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Clearfield Republican. [volume] (Clearfield, Pa.) 1851-1937, December 07, 1881, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83032199/1881-12-07/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE
"CLEARFIELD EEPl'DLICA.V
Pl'lLIIIIr BVBT WBDSBariAV, AT
CLEARFIELD, PA.
H T II 1. 1 M H E I) IN 19 91,
I ho lai arret Circulation of uy Newapapei
In Nurtb Ceutral Pennsylvania.
Terms of Subscription.
If piiiJ in alvanee, or within S tnonthi... t'i X
tf .ftid after 8 and bo fore (I month! X AO
li i iid after tbe expiration of 6 uoatbe... 3 iHi
Katoa ot Advertising,
TrtialeDt advertisement!, par square of 10 llneior
A timet or $1 60 j
r or erica sunieqneni iiiaeriion bO
A -1'tif nlctrstora' ni Kxecnton' notiora I 60
Auditors' nnttofi J SO
Cnuiioni and Kit rays 50
t)inlution notice! J 00
l ifoMlnnftl Cards, ft HnM or lti,l year..... I 00
notices, per line )0
YEARLY APVKRTIHKMKNT8.
I M 00 j I flolamn $10 00
: , .ares... 16 00 j eoluiun TO 00
.1 1 jttarei... .,50 00 1 column., 130 00
Q. B. OOODLANDKR,
Pobliiher.
IT
w. SMITH,
attorney-at-
1173 t'lrarlleld, P.
LAW
LIN OLE,
A 1'TOiSNEY-AT -
LA W,
ypd
11) llrllelblite. Pa.
It
OLAND D. SWOOPE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Curwi-nsville, Clearfield county, Pa.
oot. a, 'r it.
0
SCAR 31 ITCH ELL,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
Oflne In "Old Westrru builliog," (up slairs).
(let. . '7ft ir
JMIAEL TEST,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Clearfield, Pi.
3?rO(noo on Market afreet, thr doora fan I of
.li'i'lu Klitw'e resident)..
w
11. it. McCULLOUGIT,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
Oft. In Masonic building, Second afreet, op
pi. ail tho Court House. Je2o,'78-tf.
C. A UN OLD,
LAW k COLLECTION OFFrCE
CURWKNRVILLE,
r':i Clearfield County, Penn'a.
TSy
s.
T. liKOCKBANK,
ATTORNKV AT LAW,
CLEARFIELD, TA.
.e in Optra IIiif. ar 25,77-ly
U u. A. Wt.i.ACki
lU'U.T F. W ALI.4C R,,
DiVin L, Kheiii," '
w. e.
ALLAC.E i
KREBS,
A T T O Ii N i: Y S - A T - L A W ,
i.al l ClMrUtlJ, Pa.
JMITII V. WILSON,
jltlornru-nt-Law,
rl.KARFIELD, . . PENN'A.
.r OfRco to the Mnaonlc Dulldlng, Faroad
tret, ona J oppoiite the Court iloo...
mar.' .
!
V. SNYDER,
AfTOHNKIf AT LAW,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
'h'ire ever ihe Countj National Dank.
June . TStf.
P
.MiANK G. HARRIS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
C'LaaanaLn, Paaa'a.
1 .r.t-oUm Life and Fire Inaurance Companira
; i.cntfil.
Trt-Oftioe In the Oera Uouae.-K
M.r. II, 'Hl-I
Til".. B. HLRSIT...
..crane (RI:OR.
JURRAY & GORDON,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
4rOfflce lo l'ie'a Opera Ilonaa, aeooad floor.
V.70'71
V
ni.LIAM A. IIAGERTY,
.irroiucr.jr-t.il)',
ul'l It'i; over T. A. I'lerk i Co.'a store,
CLEARFIELD, PENN'A
TiT-Will attecd to all legi.1 bu.ineaa with
niitrivr-e nad fidelity.
frbil.'ao.K.
iHr;rri i. m'bnally pahibl w. h ccbdt,
JcKN ALLY & McCUKDY
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
Clcartleld, Pa.
rrl.etral buaineaa attended to promptly witbj
!litr. Ufflca on rJeeond alreet, aoove the Flrat
N.tional Dank. jan:l:7l
J F. Mc KEN RICK,
DISTRICT ATTORNEY,
CLEARFIELD, PA
All legal business entrusted to his can will re
r.ire prompt attention.
A-Offlre In the Court Uoaae.
igl4,l7B-ly.
Y - KRAMER,
A T T O R N E Y - A T - L A W ,
Heal Estate and Collection Agent,
LI BAUl'IKI.I), PA.,
V. iil promptly attend to all legal bueioeae ea
t'uMrd to hia care.
yMr-OBloa Id Pte'a Opera House. Janl'Je.
JOUN L. CUTTLE,
ATTORNEY AT LAVf.
i: .1 Heal F.etale A;eiit, Clearfield, Pa,
r7- Iteepeotfully offere hia aerrloea la eelllag
r.-.d buying lande la Clearfield and ailjolaing
c untiea l and with aa eapertonoeol oyer twenty
y.ere aa a enrvajor, flattere htmaelf that he eaa
rondor aatlsfaelloa. te. sk.iu.
Ujisitlatis' Cards.
D
R E. 11. SCUEUEER,
HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN,
Offloa la residence B Firat at.
April 34, I87J. Clearfield Ta.
TU. W. A. MEANS,
t'HYSICrAN A SURGEON,
Dl'DOIS CITY, PA.
Will attend profeeeloBal ealla preaiplly. auglO'70
jyt. T. J. HOY Kit,
I'HYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
COjce on Market Street, Clearfield, Pa.
r-Oflioe hourai I to II a. aa., and 1 to I p.
J)
It. J. KAY WRIGLEY,
nOMEOI'ATIIIC PHYSICIAN,
Jt-Ofii a ljolniog the realdeni-o of Jamea
ntlry, E.o,., on HeCondSt., Clearlield, Pa.
J'iiyJI,'7 II.
V. JENKINS, M. D.,
1' II Y SI CI AN A N D S U RG EON,
CI RWENSVILLK, PA.,
t'firee at rrstdrace, earaar of "tela and Pine
Jaa. tib, lafil If.
I)
It. II. I). VAN VALZA1T,
Cl.iiARKIKM), PENN'A.
CFPICE IN llFSIDPNCE, CORNER Of FIRST
AND PINK bTREKI'3.
Ofllco boart From It to t P. M.
May II, 1171.
1)
R. J. P. BUKCH FIELD,
CLBARF1ELD, PENN'A,
'"a. on of the H Roglaeit, Pennsylvania
Velaateare, daring the late war. offers bla pro
rsaaleaal aertlee. la Ihe olllaeal of Cl.arfield
eunty.
- soy- Professional oalll proaaptly atwad.d to.
-'f.e aa tieeead itroot, Bear U. . Ikarah.
pri,'l.Uj
CLEARFIELD
GEO. B. G00DLANDIR, Editor
VOL. 55-WHOLE NO.
Cards.
HENRY BRETII,
(OBTKMD r. .)
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE
TOM IRLL TOWHRnip.
May 8, 1 871-1 j
JAilKS MITCHELL,
PBALBB !
Square Timber & Timber Lands,
Jall'M CLEARFIELD, PA.
V. IIOYT,
Land Surveyor and Civil Engineer,
PUILII'HIintO, I'A.
f4r All buslneas will be atteade ! to promptly.
Die. 11, ISBOIy.
REUBEN HACKMAN,
House and Sign Paintor and Paper
Hanger,
Clearfield, Peiin'a.
ejL.WiII oiecute Joba la hia line proa tly itnd
ta a workmanlike manner. arr4,fi7
17 RANK I I ELDING
A AND
WILLIAM J). B1GLER,
.irr(.vi;rs.jr.f.j ir,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
Not. 17th, ISSO-tf.
WEAVER & BETTS,
DKALKRB IN
Real Estate, Square Timber, Saw Logs,
AND LUMBER OF ALL KINDS.
jHr-Ofilvt on fMnnd street, in rear of store
rxjin of tleurje Weaver 4 Co. f jat.U, '78 U.
RICHARD HUGHES,
Jl'STICE OF THE PEACE
FOB
Ilttatur Township,
Osceola Milla P. (1.
II official businesa entriated la him will be
prompt! attended to. mch20, '711.
JAMES H. TURNER,
JVPTICUOF TIIK PKACE,
W allaretoit. Pa.
per 11 bui prepared himself with a.1) the
nwienary blaDk fnrmi oriltr lb iVmicD tod
liutinty law, ai wrli ti blank Deetlp, eto. All
" mtiri tntrnntM to bti cre will receive
prompt altentioa.
Ma; 7th, 1B71'-1I.
G. H. HALL,
PRACTICAL PUMP MAKER,
NEAR CLEARFIELD, PENN'A.
9fPampa alwaya on hand and made to order
en abort ootioe. Pipes bored on reaaonabla terma
All work warranted to render aatialaction, and
delirered It desired. toy2S:lypd
Ijlvrry Stnblc.
rl1IlE undersigned beea leare to tntorm thennb.
a lie that be ta now fully prepared to acoommo.
tite all IB tne way o rumisbinK ll-.ees, UuKKlea,
liaddlea and Harness, on the shortest notice and
en reasonable terroa. kaaideoee on Locaat street,
between Iblrd and Fourth.
1E0. W. OKARHART.
Clcartleld. Feb. 4. IS7.
B. O. READ .,
, A. BAaRATr
JEAD & 11AGKRTY,
FIRE, LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSI RANCK
AOENCY.
erCffioeln Oreliam Building, Market atreet.
Clearfield, ..... Peco'a.
June li, I SKI -tf.
THOMAS H. FORCEE,
GENERAL MEUCHANDI.SE,
(iKAHAMTON, Pa.
Alio, attentive manufaotarer and dealer Id Square
Timber and Sawed Lumber of all kind.
VOrdera aollelted nd all billi promptly
II 11 id. jyl0'72
I. SNYDER,
PRACTICAL WATCHMAKER
awn Di.tt.ia ix
Walchos, Clocks and Jowolry,
Grakam' Ro, Jarktt Strut,
C'LEARKItl.D, PA.
All kinda of repairing in my lint promptly at
erded to. Jan. lit, 1879.
coal-:
COAL ALL THE YEAR ! 1
rfMIB aubrerlber hereby givea nolioe (bat he
1 la now delivering ooal of aa eicellent quality
and propoiea to operate bli mine
So that be will bo enabled to mpply bla euntomeri
at all timaa with good fuel. No Winter vaca
tion. Oriltri by mall promptly filled.
ft EM. 8 II A W.
ClrarSeld, Pa., Haroh 1, 1881 tf.
Clearfield Nursery.
ENCOUUAGK HOME INDUSTRY
'IMIK anderilgned, baring ealabliahed ft Nur
JL try on the 'Pike, about half way between
Clearfield and Curwrniville, le prepared to fur
nih all kioia of FRUIT TRKLS, (itandard and
dwarf,) Kvrrgreena, Shrubbery, tirape Vlnea,
Ooonberry, Lawtoa Blackberry, Htrawberry,
and Raipbeiry Vinea. Alio, bkbarian Crab Treea,
tjulnoe, and early aoarlet Rhnbarb. Ae. Orden
promptly attended to. Addreii,
J. D WRIOHT,
ie2ft OS.y Curwenaville, Fa.
MEAT MARKET.
F. M. CARD0N & BE0.,
On 8ccond St, north of Ihe Mmaion House,
CLEAHFIELD, PA.
Oar arrangementa ara rf the most eomnlete
eharaeUr lor furniahlag the puhlie with rreah
Meat, of all kind, and of the vary best quality.
we also deal la all klnda or Agricultural impio.
mente. which we keep oa oiblblnoa for the beo-
Qt of the pnblio. Call arouod wheo (a towo,
and take a look at thinga, or address no
F. M. CAUDON A DRO,
Clearfield, Pa., July 14, I87a-tf.
Insurance Agency
OF
WILLIAM 0. HELMB0LD,
ration tllatk, ttricenirllle, Pa.
Companies Eepreeonted i
Commerelal Uol"B Ins. Co., A .MIS H.oaa.?"! ti
Firemen'a Fund Ina. Co., Assets I. lo.0l 7 00
I'nloo In.ur.are Co.. Ae.ete I (170.0.17 ll
Tra.elera' Accident Ina Co . Aseeta.. l.tlD.WI
Nnrlhernlna Co.of New York Aa la IMu 00
Ineuranco placed ou all kiada ef property at
equitable relea.
TTAKI tbla method of notifying tboae la Bead
of a aood Hewer. Rearer, Thrasher ar Plow,
that I hate Ibo agency of tba
II VGKKYi:
Mower, Bcnpcr nnd Thresher,
Manufactured by AfLTMAN A O, Caatoa.0.
I ao alaa agent lor the eoieoraiea
South Bend Chilled Tlow I
ya-Peraona la seed ef either of tho chore bed
better call oa or addrera ma before parens. log
.(..where. ....,, u..tt
Jan. I, lUl.tf.) CarwoaaTlllo, Pa,
s.
Agricultural ImplcmGnts !
& Proprietor.
2,751.
INDIAN SUMMER,
''Drought the toiler Inilien Summer
To the melanehnly n-rtb Un't.
In the dreary Moon of Snow -sbosi."
Ih.w eoftly blue the Pky, ibi lljht
White eluudt alike, like barfii brlIit.
The Mono lo ihining portal itandi.
Red oak leavea In her toft brown bandi.
Her yellow, flowing heir It bound
With buy veil that awerpi the ground.
Tfaroo((h purple bar the brooklet Bowl ;
The eputted trout in winding known,
A drowsy afaeen It on the deep,
In mitt, wood, hill and water! ilerp.
Aerou the tile, aft I nit the rklra,
Like jailer wall the billi aril.
The idle mill, the breete that wait.
Bet in peerie to the oelcatlal gate,
A wandtiiuf, yellow butterOr,
Fliu to and iru the ttrown learea iigh.
The froat bat dona ita work, ami lo !
The empty ceti in bare buujha ahow.
Yet, not of tlngerlnc bird la near,
A hint ef muiio t the ear,
LSumtner'a aoft breath i on the air,
And, more than beauty everywhere ;
Ai if a loving word the tent,
The heart of Nature to eootent.
Fanny u' in Bntlon Journal.
TRIAL OF GUITEAU.
Additional Testimony on the part of
the Government,
SCENES AT THE DEPOT.
Tin
lJrifoner Correct ing
Witnesses.
"I AM A STALWART."
Alter tho opening; of tho Court Ed
ward A. Waaricr wub then cttlled. but
did not lcxpond. Jotthua A. Davia was
summoned, but alo did not respond.
Josepn jv. Miarpo, apgiHtnnt train
ninMur of the Balliinoro & Potomac
railroad, was culled and aworn. Jlo
described mintilely tho scono in the
deput. Ho did not eo tho shooting,
hut witncfsed tho arrest and tho mo
cceditiKS immediately succeeding tho
btiooting.
A YOUNO LADY WHO HAW TIIK SHOOTING.
Ella M. Ridgel', a young lady, at
tired in blac k, with her shoulders cov
ered wiili a beaded capo of a pretty
pattern, was next examined. Slio saw
tho shooting. Th President bi gan
fulling, sho said, from ihotimolho first
shot was tired. Sho thouuht it was Ihe
first shot thut struck him. She told
her story well, having it interlarded,
woman like, with many "and thens."
It was noticed that sho was tho first
witness to whom Guiicati apparently
paid any attention. Ho bonl his head
tor a few minutes, so as to catch every
word. Beforo sho finished, bowovor,
be relapsed into his usual indifferont
mood and read a newspaper.
nl'ITEAD AND THE HACKMAN.
'j'bo witness said she beard Guileau,
beforo tho shooting, speak to a back
man. Tho backman asked him if be
should co mo around to tho other door.
Tho prisonor replied : "Ob, no; I will
bo out soon." Sho did not know bow
long this was before tho President ar
rived. Sho gave a very clear atato
mcnt of the movamonU ot tho prisonor
in and about tho depot, sho having
been attracted to bim by his saying to
the hack man that ho was going to tho
cemetery. IIo looked as though bo
was in distress or troublo, sho said,
"and I thought ho was going tboro to
seo a dead friend." After the shooting
she beard bim say ho wanted a letter
which bo bad given to Gen. Shorman.
IIo seemed calmer and less distressed
alter the shooting than beforo ; bis
rotinlonanco was rather palo ; bo did
not run away, but walked. Sho turned
then tol ook at ibo President, and whon
sho next saw tho prisoner ho bad boon
seized. Tho witness had gnno to tbo
depot to soo some friends off. When
Guileau fired tbo shot ho extended
his band straight out; at the second
shot ho held it higher ; she thought
there was 12 or 15 persons in tho room
at the tinio ol the shooting.
Tbo cross examination ot tho witness
was conducted by Mr. Scovillo.
Mr. Robinson asked, however, a low
questions, in answorto wuich sue saJ
that wbon the backman snoko to tne
prisonor tho hackman pointed toward
lUh street; sho did not hear what ho
said.
OTHER TESTIMONY AS TO Till SCENES AT
DEPOT.
Joshua A. Davis, a middle-aged gen-
tloman, in a Pennsylvania railroad uni
form, a gatekeeper at the Baltimore k
Potomac denot, testified to what ne
saw of tho events at the depot on tho
morning of July 2d. Upnncross-cxami.
nation bo said that he was calling tbo
passongers for the limited express
when ho heard the first shot, be only
caught a glimpso of tbo prisonor'a fuce,
as ho was hurried out tlirougn 1110
main wailing room ; the prisoner was
strngglingasil ho wanted to getaway.
Win. S. Crawford, a young man, who
drives a wagon, was called and exam
ined. IIo bad gono to tho dopot to
take some baggago Irom tho Wbito
llouso belonging to in. i-roomnm;
started boforo tbo Trosldent, and ar
rived at the depot about ten minutes
after nino; ho heard tho shots from
the liBiri.Qi'o express office, and wit
nessed the events tbat followed. Uis
naralivo did not vary in dotad In any
material point Irom that of oti'cr wit
nesses, llo was standing that bo could
soo Guileau through tho door, but not
tba President ; he saw him fire the
Bet ond shot ; ho look a slop forward ;
bis bead was bent forward ; his arm
was extended forward ; as soon as he
fired be slopped backwards and lookod
as though he was looking at the object
at which ho firod ; bo then turned
around; tho witness saw Socrotary
11 aino running out ot tlio room, ami
thought at first tho prisoner had been
firing at him ; he did not bear tho
prisonorsay anything. Witnoss thought
bo saw Guileau enough to be able to
rccognizo him again.
OUITEAO CORRECTS A WITNESS.
Mr. Scoville asked how Guileau wore
his hat at the time, and placed the
prisoner's hat on his bead to have the
witneas indicate it. The witnoss said
that Guitcau bad his hat down ovor bis
eyes.
Tbeprisoncrpnt hishatback, smiled
blandly, and said very politely :
"1 don t wear it mat way. aubib
the way 1 wear It, sir."
Witness board ionie peopio may
Ivneh him." and aaw soma ona have
bis cane up aslbougb ho was going lo
strike bim.
Till ARREST OF O0ITIAO DESCRIBED.
John It. Scott, who Is employed at
tha Baltimore A Potomac depot as a
special police officer, was the next wit
ness, lit likewise oescnoca meai-mo
at tbo depot. II Handing, be
said, it lbs aoutn gal wnen tn iuwe-
CLEARFIELD, PA., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1881.
ing occurred; turning ho saw Mrs.
White runninj through themain room
ho saw Sir. Parkes holding a man ;
Mr. Parkes said : "this is tho man who
shot the President;" the witness then
seined him; the prisoner said : "I want
to go to tho jail." Iloaflorwards said :
'I have got a letter which 1 want to
send to General Sherman." After,
wards Police Oflleor Koarnoy look
hold of the prisoner, looked across to
witnoss nnd said : "John 1 bavo got
him." Afterwards tho prisonor said:
"I am a stalwart" and "Arthur is now
President of tho United States." On
tho way to police headquarters ho kept
repealing that ho wanted tbo letter
tnkon to Gen. Sherman, llo said also:
"I am a gentleman and a luwyer." At
police headquarters papers were taken
from his pocket and also a revolver.
Hero tho ivory-handled "bull-dog''
pistol takon Irom tho ptisoner wus
shown to tho witness and identified.
Uo handled it a little carelessly, and
tho disirict attorney called out : "Take
caro; it's loaded " Tho pistol then
was shown to tho jurymen, who in
spected it, passing it about verv ecn-
geruny.
Tbo witness examined tho pistol and
said tbero wero four loads in it, two
having been discharged.
Mr. Scott wus subjected to a long
cross-examination. Mr. Koarney, bo
said, had not taken holdot the prisoner
for fivo or six seconds after tbo witness
had soixed him. Tho prisoner did not
appear excited ; ho was very cool ond
deliberate, but had a fierce, sharp look
in ins eyes.
POLICEMAN KEARNEY'S STORY.
Patrick Koarney, tho polito officer
who arrested tho prisoner, wus then
examined. Ho talked with a much of
tho "brogue," und created considerable
amusement. Ho first sow tho prisoner
beforo tbo shooting, talking wub tbo
hackmon, who wero "bueking for a
job," as tho witness said, llo described
tho arrival of President Garfield und
Secretary Blaino; they paused at tho
i) street, entrance to ask bim (Uio wit
ness) tho time; and then disappeared
in tho depot; he (tho witness) turned
to go np bth street; beard the shots,
and turned about; tho prisoner ran
into him at tho B street door and tho
witness put him under arrest ; themun
struggling, ho puilod his club to hit
him, but "thought a minuto of tbo
grand jury, not knowing what tho
man bud done," and instead ol bitting
bim, gnvo bim a good shaking; somo
body afterwards caught hold of tho
prisoner nnd said "I arrest you," but
witness having ulreaily secured him
paid no attention ; Parkes, tho ticket
agent, ho said, madoarun and a grasp
ai mo ir.nn.
"I AM A STALWART."
When witness canto into tho room
with Guileau, Scott catno in from tbo
platform and caught tho prisoner by
tbo wrist, making Guitcau complain
mat ins wrist would be broken. Uui
leau, looking around, said, "I will go to
Jail lor it; Arthur is President, and 1
am a stalwart." Tbo witness described
tho passago from tbo depot to police
beailtiuarters, ho (tho witness) said
"This man has shot Iho President of
tho United Stalos." Detective Aclon
suid,"A ro you giving us tally, Kearney ?
"I sca'-Pio. When the papers bad
been taken Irom too prisoner, Lieut.
Eckloff asked if ho had anything to
say, and bo said "No, tho papers would
speak for themselves." When asked
his namo tho prisoner said, "Charles
Guitcau, of Illinois, a theologian nnd
a lawyer." Afterwards, wben they
wero searching him, he said : "Take
your timo; you have plenty ol timoto
search mo.
With much gusto tho witness, after
describing the scene in tbo police ollice,
tho searching ot tbo prisoner said
"Detective Mclilt'resb opened tho way.
1 took bold ot Ins' arm. Jle(Mchllitsb)
opened tbo cell door, and I put him
in." Being askod by Mr. Scovillo it
Mr. Parkes had not seized the prisonor,
tho witness said: "Noverdid bo in my
presence, so help mo God, put bunds
on bim." Alterwards tho witness,
speaking of Mr. ParkcB, said: "Ho
madoa rush at him (tho prisoner) and
said : "I'll soizo the assassin." After
witness heard tho struggle at the B
stroet door, tho latter mado no resist
ance; he was very willing to go ; Gui
tcau expressed feats of boing hurt
whilo on tho way to polico headquar
ters. "Ho had a paper in bis baud,"
said the witness, "but it had no writ
ing on it, and I took it as a bluff." llo
insistod on the lettor being sent to
Gen. Sherman ; a man named Lowry
had takon tho lettor Irom tho prisoner,
and tho witnoss told him to tuko it to
Major Brock.
The district attorney, rising, said be
had tho letter.
GUITEAU COMPLIMENTS THE WITNESS.
Tbo witness, continuing, rnid ho did
not notico anything peculiar about tbo
appearance ol Iho prisoner or bis man
ner ; bo was not excited.
Here Guileau interrupted the exami
nation and said: "Will your honor
allow mo to cxamino this witness a
moment ? Ho comes nearer llin truth
than any witness who has been on tho
stand."
"You will have to examino bim
through your rrnnsel," snid tho court.
Mr. Scovillo and Guileau put ineir
heads togolhcr and whispered for a
fow minutes, when Mr. Scov llo arose
and asked if ho (tho witness) was ex
cited when bo mado tho arrest. Ho
was not excited, tho witness said, for
he did not then know what hnd bap
poncd.
OUITEAU'S OWH ACCOUNT OF Ills ARREST.
Iloro followod a little colloquy be
tween Guileau and Kearnoy.
"As a matter of fact," said Iho
prisoner, "1 was Blanding still whon
the officer seized mo by tho wrist.
I bad just got my pistol put up wbon
ho seized mo, simulianooiisly. I told
iho officer that 1 wanted to go to jnil
at once. I mado no resistance at all."
"You went quietly along," said Mr.
Koarney, "and stood by mo at polico
headquarters. Isn't that so?"
"Yes, sir, that is so," said tho pris
oner. Kearney was then excusod from the
stnnd.
EXAMINATION OF MACKMEM.
John Taylor, a colored hackman,
was called to tho stand, and testified
that A week beforo tho shooting'iuileau
was at lb depot at tbo timo the
President was expected to go away ;
bo engaged tbe witness' back to take
him to Bonning's station.
Mr. Scoville confused the witness
considerably in cross-examination as
to how tho witnoss know it was Gui
tcau. Aquilli Barton, another colorod
hackman, was examined. He saw tho
prisoner it Ihe Baltimore A Pototnao
dopot first about half-past 8 o'clock;
Guileau cam along and asked for
Taylor; witness said Taylor wasn't
tboro, but be would like lo wait on
bim j Guitcau insisted that b wanted
to see Taylor; be returned in balf an
PRINCIPLES, NOT MEN.
hour and suiil to witness, "I want to
make a flno bargain "with you." lie
then said that ho wanted to bo luken to
tho Congressional Comctery, and said
Taylor had offered to do it for 82; ho
said ho would not tuy long, and wit
ness olferod to do it for Iho sumo.
Witness observed tho prisoner very
closely and kept sight of bim because
ho was afraid somo ono would buck'
him away from him." Guitcau went
into tbo depot ; beard tlio shots inside ;
rushed in and saw tho President lying
on tho floor; then looked around fur
tho man who hail engaged him. "I
saw tho man running back," said tbo
witness, "and know then that ho had
boon in Iho shooting; says I, Ob God,
that's tbo man that engaged mo to
tuko him to tho burring ivround." Un
dor examination by Mr. Scovillo tho
witness suid that Gnilonn did not seem
excited ; was pcrlcctly cool ; ho suid
to witness not to get txcited.
"n cro you gelling exciled !"' asked
Mr. Scoville.
"Not at all, 1 wasn't; but 1 was
'bucking1 verr strong for tbo iob
though (laugbtor)." Hosaid iho pris
oner appeared to bo "a good deal tn
bis senses."
Tho witness, ho saiJ, lookod fleshier
tlutn ho does now.
Guitcau hcie spnko: "I may stato
hero," ho said, "that I havo had the
first sqnaro'meal to-ility that I have
bad sinco the 2ilof July." This raised
a general guffaw.
nriTEAf's VISITS TO THE 8TATE
DKrAllTMENT.
Sevellon A. Brown, chief clerk ol
tbo Stato department, was next exam
ined. Ho had seen tbo prisoner very
often ; ho had como almost daily to the
Stuto department doting March, April
and May; bis visits were so frequent
that ho (witness) bad instructed the
messengers not to tuko his cards to Iho
Secretary ; ho mado his npiic&runco
shortly alter tho 4 lb of Mulch ; bo
gavo iho witness a copy of his speech,
and said ho bad mado application for
tho Austrian mission; at ono timo ho
applied for permission to go to tho li.
hrary and consult bonks, but witness
declined lo grant it ; could not remem
ber when hm visits ueu.wci ; bo after
wards changed bis application from
tbo Austrian mission to tbo Consulship
nt Puris ; at ono timo ho left a pencil
memorandum with tbo witness asking
permission In withdraw tlio speech ho
had filed ; witness was not at tbo do
pot, but saw tho President at theWhilo
llouso whon ho wus brought buck
from tho depot.
Mr. Drown wus subjected lo a very
long cross -examination. Guitcau bud,
ho said, introduced himself; ho spnko of
having iufluenco winch bo could com
mund, and mentioned Senator Lngnn;
no ono ever cumo to recommend Inm,
and bo never brought with him any
letter of recommendation ; ho (witness)
had not treated the application with
fitvor ; bo wasquilo sure thut tbo place
ho applied lor was beyond his reach ;
bo did not look upon bim as exactly
tho kind of man lor iho place; ho hud
given tho directions to cxcludo his
curds, becausu ho thought it not worth
tho Secretary's whilo to seo bim so
often ; ho did not want to givo him
any excuso to como to the department,
so ho hnd refused bis request for per
mission to go to tho library.
"if ho had como there with a leltef
from General Logan," aked Mr. Sco
villo, "or any other prominent man,
would bo havo been received with uny
more consideration ?"
"1 don'l think ho would, sir."
"Or half a dozen prominent public
men ?"
"1 think not, Bir."
"That would bavo mado no differ
ence?"
' I think not, sir."
Tho Secretary ol Slato had never
given him any instructions not to send
bim Guileuu'scards; bad never noticed
anything peculiar about bis appear
atico; bo Bccmcd to bo a nervous indi
vidual, and nuver looked anyone
straight in tho eye.
Hero tnnteau dropped Ins nowspa-
per, bocumo an interested listoncr, und
said: "I looked you in tho oyo, Mr.
Urnwn."
Tho witness, continuing, suid ho bad
never noticed anything wild in his
appearance.
A "STALWART OF THE STALWARTS.
Lieutenant Adolnhus EcklofT, in
charge of the detective squad, was
examined, llo described tlio scene
in tbo polico ofllco when Guitcau wus
brought in and his subseqiiont Iransler
to tbo jail. Tho witness under cross
examinution said Iho prisoner on tbo
way to tho jail said ho bad left papers
at tho depot to bo debrered to Byron
Andrews; ono of tho runors takVn
from tbo prisoner's pockets was direct
ed to tbo White Uouso; ho had also
in Ins pocket a speech, "Garfiuld and
Hancock; there wero some nowspa
per clippings, somo ol Guiteau's curds,
und somo pieces of money ; thoso wit
ness locked up in his drawer, but they
wero takon Irom the drawer in his
(witness') absence. On tbo way to
tho jail Guileau said ho wus a "Stal
wart of tbe Stalwarts, And spoko of
having a Icltor from General Sherman.
llo said ho bad shot tho President to
earn. l,a lf.tli hlioo n tmrtV Sml lOSUVO
tho country ; at polico head quurlors
Iho prisoner did not appear to ho very
much excited ; on tho way to tho jnil
tboro wero crowds about tlio hul k, und
ho crawled in between tbo two ollicurs
on tlio back seat and drow Ins hat
down, and the ptisoner was palo and
seemed to bo trying to screen himself
from tho public ; at police headquar
ters tho prisoner rotnarkod that "that
officer (meaning Kearney) was too ex
cited ;" the prisoner seemed very calm.
TESTIMONY OF J. STANLEY DROWN, SEO
R ETA R Y TO THE LATE PRF.S1PKNT
GARFIELD.
J. Stanley Brown was called, and
testified that ho was privato Secretary
of tho Into President. His nltention
was first called to Guitcau about the
first days of March, atiH bis observa
tions continued tip to Juno, when the
witness wool lo r.urope. llo (Gtiltraii)
appeared first at tho White llouso
about lb 8th or Uth of March ; ho
kept up hia visits, sending in bis curd
and taking bis seat in the waiting
room ; he camo into witness' room
four or five times ; saw him probably
liltcen times about tbo house and
grounds ; bo was accustomed to writo
notes to Do delivered to the rresidenu
A bundlo of notes wero handed to
Mr. Brown, nnd he identified them as
notes written by Guileau and left at
the Kxecuilv Mansion, lie testified
that tiuiloau's visits wore so persistent,
and the nature of bis application such
that he (witnoss) had told him that
his application must go tt thoSectcta-
ry of Stato; they bad very competent
ushers tboro, who hail a way ol keep
ing away persons whoso visits. were
objectionable.
Mr. lA.rklnll Here read the note to
tbe President identified by Mr. Brown.
REP
They all related to Guiteau's office
seeking.
aUITEAC'S LETTERS.
The first was dntod Murch Bib, 1881,
and was tho ono enclosing Guitoau's
speech ; on tbe 2Uth of March ho wrote,
prossing bis claim to the Consulship of
Paris; on April 8th, ho wroto in a
similar strain ; on April 29th, be wrote,
saying: "1 am very sorry you havo got
.-lenaior t-onunng down on you, and
advised tho President to withdraw
Judge Robertson's nomination and
leave Mr. Merritt in tho New York
colloctorsbip ; on May 8lh bocxpressed
his determination to stand by tho
President in his fight with Senator
Conkling; on May 10th, ho wroto : "I
hove got a new idea about '81. If you
work your position lor all it is worth
you may bo renominated in 1881."
OUITEAU PROMPT THE DISTRICT AT
TORNEY. Col. Coikhill proceeding to read,
hesitated over tbo following senlenco :
" Two National Conventions have
slaughtered Mr. Blaino on account"
"of bis" "on account of his"
"I!ailroud,"said tho prisoner, prompt
ing.
With this help tho district attorney
proceeded to tho next letter, dated
May 13th. Guiicati advised the Prcsi
dent to popularize himself by taking a
trip around tho world. On tho Kith
of May bo wroto, denouncing Mr.
Bluinc.
UUITEAU EXPLAINS HIS PREDICTION THAT
OAltPIELD WOULD C0S1E TO OIIIEP.
Tho last lettor was dated Mnv 2,'Jd
and wus tho ono in which Guitcau
spoko of Mr. Blaino us a vindictive
in. In reading tho prediction tbnt
t.onoral barlield would como to grief,
tbo prisoner interrupted and suid :
"I olilical griel, 1 meant.
"That's all I could find on tho files."
suid Mr. Brown, when tho letters had
been read.
"That's all I ever wrote," said Gui
tcau Quickly.
Mr Cork hill submitted other letters
written by Guiteau to Mr. Brown,
simply for tbo purpose of identifying
tho handwriting.
"That is all correct," said Guileau,
"1 rccognizo thorn every one."
Tho witness said everybody was re
ceived courteously at tho Whito llouso.
"Cordially you may say," interrupt
ed tbo prisoner.
Mr. Scoville, speaking of letters ro
coived by Ibo President at Mentor.
from Guiloau, said ho did not liko to
disturb tbo President's fumily lo get
them.
"They aro unimportant," said Gui
tcau, "I can givo the snbstancoof them
if necessar."
Mr. Brown testified tbat all tbo Into
President's privato letters had been
hurriedly placed in boxes, sealed np
nnd deposited in tho departments for
safe keeping.
OUITEAU CIIECK8 11R. SCOVILLE.
Mr.Scovillo hero attempted to repeat
from memory tho letter written to tbo
President and published lust July, in
which Guitcau applied for tho Aus
trian Mission, and suid bo was about
to marry a ludy ol grout wealth. Tbo
prisoner hero interposed : "That is
wrong. 1 object lo bis staling my
letters Irom memory. By referring to
ibo files of iho papers of lust July you
will find them."
Subsequently tbo prisoner said tbo
letters wero uiiimpnrtunt ; ono ol them
was written in October, 1880, and tbo
other in January, and referred to his
application for tho Austrian Mission.
OUITEAU'S PACKA11E OF LETTERS AT THE
NEWS STAND.
James L. Denny, who attended the
nows stand in tho depot was tho noxt
witness examined. Ho testifiod to
Guiteau's leaving a packago of papors
at bis slant! in tho depot. Mr. Denny
identified tho papers, and they woro
then read by tbo District Atlornoy.
Wben Mr. Dennv's examination was
concluded, tbo court adjourned till tho
next morning.
Guiteau was soon afterwords taken
back to jail.
HITTER FEELING AOAINST (11ITEAU
OUTSIDE.
Among thoso outsido this morning
wero somo whoso appoatunco was sus
picious, and on more tlutn ono a pistol
wus seen in the hip pocket. Ono man,
an ex-Union soldier, was beurd to say,
"Wo don't want any d d foolish
ness about this enso. If they play
malpractico and insanity tho caso will
end d d soon." Another, also Bn
ex soldier and minus an arm, very
coolly asked ono of tho employes ol
the court if he could givo him look
at the prisonor, somuwhero between
tbo juil and tbo court room. A by
stander suggested thut ho ought not
to havo a pistol, and tho ox soldier re
plied, "Well, 1 carry ono and a mouth
lull of tobacco juico for tho of a
." Tho officer suggested that ho
did not want to have Inm about and
ho retired, saying that if tbcro tuts
any d d legal sentitnentalism about
the caso ho would end it.
Ono of tho Indies who, during the
morning, snt in tho court room taking
notes, during tho recess guvo vent to
her feelings on the cast portico. Sho
remarked tbat tbo court would clear
Gutlcuu. '1 ho liovcrniiiL-ni nviu i-,,w J
ing all this money and making a show
of bim when they could kilt him and
get rid of him. What was wanted
hero now was less freedom and more
despotism.
OUITEAU'S NEW BRACELETS.
Perry II Corson, tho officer rf tho
van, bad a now pair of hand cuffs, hold
'ng them for tho prisoner's bnnds, as
bo camo into tho front office of tho
jail. Tho eyes of tho prisoner glisten
ed with pleasure, as ho noticed their
lustro, and ho said to Carson : "I am
much obliged for those bracelets; they
just suit me. Say to Mr. Williams 1
am much obliged to him, too. And
he jumped into tho von in a more
sprightly manner than heretofore.
A certain minister invariably forgot
tn givo out tbo notices at the proper
lime. Ono Sundav bo announced them
just beforo the last hymn, tho first line
ol which chanced lo be, "Lord, wbnt
a forgotful wretch am I ?" and thoposir
man was oven puzzled because a uni
versal smilo spread over bis congrega
tion. It was the first night aboard the
steamer. "At last," be said tenderly,
"wo are all alone, out upon the waters
of tho dark blue seas; and your boart
will always neat for me, as it bas in
tho past?" "My heart's ill right she
answered Int.guidly, "but my stomach
fuels awful I"
A young lady who was doing the
Alps, reports progress to her guardian :
"I tried yesterday to climb lb Matter
horn : didn't reach tbe top. It's ab
surdly bigh everything is in this
country, l'lcaio sond mo some money."
BL
NEW
TIIK ASSASSINS 0PKR1SG
SPEECH.
At tho opening of tho caso, Guiteau
offered to read in Court an address,
but ho was not permitted. Tho full
text ot the document is suhtanlially as
follows :
Tho spoocb which Guileau prepared
for delivery in Court savs ho is charged
with murdering Garfield. Nothing
can bo more absurd, becanso Garfield
died ol mulpractico, (jarheld was a
good man, but a weak politician. Bo
ing President, bo was in a position to
do vast injury to tho Republic, and
was doing it by tho unwiso use of pat
ronage, and tho Lord and himself took
tho responsibility of removing him.
His duty to tho Lord and to the
Amoricitn peopio ovcrcanio bis personal
feelings toward Garfield and ho sought
to remove him. Not being a marks
man, Garfield wits not finally shot;
but incompetent physicinns finished
tho work, and they, not himself, aro
responsible for Gariiold's death.
Guileau then speaks of tho breach
in tbo Republican party and bis resolve
lo removo tho President, and claims
tbat Deity ordered him to firo tbo shot.
Ho also refers to his work on theology,
insanity in his family, his married life
and his lifo in prison, and appeals lo
tnoso wnoin ho says ho has put in po
sition to send bim money for defense.
Tbo Deity seems well-disposed to fu
tber it, thus fur, and I expect lie will
continue to father it to tho end. It is
not likely Ho will nllow mo to como
to grief for obeying Him. How do
you know it wus tbo Deity ? I wus
so certain of it, I put my life on it, and
I undorlaka touy tbo Deity is actively
engaged in my defense, I am confident
Ho will cbock ninto tho wise beads on
Ibis prosecution. I beg they go slow ;
they cannot afford to get tho Deity
down on them. "Ho uttered His
voice," says tho Psalmist, "uiid the
earth melted." This is the God whom
I served when I sought to removo tho
President, and IIo is hound to t:.lto
euro of mc. Recently a Washington
newspaper lithographed a crumped
piece of paper 1 bad carried in my
vest pocket a week under tho title of
"l.uiteuus Pica." It was written
when 1 bad tho material, at odd times.
and I could hardly read it myself, and
so told tlio gentleman 1 travo it to :
but ho thought bo could read it and
took it, as bo was in bnstc. 1 next
beard of it as lithographed. Owing to
circumstances beyond my control, I
havo boon forcod to ask your Honor
to assign mo counsel and furnish mo
witnesses. I formerly practiced in
Now York and Chicago. In 1ST" I
lelt a good practice in Chicago and
went out lecturing, but I had small
success. I had tdeus, but no reputa
tion. Scovillo is developing Iho theory
d' hereditary insanity, which may havo
an important bearing on this case.
Insanity runs in my family, ily la
ther had two Bisters and a nephow and
nioco in an insioo a'sylum. Ho, him
self, was a monomaniac for twenty-five
years in the Oneida Community. IIo
could so no evil in that concern and
no good out of it. llo thought Noyes
a greater mun than tbo Lord Jesus
Christ. Uu was rational enough out
sido of Iho community idea. On that
bo was a lunatic, llo would get greatly
excited in discussing that and look and
n t liko a wild man. All this timo bo
was a good business mun. Ho was
cashier of a bank, and attended to bis
duties promptly and faithfully. It was
owing to bis fanaticism and insanity
thut 1 got into tbo Oneida Community
when a boy. Once under N ores' influ
enco it was impossible to got nwoy,
and 1 lingered tboro in tho greatest
distress six long weary years. I was
in Iho Community from 1SO0 to lSGfj.
Sinco then I bavo known and cured
nothing for them. Ono Smith, whom
1 know there, bus taken upon himself
to writo on this caRt', and among other
silly and unimportant statements ho
says : '1 was in tbo habit of connect
ing my name with tho words 'premier
to England,' " ota. Thoso statements
aro false. My father was a frequent
visitor ot tbo Community ; but never
resided thoro. Ho wanted to go, but
my step mother opposed it. 1 wish
this Oneida Community business to
pass into oblivion.. My ex wile, bus
iieen summoned by tho prosecution.
Our mnrriago was promaturo. 1 only
know her ten weeks and wo wero
married on ten hours' notico. She
w as a poor girl. Sho was unlortunato,
and I had no business to have married
her. Wo wero married in 180:1, sops
rated in 1873, and divorced In 18M,
without issuo. I was practicing law
then and wo lived at hotels and board
ing bouses. ) havo known littlo about
her sinco 1873. I understand sho
married well four years ago and Is
living in Colorado. 1 havo been strictly
virtuous six or sevon years. 1 claim
lo bo a gentleman and a Christian. I
am a patriot. To-day I suffer in bonds
as a patriot. Washington was a pa
triot. Grant was a patriot. Washing
ton led the armies; of tho Revolution
through eight years of bloody war to
victory and glory and tbo nation is
happy and prosperous. They raised
tho old war cry, "Rally 'Round tho
King, Boys; Rally 'Round tbo l'lag,"
nnd thousands of tbo choicest Bons of
tho Republic went forth to battle, to
Vlciuiv u. m Uv,i!,, M'Mt(iifin
and Grnril, by iheir valor and success
In war won tbe admiration of man
kind. Today, I suffer in bonds as
patriot, because I had tbo inspiration
und nerco to nnito a great political
parly lo tho end that tho nation might
bo saved from another desolating war.
I do not pretend Iho war wus immedi
ate, but I do say, emphatically, that
the bitterness in tho Republican parly
last Spring, was deepening and deep,
oning, hour by hour, and that within
two or thrco years, or less, tho nation
would have been in civil war. In tho
presenco of dealh all hearts wero
hushed, all contention ceased. For
weeks and weeks the heart and brain
of tho nation centred on tho Biek man
at tho Whito llouso. At last be went
tbo way ol all Iho flesh, and tho nation
was a bouso of mourning. To say 1
havo boon misunderstood or villiiied
by nearly tho cntiro American press,
nay more, by nearly tho entire Amoal
can people. Is a trno statement
Referring to tho Oneida Community,
Guileau says, notably, Ais mixing with
Oneida Noycs" fhr two years, was
tho curso of my father's lile, and for
six years 1 liv.-d under the despotism
he wielded in tbs Oneida Community.
I expressed my detestation of Noyes.
Ism then. To-day, John H. Noycs,
loundcr of the Oneida Community, is
an American fugitive on British soil.
Noyes is a cold-blooded sconndrol. lie
has debauched moro young women,
broken up more reputable funtilies, and
caused more misery by his stinking
fanaticism and liceniintisnoss than any
man ol this aga. Had Noyes had bia
duos, be would have been bung thirty
years ago for crimes committed with
hit own flesh and blood, and it would
bavo bcon a Godsend to a great many
CAN.
TEEMS $2 per annum in Advance.
SERIES - V01, 22, NO. -18.
decent people if it had boon. During
my residence in the Oneida Community,
I, liko most of tbo men in that com
munity was practically a Shaker.
1 bavo been in jail sinco July 2d, and
huve borne my confinement patiently,
knowing my vindication would come.
Twico havo I been shot at, and come
near being shot dead, but tbo Lord
kept mo harmless. Liko tho Hebrew
children in tho fiery furnace, not a
hair of my head has been singed, be-
causo tho Lord whom I served when 1
sought to removo tho President has
taken rare of mo. 1 havo been kindly
treated by the jail officials and bavo no
complaint to make savo tbat my lottors
navo neon intercepted going out and
in, and I bavo been cut off, until re
cently, from tho rcportors and news
papers, which I consider illegal and
impertinent. Certain parties, whom
I need not namo, havo boon greatly
benefitted, financially, by my inspira
tions, and 1 am going to ask them to
contribute to my dofenso. I havo no
right or wish to ask my lawyers to
work fir nothing. Thoro are hundreds
of persons who aro and will bo beno
fitted financially by tho new Adminis
tration. They aro all indebted to mo
for their positions from tho President.
1 confidently appeal to thorn and the
public at largo to sond mo money for
my defense Certain politicians Boom
perfectly willing to fatten at tho public
crib on my inspiration, but they pro
tend to bo horrified oot of their senses
by tho Into President's romoval, and
want nothing to do with mo. Thoy
say 1 am "a dastardly assassin. Tho
word "assassin" grates on my mind,
and yet somo peopio delight In using it.
Why am I an assassin any moro than
a man who shot at another during tho
w urP A thousand bravo boys on both
sides wero shot dead during tho war,
but no ono thinks of talking about
assossination. Thoro was homicide.
A man was killed ; but in my case tbo
doctors killed tho lato President, and
not me. So tbero is not even homicide
in this caso. Tbo President was sim
ply shot and wounded by an insane
mun. 1 ho man was msano in tbo law
because it was God's act and not his.
Tbero is not tbo first clement of mur
der in Ibis case. There is no homicide
in this caso und, therefore, no malice
in tho law. Admitting that tho Into
President died from tho shot, which I
deny as a matter of fact, still the cir
cumstances allending tho shooting liq-
uidulo tho presumption of malico cither
in law or in luct. Jieretoloro, politi
cal grievances bavo been adjusted by
war, or ballots. Had Jefferson Davis
and a dozen or two of his co trttitors
been shot dead in January, 1804, no
doubt our lalo Rebellion never would
hnvo been ; but Providence and timo
right all things, and to day, by a grad
ual chango of publio opinion, 1 am
juBlificd in passing with laudublo con
tempt tho continual venom of certain
newspapers. Lot tho newspapers
change from Guitcau tbo assassin to
Guiteau tho patriot. I appeal to the
Stalwart and Liberal press ol tbo na
tion lor justice 1 appeal to the Ito
publican party .especially tbo Stalwarts,
of whom lam proud to bo ono, lor
justice 1 appeal lo the President of
the I nitcd States lor justice. I am
tho man that mado bun President.
Without my inspiration ho was a po
litical cipher, without power or im
portance. 1 was constantly with him
in Now York, last Pall, during the
canvass, and bo and tbe rcBt of our
men know that wo bad all wo could do
to elect our ticket Had Hancock
kept bis mouth closed on tho tariff,
or had tho Morcy letter been delayed
ono week, Hancock would certainly
bavo been cloctod. i hen no man
could tell what might bappon to tho
liepublic. J nm moro than glad Arthur
is proving himself a wise man, in his
now position, and I expect he will
givo the nation the finest administra
tion it has over bad.
I appeal to this Honorable Court for
Justice; I am glad your Honor is a
gentleman of broad views and Christian
sentiment and clear head. I count
myself fortunate, indeed, tbat iny caso
is to bo tried beforo such a vory able
and careful jurist.
SILVER DOLLARS.
Immediately upon tho passago of
tho bill requiring tho mints to coin two
millions ot silver dollars per month, a
huo and cry was raised that thoy
would not circulate, people would not
huvo them, businoss mun would havo
no place to keep them, bunks would
not tako them, and the Government
could not supply rooms enough to
safely bold them. Bankers and brok
ers and governmental officials did
mako ovory effort to disgrace thorn and
prevent their circulation, and millions
were piled up in tho federal treasury
vaults and in tho mints. But people
would bavo thorn, and largely begun to
rcluso the filthy, disease carrying small
notes (sbinplaslers) that aro absolutely
mostly unlit for any decent person to
handle. Tho Banks begun to bo glad
10 got tho silver dollars, tbo great
body of tbo peopio wero anxious for
tbcin, and all who laid np sums of
money carefully selected thoso dollars,
Tbo result is that tho Government has
been literally run out ol them and has
scarcely enough on hand to redeem
itio Bllvei certifioaloo tn oiroulatlon.
The federal treasury has bcon com
pelled to step paying them out until
moro aro coined, and Iho public are as
lur from boing satisfied with tbo quanti
ty existing as ovorl Shod out the
"dollars of our daddies." People want
them in abundance and prolusion, and
will havo thorn. -CYinfan Democrat.
Nasry'sCarpet Bao. Nasby writes
to tlio Toledo Ma le : "I her invent"!
a now carpit bag for tbo esrhel
yooso uv patriots and agitator It is
mado uv thin Injy rubber, w'th frame
that folds up into a iH compass.
Yoo tako that carpit oag and blow it
up till it bulges ou nt tbo sidos et tho
it win full of e'ozo and things and
walk into a lodging bouso and demand
rooms win confidence That carpet
hag histin with valyooablos Battles it.
It looks solvent and everything is in
looks. Yoo slay on tbe strength uv
that bag, and bev yoor meals sent to
yoor room, and live tat Presently
your lundlady wants money, and com
mences to walcu (hat carpit nag. 100
can't get out of tho house with it, for
that is her ankor and bcr hope. ory
good. Somo evening yoo go to your
room, let the wind out uv it, fold it up
and put it in your coat pockit; and
bid her good evening, telling her yon
shol be homo early, and she may light
tho fire at 10, and the placs that knowd
yoo wunst knows yoo no more furavor.
Tho first dark placo yoo oomo to yoo
blow it np agin, and go boldly into
mother bouse and establish yootsclf
in comfort of not in luxury."
Some things are patt findinj out.
The lovo for whiskey ia what staggers
a mm. ,
EDUCATiMAL.
BT M. L. Mequbwitr"
Col. J. P. Benford haa area far ajlmeolf a rep
atatioa la U ancle that can never bo etfaoed. Aa
a leotarer be atanda witbont a peer oa tbe Amerl.
oaa platform. He talka with tbat freedom aod
ease tbet le admired by all aad poseeeeed by eery
few. He was the beet lecturer of tba aiae wba
appeared la tbo II inner oourse. Muoey (lad.)
iJaiff TYm.s.
Col. Copelaad'a lecture waa lalmitablo la Itf
way, a mlaturo of aplendid oratery, eauatlo wit,
aad humor of refined aad highly ontertalalng
order, ateoy who listened to him declared htm
more thaa a match for laaersoll and the Dear of
any lecturer la the field. Ckieap Trib:
ci.EABrir.ij enrxrr teachers'
ixmiTcn:.
tlENEKAL PROGRAMME.
HOW TO IIECOME ENROLLED.
Accompanying tho circular ia an
envelopo containing a printed form
which fully explains the plans adopted
for enrolling members and certifying
tbo result of their attondenc to school
boards, as required by tho Act of As
sembly of April, 1881. We prosum
all teachers know that tbey are now
allowed their time and wagos while at
tending the County Institute. (Act
of April, 1881). Teachers who are en
rolled on Monday afternoon and re
main until Friday noon, will bavo a
credit of fivo days, as tbo law allows a
halt day lor coming to, and a halt day
for rolurning from place of meeting.
A list of all tho school districts ot tbe
county, with the names of all tbe teach
ers employed therein is now recorded
in tbo roll book. At the oponing of
tho session on Monday tho distiicts
will bo called alphabetically, and tbe
teachers present will then deposit tbeir
envelopes with tho Enrolling Commit-
too, who will seo that they receive the
proper credit upon tho books. Please
observe closely tho instructions printed
upon tlio blank, and thus avoid con
fusion and mistakes in enrolling names.
HAT Till I'll ESS HAS TO SAY OP OUR
INSTRUCTORS.
Spaco will only admit of a brief in.
trouuclion to tho gentlemen who will
lecture beforo our Institute. Thoy are
all men of National reputation, ind we
could giro hundreds of testimonials if
it woro necessary, regarding their fit
ness tor tho work they aro pursuing :
COL, J. P. BANKORD,
The old-lime favorite, will appear for
tho lust time, belore our Institute, on
Montloy ovening, Doc. 11th, at which
limo he will either delivor bis celebrat
ed lecturo, "Paris in War times," or
repeat his famous lecture, "Old Times
und tho Now." A Pennsylvania editor
truthfully describes Col. Sanford in
Ihn tollowing paragraph :
"Alter hearing him last night, wo
can truthfully say : His witticisms are
irresistible; his whole soul manner,
his full, clear accent, his natural elo
quence, his poworful human sympa
thies, bis aculo comprehension of hu
man nature, and his wide world trav
els, stamp bim as one of tbo most in
teresting speakers and remarkable
men of the United States."
PROF. LADD AND DR. IllllBEl
Will lecturo on Tuesday evening. .Iu
order that all may bear thoso distin
guished gentlemen, no admittance feo
will be charged.
Hon. E. E. lligbeo (as all know) is
our present efficient State Superintend
ent. A gentleman possessing rare
gills as a speaker, and as a scholar
without a peer in tbe State. Dr. Jlig
beo is a gonial, self possessed and
scholarly gentleman, having a stern
devotion for tho responsibilities that
rosl upon bim as a loader of the edu
cational forcos of the Commonwealth.
Ho comes to Clearfield county to form
the acquaintance those whose co ope
ration ho expocts in the discharge of
bis duties, and wo trust bia reception
may be a cordial od from our teach
ers and Directors.
PROP. JOBS) J. LAnn
Comes from tho Sunny South, having
been employed tor tbo past eight years
as School organizer and Institute lec
turer lor tho southern blatos, under
Iho direction of tho General Agent of
tho Pea body Fund. Prof. Ladd bas
dono Institute work in most ovory
Slate in tbe Union, and is the greatest
and most acccptablo Institute man in
tbo United atatcs. ito will be with
us tho cntiro wock, and on Tuesday
ovoning will delivor his lecture "Par
ent, Teacher, Pupil."
"r rot. John J. J.add baa endoared
himself to a large circle ot friends
among the teachers ol North Carolina.
His lectures, boforo tbe btato IS ormal
School, over which ho presidod fur
threo years, will not soon bo forgotten,
llo baa beon transferred to Arkansas,
whore he will stir up tho Educational
world." Chnprl Hill (N. C.) Ledger.
"At 7 o'clockthe bouse was literally
packed to hoar Prof. Ladd. Wo can
not do the lecture justice. It was on
of Prof. Ladd's own zealous, earnest
talks, glowing all through with tbe
warmth and ardor which flows from a
soul thoroughly enlistod and fired up
in a groat, good and noble work. For
tunate were tbey who hoard it"
Dardincll (Arkansas) lmigrant.
COL. L. P. OOPELAND.
Wednesday ovening, December 21st,
Mr. Copelanfl will deliver hiscelobrat-
ed locturo "Snobs and Snobbery." W
submit the following in evidence of
tho morns or tho lecture :
Tho Col. dealt with snobs of both
sexes, and snobs whoso appellations
are manifold, the titled, literary, fash
ionable, the money snobs, and so on to
the ond of tho chapter. Verily were
all snobs brought to grief. Those who
did not attend missed a rare intollocual
treat, a gonuino 'feast of reason and
flow of soul,' and tboso who did not
must congratulate thomaolvos upon
their rich enjoyment." Troy (iV, Y.)
Times.
TIll'RHI'AY EVENINII, DECEMBER 22,
On this evening the Colonel will do
liver his lecture on the "Miatakos ot
Bob." All who hear tbo first of courso
will be present to hear tha second.
Head what ia said ol this lecture :
"Col. L. F. Copoland, of Indiana, has
beon in this place Iprsuring on the
'Mistakos of Bob.' tVe would adviso
fooplo every whe to bear this lecturo.
t is logical, lumoroiis, pathctio, and
sensible, aC tho best lecture wo ever
listened w 'and such as Is ncodod in
every town, The gentleman is a mag-nifl-ont
orator and be keeps hia audi
ences in splendid humor by bis witty
and ludicrous illustrations, while at
the same time a vein or good, sound,
practical ideas ia constantly befor
thorn." Altion (.VirA.) Cor. A'. Y.
II ilncM.
SPECIAL TO OUR PATRONS.
The con i so of lectures will b given
in Pio'i Opera Uouso. We feel safe in
saying that they will prove more ac
ceptable than any course of lectures
ever dcliverod in Clearfield. We know
thoy aro much moro expensive than
any proceding ones. At our low rate
of admission it will require liberal
patronago to meet tho expenses con
nected with these lectures. The fro
lecturos of Tuesday evening, music,
ovening readings aod ball rent alon
will cost II oo, all of wbicn must com
from the proceeds of theother evenings.
Tbe rates of admission will bo a
follows:
Single tickets to tho lectures of Col
onels Sanford and Copoland, 40 cent.
Ticket for tbe lull course, II.U0; a .
slight reduction madeon family ticket. '
Tickets will b sold at the postoffico
and at the ticket ofllco, at tb hoad of
tho stairs. '
Tho train duo at Curwenaville at
11:40 A. M., will probably b run back
to Clearfield on Monday, in order to
bring op river teachers to th opening
session of th Institute.

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