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The Cambria freeman. [volume] (Ebensburg, Pa.) 1867-1938, September 10, 1897, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83032041/1897-09-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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FARSVJERS!
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provcniciits in the
OLD SHENKLE MILL
nc arc now prepnrcd to torn out
FIRST-CIiASS WORK on Sliort
XotiiT. S(rlicirino a portion of your
piKroiuioc, I rcmsiiii
s.
PROPRIETOR.
if
""3 MORE DOCTORS FOR ME!
I coiitiimptive. nnt nie t
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J bru3e , ,t M m tnlard rtl
rj." t mail, in form of 1'iUa
f- M 00 " of 51 OO.
n of K,,,"'y CornplaintA.
y "V ' oniMniud lis no rival.
,7 "Ek!.a, friT letter
ir.!"! ? f nt tor Mr Hnkhani'i
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'nknam M Oo., Ln. Mam.
"Oil
i. ,. CfEAT DISCOVERY"
Of p s':!,ar. tut Caacia M-a4.lAl.laT.
lnterest to the Fair Sex.
'uJ"', l"""-"'i"t rinuTal of unattftitly
l,'ei ft 1 '''' It thoualiil
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f :" PMmiiik IrraUneut ttier.
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rrii'ii( , " lth 1,r- tl"ert'i rcii.e-ly
oi.7, mouienta. villi a sniail
ti. . ' !''nM.. It removes the hair
tati,r'i'"'''yt "'!ury to the mint ttelttat.
y-J. ,"UTuU't "' Itching aentalion and
"'U, u' ''i-nntii of anr kind parvus at
rl.t. t'1" dlrerUl, rail eltert
. lii, I i ',"'ut 1lna of vititint:
-f1, " 'etti.i are Klvrn will. e. u
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JAS. C. HASSON, Editor nno
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()T .TIAf!
KING." THEN
ROYALTY ITSELF.
' . ''. . ' ' ' 1 I 1 I 1 I'll I 1
A M 1
DE3
LUDWIl
OH! MY BACK
Ifrrj (train or rolil mtlvka that vttk bark
aad ararijr Bruairaira job.
tmnwH'5
THE CT
BEST TONIC
.n-dlc the NerTca.
FnrlrhnK niootl. ilve Ntw i.r.
Da J. U Mnaa. FWneiJ. I.fwa. rtym:
Bmwn'. Iron BiUra th tt In.a HMtdM-in I
b.T known to in; : r1i .r.ctR-. I t.ioiid it
m-iatlr tnlicial in irum-r i.li)r.H-aI.ih.uM.n,
aud in all 1W.i1iMuiii a.lu-uU. lliat r . h--..Ui
uo Um inli. I'"" l"1' o"11
Ma. W K Hum. k.T7 Mm Si. l3oinKl.n k,
amy.- I comiplttty bt kfo d-tm m linllb .a4
triukltl who ijiu in u ' l-k. Hrvt.lt'. Iruu
liiUara Hiunll rw.t-.td n I" lit-Jlu.'
'k arulcrtwtjvd rwd liaa.
irr. Mo. oui ir
KlLTlA.Ui. at
on riiM- 'I'm U r ttt t
BattM 1 Utallll
t'avpatK. and Trsd-Msrksi obtained, and all l't
ent bnine!4 rtni,ut'ttt fr Moderate Ft.
Our Office is Opposite U. S. Patent Office,
and venntrrnrF patfr.t in les time tban tnoe
rrnwlr from Wasthmirttin.
t-nrt niiKlt-l. drawiiiir ur r.hoto.. with afcrlp
M'.m. We advie. if jiafentable or not. frre of
rhar-e Our fee not due tiil patent i erared.
a Pamphlet. "Uuw tt obtain Patents." wita
namt t.f a. tiial clie.it!. in ytmrState, county, w
to u, eent free. A (litre-',
C.A.SNOW&CO,
Onooaite Patent Office. Washinoton. f C
f HE ACCIDENTS OF LIFE
Write to T. S. Qliscev,
Drawwi 1j3, Chicago, Secre
tary of the Star acciin
Company, for information
regarding Accident Insur
ance. Mention this paper.
By so doing you can aave
His paid over jduO.OUO OO lot
membership fee.
Accidental injuries.
Be your own Agent.
NO MEDICAL EXAMINATION REQUIRES
I - - 1 - -
iiffilll
If flrl Ifl lil HI Iii-'
1 1 i-i iri
Proprietor.
--fe.
A MIDNIGHT Sg
m SURPRISE, m
Bj Elvira Floyd Froeneckc.
LIFK in mir family has always Wen
atjitiitetlby unexpected liappeiiins.
i'loper, w ell-ieuiatetl siit-i .-t it ions
liitxe a way of reeisiny results w liieh is
luuniUatiii ami tlejn e.ssiiij'. When Al
tT'riitn ltiur.t a new taii-culoreil cout
tiiitU-r the iinpi etssioii that it umilil
leuse his sweetheart ami f,'ie him a
smart, fashionable air he fount! that tan
was unhei-oluin', that his sweetheart
preferred ";ray and that the latest hue
for sjn iii"; eoats wus a striking shatle of
I'liim.
'lai-isse, ttni, had the same well-tle-veloiieil
propensity; for on presenting
n ytnuir lawyer (of tender heart, and
inleileelual telideiivies) with a lxok ly
Mr. Hall Caiue she found that lie had
read all that gifted man's works ami
was eajrer to learn !iuet hiu- of the
In i"h!er lijrht.Zaiifrwill.
I'oor Aunt l'olly fell ill with jrrippe.
She s n tie red lout.'' anil recovered .-hiwly.
It left a leiracy in the shape of a iiasty
coiih that refusetl to he quieted. One
tine day she took courage and went to
call upon some dear friends. 'I he old
ladies were in. They were delighted
to see her, but were very much dis
tressed about her cold. During the
shifting conversation, which covered
the broad field that lay between ora
torios and home so lpinaking, they rec
ommended numberless cures. Towards
five o'clock Aunt l'olly rose to go. There
v-as a Hashing eye signal between, the
kind old hostess and import uuate "Oh.
don't go's!" from both.
Aunt l'olly Kink gracefully in her
chair as one of the ladies disappeared.
Throughout the period of waiting
most pleasaut thoughts were borne in
her iiiuid. How kind they were! How
delightful to agaiu isit old friends!
What would the coining refection be?
l'robably tea; may be coffee. No! More
likely cocoa, and possibly elderberry
w ine or iHitiillon. She finally arrange!,
the probabilities between elderberry
wine and cocoa, while apparently deep
ly engaged in con versa uhiii with her
entertainer.
A slight bustle at the door. A click
of a spoon. She turned her head to see
the apparition of a female figure ad
vancing, which held in one hand a large
bottle of coil liver oil. in the other the
hutrest silver tablespoon ever made.
A spoonful was poured out slowly ant
handed to the unfortunate iruest. She
gulped tlow n the dreadful dose and
hastily made her escape. Aunt l'olly is
a Christian, and nothing transpired
that was disastrous to friendship or
good breeding. lbi, oh, how she did
think!
We were all a bit chary of supersti
tions, because of our peculiar experi
ences. There is tliat one of a black cat
bringing truod luck; but when Kloise
scratched her dainty hand on w earing a
black-cut pin for the first time, am!
when Cousin I'.elle's story was sent liv
ing back as "unavailable" by the editor
of the I'.lai k Cat magazine, we were not
eager to welcome the tremendous
black-coated, yellow-eyed pussy, that
ierald assured us would make happi
ness for all the family.
Still she was a lady, and had some pre
tentions to beauty, so we adopted her,
and baptized her "I H- il." She certain
ly acted as if about to change condi
tions, for nothing serious occurred,
and beyond a propensity for Iving oi..
the most comfortable bed she .oiild find,
or dipping- her dainty paw in ap ink lot
tle imitating the writer she was most
exemplary.
Sometimes it annoyed im ttiat we had
not a food terrier in Ilexil's place. She
could kill rats, of course, but could give
no alarm in ease thieves entered the
house. We tried ad. ling a bright little
hlac k-and-tan terrier to our family.
This would not do at all. Hevil must
reign supreme, and the dog was ban
ished. r.nrglaries liegan to be frequent in Hie
neighborhood. The ater ami mater
were going abroad, ami we home guard
were on our mettle. We were taught
and retaught pistol practice until we
were sure of our man, did he dare otfer
his body as target.
The gunsmith had never sold so manv
pistols, nor such quantities of ammuni
tion, since he had taken his shop, lie
was a queer little man w ith a bent back
and a deep-set eye. His grimy hands,
greasy knee-caps and odor of
yunpowder were his trademarks.
He looked us harmless as a
pearl-handled revolvttr; but the
way his prices rose to meet this de
mand, and the fables he concocted
about his antique stock, showed his
capability for improving op ortunities.
Still with paternal solicitude the
household head was loth to leave us
without further precautions for our
safety.
A burglar alarm was added to the
household attachments. It was of an
electric construction; and there were
numerous dynamos and endless elec
tric w ires Hying around the house for
a w eek or more.
Kiuallv all was complete. Each bed
had a formidable row of wires am! bat
teries; while within eo&y touch of the
hand was a small crank that set bells
ri Hiring iu furious clamor.
We were alone at last. Each morn
ing Charles Augustus, the colored gen
tleman who arranges our destinies and
receives our guests, set the alarms, to.
which all the bells responded merrily.
Each night Algernon and I examined
our weapons and laid plans to meet the
marauder.
After several nights of broken slum
ber, w hen each heard noises ami met in
corridor, pistol laden and in light attire,
we conc.ieieti that it was alsurd to
meet trouble two-thirds of th way.
So we settled down to peaceful sleep
and lonf r:"hts of rest.
We had had a delight f ul holiday. For
two days friends had isited us. W e had
been in town, sight-seeing and woi.der
ga.inir. ending with a dance one night,
.i trip to the theater the next. Again
,c h..d settled down to get rid of our
tin day night's tiie with really pleas
ant a.itn i atiou.
1 ditan.cd of Christmas; then, that
e w ei c waiting to see the old year out,
vLen I awakened, and the bells were
--'rj''
'HI 18 A PRKKMAN 'WHOM THI TBCTH
EBENSBUKG, PA., Fill
I all ringing! Every electric alarm
I Iti 'itiirifnp H M .l.l...l .
'""'f-)"! tiiiiiij uuii-i-i-i, iiiiuru U
which were the gongs of the Iront and
back doors, while sounds of voices from
excited men outside added to the noisv
blare.
I rushed to the hall, forgetting my
pistol, am! met Algernon, clad iu pis
tols ami night bhirt, hurrying to the
front tloor.
"Have you killed him?" I cried, sup
posing at least one burly corpse must
lie l iug somew here near.
"Killed her, jou mean," sneeied AI
gernon, rushing' downstairs. ".No! 1
haven't, but by Jove I w ill."
I thought lie hail gone mad and was
almost frantic villi terror. Still 1 did
lean over the baluster and saw the cap
tain of olice, the sergeant, six hi;; po
licemen ami eight s mpii t liizi ng neigh
bors forming a line that was like uu in
terrogation Mint.
Algernon looked dignified, thoutrh
the circumstances were trving. He
k pt the throng quiet ant! explained
quickly, answering the shower of ques
tions that assailed him with:
"I am very sorry, gentlemen. Our
i. hi rill was set run! we were sleeping
soundly. The bells were set in mo
tion by our cat w lro took a notion ttt
play with the crank."
Not a mule came to those expectant
faces. Poor men! It was a cold morn
ing two a. in. ami they intended to
capture at least one man after th?ir
trying ordeal. Slowly they filed out
and Algernon rei-limbed t he stairs. Dis
gust und gloom were written over his
dejected face and manner. I looked up
to say: "Oh, Algernon! 1 am mortified
t i death."
Sudtlenly the lad burst into an un
controllable fit of laughter. "Not a
burglar! Confound the alarm! I be
lieve there never was one that went off
at the right time. Ami where is that
cat! She must be abolished. This is
not the first time the devil raised a
nt-iifbborhotd. hut it will be the last
time here;" and he went in search of the
imp, whose sagacity saved her neck, as
she had brokeu our peace. 'New Eng
land Grocer.
TOOK THEIR ADVICE.
1. 1 e u I . Tjlrr Took a Kerr, Bat It 1)1 U
.Not 'I'm We lilua to laal. iilcard.
When Kear Admiral Sicard, who
took command of the North Atlantic
squadron the other day, was a captain
he was stationed for a lime on the old
receiving- s,hip Vermont in the IlrookH n
navy " aid. To him Lieut. Hansou K.
Tyler, now retired, wsts ordered to re
port for duty on the Vermont.
Tyler was a big, round, good-mwiired
crmoiitcr, with a long, nasal, down
cast draw!, and all the navy had nick
named him "Horse." It happened this
time tlwit "Horse" reported four days
late, antl ('apt. Sicard was annoyed.
The captain was not a martinet, but he
w as a believer in st rict discipline and in
tLe fullest performance of duty. When
he was in command of a vessi l it was al
wa s shipshape. When he was in com
mand of a navy yard things moved off
as it was intended they should move.
So. when Tyler came aboard the Ver
mont ('apt. Sicard was displeased bt-ll!s-:.t
of his tarili nrst.
"llootl morning, ('apt. Sicaid.
drawled Tyler. "1 am ordered to the
Vermont, and I am here to report t -
on for duty." -
"Cood morning, Mr. Tyler," an
swered ("apt. Sicard. "Will you have
the goodness to explain why vou are
four days late?"
"Certainly, captain," Haul Tvler. with
just the suspicion of :t grin am! an ext ra
attenuation iu his drawl. "Vou see. my
ortlers were to report aboard the Ver
mont at Itoston. I went to liostou and
found that the Vermont was at l'.rool.
lyn. I didn't know whether to bring,
I '.os ton down to the Vermont or th;
Vermont up to Itoston. While I w as de
bating the matter I got a telegram fron.
the department (he pulled ;t out ami
showed it to ('apt. (Sicaixl) that said'For
Koston in your orders retid Itrooklv n."
so 1 came down to New York yester
day. I'd never been in LSrooklyii. so 1
asked a man how to get the l'.rooklvn
navy yard, am! he said I'd better take
a ferry, so I took a ferry, and when I
got olf 1 asked a man how to get to the
Crook lyn navy van!, ami he sai.l:
'Take a ferry.' I asked him what that
place was. and he said: 'Staten island.
St i I took a ferry, and w hen it stopped it
was in a place a man said w as Conimimi
paw. I asked him how to get to the
ISrooklyn navy yard, and he Raid: 'Take
a ferry. 1 thought it wasn't a po:id
place for me to be around loose iu at'
night, so I got a hotel and went to bed.
and this morning I hired a loy for ill
cents to pilot me to the Ilrooklyn navy
yard: and. by the way. captain, have
you got that sum in your clothes?"
And they sav "Horse" Ty ler got off.
X. Y. Sun.
A BLACK CAT'S VISIT.
Kate uf a Woman ho llelleved It
Hr.BKhl liuiiil Lark.
The hku-k cat superstition certainly
has a strong hold. A strange bluck cat
came to the resilience of a Troy fam
ily during the pretscnt year, ami it was
occasionally fetl by the kind-hearted
woman of the house. The cat kept
coming, says the Troy I'ress, and in
sisted iqion domesticating itself, and
the woman laughingly remarked to her
friends that it was a sign of good luck.
Hut she had no children, and did not
want to le troubled with a cat. She
told her husoaud that he must get
r'nl of it. They disliked to kill the cat.
and finally decided to take it into the
country and drop it,
Iite one afternoon, they put the
cat in a l ag and drove about five miles,
when they untied the bag and freed
the cat. after which they returned rap
idly. The woman died inside of hah
an hour after reaching- home, au ac
cident befalling her.
If it be good luck for a black cat
to come to one's house, it surely must
signify Mr luck to take or diive it
away. The woman was familiar with
the omen, as she had repeatedly re
ferred to it, but probably itever stopped
to consider that such a sigu would
imply evil consequences if the harbin
ger of good was turned away. At al
events, she took the black cat away
and was killed altnuKt immediately
thereafter. While we take no stock
whatever in this popular superstition
we know the facts to be as stated.
A few days after the funeral the caf
came back.
M4IE1 FRKK AM A LI- AUK 8LAVK8 BEcIDK.'
DAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1897.
UPRISING OF THE CHEYENNES.
I'eople W ho Have t;aa. and Caa Shoot
Are .ot Afraid, of 1'beiu.
The people who live in the Powder
river country are accustomed to the re
ports of Indian uprisings. The scares
have their beginnings in tuiall events.
The one in 1S4 was started by two
drunken cattlemen, who were silting
in a house when three Indians came
ritliug up the road on their pomes.
One of them, who luol been di inking
more than was good for him. made a
bet that he could raise the hat from
the head of one of the approaching
Indians with his riHe without scalping
him. So he ienel tire, and he-did raise
the Indian's hat, but he shot a trifle too
low ami creased his scalp, not hurting
bin. seriously, but starting the b!od
and making the ludians angry. They
rode away, ami that night came with
a band of their companions ami burned
the ranch houses down. The residents
of that section organized a Kissc of
2IHI or 30O and went after the Indians
in earnest, but the men who tired the
ranch were subsequently surrendered,
and the affair quieted down without
more bloodshed.
The Chev t-niies then hud a little set
tlement on Otter creek, at its coutl uence
with the Tongue river. Afterward a
lot more of their tribesmen joined them,
and there a mission was established for
them, where the government now takes
care of them. At that time they were
not cared for at all, and their old v"
lueaus of living- was by hunting anil
stealing. They were treacherous ami
undesirable as neighlnirs. They would
always look around hen t hey made a
visit to a ranch to tre whether there
was any arms around, antl if there were
not they would set tqiou the people
and rob them of everything they had
in broad daylight before their eyes. If
they met a man on a horse on the ranch
who wits not armed they would set him
afoot on the spot am take his horse and
outfit along with biiem.
They are the same Indians who took
part in the raid in Nebraska and after
wart! iai ticipated in the Custer mas
sacre. The Che venues are not a par
ticularly high class of Indian, though.
They are not especially brave, and I
never saw one who was a ginid shot.
They are rapidly diminishing in num
bers. '1 he locality wheie they are now
was once a fine hunting ground, but
that diy is gone. They are fed by the
government and fiirtiiohcd with some
of the comforts of civilization, but for
the most part they retain their original
customs from preference. They live in
houses a part of the time, but eat on
the ground when tables are furuL-hed
them, and in many other ways show
reluctance to enter into the spirit of
the go eminent in its efforts to civilize
them. Helena (Mont.) Independent.
STORY OF A CAPTURE.
Wit of a Wife S-eil Iter llu.hand
front the OIHeera.
"If I hadn't seen it with my own
;. is," saitl the old forty-niner, "I
wouldn't be a tellin' it. Inourcampwe
had got kinder civeilicd and unless a
it Her was st rung up i ml net bate fur lilt
in dust what didn't belong ter him. or
rid iii' otT w it h a boss nut huv in" : 1 1 le ter
til' same, we locked him up and held
him fur a fair trial. We had a icl "h-r olh
eel s an" g uai ls an' t l.e conv it is h..d ter
work get I in' iu wood an' ch-ai.ui' up
'round i air. p.
"One fine-look in' feller came in there
with his wife, an' she w ar finer 1. .ok in"
not he was. 1 never hnowed jri
whether he done it or not. but it war
charged that he was caught craw I in out
from a tent with his partinei's swai
We caught him an' put him inter th
workiu' gang till the gran jury couli
set on him. lie had a mighty line lu.s
that a lot id us wanted ter buy. but hi
wife wouldn't sell au took tare of Inn.
as good as a man could do.
"On a Saturday night that fellet
broke guaid. While we was chasiu
'round a Chinerman i.otertied us as l.ov
th' man was at home with his wife
I hey must have heenl tiscomiii. fm
there was a rush from th' back dooi
there was as purty a spring into tin
saddle as you ever see an' all of us w-n
clatterin' alter th big hi ss wh.le i.
rider waved a hat an mocked at us. V.
f ollered fer miles, droppiu' out i lie b
one till me an' th'sht-iiff had 111" trad
We could change bosses, but fur tci
hours that there big black kept tl."
loud au' showed us his heels. 'I hell hi
rider jist coolly got off and set tlow n or
a log ter wait fur us. WVgalh'ptd u;
with guns in both ban's an' ordered a
surrender. Durn me if it wasn't th'
purty woman, an we never see either
of ein again. Detroit Free Press.
CORRESPONDENCE POINTS. x
Write legibly; if you cannot, you
thou Id learn to do so. Practice makes
perfect.
To write a good hand is an essential
accomplishment which every woman
should acquire.
Answer every note or letter, except
such as may be impertinent or insult
ing; these are not worthy your notice.
Plain, white unruled paper is always
the most refined anil elegant for note
paper and envelopes, though a delicate
gray is not iu bad taste.
Place the postage stamp in a straight,
that is. vertical ixisition. in the upper
right hand corner of the envelope. Itur
gues great carelessness to put thestamp
on in any sort of a fashion.
Avoid gairishness in color am deco
ration in your note paper. It is ex
ceedingly oor taste to use red or green
ink, or orange-colored note pa-ier, or
mi per of any other strong color. La-die-"
World.
Daaelaar In Para--, a a jr.
The women of Paraguay have but one
pastime., that of dancing. 1 hey wear
white robes, but leave their shapely
shoulders aud taieriug arms all b; re.
A gold comb of enormous size is the
only ornament. Parties are gotten up
on the slightest pretext. The dances
arc iu quaint, original figures, but near
ly :dways very grateful. Sometimes the
lestivities will be kept up through the
entire right, after which the partici
pants will gayly ret urn to their t cupa- i
tions of whatever nature, always con
tented, always happy. Sometimes there
will lie a grand contribution picnic at
some distant point, where the dancing
will be kept up through the round of a
whole 24 hours. For these people live
to be happy through the livelong day.
Chicago New.
81. OO and
MAINE MOONLIGHT.
, uiuuaou wamy aa ii is maae La
1 M Till . ... -
the Temperance State.
A Llaaor That Cirvn It. Way Down
aad MaWe. a Man lilaovta
III. I'areatt-llodglai,'
the Law.
For 2J years after the jtassnge of the
Neal Dow law there were many illi.il
stills iu Maine, all or which icldetl a
fair protit to the owners. '1 he hard
times, which lasted from ls7J to l-,7,
drove most of the luunufact uit-is ..lit
t.f the .Misiuess. Soon afterward anOr
luiid genius discovered a wav of mak
ing whisky from alcohol by i iing it
with water ami crotou oil. and then the
revenue officers rested, ltelieving t here
were no offenders in the state.
The compound which was put up bv
the Orlaud man has been known under
various names. It was gem rally called
"split." on account of the way the al
cohol was divided, though the inventor
and his friends have always termed it
"ten-minute whisky." liet-ause of the
short time in which it was prepared.
The cost aud manner of making two
gallons of ten-minute whisky are as
follows:
To one gallon'of alcohol, valued at one
dollar, add 2n cents worth of croton
oil. Shake well lor ten minutes and
add a gallon of pure water. The re
sult is two gallons of In-rod whiskv.
at a cost of IK) cents a gallou.
Three thinks of this mixture would
make a g-nl man disown his patents.
The ten-minute whisky came into gen
eral use and the owners t.f the ill cit
stills moved over the line into New
I'runsw ick in order to live, ah-.. hoi
came to Maine by the quart, gallon, bar
rel and hogshead until the IUiston deal
ers grew curious and sent secret agents
down east to learn what became of
so much raw spirits. When they found
out that it was made into teu-miuute
whisky they doubled the price.
Meanwhile the price of grain went
lower and lower every day. Cor.'
which had generally sold for 7u cents
a bushel, and had not gone below 5ii
tents since the days before the war
dropped to 40 cents lust fall, held there
til winter, and had a downward ten
dency when the spring of 1'j7 i.cii d.
According to the Maine standard a
bushel of corn, when Sprouted, roasted
ground up, fermented and distilled, will
yield four gallons of whisky, and with
corn at 40 cents a f.-ushel good corn
whisky should not cost over 2u cents
a gallon. As long as alcohol was sol. I
at one dollar a gallon, it was heaper
to make ten-minute whisky than run
the risk of conducting a still; bi.t w hen
ulcohol ami the internal revenue ax
on whisky went up, and the price ,,f
com went dow u, the distilleries started
once more and are rejMirted to be doing
a good business.
'though some of the Maine liquor
dealers are rich aud proserous, mo.-t
of them lead sorry lives, and are glad
enough to get through the year with
out falling' in debt. As their real 1 usi
ness must lie concealed, a majority of
these men conduct cigar or t-atidy
stores, or make pretense of Wing v i. t u-
allers and lioardiiig house keejiers. The
few who have saved money enough huv
farms in the country, which supply the
shops with fresh fruits and vegetables
Of late these farmer saloon keepeis
have engaged largely iu stin k raising,
keeping fat cattle and hogs on places
that can hardly supjiort labbits. Nat
urally they have to buy grain; am!
while they are at it they might as well
purchase enough. So great quantities
are bought aud consumed to fatten the
stock aud restore fertility to the run
out farms. How much of this goes to
fatty tissues for the animals and how
much to the illicit stills not-oily knows,
though when a man who keeps two
cow s uses ten liags of w hole corn a
week it may lie inferred that the stills
get the larger portion. ,
Another method adopted by the men
who cannot afford to own farms ami
thus make their own whisky is to, in
heavy patronage to the men w ho ntldh
spring water of certified purity.
Though all the Maine cities and most
of the larger towns have public water
works thele is no other state of its
population in the union where so mud.
so-called spring water is sold. Evcrv
place of 5.1 Oti inhabitants is supplied
lay three to ten water carts, represent
ing as many springs. The teams call at
houses and stores every day, leavin
full jugs ami taking away empty one:
Of late the liquor dealers have begun
to patronize those water jieddlers verv
freely. Living ten to twenty-live gal
lons a week. When ashed w hy they buv
so much water, paviug from half ;.
cent to a cent am! a half a gallon for
it, the dealers say that t phoid fever
is abroad, and they fear their customers
may catch the malady. X. Y. Sun.
POINTED DARTS.
Some men are polite merely for busi
ness. Anyliody feels foolish when he can't
answer Bible questions.
A man may not own a pocketliook.
and yet have lots of money.
A fellow w ith a new gold watch cares
a good deul aliout what time it is.
A got-d many women enjoy telling
how they were once so sick that the
doctor gave them up.
Some folks wouldn't enjoy giving a
jiarty if souietxxly didn't kick because
they were not invited.
When rich parents have girls who
can't get through the public schools,
they send them away to a female
seminary. Washington (la.) Demo
crat. NAMES OF THE DAYS.
Wednesday belonged to Woden, the
great god of war.
Monday, or Moon's daeg. was given
over t j the worship of the moon.
Thor's daeg was named for Thor, the
eldest son of Woden and Friga, the
bravest of the god s.
Sundiy (.Sun daeg in the Saxon)
chines from tire sun, chief object of the
S'-axou's worship.
Tuesday, or Tuisco's daeg, so called
in honor of Tui-co, the sou of earth and
deified fat her of the Teutonic race.
Fliga's daig was dedicated to the
w ife of WodcD.and Saturday or Sui ter's
ducg was called after the god SueU-r.
w
postage per year In advance.
i
DISEASES OF INFANTS.
Memhraaeon. tflrrtlua. i. . .
4 ouimon.
The high mortality among infants
is largclv due to the w i. !. ., Sl., tK..
currci.ee of inflammations, ,.i the mem
branous tract, the exact t-,..t ,.f ja.
Ilammatiou arv iiig-with tin- change of
the seasons. In summer the mucous
membrane of the stomach is bkelv to
U- attacked, causing frequent v. unit
ing, which results iu an int. rf.-r. i ,.
with the absorption of nourishment;
while a similar inflammation of the
mucoiis membrane of the intestines
will cause iicrsUtciit diarrhoea, with a
like result.
In cold weather the mucous mem
brane of the nose, throat or lungs
is oftener the seat of the t!i, ;,se.
The skin of infants, too. i iT.-,-, Ilt a
feeble resistance to outr-i.!.- i :!, , ,
A condition of the I.i.mi.I ,!,.,. ,,,
gestiou often gives rise to e.-zt ma on
the cheeks, scalp and els. wheie. t
symptoms U-ing roughnc: s. redness
and even moisture w. , pi, r ,.f ,.
skin. Local irritations, such as mois
ture, cold, or the rubbing of seams, are
-pt to give lise to the state known as
"chafed skin."
This sensitiveness t.f th.. infant
skin should be Ix.riie in mind, and t he
underclothing should U- I.H.se. s.,n.
and frequently -hanged, while i ..tur..-J
skin-tonic for U.th infant and ad.dts
- the bath should be .lady adminis
tered. In view of the quickness w it h v.hi.h
infants become ,-hi, ,. espe, ialv In
fore the K-riod when they are able to
walk, the garment worn n xt to the
skin should l-e invariably ,.f wool,
which material affords the l-st protec
tion against a loo rapid loss ..! heat.
Ill sin . : the garment should be thin
ner, b:.i alvavs of wool. Infants arc
rarely "bt: ...iicd up" tin, mini,, m.t
w ithst:-.! t'n - opinions often fre.lv ex
pressed to the contrary.
'1 he la. k . f resistance to dis.-ase in
infancy which has been noted in con
nection with the skin and the mucous
membrane is likewise characteristic of
other organs. TLe most common age
at which infectious diseast s are con
tracted is in infancy, ami iu t-arlv in
fancy they prove more scn-ic than
with older children and are of teller
fatal.
An impression that "children's dis
eases" are iM-tter once had and done
with is entirely at variance with the
observation and judgment of the ineil
ical profession. The sequence of .in
cuses which the physician so often s.-.-s
in children, as the result of on. of the
contagious diseases needlesslv con
tracted, is (ess ... v-h,. h he cannot ig
nore. Om . is. e ,.u.es a child less
able to bailie successfully with an
other which may be contracted 1-efore
he is rid of the tirst. Wise parents
ward off the contagious diseases as
long as M.ssil.Ie. Even measles fre
quently proves fatal in the oiing in
fant, w hile iu tit her cases its ev il ef
fects are lasting throughout childhood.
ouths Companion.
BASEBAlTlI
IVtroit recently released four of its
players.
Tim Ikinahue is the hardest lo-er
among the colts.
Danny Friend is pitching winning
ball for Kansas City.
McJauies. of Washington, doesn't
like to pitch on .-"'inday.
"ISuck Ewing's (Quitters" what the
reds are now being dubbed.
The colonels make a specialty of
double plays in their pra.-tu-e vvoik.
The colts lead the league up to. late
in the nuinln r of double plavs made.
Dick ("ooley is just now the lx.ss bat
ter and base purloiner of the Phillies.
Frank Selee is said to 1- willing to
wager that Lost on will finish one-two.
Catcher Canzel is the only bean
eater who has been with the team eight
years.
It looks as if Tommy Tucker's tlavs
iu the big league are over. XoIkhIv
seems to want him.
St. Paul seems to have a cinch on first
place in the western league race, for the
present at least.
P.uck Ewing is said to have the pre
tiest set of baseball lingers of anv
player iu the business.
The St. Louis bh-acheries roast Yon
dcr Ahe whenever they get a glimpse of
him iu the stand or on the field.
Many a veteran ball plax er has been
relegated to the bench this season and
many a youngster has developed into a
star.
Par St. I ouis. the western teams have
shown themselves to be fully as strong
as their eastern rivals on the present
shift around.
Catcher Charley Farrell is said to
have a new trick this season. In prac
tice he apparently has great .l;i" t ultv
in throwing the ball down to sc. on.!,
but when the game starts he nips the
first base runner who tries to steal the
bag.
THE FARM.
Young pigs, just weaned, should never
be put into a lot with older ones until
they have learned to "hustle" for them
selves. Short whift'etrees one foot long are
useful in plowing among trees. With
them a horse can walk close to the tree
w ithout danger of bruising it.
I 'se your spray pump for whitewash
ing the xultry house inside. Pour car
bolic acid tm the bine iicfoie slaking,
make the wash very thin, add plentv
:-f salt, apply lit-rally.
lVnmark's foreign egg trade has
srowii to tremendous s:ze. niainlv with
Englaad. Twenty yea rs ago t he annual
Danish export of cgfs w as t.Mi.ooo; iiow
it is reckoued at 1 1 H -m i.boO.
Something that follow s and takes the
place of aspjiragus is Sw iss chard. The
xouiig and tender leaves male excel
lent greens, ami when older, the center
r rib l-ecouics large and juicy. Trim off
leaves and cook like asparagus.
Growth of London.
London was considered overbuilt in
15SO. and in that year a law was asscd j
against building on lots previously un
occupied. The cry was renewed iu I son,
when London contained b.o.'.oo build
ings, ami again in 173, the number of
inhabited houses then reaching T2-70 4.
In spite of the prophets the bigcitv has J
coiitinmd to add miles of new street a
every vcar. X Y. Sua. i
'"'Meeirr.l.lloBol tb. U, -
1 lorn, I'tmen i a
linen, uuDth, ' rr
i iih-o. u,in, f.
libra i ifjr ....... -
loch., , .ji,Lv.v;.v. - t"i
., Je- ".;;;.; .,"4
IWI'M 6 DioDlLl , "
Inch.. ! yer "IT ,7,,
U euinroD. e month. J"!
j cia,o. e n-onu...::::;:;::;:;;
. Jar... .......... ......... .
Ba.n Item. b,rt motion. 0c. w Us
ASui'tf.IrN".' m'1 L,tn,u"' Notice. 0
d.1 ltiiii,r oV1oii".". JJ
"-"lui.oi or i r,iuuol an evn.,n
j'V. ,""B " i limit r
ib I job iuret it.
MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS.
- A huge ev J-les-s li-ee ill Tide, in the
tate of I.1X.4,-U. Mexico, is lit feet in
ci n uiiif. i ,-:,--.
A t:e-cent stamp must adorn everv
. av l-.w.k. I; cg. r .r oil , r account U.k
kt pt bv a bus;,,, sS house iu Mexico.
I he . -. ::, ; ti .- t.,;i ;i1 i i.,v, r. x. H .
arc a. i.,. g, ,J ; a ,.;n.,. :u)i r.v..!ve.
s"ti. at th.- inmates can su.-t-essiv. K see
hc c.untrv at all points of the i uu-pa-s.
b.-re::v-.I widower iu St.doseph.
M-... t....i. ,,l t,, h;ii,.-.-:i ., s. u.f.
:. i. !. s : im s,,,,,,,. u s ,llir,j T1
:' -!v of V... t had beet, temporarily
pl.M--.! in a receiving vault.
' ''' '! "! I a il-i-te is a voting rrar-
, I'lii; win re.il'v l... s his m.nher-
J "'-I.v, low ,.r s.. ,.UJ)ll irr
j ml ht. r 1,:,, I.,-,.,,-!., .-,.;f f,.r aliennt-
, n.-r her l.i:-lut .! :, fT. .-t ions.
.in . f b . i ,,t v ;is ,,,,
" ' -'"'. at-.l V; s,,-!!a Kvhi.s. ,f
'. S", ri,,,.s. ,., , ,t!, j.,( t(,
I" an instant the egg exploded
:!d the lady w as s;...t t , i , d vv it h v ing
lard.
A cilien t.f P.uctfi.'d. Me., hist
he- I r and his furniture l.v fire.
Mis neighbors came t.. his r. lieT hv
:le ..e-.T,f.i.M, of various 1IM 1,,-Vl
..iti. !e. ai d among them were 4.1
-t- ,.1s.
- r. :d state nget.t in N'evburg. X.
-. . t.gi.j..! a painter to paint a ho: c.
ii::.V at d out II.- r.-,. him tl.ewr.u?
i i in'-, i. ;,t ,! the w .-oi g I.ou-e w as con.
!!!. painted before the blunder was
il.-cov er. d.
-i i xtr.H.r.'.It at y railroad tri; was
reeentlv e ld, ov. r the Chicago." P.ur-lii-gto.)
a in, -icy. fr Chicago to Den
ver. The .o-T:M.ce is o-T. miles, ai d the
trio w-is taade in 1 .o..'i n.i n ut es" act uul
rnr n i ng time.
- h-dv in Wilkesbarre. Pa., who
ib.-d pos.-s-(.,l. ,.f corsiderable proper
t left it all to a f, male friend who had
been verv kind t . h.T-all except r.t
cent; ard this -! ,. decreed should
given to her husband five years after
her deSt' h.
COULDN'T SPANK HER SON.
lie ni a l ather llli.iwelf and ould
llatr lleen t.l:., !,, oblige.
People in m ... i an i-i.i ouragcm. nt
f..r doing the t.ood Samaritan act i:. .he
interests of the public, as the man de
cided w ho oil, red to assist a li.sira. I, d
woman and ami borate the sulTt-. '..gs
of a lot of lesoeclable people bit a
sn ! ii 1 1 ba a .-a r.
1 he bo, who how Is was iu e. id. nee.
the . III led thirling of his ol.lv t.WJl
mother .,nd the terror of cvcrvboiiv
cis.-. and he h.nl k. pi the t ar in a s ate
oi wild -.. i:,...i,i and cv ban-led the
patten.-,- ..f evcrv 1m1j. in. biding h;s
doling parent.
"'till, if v..,u- fall., r w, re onlv h. : l- 1 "
.-h. had said f..r :ht t.Mieth tin,.-. as he
t r i.-vi taii.li 1 o i . si rj.n the how bug ter
ror. At that he stopped howling l..ng
enough t. beat the air With his sii.all
r-l.ins. and the wiui.au on the other side
of him 1. i,;.n K.-.l audibly that a cage
vas the pr.q-.-r place for savages like
him.
.b hnuv. dear." ashed his mother,
v oti't vou t.e a good bov V
lloai s and kicks from Master .lohnnv .
"Oh. 1 wish on r fat her w ere here t.
give y.u a good frouncing th.s v.ry
Ininutt!" she wailed as she struggled
with l.iui.
Then it was that ihe ph '. ia n t h r p: st
t.f the company asseitcd himself. l!t
had been trying iu vain to read his
Uioining aper ever since he stait'.-d
from home.
"Allow inc. nun hi in."" he sa id. 1 .la I a' 1 . :
"1 am a father nystlf. and I wiij b
happy. In . has: i - y our cherub iu lc!.af
of his at.-. ,.t patent.
""h. no you won't, not if I know it!"
said .b hnny's mother, rising jn her
wiath like :t tigress. "Tin re ain't i!at
man livii-g dare lay :t linger on that
I:, .y LN t.w n fa t her or anv .' ht r i '!
oi l catamount vv ho thinks he kin it
all" and she efTei-t ual'v shut, off de
dale Ly going int.. 1 1. . -text car and tak
ing the sweet infant w ith her. Chit ago
I i lues-1 1 erald.
DIMINISHING STATURE.
tine uf the hlt-t aunea la the Milt
far vmi.'r 1 .l.clrd.
This relation between stature and
heal ih is brought to concrete expres
sion ia the an. lies of Europe through a
I I ;e. t i.ui of all I ecruits f..r s. r. i. e w ho
fd b.-li w a t ci lain nilaoii iin standard
if height, generally aluiut live feet.
The i csiiit of t his. say s Popular Science
M.ui: lily is t . pit -elude t he ssibl htv it
mariiage for all the fully developed
iii. u timing their three years iu the
baira. ks. while the undersized individual-,
exempted I rom scrv ice on this ac
count, arc h it flee to propagate the
t-pe. ics meanwhile. Is it not appar. at
that the elTcct of this artilicial selec
tion is to put a distinct premium upiii
ia.". i iority of statue in so f ir as the
it. lure generations are concerned?
This ciiforctd postponement of mar
iiage for the normal man implies not
mciely that the children of normal
far.. dies are boili later in life th.tt
woiii.I not be of great moment in itself
it iueatis far in irc I han this. The ma
jority i f h-hlreu are more t.fti ti ioru
i.i llic earlier half i f married life, be
fore the age t.f .''a. Ileute a postpone
ment of matrimony means not onlv
later children. but fewer children.
Herein lies-in." great significance of the
a l..r i;
Standing armies tend
i"i this respect to overh.a.l succeed! ng
generations with iufeiior types of men.
'it i ... t m u. c n.
In the present -day desire for aie
propi lateness in all thii-g. ihe fruni::.g
of pit res receives no 111 t le attetit i. i.
-e s. i s a groi ji ,.f sacred sul ec". s.
t tipies of some great original, either i i
colors or phot. -grat h. placed together
in turees. a-.d soil liatiiv surrounded I..
a boidt-r of tr.nue t :..thic arching. g !t
or silver, that the t if.t t closely i.-s. i .
ble the paneling t,f a i hun h window,
ant! seems most appos.ite to the sni
f T,iis is "sually the favorite Sait
Cecilia, one t.f many Madonna, or a
cathedral interior. N. Y. Post.
( allaari ilri Irr.
Young Iluslond IVar, what was
that w liite ,owder you drop.ed into
the fire?
Young Wife (cooking) That was
baking powder, stupid! I"ni ready to
jiut the cake into the oven. X. Y.
Woi vf.
Id

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