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Lancaster daily intelligencer. (Lancaster, Pa.) 1864-1928, February 27, 1880, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83032300/1880-02-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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Volume XYI-Ke. 152.
LANCASTER, PA., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1880.
Price Twe Ceats.
f7W
m
TERMS.
THE DAILYINTELLIGENOER,
PUBLISHED EVERT KTEIflRO,
BY 8TEINMAN & HENSEL,
Intelligencer Building, Southwest Cerner of
Centre square.
Tuk Daily Intklliqencer is furnished te
-ubseribers in the City of Lancaster and sur
rounding towns, accessible by Railroad and
Daily Stage Lines ut Tkx Cents Per Week,
liayuble te tlie Carriers, weekly. I5y Mail, $5 a
y-ar in ad vunce ; otherwise, H.
Entered at the pest office at Lancaster, Pa., as
second class mail matter.
S-The STEAM JOB PRINTING DEPART DEPART
MKXTef this establishment possesses unsur
passed facilities for the execution of all kinds
of Plain and Kancv Printing.
COAL.
B.
. MAKT1X,
helcsale and Retail Dealer in ull kinds of
LUMBER AXD COAL.
3-Yard : Ne. 420 Xerth Water and Prince
strcet, above Lemen, Lancaster. nS-lyd
COAL! COAL! COAL! COAL!
Ccial of the l!:st Quality put up expressly
ler family uc, and at the low
est market prices.
THY A SAMPLE TON.
XI- VAKD 150 SOUTH WATER ST.
iii-i-lyd PHILIP SCHUM.SON A CO.
Just received A FINE LOT OF BALED
TIMOTHY HAY, at
M. F. STEIGERWALT & SON'S,
DEALEl'-S IN
COAL! FLOUR!! GRAIN ! 1 !
FAMILY COAL UNDER COVEK.
31 iiin-etn Patent Precess Family and Baker's
Fleur, Ruled Hay and Feed of all kinds.
AVaicIieuse and Yard: 234 Xerth Water St
s.27-lyd
C0H0 & WILEY,
. SOUTH WATER ST., Lancaster, l'a.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
LUMBER AND COAL.
Alse, Contractors and Builders.
::tiin:ites made and contracts undertaken
en all kinds of buildings,
limucli OMc; : Ne. 3 NORTH DUKE ST.
ieb'JS-lyd
COAL! - -"-"CQALTi
GORREOHT & CO.,
Fer Ceed and Cheap Ceal. Yard Hurri-burg
Pike. Olllce -2H!4 Exst Chestnut Street.
P. W. GORRECHT, Agt.
J. IS. UI LEY.
e!Md
W. A. KELLEK.
"jO'O TICK TO TUB PUBLIC.
G. SEXEK & SONS.
Will continue te sell only
GEyUIXELYKENS VALLEY
and WJLKESBARRE COALS
Inch arc the best in the market, and sell as
LOW as the LOWEST, and net only GUAR
ANTEE FULL WEIGHT, butallew te WEIGH
OX AXY .scale in geed order.
Al-e Rough and Dressed Lumber, Sash
Deers, Blinds, Ac, at Lewest Market Prices.
Ofllce and yard northeast corner Prince and
Walnut streets, Lancaster, Pa. janl-lfd
HOOKS AS1 STATIONERY.
i)apj:ti:kie axi iuktuuav cards.
in gui: at vauiety, at the
BOOK AXD STATIONERY STOKE
L. M. FLYNN'S,
Xe. 42 WEST KING STREET.
1880. 1880.
VALENTINES!
A CHOICE STOCK OF
MARCUS WARD & CO'S
Valentines and Valentine
CARDS,
Unsurpassed in variety of design and bca uty
FOH SALE AT BOOK STORE OF
JOO BAM SOIS,
15 and 17 NORTH QDEEN STREET,
LANCASTER. PA.
uoets ash shoes.
Tf 4 QTr ROOTS. SHOES AND LASTS
JJj AlJ J. made en a new principle, insur
ing comfort ler the feet.
t-V"VFC Lasts made te order.
j)UUlO MILLEU,
lel)H-tfd
133 East King street.
c
IRCUMSTANCES WILL NOT PERMIT
te auvuktise a
niPBi
but wc wiU de the next thing te it, viz :
We will call the attention of our friends and
customers te the fact that we have en hand a
very Large Stock of
BOOTS AND SHOES,
purchased betere the late ADVANCE, which,
we will ell at
Strictly Old Prices.
C.Giveusacall.
A. ADLER,
43 WEST KING- STREET
WRITING INKS, AC.
TJSE THE REST.
HARRISON'S
CELEBRATED
WRITING INKS, FLUIDS
AND
MUCILAGE.
Give them a trial. Ask yenr stationer for
them and take no ether. 49-Sl'ECIAL KATES
ter inks, in bulk for Schools and CeUeges.
HARRISON MANUFACTURING CO.,
512 Broadway, New Yerk.
Please mention tnu paper. fcbS-lmdAw
clothing.
NEW GOODS
fee
FALL & WINTER.
Wc are new prepared te show the public one
of the largest stocks of
READYMADE clothing
ever exhibited in the city of Lancaster. Geed
Working Suits for men $6.00. Geed Styles
Cassimere Suits for men $7.50. Our All Weel
Men's Suits that wc are selling ler $9.00 are as
geed as you can buy elsewhere for $12.00. Our
stock of Overcoats are immense. All grades
and every variety of styles and colors, for
men, boys and youths, all our own manufac
ture. Full line of Men's, Youths' and Beys'
Suits. Full line of Men's, Youths' and Beys'
Overcoats.
CUSTOM DEPARTMENT !
We are prepared te show one et the best
stocks of Piece Goods te select from and have
made te order ever shown in the city. They
are all arranged en tables Utted up expressly
se that every piece can be examined before
making a selection. All our goods have been
purchased before the rise in woolens. We are
prepared te make up In geed style and at short
notice and at bottom prices. We make te or
der an All Weel Suit for $12.00. By buying
your goods at
CENTRE HALL
you save one profit, as we. manufacture all our
own Clothing und give employment te about
one hundred hands. Call and examine our
stock and be convinced as te the truth of which
we af 11 nn.
MYERS & RATHFON,
Centre Hall, Ne. 13 East King Street.
epeci;
.VI. NOTICE.
66.
68.
D.Gransmaii&Bre.
MM CLOSM SALE!
OF
OVERCOATS AND HEAVY SUITINGS.
SPECIAL 1XDUCEMEXTS
te bnycrset Clothing in order te make room
for a large SPICING STOCK new being manu
factured, and we are needing room. We offer
m ell-made and stylish
Clothing for Men and Beys
LOWER PRICES
than ever heard of before, although Goods are
going up every day. We will sell, for we must
have the room.
Loek ut Our Astonishingly Lew Price
List :
OVERCOATS! OVERCOATS! OVERCOATS!
fer$i90, ler $3.85, for $5.35, for $0.75.
OVEICCOATS ! OVERCOATS ! OVERCOATS
for $7.75. for $9.75, for $10.75.
OVERCOATS ! OVERCOATS ! OVERCOATS !
for $12, $14, $16 and $20.
These are heavy-lined Overcoats, carelully
made and splendidly trimmed.
OVEICCOATS ! OVEICCOATS ! OVERCOATS
for $7.50, ler $3.50, for $9.50, for $13.
OVERCOATS ! OVERCOATS ! OVERCOATS !
for $15, for $18, for $20.
These are Plaid-Back Overcoats, equal te
custom work.
HEAVY, MEX'S SUITS !
for $3.50, $1.00, $5.00, $7.00, $9.00, $10.00.
MEX'S SUITS FOR FIXE DRESS !
for $12.00, $14.00, $15.00, $10.00, $18.00 and $20,00.
BOYS' SUITS AXD OVERCOATS !
BOYS' SUITS from $2.23 te $10.00.
BOYS' OVEICCOATS VERY LOW.
We sell only our own make and guarantee
satisfaction.
Meney returned en all goods net found as
represented.
AiTPlcasc call, whether you wish te purchase
or net.
Is stocked with the latest styles, which we
make te measure at the lowest cash prices and
guarantee a perfect lit.
SUITS TO ORDER from $12 upwards.
PAXTS TO ORDER from $3.50 upwards.
D. GANSMAN & BRO.,
MERCHANT TAILORS AND CLOTHIERS,
66 & 68 NORTH QUEEN ST.,
S. W. Cerner et Orange, Lancaster, Pa.
(Bailsman's Cerner.)
EOUNHERS AND MACHINISTS.
T ANCASTEK
BOILER MANUFACTORY,
SHOP ON PLUM STREET,
Opposite the Locomotive Works.
The subscriber continues te manufacture
BOILERS AND STEAM ENGINES,
Fer Tanning and ether purposes ;
Furnace Twiers,
Bellows Pipes,
Sheet-iron Werk, and
Blucksuiithing generally.
JS- Jobbing promptly attended te.
augl8-lyd JOHN BEST.
TINWARE, AC-
CALL ONSHERTZER, HUMPHREYILLE
& KIEFFER, manufacturers of
TIN AND SHEET-IRON WORK,
and dealers in GAS FIXTURES AND HOUSE
FURXISIIIXGGOODS. Special attcntiengiven
te PLUMBING, GAS and STEAM FITTIXG
Xe. 40 East King Street, Lancaster, Pa.
MARBLE WORKS.
WM. P. FRATLEY'S
MONUMENTAL MARBLE WORKS
758 Nerm yueeu Street, Lancaster, Pa.
MONUMENTS, HEAD AND FOOT STONES,
GARDEN STATUAKY,
CEMETERY LOTS ENCLOSED, Ac.
All work guaranteed and satisfaction given
in every particular.
N-B. Remember, works at the extreme'end
of North Queen street. m301
CLOTHING.
SMALING'S
I Grand Opening et
SPBUG WOOLMS !
Londen and Parisian Novelties,
THE LARGEST ASSORTMENT,
CHOICE SELECTIONS,
CORRECT AND LEADING STYLES.
Having enlarged room, extended facilities
and increased light ler displaying the Hand
somest Stock of
"WOOLENS
fee
GENTLEMEN'S WEAR
ever offered te the public, forming a Grand
PANORAMA of
Beauty Taste,
Talent and Skill.
The Latest Novelties of the Season.
All are cordially invited te examine our
stock. Prices en plain cards as low as consist
ent witli llrst-ciass werK ami Trimmings.
J. K. SMALING,
ARTIST TAILOR,
121 North Queen Street.
niarS-lydS&W
CENTRE 1ALL7
24 CENTRE SQUARE.
Closing out our
WINTER STOCK
AT
In order te make loom for the
Large Spring Stock,
' Which we aic new manufacturing.
Overcoats,
Suits and Suitings,
Te be sold at the Lewest Price-.
0. B. Hostetter & Sen,
24 CENTRE SQUARE-
2G-lyd
LANCASTER. PA.
A RARE CHAICE !
The Greatest Reduction of all in
FINE CLOTHES.
H. GERHART'S
Tailoring Establishment.
All Heavy Weight Woolens made te order
(for cash only) at
COST PRICE.
I have also just received a Large Assortment
et the Latest Novelties in
ENGLISH, SCOTCH
ASD
AMERICAN SUITINGS
Of Medium Weight, for the
EARLY SPRING TRADE.
These goods were all ordered before the rie
in Woolens, and will be made te order at re
markably low prices. Alse, aFine Line et
SPRING OVERCOATING,
AT
H. GERHART'S,
Ne. 51 North Queen Street.
CHINA AND GLASSWARE.
-VTOTICE! NOTICE!!
Te Save Moving
China, Glass and Queensware
Will be sold at
It EDUCED PHICES,
CHINA HALL.
HIGH & MARTIN,
Ne. 8 East King Street.
HANKING.
djm xe Kfin AM "WISHING TO
31U nUUU make money in Wall St.
should deal with the undersigned. Write for
explanatory circulars, sent free by
mAVTTVfi St f A Bankers and Brokers,
HLCKL1NU & tO., 42 Exchange Place,
New Yerk. iel9-3mdeed
rrrn
X LOCHER'S COUGH SYRUP.
Greatly fieni Prices
Hamastct Intelligencer.
FRIDAY EVENING, FEB. 27, 1880.
The Rival Sportsmen.
The sun, as a great round ball of geMen
red, was fast descending through the love
ly purple haze of Indian summer, which
mellowed the distant hills of the Blue
Ridge mountains, with an indescribable
charm, as Ralph "Waldren drove up te one
of these old, but aristocratic mansions of
the Shenandoah valley the home of some
of the best bleed of Virginia. lie had
been invited by its hospitable owner te
spend a few days in quail-sheeting among
its rich stubbles. The same day he came,
Harry Sinclair, a young farmer from an
adjoining county, had also arrived, osten
sibly te enjoy the rare shootings of the
neighborhood, but in reality te continue
his addresses te Blanche Randelph, the
only daughter and child of their host, and
te whom for twelve months he had vainly
declared his love. Ralph Waldren was
welcomed by the old friend of his father
in the hall, and as the deer of the stately
p.nier was opened, Blanche, with face te
ward the setting sun and back te Sinclair,
was heard te say in a tender, womanly
voice, " Xe, it can never be. " The nei&e
of their entrance attracted the attention
of the two, and Colonel Randelph at
once presented his young friend te his
daughter, and te the gentleman by her
side. It was an embarrassing situation
for her, but recovering herself instantly
with exquisite womanly tact, she bade
him welcome. Blanche Randelph was a
woman of peculiarly rare attractiveness
for one se young, combining almost fault
lesss beauty with a grace of manner that
was irresistible. These characteristics she
had inherited from a long line of ancestry
that had claimed the fairest daughters,
whose beauty and wit had been heightened
by frequent participation in the out-deer
sports of the country,and social intercourse
with the most gallant gentlemen of the
times. But a most unwelcome visitor te
Sinclair was Waldren. He had hoped that
in the solitude of the country home, with
no opposition, he would at last persuade
her te be his own. When he saw
Waldren enter with such an air of cultured
refinement, and of such a prepossessing
appearance, an indefinable dread leaped
into his heart the future stepped back
into the present with prophetic clearness
there was his rival.
The evening passed pleasantly enough
for all but him. The old Colonel told with
the rekindled fire of youth of the sports
of former days, when every man was a
fox hunter hew he could step the whir
ring quail and silent woodcock, the music
of the deep-bayed hounds, and the silent
stalk of the ever-watchful stag, until the
old time-piece at the head of the stairs
warned them it was time te retire. As
they rose, Blanche went te the mantle,
took a solitary bud from the vase, and said :
"This is the last rose of summer, it shall
be his who brings in the larger number of
birds te-morrow." As the two young
men separated, each determined for him
self that he would win the prize. Wal Wal
deon, as he lay trying te entice sleep te
his eyes, lccalled with the glow of young
manhood the sweet glances he had caught,
and the mere eager he was te win her love.
Sinclair would defeat this city gentle
man, and have her fix with her own sweet
hands the rose bud in his buttonhole be
fore the very eyes of his adversary. Thus
each lay witli their thoughts till long past
midnight. Blanche thought of them tee
for a while, as a young maiden would, and
quietly "dropped oft" te sleep, net dreaming
of the profound rivalry she had incited.
There is no deeper strain capable taxing
the young breast of manhood than the
contest of winning the approbation of
woman ever the head of a rival.
Morning came and with it a lovely au
tumn day, clear and bracing. Blanche
steed in the hallway and bade them adieu
as each separated one te the West and
the ether te the East. All day long they
hunted every licld and hedge row, urging
te the last degree tliir willing dogs. In the
morning Waldren shot with neiveusncss,
the effect of his sleepless night and inward
excitement, and missed many birds that in
a calmer moment he would have killed in
the air. Sinclair was steadier, but by no
means in his best form. As evening drew
en Waldren recovered from his uneasiness
and, thanks te the untiring and indomita
ble energy of his Irish setter, who was ap
perently better than in the morning, made
up much of his less, while his competitor
failed instead of improving. Twilight
came tee seen for each the birds were all
afield, until at last in rising the shooters
had te drop te knee te get the line of ilight
above the horizon. Quickly the night set
tled down and reluctantly they had te
step. Each wended his way homeward,
anxious yet hopeful. Never did maiden
attire herself mere sweetly than Blanche
that evening. Beauty, modesty, grace
and gentleness combined te lend her their
charms.
"Hew many, Mr. Waldren?" said
Blanche as lie came up the lane in front of
the house.
" Only twenty-seven. I fear I have lest
the bud which I had intended te have
cherished te the last day of my life," and
he looked ardently in her eyes.
" Then I trust you have wen it," softly
returned Blanche.
At that moment Sinclair appeared.
Blanche half suspected he had overhead
this last remark, and te recover herself,
quietly enquired hew many he had brought
in.
" Twenty-nine," said Sinclair.
An involuntary dejected leek stele ever
Waldren's face, and without a word he en
tered. " The flower is yours, Mr. Sinclair,"
said Blanche as she turned te enter. A
tone of disappointment would have been
apparent te a stranger, but the winner had
worked se hard for the coveted prize that
he was entirely oblivious te the expression.
A few minutes before six each appeared
in the drawing-room completely trans
formed by their evening suits dilfering in
nothing from the city beau except the fine
bloom of the eheek. Almest immediately
Blanche presented the victor with the
prize, but allowed him te fasten it in his
button-hole, unaided. I believe she would
have assisted in this arrangement if the
ether had been the winner. Sinclair was
evidently vexed at this. He had fought se
hard te gain the prize, and then te lese
what he considered its great value, was
mere than he could bear. Accordingly all
through the evening he mitde constant
allusion in a rather ungenerous spirit te his
wearing the trophy, and te such an extent
as te arouse the sympathy of Blanche for
his rival. Waldren received his remarks
with great forbearance, expecting, as is
always the case, that he would, if he should
net specially defend himself, find in her
his advocate. At last a still mere vain
remark from Sinclair about his excellent
sheeting aroused Blanche te the highest
pitch and, taking rather nervously from
her besom a handsome geld locket, she
said :
"Mr. Sinclair, I de net believe you are
a better shot than Mr. Waldren, and te
test it, whoever is the winner te-morrow
shall have this locket. It is the gift of an
old friend, and I prize it very highly."
Waldren instantly interposed and begged
her te withdraw the offer, but Blanche
was firm, and he had nothing te de but
accept the situation. By this time the
conversation was anything but pleasant,
and the party seen broke up for the night.
Waldren and Sinclair, who had the pre
vious night tossed themselves restlessly,
were seen, from their unusual fatigue, lest
in sleep, but Blanche could net compose
herself. Mere than ever she hated Sin
clair. Hew unfavorably his conduct com
pared with Mr. Waldren ! A victor should
be magnanimous net mean and contempti
ble, bach thoughts as these kept running
through her mind until Blanche came te
regard Waldren with especial favor, and
wished in the bottom of her heart that he
might win and wear her locket se rapidly
had he by force of circumstances taken
possession of her thoughts.
The next morning was a repetition of
the same lovely weather as the day before.
As they parted at the deer each took the
same reute he had done previously. The
fine bracing morning sent the rich bleed
bounding through their veins. Sinclair's
pointer felt its influence tee, as with nose
breast high and -magnificent pace he quar
tered his ground. Soen it was evident he
winded the birds by his change of gait.
New he has them. What a sight ! Rigid
as marble and every feature of his fine
head intensified with excitement. The
setter may be in many cases the preferable
deg te the peintcr,but as a thing of beauty
there is no equal te the latter when point
ing his game. In a moment Sinclair was
behind. A whir from a score of wings,
two barrels and a clean miss. Bad luck
for a beginning. It never left him during
the day. The fates seemed te be against
him. Waldren, en the ether hand, was
mere fortunate. With geed sense he
sought the coveys he -had found the
day. Beth he and his deg were calmer,
and he made many a beautiful shot as
quail after quail sprang from the ground.
The evening was sitting in, and Sinclair's
heart began te fail him. Frem across the
hills he heard the frequent reports of his
rival's gun, when he met an old friend,
Tem Hardy, with a mongrel by his side.
Tem was a hanger-en at a country store at
the erons-reads, and shot for a livelihood.
" What aic you doing here, Tem ? '
"Been sheeting a little, Mr. Sinclair."
"Any luck?"
"I believe I have a dozen or se."
"Let me see them."
Tem ransacked his pockets and counted
out fifteen birds.
"I will take them and pay you the next
time I sec you."
"All right, Mr. Sinclair."
Sinclair put them in his bag among these
he had shot, and they parted. A smile
stele across his face as he thought, " I will
have the locket new." He bagged but one
mere bird and night forced him te turn his
face homeward. He was the first te ar
rive. Blanche wa.s waiting for them. She
saw him come and involuntarily tried te
avoid him, but he called out : " Miss
Blanche come, count them for yourself."
One.aftcr one he lay them before her until
the old bench in the veranda was com
pletely filled. Forty-three in all, includ
ing one woodcock. Ralph Waldren saw
the immense amount of dead game as he
came up, and knew at a glance it must be
a close contest. He had net had time te
count his own, and therefore drew them
out as Blanche extended her hand te re
ceive them. When he had counted as far
as thirty-eight, it became truly exciting.
Blanche hoped they would held out. he
feared they would net. Forty-two. Alas,
he was defeated again.
"It is my locket," said Sinclair.
"Yeu shall have it, sir," replied
Blanche, irritated at his haste in claiming
what she had never any intention of deny
ing. "Take it new," and she instantly un
loosened it from its chain and handed it te
him.
"Thanks," and he quietly put it into his
waistcoat pocket. Waldren exceedingly
regretted he should have been the occasion
of the less of Blanche of anything se
valuable, and particularly that which she
had prized highly, and se expressed him
self te her as Sinclair retired preparatory
te dinner.
"I care nothing about the less of the
locket, Mr. Waldren, but I feel sure he
will wear it in a most conspicuous place,
which will annoy me every time I see it,
and may give rise among these who knew
it as having been mine, te some unpleasant
remarks."
On the return of the young gentlemen
te dinner, the first thing which caught
Blanche's eye was the locket suspended te
Sinclair's watch chain. This was tee
much for her and with great dignity of
manner, she said, " As you have given se
prominent a place te the locket, I trust you
will take pains te say under what circum
stances you became its possessor."
" I thought, Miss Blanche, that as the
article had become my property, I would
be entitled te dispose of it as I pleased.
It is hardly necessary te chronicle that
the evening was passed even mere unpleas
antly than the previous one. The only re
lieving circumstance being the announce
ment by Sinclair of his departure after
breakfast. He came unbidden ; he was te
go unregretted. ,
The next morning as the colonel with
Blanche and Waldren were standing en
the terrace, while Sinclair was packing
his pert-mantcau, Tem Hardy came en an
errand from a neighboring farmer. When
Sinclair saw him his deceit of yesterday
rushed across his mind. He suspected
Tem had come for his pay for the birds,
and was telling his business te the party,
and without waiting te discover what was
the occasion of the intrusion, said in an
angry tone, " Yeu impudent fellow, what
brought you here after me?"
" Why, Mr. Sinclair, I de net want pay
for the birds new new ; I came en an
errand for Mr. Pendleton. "
Pale as a dead man's face, Sinclair be
came in an instant when he saw his mis
take, and that his secret was se near the
light. Blanche looked at him and was as
tonished at the change. The truth then
came te her mind, and she said softly,
"Tem, when did you sell Mr. Sinclair any
birds ?"
" I beg your pardon, Miss Blanche, I
knew Mr. Sinclair will pay me."
"But when, Tem, did you sell him the
birds tell me all about it."
Tem, in looking down, as was his habit
while talking, did net see the endeavors of
Sinclair te draw his attention.
"Why yesterday as I was coming
through the valley by the old mill, I met
Mr. Sinclair out hunting, and I let him
have fifteen of my birds, but don't think
Miss Blanche, I fear he will net pay me
for I knew he will."
As Blanche turned en Sinclair never did
soldier stripped of his epaulets en battle
field leek meaner.
"Give me back the locket," said she in
a commanding voice.
Without a word he took it from his
chain and handed it te her and then stele
away.
"Mr. Waldren, this is yours. Yeu
have wen it fairly. Wear it for honor's
sake."
Sinclair shortly after left the state, and
Blanche, while en a visit te the city during
the following winter, premised Ralph
Waldren te be his forever.
A Strange uream-Stery.
There is a inexplicable story which I
believe has never been published among
the traditions of the fertile hill-country of
western Pennsylvania, the most unlikely
quarter in the world te serve as a breeding
place of mystery. It was settled almost
wholly by well-to-de farmers from the
north of Ireland, economical, hard-working
folk Ged-fearing tee, after the exact
manner described by Jehn Knox, and
having little patience with any eiher man
ner. Net a likely people, assuredly, te
give credence te any fanciful superstitions,
and still less te originate them. This
story indeed has a bold, matter-of-fact
character in every detail which quite sets
it apart from relations of the super
natural. I have never heard it explained,
and it is the best authenticated mystery
in my knowledge.
Here it is in brief. Among the Scotch
Irish settlers in Washington county in 1812
was family named Plymire, who occupied
a comfortable farm and house. Rachel,
the daughter, was engaged te a young
farmer of the neighborhood. On a Satur
day evening in July, having finished her
week's work, she dressed herself tidly and
started te visit her married sister, who
lived en a farm about five miles distant,
intending te return Monday morning.
She tied up her Sunday gown and Hat
in a checkered handkerchief, and carried
her shoes and sheckings in the ether hand,
meaning te walk in her bare feet and te
put them en when she came in sight
of her destination, after the canny
Scotch fashion. She left home about 7
o'clock in order te have the cool evening
for her walk. The read te the farm was
lonely and unfrequented. The girl did net
return home en Monday, but no alarm was
felt, as the family thought her sister would
probably wish te detain her for a few
days ; and it was net until the latter part
of the week that it was found that she
had never been at her sister's. The ceun
try was scoured, but in vain ; the alarm
spread, and excited a degree of terror in
the peaceable, domestic community, which
would seem inexplicable te city people, te
whom the newspaper has brought a
budget of crime every morning since their
childhood. Te children raised in these
lonely hamlets and hill-farms murder was
a far-off, unreal honor ; usually all that
they knew of it was from the doings of
Cain and Jael, set oil with hideous wood
cuts in the family Bible.
The girl had left home en Saturday at 7
o'clock. That night long before 10 o'clock
(fanners go te bed with the chickens), a
woman living in Green county, about forty
miles from the Plymire farm, awoke her
husband in great terror, declaring that she
had just seen a murder done, and went en
te describe a place she had never seen be
fore a hill country with a wagon-read
running through it, and a girl witli a bun
dle tied in a checkered handkerchief, her
shoes and white stockings in the ether
hand, walking briskly down the grassy
side of the read. She was met by a young
man the woman judged from their man
dcrthe meeting was by apppeintment ;
they sat down en a leg and talked for some
time.
The man at last rose, stepped behind
her, and drawing out a hatchet, struck her
twice en the head. She fell backward en
the wet, rotten leaves dead. Presently the
man was joined by another, also young,
who asked, " Is it clone ?" He nodded,
and together they lifted the body and car
ried it away out of her sight. After awhile
they came back, found the bundle of Sun
day finery and the shoes and stocking, all
of which were stained with bleed. There
was a ruined old mill near the read ; they
went into it, lifted a loose beard in the
flooring, put the bundle, shoes; etc., with
the hatchet, underneath, and re
placed the beard. Then they separated
and went through the weeds in differ
ent directions." The farmer's wife told
her dream te her husband that night ; the
next day (Sunday), going te a little coun
try church, she remained during the inter
mission between the nferning and after
noon services. The neighbors who had
come from a circuit of twenty miles te
church, gathered, according te their home
ly habit, in the churchyard te eat their
lunch and exchange the news. Our dream
er told her story again and again, for she
was impressed by it as if it had been real
ity. After the afternoon service the con
gregation separated, going te their widely
scattered homes. There were thus many
witnesses ready te certify te the fact that
the woman had told the dream the morn
ing after the murder was committed at a
distance of forty miles, when it was abso
lutely impossible that the news should
have reached her. There were no tele
graphs, we must remember, and no rail
ways in these days net even mail-carriers
in these secluded districts.
When the story of the girl's disappear
ance was told ever the country at the end
of the next week, the people te whom the
dream had been repeated recalled it. New-a-days
the matter would only serve as
geed material for the reporters, but the
men of theso days still believed that Ged
took an oversight even of their dreams.
Ought net this be a hint from him ? The
Rev. Charles Wheeler, a Baptist clergy
man of Washington, well known in West
ern Pennsylvania and Virginia a genera
tion age, and Ephraim Blaine, esq., a
magistrate, father of the present senator
from Maine, and as popular a man in his
narrower circle, drove ever te see the
woman who had told the dream. Without
stating their purpose, they took her and
her husband, en pretence of business, te
the Plymire farm. It was the first time in
her life that she had left her own country,
and she was greatly aroused and inter
ested. They drove ever the whole of the
read down which "Rachel Plymire had
gene.
"Have you ever seen this neighbor
hood?" one of them asked.
"Never," she replied.
That ended the matter, and they turned
back, taking a little-used cross-read te
save time. Presently the woman started
up in great agitation, crying, " There is
the place I dreamed of !" They assured
her that Rachael Plymire had net been
upon that read at all. "I knew nothing
about her," she said, "but the girl I saw
in my dream came along here ; there is the
path through which the man came, and
beyond that turning you will find the leg
en which he killed her." They did find
the leg, and en the ground the stains of
bleed. The woman walking swiftly led
them te the old mill and te the beard
under which lay the stained clothes and
the hatchet. The girl's body was found
afterward, buried by a creek near at hand.
Rachel's lever had already been arrested en
suspicion. It was hinted that he had
grown tired of the girl, and for many rea
sons found her hard te shake off. The
woman recognized him in a crowd of ether
men, and startled her companions still mere
by pointing out another young fellow
from the West as his companion in her
dream. The young man was tried in the
town of Washington for murder. The
dreamer was brought into court, and an ef
fort was actnally made te put her en the
witness-stand, but even then men could
net be hung en the evidence of a dream.
Without it there was net proof enough te
conviction, and the jury, unwillingly
enough, we may be sure, allowed the pris
oner te escape. It was held as positive
proof of his guilt that he immediately mar
ried the sister of the ether accused man
and removed te Ohie, then the wilderness
of the West. R. H. D.,Jn Lippineett's
Magazine.
MILLINERY AND TRIMMINGS.
OPENING OP
NEW GOODS
GUNDAKER'S
MILLINERY
Trimming Stere.
Ladies, if you want New and lleautiful
Embroidery. Edging and Inserting cheap
call at GUNDAKER'S.
If von want the Latest Styles of Elegant
Rlack Silk Fringe, .silk. Jet, l'earl. Fancy
Pearl and Ivery Buttens, call at GUN
IAKEU'S. If you want Silk or Satin Kibbons. elc-
Sint quality and cheap, call at GUN
AKEU'S. If 'you want Kuching, Crepe Llsse, New
Fichus, Urctenne Luces, Valenciennes and
etherNcw Lace-, Lace Tics, Hews. Fancy
Kibbons, Ac. call at GUNDAKER'S.
Ladies, if you want le buy geed desir
able goods for yourself and family, and
have all goods warranted, veu can buy
them the cheapest at GUNDAKER'S.
Give us a cull and examine our stock
The goods are all new at GUNDAKER'S.
142 & 144 North Queen St.,
LANCASTER, PA.
JEWELERS.
B. F. BOWMA2T,
WHOLESALE
Watches M Clocks.
106 EAST KING ST.,
LANCASTEIl, PA.
.13.
1. 13.
East King St. East King St.
TRIPLE-PLATED
STEEL HANDLE K WES
Medium Size Denhle Bolster Handles,
Dessert Size Deuble Bolster Handles,
SATIN FINISHED HANDLES.
TLAIN FINISHED HANDLES,
ALL or
Rogers & Bre.'s Celebrated Manufacture,
AT
AUGUSTUS RH0ADS,
JEWELER,
13 East Kins Street, Lancaster, Fa.
FURN1TVRE.
SPECIAL INVITATION TO ALL.
Te examine my stock of Parler Suits, Cham
ber Suits, Patent Rockers, Easy Chairs, Ratan
Rockers. Hat Racks. Marble Tep Tables, Ex
tension Tables, Sideboards. Hair, Husk, Wire
und Common Mattresses, Boek Cases, Ward
robes, Kscrlteirs. Upholstered Cane and Weed
Seat Chairs, Cupboards, Sinks. Deughtrays,
Breakfast Tables, Dining Tables, Ac, always
en hand, at prices that are acknowledged te be
as cheap as the cheapest.
UPHOLSTERING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES.
REPAIRING PROMPTLY AND
NEATLY DONE.
Picture Frames en hand and made te order
Regildlng done at Reasonable Kates at the
New Picture Frame and Furniture Stere,
15 EAST KING STREET,
(Over Bursk's Grocery and Sprccher's Slate
Stere.)
WALTER A. HEINITSH,
(Schindler's Old Stand),
CARPETS.
"I K.EAT BARGAINS.
A Large Assortment of all kinds et
CARPETS
Arc still sold at lower rates than ever at the
CARPET HALL
or
H. S. SHIRK,
202 WEST KING STREET.
Call and examine our steckand satisfy your
self that we can show the largest assortment
of Brussels, Three plies and Ingrains at all
prices at the lowest Philadelphia prices, and
the Latest Patterns. Alse en hand a large anil
'emplete assortment of RAG CARPETS. Sat"
isfactien guaranteed both as te pric and qual
ity. Particular attention given custom
work. Carpet woven when parties will Ann t
their own Rage. I am paying 8 cents In cash
and 9 cents in trade for Fine Carpet Ragssti
Balls. my23-ttdAwln
A.TTORNEYS-A.T-LA. W
A. J. STEINMAN,
Intelligencer Building. Southwest Cerner Cen
tre Square, Lancaster, Pa
W.U. HENSEL,
Intelligencer Building, Southwest Cerner Cen
tre Square. Lancaster, Pa.
HENRY A. RILEY
Attorney and Counseller-at-Law
21 Park Bew. New Yerk. .
Collections made In all parts of the United
Slates, and a general legal business transacted.
Refers by permission te Stelnman A HenseL
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