beef contractor in Castille, and a
master pilot instead of a navigator.
We are much obliged to Vespucci for
giving the early inhabitants of this
country sc good a reputation in his an
nals and while we are the heirs of his
name there is also on our part a sir.-ug
temptation to keep his memory greet,
in spite of the efforts cf his detractor,
to wither or efface it.
THE COLUMBIAN. BLOOMSBURG, PA.
Battles and
Diseases.
This is the story of one who participated in many
naval and infantry engagements during the war.
From wounds received then he suffered for years, but
to-day, rejoices in renewed strength.
There ii a distinctly peculiar halo that
Invests the being of an old soldier in the
•yes of the present generation. The sight
Of him arousesafeeling of admiration for nb
brave deeds and heroic achievements.
Among those who bravely fought was
Dr. L. J. Clark, who, when but a beardless
boy, heard the tocsin of war sounded.
It fired his patriotic spirit to a fervency
that found relaxation only in his realization
of fighting in the battles.
To the call of President Lincoln for troops
in the latter part of '6l, young Clark
promptly responded.
There was need of men in the navy, and
be joined that service in the mortar fleet
oi Admiral Porter, which soon after began
operations so the Mississippi River.
At the terrific bombardment of the
Vlcksburg forts, the hero of this story fell
on the deck of the Juliette with a shattered
arm from a charge of schrapnel.
He lay in the hospital for months, and
when he had recovered sufficiently to be
moved, was sent to his home at Warren, O.
Though partly incapacitated for active
service, his patriotic zeal got the better of
him, and when the call for more troops
came, young Clark enlisted in a company
formed by Capt. Joel I. Asper, at Warren.
It became Co. H.of the 7th Ohio Volun
teers and was sent to the Army of the Poto
mac under General Grant then campaigning
in Virginia against General Robert E. Lee.
In a skirmish near Richmond, he was
wounded again and was sent to the hos
pital. He remained there for some time,
General Wheeler,
The military man who, next to Col
onel Roosevelt, has been fortunate in
the reputation he has made out of the
war seems to be General Wheeler.
He has filled conspicious places both
at Santiago, when General Shafter
was sick, and more lately at Camp
Wickoff. Being an older man than
Colonel Roosevelt, and not put to
gether with the same quality of rivets,
he had the bad luck, which Roosevelt
escaped, to catch the fever inoppor
tunely at Santiago. Every one knows
how resolutely he minimized that dis
advantage. All that we heard of him
in Cuba, and all that we have heard
of his labors and reports and observa
tions at Camp Wickoff, have tended
to make folks think of him as a truly
valuable citizen, wise, active, efficient,
a very able soldier, and possessed of
an admirable spirit. Wherever we
hear of him, he is doing good. When
ever we hear from him, it is someth
ing worth attention. It is matter for
thankfulness that ho is a member of
Congress, and that when military and
other important measures come up
there next winter his voice will be
heard and will carry weight. The
sympathy of the whole country goes
out to him in the loss of hisson, Naval
Cadet Wheeler who was drowned
while bathing at Camp Wikoff.—
Harper's Weekly.
THE HEART MUST NOT BE TRIFL
ED WlTH.—Where there are symp
toms of heart weakness, there should
be Dr. Agnew's Cure for the heart,
it's a magical remedy, gives relief in
thirty minutes, and there are thous
ands who testify that it cures perman
ently. Mrs. W. T. Rundle, of Dun
rialk, Ont., says: "I was for years un
able to attend to my household duties.
I used Dr. Agnew's cure for the heart,
the result was wonderful, the pain left
me immediately after the first dose,and
a few bottles cured."—l 6
Sold by C. A. Kleim.
Aprunstryng—" There's a man who
never had an unkind word from his
wife during all his life." Henpeck—
" Gracious, he's one in ten thousand ;
I can hardly believe it." " It's a fact;
you see he's a bachelor."
THE STOMACH'S WOES—Are pleas
antly and positively healed by Dr.
Von Stan's Pineapple Tablets. They
act upon and digest the food, prevent
fermentation and all distress of the
stomach. Eminent physicians have
noted their sterling merit and the
wonderful cures wrought right in their
own practice and prescribe to relieve
and cure. 35 cents.—2o
Sold by C. A. Kleim.
Magistrate "Ten dollars and
cost; this is the twelfth time I've had
to fine you this year, and— " Inebri
ate—"Well, say, Judge, oughtn't I
get wholesale rates ? "
DOCTORED NINE YEARS FOR TETOR.
—Mr. James Gaston, merchant, of
Yvilkesbarre, Pa., writes: "For nine
years I have been disfigured with tet
or on my hands and face. At last I
have found a cure in Dr. Agnew's
Ointment. It helped me from the
first application, and now I am per
manently cured."—lß
Sold by C. A. Kleim.
The final returns of the election in
Pennsylvania this Fall will probably
be longer delayed than ever before in
the history of the state, as some of
them must come from Manila, where
the Tenth Regiment will vote.
but finally recovered, and went home.
Shortly after, he began the study of veter
inary surgery, and, when completed, went
to Chicago, where he has resided for thirty
years, and is now one of the leading sur
geons of that profession in the city.
His old wounds began to trouble him
several years ago. He grew weak, ema
ciated and thoroughly debilitated. His
friends began to despair of his life.
He was but a shadow of his former uU,
weighing only 90 pounds, a loss of nearly
50 pounds. He had the best medical atten
tion, but it did not benefit him.
" Finally a friend gave me a box of Dr.
Williams' Pink Pills lor Pale People," said
Dr. Clark. "After taking the pills I was
so much benefited that I purchased a
dozen boxes and took them.
"They were of more benefit than the
ablest physicians' treatment. By their aid
alone, I soon regained my strength.
"I weigh 160 pounds now, and except
for injuries that can never be remedied, I
am as well as ever.
"I consider E>r. Williams' Pink Pilb for
Pale Peopje the be3t remedy I know of to
build up a run-down system."
To-day Dr. Clark is a picture of health.
He is 59 years old, an active member of
Hatch Post, G. A. R., and resides at 4935
Ashland Ave., Chicago.
Many veterans have found Dr. Wil
liams' Pink Pills for Pale People of inestim
able value in counteracting the unhealthful
effects of army life. All druggists sell
these pills and highly recommend thcra.
Jurors for September Court.
TRAVERSE JURORS, SECOND WEEK.
Beaver—John Clingcrman.
Benton lioro.—H. O. McHenry.
Benton twp.—R. M". Shultz.
Berwick—James W. Basom, MacCrea Evans,
11. C. Lnubach.
liloom—A. 11. Corell, George \V. Hartzel,
B. Fred Hnrtman, Jacob Stiner, E. J.
Stetler, C. M. Ter *il!iger.
Briartreek—Samuel Rinnnl, Alfred Stiner.
Catawissa boro.—Jas. A. Guv, Chas. Heist.
Ccntralia boro.—James J. Colihan, Kobt. P.
Farrcl.
Greenwood—Lewis Robbin?.
Hemlock John Moore, Barton Purcel.
Jackson—Earl Derr Michael Hartman.
Locust—Daniel Knorr.
Madison—Latimer Whipple.
Main--Boyd Hartzell.
Mifflin—J. D. Houck.
Mt. Tleasant—Clinton Crawford.
Orange Josiah Lowery.
Pine—J. F. Fenstemacher.
Scott—Jacob Hirleman, 11. C. Millard,
Charles Shaffer, Jerry Welliver.
Sugarloaf—Andrew Lewis, Ale Park.
SHERIFF'S SALE.
By virtue of a writ of Fl. Fa., Issued out of
the Court of Common Pleas and to me directed,
there will be exposed to pubUc sale at the
Court House In Dloomsburg, Columbia county,
Pa., on
SATURDAY, OCT. 22, IS9B,
at two o'clock p. m., all that lot or piece of
ground, situate In the Town of Btoomsburg,
County of Columbia and state of Pennsylvania,
bounded and described as follows, to wit: Be
ginning at a po'Srt In the eastward line of Mar
ket street, ono hundred and sixty feet north
ward from the northward 1100 of Elgbth street,
and running thence eastwardly parallel with
tbe northward line of Elgbth street ooe hun
dred and forty feet, and running thence south
wardly parallel with the eastward line of Mar
ket street forty feet, and running thence west
wards parallel with the northward line of
Eighth street one hundred and forty feet to the
eastward line of Market street, and running
thence along the eastward line of Market street
northwardly forty feet to the place of begin
ning, whereon are erected a nearly new two
and one-half story
FRAME DWELLING HOUSE
and other outbuildings.
Seized, taken In execution, at the suit of
Helen E. Tustin vs. T. M. Dawson, and to be
sold as the property of T. M. Dawson.
K. It. JOHN, W. W. BLACK,
Attorney. Sheriff.
CHARTER NOTICE.
Notice Is hereby given that an apnllcatlon
will be made to the Court, or common Picas of
Columbia county, on the fltth day of October
next, at ten o'clock In the forenoon, under Act
of Assembly entitled "Au Act to provide for the
Incorporation and regulation of certain corpor
ations," approved April SOtli, 1574, and the sup
plements thereto, by George A Mason, D. T.
Kline. Amasu Whltenlght, Charles Kibble and
John Melllck, for the charier of an Intended
eerporatlon, to be called •• Camp No. 23, Patri
otic order sons of America," the character and
object of which Is fostering and cultivating a
spirit of patriotism and love of country among
themselves and others, and for these purposes
to have, possess and enjoy, alt the rights, oenr
nts and privileges, conferred bv the Act of As
sembly aforesaid, and Its supplements.
IKM.KK & IKEI.EK,
Bloomsburg, Pa , Sept. 13,1598. SOLICITOUS.
EXECUTRIX' NOTICE.
Estate of Pt ter Solledcr, late of Dloomsburg, Pa.,
deceased.
Sotice is hereby given thai letters testamentary
on the estate of Peter Sotleder, late of the town of
BUxtmsbnrg, Columbia county. Pa., deceased,
have Iteen granted to Mary K. Solleder, resident, of
said town, to whom all persons indebted to said
estate are reijuested to make payment, and those
having claims or demands will inake known the
same without delay.
MARY K. SOLLEDER
91-6 L Executrix.
Quick Communication
Facilitates Business.
Use the LOCAL TELEPHONE
and Communicate.
Direct with persons in Berwick, Cata
wissa, Danville, Riverside, Rupert,
Willow Grove, Almedia, Lightstreet,
Lime Ridge, Mifflinville, Millville,
Rohrsbnrg, Nescopeck, Orangeville,
Stillwater and Benton. Also long
distance lines to nearly all the towns
in the different States. Rates reason
able. Local exchange over Postotfiffe.
CENTRAL PENNA. TELEPHONE
& SUPPLY CO.,
JOHN KENYON, Manager.
CARDSJe
N. U. FUNK,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Mrs. Ent*s Building, Court House Alley,
BLOOMSBURG. PA.
A. L. FRITZ,
ATTORNEY - AT-LA W,
Poet Office Building, and floor,
BLOOMSBURG, PAi
C. W. MILLER,
ATTORN E Y-AT-LA W,
Wirt's Building, zad floor,
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
JOIIN O. FHKIZC. JOHN O. HARXAN
FREEZE & HARMAN,
ATTORNEYB AND COUNSELLORS AT LAW,
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
Offlceß: Centre St., drat door below Opera House
GEO. E. ELWELL,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Columbian building, 2nd floor,
BLOOMSBURG, P.k.
WM. h MAGILL,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
Office in Lockard's building,
Corner Main and Centre Sts.
W. H. SNYDER,
ATTORNEY—AT-LAW,
Office 2nd floor Mrs. Ents building,
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
ROBERT R. LITTLE,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Columbian Building, and floac,
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
A. N. YOST,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Wirt Building, Court House Square.
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
H. A. McKILLIP.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Columbian Building, 2nd Floor.
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
RALPH R. JOHN,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Hartman Building, Market Square,
Bloomsburg, Pa.
IKELER & IKELER,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Office back of Farmers' National Bank.
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
R. RUSH ZARR,
— ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
Office in Clark's Block, corner of 2nd and
Centre Streets, I-12-'94
W. A. EVERT,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
(Office over Alexander £ Co. Wirt building.
G. M. QUICK,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
Office over First National Bank.
EDWARD J. FLYNN,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
CENTRALIA, PA.
WOlHce Llddicot building, Locust avenue.
JOHN M. CLARK,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW AjTDJOEXECE m
THE PEACE,
Meyer BNa Budding, sad Enae,
BLOOMSBURG, f A.
J. H. MAIZE,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW, NFSTTPAGCE ABB
REAL ESTATE AGENT.
/ Office in Lockard's Building.
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
B. FRANK ZARR,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Clark's Building, cor. Main and Ccxtza Sis,
BLOOMSBURG, Pa.
HTCiiJx be consulted in German.
W. H. RHAWN,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Office, corner of Third and Main It—
CATAWISSA, PA.
J. S. JOHN, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office and residence, 410 Main St.,
3-7°- v BLOOMSBURG, PA
J. HOWARD PATTERSON^
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Rooms 4 and 5. Peacock bldg.
Telephone 1463. BLOOMSBURG, PA.
HENRY W. CHAMPLIN, M. D.
Office over Farmer's National Bank.
Hours 10 to 12 A. M., 3 to 5 and 7 to 8 P. M
Residence, 218 Third St.
TELEPHONE.
FIRIOIIL ATTENTION TO DISEASES OP CNUHR
H. BIERMAN, M. D.
HOMGSOPATDICPHYBICTAN AND SUKGKFN
orrici HOURS: Office A Residence, 4th Bt.,
Until 9 A.
Ito 9 and 7toßr. M. BLOOMSBURG, PA
DR. ANDREW GRAVDON,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
BLOOMSBURO, PA.
Office and residence In Prof. Waller's Home.
* MARKET STREET *
TELEPHONE.
DR. F. W. REDEKER,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Office and Residence, Centre St., between th
and 6th Sts.
Diseases of the ear, nose and throat a
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
(Stoma m.
OFFICR HOURS: -{ 1 to 8 p. m.
' 17 to 9 p. m.
J. J. BROWN, M. D.,
Market Street. BLOOMSBURO, NL
THE EYE A SPECIALTY.
Eyes treated, tested, fitted with glutei
and Artificial Eyes supplied.
Hours 10 to 4. Telephone Oonneetton
DR. M. J. HESS,
DENTISTRY IN ALL ITS BRANCHES,
Crown and bridge work
—a—
SPECIALTY,
Corner Main and Centre Streets,
BLOOMSBURG, PA.,
DR. W. H. HOUSE,
SURGEON DENTIST,
Office, Barton's EulldlDg, Huln below Martre
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
All styles of work done in a superior mannet,
and all work warranted as represented.
TEETH EXTRACTED WITHOUT PAIR,
by the use of Gas, and free of charge wha
„ artificial teeth arc inserted.
"To be open all hours during the day.
DR. C. S. VAN HORN,
DENTIST.—
Office corner of East and Main streets, on
posite Town Hall.
Office hours 8:80 to is a. m ; 2 to p. m.
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
C, WATSON McKELVY,
FIRE INSURANCE AGENT.
(Successor to B. F. iiartman
t ,? elve of the strongest oaasma -
les In the world, among which are:
CASH TOTAL sumtm
Franwin of PhlltL. &
Penna. Phlla 400,000 8,895,160 l! 2£
Queen, of N. Y. 500,000 3,538,915 I!ES
Westchester, N.Y. 800,000 1,7M,30T *S?R
N. America, Phlla. 8,000,000 9,780,689 *WI.TYI
OFFICR IH I. w. MCKLLTT'S HTORR.
WLosses promptly adjusted and pL<
M. P. LUTZ & SON,
(SUCCESSORS TO FREAS DROWN)
INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATB
AGENTS AND BROKERS.
■ —o
N. W. Corner Main and Centre. Streets,
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
—o—
Represent Seventeen as good Comm
ies as there are in the World and B
losses promptly adjusted and paid
at their Office.
CHRISTIAN F. KNAPP,
FIRK INSURANCE,
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
Home, of N. Y.; Merchants of Ncwndt
N. J.; Clinton, N. Y.;Peoples', N V -ft-i?
ing. Pa (German American Ins. Co., MM
York; Greenwich Insurance Co., New' Yorik
Jersey City Fire Ins. Co., Jersey City, N. 1.
These old corporations are/ well imsesl
by age and fire tested, and have never yet
had a loss settled by any court of law. nwtr
assets are all invested in solid securities wad
liable to the hazard of fire only.
Losses promptly and honestly adjusted aad
paid as soon as determined, by Christian F.
Knapp, Special Agent and Adjuster ttlniiM*
burg. Pa.
The people of Columbia county eheeld
patronize the agency where losses, if any.
are settled and paid by one of their DM
citizens.
CENTRAL HOTEL,
B. Stohner, Prop. C. F. Stohner, Assistant
BLOOMSBURO, PA.
I.arge and convenient sample rooms. Hot
and cold water, and all modern conveniences.
The hotel has been lately refurnished.
CITY HOTEL,
W. A. Hartzel, Prop.
No. 121 West Main Street,
SSl'Largc and convenient sample rooms, bath
rooms, hot and cold water, and modern con
veniences. Bar stocked with best wine and
lujuors. First-class livery attached.
EXCHANGE HOTEL^
G. SNYDER, Proprietor,
(Opposite the Court House*
BLOOMSBURG, PA.
Large and convenient sample rooms Bath
rooms hot and cold water, an.l all modem
conveniences
GET YOUR
JOB PRINTING
DONE AT
COLUMBIAN OFFICE
7

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