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Lancaster daily intelligencer. [volume] (Lancaster, Pa.) 1864-1928, May 18, 1880, Image 1

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Volume XVI-Ne. 221.
LANCASTER, PA., TUESDAY MAY 18, 1880.
Price Twe Cents.
svhf sjnsjft: ""-jr
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L
I
i&v
TEJIMS.
THE DAILYINTELLIGENCER,
PUBLISHED EVERT EVENING,
BY STEINMAN & HENSEL,
intelligencer JJulldlng, Southwest Cerner of
Centre Square.
Yur. Dailv Intelligencer is furnished te
iil-erlbers in the City of Lancaster and sur-
leunding towns, accessible by ltatireaa ami
Daily binge Lines ut Ten Cents Per Week,
payable te the Carriers, weekly. By Mail, $5 a
year in advance: otherwise, $0.
Entered at the pest office al Lancaster, Pa., as
t-cceml clasH mail matter.
e-The STEAM JOB l'BINTING DEPABT DEPABT
MKXTel tliis establishment peieca unsur
pucd facilities ler the execution or all kinds
of Plain and Fancv Printinif.
COAL.
I) It. MAKTIN,
l.
Wholesale and Bctutl Dealer in all kinds of
LUMBEB AND COAL.
2-Yanl: Ne. 2i Xerth Water and Prince
hliects, above Lemen, Lancaster. n:-lyd
COAlTITeAL! IJOAL! COAL!
Ceal of the Itcst 0,uiillly put up expressly
for family use, and at the low
est market prices.
THY A SAMPLE TON.
Kil- YAltD 1.10 SOUTH VATKK ST.
nril-lyd PHILIP SCHUM.SON & CO.
J iNT i:i:ci;ivki) AFiNii
1 1 A V A X D STB A W, at
LOT OK BALED
M. F. STEIGERWALT & SON'S,
DE A I. lilts IN
FLOUR, GRAIN AND COAL,
S!l XOBTII WATKUSTBKKT.
tr.J-Western Fleur a Specialty. r"27-lyd
COHO & WILEY,
::.-. XOKT1I WAT Ell ST., lAincaxtv.r, l'n.,
Wholesale and Kclall Dealers in
LUMBER AND COAL.
AIme, Contractors and Builders.
EMiinutes made ami contracts undertaken
en all kinds el building.
Branch Olllce : Xe. 3 XOBTII DUKE ST.
SebiS-lyil
COAL! - - - COAL!!
ae te
GORRE0HT & CO.,
rordeod and Cheap Ceal. Yard Harrisburg
Pike. Office 2X Ku.t Chestnut MrccL
P. W. UOItBECIIT, Agt.
.1. B. BILEY.
5-1 W. A. KKLLEB.
nOUUS AS It STAT10XEKY.
Vi:w STAT10KKY!
Xcw, l'lain and Fancy
STATIONERY.
A Ne, Velvet and E:illake
PICTURE FRAMES AND EASELS.
AT
L. M. FLYNN'S
IJ0!)K AX I) STATIONERY STOKE,
Ne.4S WKST KING STBKET.
S
'PJ-X'IAI. NOTICE!
ABCHEEY !
A FIXE LINE OF
ARCHERY GOODS,
.IITST BECEIVED,
AND FOB SALE AT THE BOOK STOBE
OF
JOHI BAEE'S SOUS,
15 and 17 NORTH QUEEN STREET,
LANCASTEB, PA.
II A LTA 1'EltS, &cT
"WJK AKK lUSTTKU VKKl'AKGU TO
V Meet the want-.et the people than any
M!:wiu heretofore. Our line is larger than
Usual, and in
PAPER HANGINGS
we have the Xcw Patterns ler the Spring in an
endless line te (.elect ireiu.
WINDOW SHADES
of every description, in Cerner and Band, six
ami seven feet in length.
Plain Goods by the yard in all colors and
widths. Paper Curtains te the trade at Factory
Prices.
PATENT EXTENSION
Window Cornices,
the Xcwcst, Best and Cheapest Cornice made.
Easily adjusted te litany Window up te live
feet ih width.
Curtain Poles. 1. lj4':inil 2 inches, in Ebony
and Polished Walnut, Bings, Brackets, and
Fancy Ends Complete.
PIER AND MANTEL MRKOIiS.
Orders taken for any size at Lew Prices.
PHARES W. FRY,
Ne. 57 NORTH QUEEN ST.
teblO-lvdSw
OEXTS' UOOltS.
V"i:ckxii:s.
xew goods, xew styles. at
EBISMAX'S.
II
ALI' 1IOSK.
BALBBIttUAN, POLKA DOTS, Ac, AT
EBISMAN'S.
IT
ANDKEKUlUKFS.
Nobby Patterns, Silk and Linen, by the piece
or dozen, at r EBISMAVS,
OUSPKNDKKS.
CHOICE GOODS, LOW PBICES. AT
E. J. ERISMAlSrS,
CO NUKTU iJUKKN STKEET.
TJX WAKE, C-
CALL ON SUEKTZEK, HUMI'HREVILLK
& KIEFFEB, manulactuiers of
TIN AND SIIEET-1BON WOBK,
and dealers in GAS FIXTURES AND HOUSE
FUBNISHING GOODS. Special attention given
te PLUMBING, GAS Jand STEAM FITTING
Ne. 40 East King Street, Laneuster, Pa.
JtEMOVAES.
DU. S. It. FOKKMAN,
(PHYSICIAN ANDSUBGEON),
Bemeveil trem Ne. 18 Seuth Prince street te
Ne. 211 West liing street, Lancaster, Pa.
rm24-3md
CLOTHHfO.
1880. 1880.
RATH V0N& FISHER,
PRACTICAL
FASHIONABLE T AIL0BS.
SPRING AND SUMMER
CLOTHS,
G'ASSIMERES,
COATINGS,
SUITINGS,
VESTIXGS,
PANTIXGS.
TROUSERINGS,
OVERCOATINGS,
Maile te order ler Men and Beys in the picvail
ing Styles, and satislaetien guaranteed. Ale,
Ready-Made Clothing !
AND ALL KINDS OF
FURNISHING GOODS
At the Old Price belere the Advance,
RATHVON & FISHER'S
Practical Tailoring Establishment,
lOI XOBTII QUEEN STKEET.
mt-luid
H. GERHART'S
Tailoring Establishment,
MONDAY, APRIL 5.
Having Just returned from the New Yerk
Woolen Market, I am new prepared te exhibit
one of the Best Selected Stocks of
WOOLENS
KOU THE-
l
ir
Ever brought, te this city. Nene but the very
best of
ENGLISH, FRENCH
AND
AMERICAN FABRICS,
in all the Leading Styles. Prices as low as the
lowest, and all goods warranted as represent
ed, at
H. GERHART'S,
Ne. 51 North Queen Street.
Spring Opening
24 CENTRE SQUARE.
We have fei sale for the coming ieaens an
Immen.su Stock et
Reaiy-Me GtettbuL
of our own manufacture, which comprises the
Latest and Most
STYIJSI DESIGIS.
Come and see our
NEW GOODS
which is larger ami compeed of the best styles
te be leund in the city.
1 B. Hosteller & Sen,
24 CENTRE SQUARE-
2i-lyd
LANCASTEB, PA
JCOJiES, ItLAXKETS, CG".
IS
'IGN OF THE 1JUFFALO UEA1).
KOBES ! ROBES ! !
BLANKETS ! BLANKETS ! !
I have new en hand the Lak'gkst, Best akd
Cheapest Assektmknt of Lined and Unlincd
BUFFALO BOBES in the city. Alse LAP
AND HOUSE BLANKETS of every descrip
tion. A full line of
Trunks and Satchels,
Harness, Whips, Cellars, &c.
S-Bepairing neatly and promptly denc.-S
A. MILEY,
lOS Xerth Qiwen St., Jjancaatsr.
iKfl-IydMWAS
HOOTS AXJU SUOES.
"17 A QV BOOTS. SHOES AND LASTS
XjxjlO X made en a new principle, insur
ing comfort for the feet.
T)Vrrl',Q Lasts made te order.
ebll-tld 133 EastKing street.
Eli UCATIOXA I.
rpilK ACADEMY CONNECTED WITH
X Franklin and Marshall College eilers su
parlor advantages te young men and boys who
desire either teprepare for college or te obtain
a thorough academic education. Students re
ceived at any time during the school year
Send for circulars. Address
BKV. JAMES CBAWFOKD,
eclll-lvd Lancaster. Pa.
SPRTNfi OPEM
Sp
Lancaster IntelliQzntct.
TUESDAY EVENING, MAY 18, 1880.
THE POWER OF WILL.
MESMERISM-AND STATUVOLISM.
Peculiar rsj-puole&ical Phenomena.
Dr. William n. Falinosteck's Theories DIs
cuMed in a Londen Journal.
FROM GRAVE TO GAY.
AJ" Free PreKH " as Commonly Interpreted
Hew He Named the ltaby.
McsinerUui and Statuvelcnce.
The Londen Spiritualist has a letter from
an American correspondent recounting the
discoveries of our distinguished fellow-
citizen, Dr. Fahncsteclc, in the science
which he has named btatuvelence, and
which he finds te furnish no basis for
spiritualistic doctrines. "Wc give the let
ter below, with the exception of some gen
eral introductory remarks :
'- Statuvelcnce ( or statu vel ism )
means, of course, a state produced by the
will ; and the implication of the term is
that it is a state self-produced, and net the
result of the action of the will of another.
On the hypothesis, which may be entirely
erroneous, that you have had no particular
account of this matter in England, I will
venture te give you a short general sketch
of the subject, reserving for some future
tunc a discussion of statuvelcnce with ref
erence te the elucidation of the mysteries
of trance mediumship, the advancement e
the art of self-healing, and the higher edu
cation of the will.
According te the original mesmeiists the
trance was produced by means of a uni
versal fluid, directed by the will of the
operator. Te the magic power of this
controlling will the subject was supposed
te be, for the time being, absolutely en
slaved ; liberty being restored only at the
stage of independent clairvoyance. The
early English experimenters did net ma
terially vary the French methods, though
they showed their lack of full acceptance
of the unproved theory of animal magnet
ism by substituting for that term the non nen non
cemmital " mesmerism." Te be sure,
when, twenty years later, Baren Keichen
b.ich's researches in reference te the ed od ed
ferce seemed te corroborate and elucidate
3Iesmer's cruder conception, Prof. Gregery
and ether writere re-adopted the phrase
"animal magnetism," and the term has te
some extent regained a feeling. It is,
nevertheless, ttue that the attempt te com
bine the original idea of Mesmer with inore
recent notions of edyllic and electric forces
has brought forth some of the most absurd,
ideas extant systems of "electro-biology,"
and "electro-psychology," fruitful
in magnetic coins and electro-magnetic
discs, composed of mineral substances se
scientifically arranged that the subject
who faithfully gazed thereat seen suc
cumbed te the occult influence, and fell
into a state of somnolence, willy-nilly.
Dr. Braid was canny Scotchman enough
te see that the cause of trance, when os
tensibly produced by such means as these,
lay net in the occult virtue of the magnetic
disc, but in the fixed attention of the sub
ject, and he showed conclusively by his
experiments that the trance could be pro
duced by a "double internal and upward
squint." Although the doctor and scep
tical scientists who have adopted his
"hypnotism " in dealing with the subject,
may have gene tee far in assuming that his
experiments proved, or tended te prove,
that subjects had never been entranced by
the mesmeric cll'ect of passes, but only by
the expectant contemplation of these mo
notonous muscular motions of the opera
tor, yet the hypnotic experiments did a
real service te psychological science by
showing that the concentration of the sub
ject's mind upon something eutsi'dc of him
self was just as effective as the concentra
tion of something outside of himself upon
the subject's mind showing, at least,
that the rule was one which worked both
ways.
Statuvelcnce gees still farther. It ab
jures all effects claimed te be produced by
the will of the operator, rejects as unneces
sary all gazing at external objects, and bases
itself upon the preposition that the will of
the subject (the term " will" being under
stood as comprehending the various men
tal attitudes of desire, fear, expectancy,
imagination, faith, etc.) is all-suiiicieut
for the production of the phenomena, and
that, in spite of the mass of testimony te
the contrary, they never have been pro
duced by any ether agency. The last state
ment is certainly a bold one, and challenges
criticism, but, whether true or untrue, it
is evident that a method the first postulate
of which is the supremacy of tiic subject's
will at all stages of the progress of enter
ing the trance, will develop higher phe
nomena than that method which concedes
se much te the will of the operator. View
ed in this aspect, the trance is no longer a
temporary mental enslavement, the depler
able consequences of which have been
darkly picturcihin various popular novels
of the day, and sometimes, though mere
rarely, encountered in practical experi
ments. Indeed, statuvelcnce is net a pro
cess te be blindly submitted te, but an art
te be learned, and the adept operator is no
longer a magician, but only a teacher.
But the reader who has followed me thus
far may desire te knew something about
the author of this system, his method of
instruction, and the phenomena produced
thereby.
Dr. William Baker Fahucsteck, the or
iginator of the statuvelic idea, is a' resi
dent of the city of Lancaster, Pennsylva
nia, and is new seventy-five years of age.
lie is a thoroughly educated and exper
ienced physician, as well as a mineralogist,
botanist and inventor, lie began te experi
ment in the line of animal magnetism
about 1840. His first subject was a boy,
who, after becoming entranced, ran all
ever the house, in spite of the operator's
efforts by will and voice te prevent him.
This first experience caused him te doubt
the supreme efficacy of the mesmerist's
will, and further investigation led te the
belief that the cause of the phenomena
was entirely in the expectancy, faith or
will of the subject. He seen beuan te
teach this doctrine te his subjects, and yet
met with increasing success. In a letter
te a Philadelphia paper in 1843, he re
ported that ever three hundred persons
had entered the state under his tuition. In
1843 he wrote his interesting and valuable
book entitled "Artificial Somnambulism,"
but did net publish it until 18G9. In 1871
a new edition was published (which is
still in circulation). The title being
se as te read, "Statuvelism, or Artificial
Somnambulism, Hitherto Called Mesmer
ism." The matter of the book remained
substantially unchanged. He expresses
his theory in a nutshell, en page CI, as
fellows :
" I have instituted many experiments te
determine the cause of this condition, and
all the facts gathered go te prove that the
state can be entered by an act of the sub
ject's own will, or can be induced by the
belief (en the part of the subject), that an
other person has the power of throwing
him into it."
In what I have te say of Dr. Fahues-
tock's method, I speak largely from per
sonal observation.
He sits down with the subject, without
physical contact, and directs him te let
the body remain in a perfectly relaxed
condition as far as possible, close the eyes,
and fix the mind en some familiar scene at
a distance, which it is particularly pleas
ant te revive in imagination. Anxiety
must be avoided. There must be no
straining effort of vision, as when one at
tempts te discern a distant object with the
external eye, but the subject must imagine
himself calmly scrutinizing the object in
all its details as if it were immediately be
fore him. The doctor talks te the subject
from time te time, exhorting him te for
get himself and his surroundings, and
keep his mind fixed en the distant place.
As seen as the subject sees, or fancies he
sees anything, he mentions it, and is told
te grasp it fully and observe its details.
I am giving a very rough sketch of a
method which is varied greatly in its ap
plication te particular cases ; but the fun
damental idea is that it is the mind that
sees and feels, and if the mind can be suffi
ciently abstracted from its immediate sur
roundings, it can just as well see te the
Planet Jupiter as into the next room. The
spirit world, as he expresses it, is an
"eternal here."
Although the ultimate object, m the
case of a diseased subject, is net the de
velopment of clairvoyance, the same
method is pursued, as being the best
means of getting the subject outside
of himself. When the state is fully
entered (and animal magnctisers would be
surprised te see hew Inrj e a percentage of
successes there .":) md clairvoyance is
developed, however imperfectly, the next
step is te teach the subject whose physi
cal frame has probably by that time as
sumed cataleptic rigidity that the mind
has, in this superior condition, absolute
power ever the bodily sensations, and can
feel or net, as desired, and that any reso
lution formed in the trance has a supreme
effect en the outer life. Fer example, if
it is desired te leave any part of the body
in the cataleptic state, in order that nature
may have a chance te heal without ner
vous irritation, the resolution se te de
produces the required effect ; and the
resolution te feel well, te be well, te forget
your disease, produces an cll'ect exactly
proportioned te the firmness and faith
with which the resolution is formed.
Everything depends en the will of the sub
ject ; the operator can only teach and sug
gest. Se, tee, the memory of the occur
rences of the trance-state is canied into
the outer life or net, just as may be de
sired and willed.
But the most wonderful, as well as the
most practical, development of statuvo statuve
lcnce is the power te deprive any part of
sensation in the waking state, when de
sired for the prevention or annihilation
of pain. The method of attaining this
power is peculiar,and net easilyexplicable.
The subject is diiccted te awaken the head
first, leaving the body cataleptic ; then by
an dibit of will an arm or any ether part
can be restored te feeling, and then in
stantly brought back te the cataleptic
state. After this double process has been
gene through with three or four times in
as many minutes, the subject acquires the
knack of doing it, and repeated practice
seen renders him able te threw any p ut cf
the body into the " condition," as the doc
tor calls it, instantly. The value of this
power te suffering humanity cannot be
computed.
I have been betrayed into saying se much
that I forbear te give any of the many iu
tresting cases illustrating statuelence, of
which I have personal knowledge or au
thentic information. I will report some of
them in the future, if I have any assurance
that this phase of psychology is new or in
teresting te your readers. Meanwhile it
may net be amiss te say that I have veri
fied and supplemented Dr. Fahnestock's
investigations by such experiments upon
subjects of my own as I have had opportu
nity and leisure te make ; hoping thereby
te help, if ever se feebly, te bring about
the consummation of a recent (albeit anti
spiritualistic) prophecy, te wit : that " in
the twentieth century the true philosophy
of trance and kindred phenomena of the
nervous system will be taught in all our
schools."
A Free Press.
.Seme of Its Advantages Tersely Stated.
Xew Haven Begister.
The beautiful idea of getting something
for nothing is iiewhcrQ mere readily trace
able than in a newspaper office.
Se much has been spoken, written and
sung about a " free press" that people have
come te accept the term in a sense alto
gether tee literal.
If a man has a scheme of any kind ger
minating he just steps into the editorial
room and details it with the remark, "I'm
net quite ready te advertise yet, but a few
words will help me along." He gets the
few words but never gets ready te adver
tise. Twe tickets admitting lady and gent te
the "G. R. X M. T.'s grand ball" are ex
pected te produce a six-line local and a
quarter of a column description of the
ladies' toilets after the ball is ever.
Church fairs and the like aic worse than
balls. They never leave tickets, but de
maud mere space, because "it's a matter
of news, and a help te the cause."
Should a boy saw oft' his finger, " Dr.
C. O. Plaster dressed the wound with
great skill,'' would be a graceful way of
stating it, and, besides, it is "unprofes
sional" te advertise.
The patent rat trap man brings in one of
his combinations of wire and meuldy
cheese bait, sticks it under the editor's
nose, and explains hew they catch 'cm
every time the spring works. " It's some
thing of interest te the community, and if
you put in a piece save me a dozen
papers," which he quietly walks off with,
as though he had bestowed a favor in al
lowing editorial eyes te gaze en such a
marvel of intricacy.
An iuvitatien " te come down and write
up our establishment" is a great deal
mere common than a two square " ad "
from the same firm. Newspapers must
be filled up with something or ether, you
knew.
The lawyer, with strong prejudices
against advertising, is fend of seeing his
cases reported in full in the newspapers,
with an occasional reference te his ex
ceedingly able manner of conducting the
same. It is cheaper than advertising.
In fact everybody, from a te izzard,
who has an axe te grind, asks the news
paper te turn the crank, and forgets te
even say thank you, but will kindly take a
free copy of the paper as part pay for fur
nishing news.
The press being "free," all hands seem
bound te get aboard and ride it te death.
That is why newspapers are se rich that
they can afford te pay double price for
white paper and never ask Congress te aid
them by removing the duty en weed pulp.
Naming the Baby.
Little Beck (Ark.) Gazette.
"My wife hez jes' presented me wid de
fines' boy in dis country said Black Bill,
entering a magistrate' s"office,taking off his
hat and slinging perspiration from his
brew with a crooked forefinger. "Yas,
gentleman," he went en, "de fines' chile I
eber seed. An' I'se jes' get a twenty del
lar gelu piece right heali tcr gin ter de
man what can guess what I hez named
him. Ter keep yer frum spredin' ober de
wliele universe ob names, I'll state dat
hit's a Bible name."
" Abraham," guessed some one.
"Ner sah."
" Paul."
"Xer sah."
"Jeb."
"Guess again."
"Nicodemus."
"Keep en cemin.' "
" Abemleich."
"Try me agin."'
The guessing ceased after a time, and
finally Bill remarked :
" I'se named dat boy Judus Escarut."
" What !" said the magistrate. "Judas
betrayed our Saviour."
"Can't help hit. Dat's de boy's name.
Judus hez been slighted. Nobody hez eber
had de immoral courage tcr name a chile
fur dat man. But dat ain't the main
reason why I names him Judus. I'se get
de Bible ter 'stain me in gibin de chile dat
name."
"Hew does the Bible sustain you in
desiring te perpetuate that name?" asked
the magistrate.
" Hit's dis lack. Chris' in remarkin' ob
Judus said dat hit would hab bin better fur
dat man cf he hadn't bin born."
"Well."
" An' censiderhi', hew many meufs is
opened at de dee' when I gees home wid a
side ob meat, it would hab bin better fur
dat boy ob mine of he had nebber seed de
daylight. I knows what I'ze talkin' about.
In de futur cf I finds dat de boy hez made
a improvement en hisself, den I'll change
his name tcr Jim."
Cau-e and effect. Saw it advertised, bought
it ler lifty cents, swallowed it for a cough that
had troubled me fourinenths, twodeses helped
one-halt bottle cured. Beceniuiend it te all.
1 icier te Dr. Themas Electric Oil. Fer sale by
II. B. Cochran, druggist, 137 and 13'J Xerth
Queen street, Lancaster, l'a. 21
statistics prove that twenty-nve percent,
of the deaths in our larger cities are caused by
consumption, and when wc reflect that this
terrible disease in Its worst stage will yield te
a bottle of Leclier's Benewned Cough Syrup,
shall we condemn the sufferers ler their negli
gence, or pity them for their ignoranee? Xe
!) Kast King street.
II. V. McCarthy, Wholesale and Betail Drug
irNt. Ottawa. Ontario, writes : " I was afflicted
with Chronic Bronchitis ler some yeais, but
have been eemplety cured by the use et Dr.
Themas' Electric Oil, in clones of 5 drops en
sugar. I have also pleasure in recommending
it as an euibioeatieu for external u-e." Fer
II. B. Cochran, druggist. 1S7 and 13D Xerth
Queen street, Lancaster, l'a. 22
JEWELEJIS.
TOUISWIilJKIt,
j W'ATCHMAKEB.
Xe.ir.9 XOBTII QUKEX STB KKT, near P. B.
IJ. Depot, Lancaster, l'a. Geld, Silver and
Xickel-eiiseil Watches, Chains, Clocks, &e.
Agent ter the celebrated I'antascepic Specta
cles and Eye-Glasses. Bepairing a specialty,
aprl-lyd
A
N UNUSUALLY LAUGC
FINE STOCK OE
Lies' rail M Gil CteiES,
At no advance en Old Trices.
E. R BOWMAN,
10(5 EAST KING STREET.
LANCASTER. PA.
GOLOEED SPECTACLES
-ASD-
EYE GLASSES,
In all the Shades of
BLUE, GREEN AND SMOKED,
AUGUSTUS RHOADS'S.
Jeweler, 20 East King Street,
LANCASTEB, PA.
Watches-, Clocks and Jewelry Bepaired.
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12th and Chestnut Streets,
PHILADELPHIA.
apr6 lydTu,Tli&S
AT'XOHXEYS-AT-LA W
UEXBY A. KILKY
Attorney and Counseller-at-Law
21 Park Bew, New Yerk.
Collections made in all parts of the United
Slates, and a general legal business transacted.
Jtsfera by permission te Steinman & Hensel.
CLOTUIXO.
SPRING, 1880.
WANAMAKER & BROWN,
Gentlemen and Beys' Outfitters,
OAK HALL,
S. E. CORNER SIXTH AKD MARKET STS.,
PHILADELPHIA."
We respectfully announce the completion of the new stock of
Men's and Beys1 Clothing for the Spring of 1880,
which ha net only the distinction of being the largest, but has cost us mere pnlns-tul-in;; care
than any stock we have ever made. We are net content unless each year Unds us improving
and progressing, and 13) shows the result of extraordinary ctTert te excel.
Te our long practical experience and commodious premises we add net only the advantage et
showing our customers the very largest stock, but the system of business originated
by MI. JOHN WAX'AMAKKIt gives our customers every advantage in
making their purchases at OAK II AL L,
BECAUSE,
1st, The qualities and defects of goods nre stated.
2d, One price and only one.
3d, A thorough guarantee given.
4th, Meney refunded if goods are returned.
WAMIAKER & BROWtf.
JJJtY
GrEAlSTD OPENING
AT THE
NEW YORK STORE.
1MMEXSE DISPLAY
DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS.
A CHOICE VABIETY" FOB SELECTION AT
QUICK SELLING PKICES.
Xew Spring Dress Goods, Summer Silks, New Spring Shawls, Shetland Shawls, Xew
Spring I.awns, Chintzes, and Calicoes. Xew Spring Hosiery. Summer Underwear, New Spring
Cleves, Laces and Embroideries, New Spring Styles in l'urasels and Sunshades.
WATT, SHAND & COMPANY,
S AND 10 EAST KING STREET.
LADIES' DRESS GOODS
-AT-
HAGER & BROTHER'S.
NOVELTIES IN SIMvS.
NOVELTIES IN SILKS.
NEW SHADES CASHMEBE.
XEW SHADES CASIIMEItE.
-4 WOOL BEIGES.
C-4 WOOL BEIGES.
SILK
SILK
1'LAIX AXD LACE BUNTINGS.
l'LAIN AND LACE BUNTINGS.
LAWNS AND CHINTZES.
Figured ami Dotted Svi-. Corded l'iques, Victeria Lawns, French Muslins, Ladies' and
Children's Hosiery, Lifele and Kid Gloves, Laces and Embroideries.
PARASOLS AND SUN UMBRELLAS.
43-WE INVITE EXAMINATION.
Wall Papers and Window Shades!
:e:
In WALL l'AI'EBS we are offering a Large Line te select from in all grades, and at
LOW PRICES.
Hi
WINDOW
- AND
FIXTTTBES.
Wall Paper and Sliades hung at Short Netice. 47Estimates made.
J. B. MARTIN & CO.
EOR TJIE
THE OPINION OP THE LADIES WE HOPE HAS BEEN FULLY CON
FIRMED BY WIDE SPREAD EXPERIENCE THAT
HOUGHTON'S
Cheap Mllinery & Trimming Stere
Is the Cheapest and Bett Tlace in the city te buy
lillinery. Goods and Dress Trimmings,
And wc will receive daily New Goods and all the Latest Styles, and ladies will find the Largest
Stock and Greatest Variety et Hats, Bennets, Bihbens, Feathers, Fiewers.Silks. Satins, Fringes,
Kid and Lisle Thread Gloves, Laces, Embroideries, Tuckings, Puffings, Velvet Neckties,
Ladies' White Tucked Skirts 50c. 75c and $1.00 each, andjtht Largest Stock of Fancy Dress But But
eons In the city. We constantly keep the Finest Line of
ENGLISH BUCK CREPES,
Only Ceurtauld's Best Makes and at the Lewest Prices. Alse, Crepe Veils in all Sizes, Crepe
Hats and Bennets constantly en hand and made te order by the beat Milliner in the city, as
we keep no ethers, nor no apprentices te botch your work, at
M. A. HOUGHTON'S
Cheap Millinery and Trimming Stere, 25 N. Queen St.
GOODS.
OF NOVELTIES IX
NOVELTIES IN SILK AND WOOL.
NOVELTIES IX SILK AXD WOOL.
NEW SHADES CASHMEltE I'EKIX.
NEW SHADES CASHMERE I'EKIX.
AND WOOL GBENADINE.
AND WOOL GBENADINE.
TBIMMING SILKS AND SATINS.' -
TB1MMING SILKS AND SATINS.
LAWNS AXD CHINTZES.
a
SHADES
-
LADIES.
Specially

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