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The Democratic press. [volume] (Ravenna, O. [Ohio]) 1868-1901, April 24, 1895, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83035083/1895-04-24/ed-1/seq-1/

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SEE OUR WINDOW
FOR
JOS. TURNER'S SONS'
WOOLENS.
SUITS $15.00
TO $16.50
ORDER, SIO.Oo
PANTS
TO ORDER, $3.50
MONSEY& CHALFANT
Popular Priced Tailors.
,,k: FIRE! FIRE!
Insurance a Specialty.
PRES
Hot Gtxxl people of Portage County! Do
you want Reliable Insurance? Then go to
E. M. WALLER,
who has bought tbe M. A. King Fir Insurauee
Agency tha largest in the County and is now
giving hit entire time to tbe insurance boaineeft
Reasonable rates and honest dealing is toe
motto,
Office in Phenlx Block, over J. C. Class
Dry Goods Store, Bavenna, Ohio.
Vol. 27, No. 3fi.
RAVENNA, O., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1895.
Whole No. 1388
f J . ' J
I (i
NO IT n
DEMOCRATIC
I
Cleveland & Pittsburgh Div.
ennsylvaniaLinBS. ;
- lv.i005j 4 35
10 15
Atwaier
KoiMmrn
Itiiverina .
Fj.rlv.llB ",1052, if3 54!
Hudson ";il02i S 95 Oil
MHcirtnIa .. " ill 14l 4 23
H.-dtord " 1121 S 451 4 351
Newbni-Kh . " 11 42: 6 Offl 4 50
4 Ic v-liut ar 12 10 6 25, 5 25l
PM PM AM
I lit :t.tu at-i 37T
Southward.
AM I AM i PM PM I'M
lTlnl lv.i8C-0t7 00tll 10325
7 2a; 1 1211 45: 3 55;
Btlford
Maoedouta
lludNOtt
Karlvlllo ..
liavenua ...
Hootslowu.
Alwalpr ....
LimavlUe
12 Oil 4 081
I2''l5 4 16;
8 09 f 2 01 12f44 445, 640:
8 19! 5 12 1 00! 5 05: 6 55;
8 26f2!1fl08' 14i r.Mj
838 J32fl20 525
8 44f2 37fl25. S99
12 30 a
i , r.
935 8 55 2 50 135: 540;
9 40, 8 53.2 55 1 4ll pm
ill!
Home won U.
Havard "
E. liorljrster "
Kensitngtou . '.
tiumuill vlile "
t ilmoville ... '
Imiidnlc . ... "
Btacaiivil'n .. "
Vell.iwl'reek "
9 0;)l3U?llb2' :
9 20i 3 20' 2 151 C
3
?5
9 30f3 24 f2 20j 5S? i F
9 42; 3 32' 231
956fS 48 ' 2 42
10 071 4 05 2 57
?t::
10 23 4 221315'
r
r-S-3
- C 3
a
10 27 '4 25 ' 3 22;
WfllST.lli 5 . "
5- ii0 40! 440: S40J
-!!0 45 4 45 3 50'
I
1 lv. 1- ill 00!
F M verpool " j 7 ill 10;
ar
ac
set
uu: ios
10: 4 06,
iv vr
livWIU-Mt'l'..
5' ' ill 50 6 00 5 oo:
ar A2 00.12 40, 6 50; 5 50
: N' N PM PM I AM j
4K
54S
PM
:t i. iid 3:t connect at Wellsvllle for
fcteuhenvill and Hrllaire. Ka.33and 349
omnecl in Uniou Station, Pittsbuirgu, toi' tiie.
baM.
BETWEEN BAYARD AND NEW PHILADELPHIA.
Head Down. Read Up.
I 52 j 6. 5
m AM j AMj
M 10 19 40 6 50 it Bayard .
4 20 9 4?: 7 10 " Minerva
AM PM PM
..art9 00t3 2014t
B 40; 3 1 u i 1
4 31 9 5$ 7 35 '
4 3S :0 03 8 05 '
4 55 -.0 15) 8 40 '
5 02 10 23j 8 55 '
5 221041 915-
Oneida
8 23 3 01: 3
8 05 2 5 8 2
Malvern
.Waynesbarg..
. . Magnolia
.Mineral Poiut
Zoar
.Canal Dover..
7 35 246 215
7 25 2 41 205
6 55 2 26 145
3 I a
312311
5 3D 10 50, 9 25
6 45 2 2U
6 25 2 05
605 155
55511 1
9 50 "
MO
1 25,10 10 mi
AVI AM
.. New Phila.. lv
AM I PM ao'H.
Duily. fExcept Sunday. fFlagstop. JMeals.
Dark !'d Type dtsetM timt from 12 00 noon to 12 00
ncrtt, ght ttMl bom 12 00 in ixght to 12 00 boos.
JOSEPH WOOD, E. A. FORD,
Greml liupr. Gneral Panongor lgnt,
11-30-M.-I PTTTsiiUKOH, PESN'A.
Fo. '.wis corfls, rates of fare, through tickets,
checks, and further Inforniation re.
carding the running of trains apply to any
gent of the Peuntylvania Lines.
W D OMtl. Aeai. Rivenna, Ohio.
TIME TABLE
.Adopted Nov, 25. 1894.
lentral time 88
minutes slewcr thas
Columbus time.
Trains ijerar' from Ravenna as follows:
KA8TVV ABU,
Depart.
No 8 New York and Boston 2:35 a. m
No. 3 Loci Freight 7:15 a- m
No. 12 New York and Bos'od 8:59 a. m
No. lu Yonogstown and Pittsburg 5:15 p. m
Depart.
No. 5 Chicago & Cincinnati Vestibule, 7:57 a.m
ho II tialiiou riaenger 3:22 p. m
No. 3 Lbirao and CiDoinnati 5:1 p.m.
Nos. S. 12 16 5. 11 and 3 ran daily.
No 11 makes all stops, haiamanca to Gallion.
No. 16 makes all slops. Cincinnati to YouDgs
town. No 12. Flag Stop at Freedom, Windham, and
Braceville.
A. M. I ncs SB A en 'I Manager. Cleveland.
S. I. KoBsnTu, tien'l Pass. Ag't, New York.
" iL'tiaS. A.ti i A.ChiCMif"
M. L. FoCTS Q-n. 1'asi. ln ar'aieDt. Cleveland.
I K ' ' -
TIME TABLE.
CENTRAL STANDARD TIME.
Im Effect Jan. 6, IS85,
MAIN LINE. Westbound.
STATIONS. NO. 7
NO. 3
NO. 16
No. 6.
A. M.
7.SO
e.ii
8.40
9-OT
IO.OO
IO.IO
IO.S4
I0.40
I0.49
ICS I
I 1.03
I 1.88
I I.6O
2.14
12.28
P. M.
2. IS
2.20
8.27
3.44
4.O8
4.05
5.08
5.84
6.55
O.OO
0.07
B. 1 8
e.52
7.1 I
7.2S
7.40
B.Od
2.15
Lv. PITTSBURGH
" ALLeQMSMV
" OALLERVOO
'' JgLIENOPLB
' ELLWOOO
" NEW OA8TLE
" VOUNOSTOWN
" NltES-
S.IS
4.2a
.a
s.i 1
S.4S
DC FOREST JO
WARREN-
LCAVITTSBU'O
NEWTON F'LS.
" RAVENNA-
" KENT-
OUVAH'OA FL8
AKRON -
A OrllOAGO
' COLUMBUS
12.47
I i.Ou
S.OOam
6.85
EA8TBOUNO.
aw ocnevwe ni rasscnqcr i rains-ienirai i imt- 1
;77 jS35 SS7 3411 ;f Willi i Sm
Northward. ,j e; 3 5 71 j lkftM
Rochter .... (7 05 2 1 1150'" Tzi j IvFlP
H.vr " 710, 2 1911 SSI w5 C 3 , 3 :"
fcU Liverpool " 7 2 4612 3. "a "2 1 ?t I H j V
WVll.vllle I "r- 8 03 25S1240 f ? ?s . 'Sri V
J lv 8 031 $ 00 12 45 e i , ; Q-i.
YellowCreek ' 8 16! lfcE esS ? i ? " " " .; V
lwBiiir.ll... 8 2S ilOKaJ' 2-1 ""si
Irondale. "626 .... U08 ,"es Si'lS J '1
Snramitville" 8t4i ''13? 1-.. i f ift
Keusiiigtoii.." 9 06 3 ST 1 60 5 ' i I ', J
K. Rochester" 9 14 .... (2 0$ IJJJ Sfi 1 F ',' tl fk
Bayard 9fcO408 2 05 t.' - - ' II I
Uuineworth." 9321 .... f2 lei105, "j l- " j SB
. t ar. 944: a Sfl 231 AM i QmV.R te, .. W
,2 56,t7 40; bfo6 5C I - fl
" 101K .... I'305 7 47) V J
";i0 20; 4 47;'312 7 53 ? JT
" 10 30; 113 25 8 05' AM I :f
"1040 5 IK 333 R 1SfiOR
SMIfid 1 r
912 7 23 $!'iu&0''a0f
9 25) 750)"" JK .D
9 50 8 251125 83C
PM PM AM AM AM AMI PM ,
8 23, 7 23; 1 1211 45: 3 55: 5 33 . W
73& 12U2 01I4 081S50 ?H
.... 7 4 136L2'15; 416; 6 08 G
h 73, fl
mm
ia.j
8TATION8. NO. 8 j NO. 8 NO. 14 NO. 4
A.M. I P.M. P. M. P M.
LV. CHICAGO ' 8.00 6.35 II.OO
" AKRON. I.251 6.203E! I 25
" CUVAM-QAFLS B.SO I.S5
" KENT 6.45 I.SO
" RAVENNA- 2.02 7.0O 2.07
" NEWTON F'LS 7.32 2.40
" LEAWITTSBU'O ? 2 82
WARREN- - 2.48 7.SO 2.S3
' DEFOREST JO 8 os
' NILE8 B.20 3.IO
' VOUNOSTOWN 3.21 8.45 3.40
' NEWCASTLE- 0 85 BOO 4.05
" ELLWOOO 7.11 4.19 0 44 4.40
" 2ELIENOPLE- 7.40 IO07 5-12
' CALLERVJO B.OI 10.25 5.30
" ALLEGHENY 8-IO 6.40
An. PITTSBURGH 8.15am I 1.40 9.20
" WASHINGTON 4.45pm 7.10
' BALTIMORE 6.05 8.80
" PHILADELPHIA ......... 8. 1 8 I I I O
" NEW YORK I IO.S5 1.65
I A. M. 1 P M. M. ' P.M.
...... i.e. 14 ako 1 5 run Daily, arhive aj,d dcpar
HOM B. a O. OtPOT, PITTSSOHOH. N08. 3 AND Dtt
a-T-riN alleqheny aho de forist Junction. Othef
Ttt.'N O.tLV ExCfPT SUNDAV.
LAKE DIVISION.
NO. 53 NO. 19 8TATION8. NO. 18 , No. 52
A. M. P.M. LV. A. A.M. P.M.
I 2 25 .VOUNOSTOWN O 5 j
.4S I S OS -OE FOREST JUNO. 8. IO 5. 1 0
SOS I 8.13 WARREN 8.02 ' 4.50
?.3Q : 8.48 'W. FARMII.OTON-. Y.SO ,
B 25 : 4-OS MIDDLE FIELD-- 7.11 : 2.33
8 40 4.12 BURTON 7.05 2.20
8.57 4.l8"-eA8TOLARI0ON- 056 202
OS7 4.37 OHAROON 8.39 ; 1.16
10 40 5 02 PAINESVILLE. 0.13 , 12.25
OAS 5. OS L.S.aM.SDEPOT- 8 IO : I 2.20
. V. Patton,
General Supt.
C. W. Bassett,
AsS'T General Pass. Agent.
E. P. MEKIZ, AGENT, ttAVBN!IA. OHIO.
2.50 CLEVELAND
BUFFALO
VIA "C. & B. LINE."
Cominenoine wi'b opening of navigation (abont
l.Dril 1st). Ms rrniUoeot side-wheel steel steamers
State ototiio"! - state
BUEDAY IHCLCDED,
Lv. Cleveland. o:' Or U. Lv. Bufi'tlo, - 6:30p.u,
Ar. Buffalo. - 7:iA a I Ar. Cleveland. 7:iOA.M,
CENTRAL STANDARD TIMS.
Take tbe " O. & B. Line " stpamers. and enjoy a
reffpehina nirht rt whrj n route to Buffalo,
Niagara Falls. Toronto, New York, Boston. Albany
I 000 Islands, or any tCastern or Caoadian point
ClisaiiExciirsiaiisWfiellyNieEaraFalls
Smo cbsts Pobtaoe fob Tocbist Pampblii
W.F.HERMAN, T. F. NEWMAN,
Sen' Pass. Agt. Gen'l Manager.
OLSVBLAR04O.
Look at This
UK,
WITH
for
I f A e
F. C. PARK
J Ille Reliable Jeweler f
No. I . RIDDLE BLOCK.
NEW? SPRING
CLOTHING
FOR
MEN",
YOUTH,'
BOYS and
CHILDREN.
A complete new stock in latest styles, and vari
ety superior to our previous tffjrts. Quality and
prices cannot be beat. Also,
HATS, CAPS, SHTRTS, UNDERWEAR,
NECKWEAR, HOSIERY, GLOVES,
TRUNKS, VALISES,
Also, the
Fine Woolens
atest in
Those who get their clothes made to measure
would do well to call and examine before buying
elsewhere.
CLOTHIER,
MERCHANT TA JLOKj
GENTS FURNISH ICR,
Talcott's Art Gallery.
PHOTOS OF ALL KINDS.
SPECIAL ATTENTION
GIVEN TO CHILDREN.
All Work
RAVENNA, O.
It Mil PAY You to Yisit Our Store
ANl SEE THE LARGEST LINE OF
FIElIf 111, " GEO OKIE!
Lit
NOVELTIES and
PlEfll
To be found in- one house in the State,
Our Prices are Below Competition!
Our New Upholstered Rockers are Dandies,
In CROCKERY
AND LOWEST PRICES.
Our Bargains in Lamps
Our UNDERTAKING DEPARTMENT
18 IN CHARGE OF A. B. FAIRCHILD.
Which ia a Guarantee that it will be well dons,
W. A. JENKINS & CO.
No. 8. Phenix Block.
We have the
Sweat Collar
On the lllarket.
RAVENNA, O. C. W. COCKEL.
for a Flyer!
JAMES
BOSS FILLED
CASK,
20-'EAR
With Real
Perfectly Cut,
Or any other American Movement,
$18.
We have only a lim
ited number of these.
Come and see the Beauties.
Suits and
Overcoats
UMBRELLAS, &c.
for Order Work
No. 3 Phenix Block.
Ravenna, O.
FRAMES MADE TO Uh.
IN ANY SIZE, IN LATEST
PATTERN OF MOULDING.
First Class.
OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE.
Clan
FANCY PIECES
Will
Finest Line ever shown
you should not let pass
Best
35c
? GOOD !
COM
We refer to our Superb btock of
Springs and Summer Shoes!
All the Latest Styles.
All the Best Workmanship.
All at the Lowest Prices.
Come in and eee us. We are always happy to see
our friends, and will use our best endeavors to make
your visit agreeable, socially and financially.
-" Smith and
txperr fooi Fitters,
HIS ONE REQUEST.
Mr.
Crigrgaon Took Notes of II tittle
Breaches of Ktlquette.
Mrs. Griggson You know avo arc
going around to the Van Kilters' to
morrow evening to dinner. Mrs. Van
Kilter is such an aristocrat.
Griggson Is she?
Mrs. Griggsoa Yes, she is. Aud 1
Henry, I hope you won't inind my
speaking of it Imt you know there arc
some little matters that you are not al
ways particular about."
unggson (laying down his paper)
What do you mean?
Mrs. Griggson Now, please don"t set
vexed but you know Mrs. Van Kilter is
so extreme and she notices everything.
Griggson I'm not vexed. What do
you want me to do?
Mrs. liriggson Well, tor instance,
when you enter the dining-room don't
be in hurry oh, Henry, don't rush at
the table as if it were a lunch counter.
Then wait until the ladies are seated.
You kuow sometimes you act as if you
couldn't wait. Confine your attention
to the other guests and appear as if the
dinner were only an incident.
Gnggson Certainly; I see.
Mrs. Griggson Then about your
soup. Always, Henry, from the side ot
tbe spoon and silently, Henry, silently.
Griggson Ab, yes, of course.
Mrs. Griggson And let your napkin
be unobtrusive. A napkin should never
be in evidence.
Griggson (taking out his note-book)
Wait a minute until I catch up. Now
go ahead.
Mrs. uriggson Please be serious.
Griggson Never was more serious
in my lile. 1 aim to please. Vnat
more?
Mrs. Grigg3on Well, sometimes you
have a habit of remarking on the dishes
as they are set before you: That's
good!" "Never tasted anything better!"
ou won't this time, will you, clear?
Griggson Certainly not. Anything
else?
Mrs. Griggson And don't put your
chair too near the table nor yet too far
away. Be careful to get it just right,
then you will be more easy. Then be
sure and pay strict attention to Mrs.
Van Kilter's remarks. She is so sensi
tive if she is not appreciated and really
she is quite bright.
Griggson All right. Now, there s
one thing, my dear, 1 want to ask of
you. Before we start out for that din
ner l want you to give me a good
square one.
Mrs. Griggson Mercv! What for?
Griggsson Because I don't expect to
eat a thing wnile 1 am there. iv. Jr.
World.
THE PARROT SHOUTED
"HURRAH."
and Plainly
Bat Got Otssrnsted at Last
Showed It.
There is one member of congress
whose wife owns an intelligent parrot,
which she brought from Mexico and
who?e talking taleut3 she has developed
with great assiduity and no little suc
cess, says the Washington Post. Of
course J0116S that's not his name and
the nom do guerre stands merely for
convenience ake as the true name of
the eougressman referre to Jones
was a candidate for re-election in No
vember, and, foreseeing his triumphant
vindication at the polls, the affectionate
Mrs. Jones specially ti'ained her parrot
to shout "Hurrah!" till the windows rat
tled whenever Jones' name was men
tioned iu his presence.
On the evening 01 the election sne
arranged to have the bird hung in the
reception room, where her husband
was going to receive his menus ana
also the returns. ith fond expectancy
ho looked for the news to come that
her husband had been elected by a
stunning- maioritv and the parrot shout
ins in the wild freuzv of his boundless
glee: "liurran tor joues: '
Alas, that the best laid plans of men
and mice gang ait agleel
When the fateful moment came a dis-
trpQenrl meQAnow with flushed face
and disheveled hair, burst into the sit
ting room with the announcement:
'"You're beaten, Jones!"
It was the parrot's cue aud he hadn't
forgotten his careful training.
"Hurrah for Jones!" shouted the green
imp on his perch and everybody iu the
room stood aghast at the audacity of
the biped.
Mrs. Jones was the first to show
sign of animation and it manifested it
self in a volcanic eruption of temper
directed against that cute and innocent
Mexican paiTot, which effectually put
a quietus on his exhilaration. The poor
bird cowered in the corner. In naif aa
hour the tide had chauged,
"You're elected, Jones'." shouted the
last messengei".
'Shout. Pollv. shout!" cried Mrs.
Jones, in a transport of delight.
The bird looked at her sideways, with
a look of disgust.
"Oh, Jones!" he muttered, turn
ing his back to her.
Accomplished His Object.
The Detroit Free Press tells how the
most popular man iu a western town
got into a difliculty with a disreputable
tough who was the terror 01 tne place,
and did him up iu a manuer eminently
satisfactory to the entire community.
It was necessary to vindicate the maj
esty of the law, however, and the of
fender was brought up for trial ou a
chargo of assault with intent to kill.
Th8 jury took the case and were out
about two minutes, when they returned.
"Well," said the judge in a familiar,
off-hand way, "what doe-i the iurv have
to say?"
"May it please the court." responded
the foreman, "we. the jury, lind that
tbe prisoner is not guilly of hittin1 with
intent to kill, but simply to paralyze,
aud ho doue il."
Tbe verdict was received with ap
plause and the prisoner was released
with an ovation.
First Domestic Me new mlstre33 Is
verv ladylike. Second Domestic What
d you mean by ladylike? First Domes-
tic Sure, 01 inane Bhe'a cLLfferent from
0-:U
em igiiaiiisj
RAILROADING IN MAINE.
A Condnrtor Stranded in the AVoodx, with
Ilia Train Dividel.
"I wauted to go to Mars Hill," said
the drummer, "and a man at Honlton
said that the train would leave Houlton
late in the afternoon and reach Mars
Hill early in the evening. Along with
a lot of other unfortuuates, equally anx
ious to get up the line, I got into the
stimmg car and waited, buppertimc
came and went no start. A passenger
went out to investigate and found that
in some unaccountable way the engine
naa pulled away witn the freight cars
and left the caboose standing on the
track. Some one had forgotton to
shackle it, we were told.
But, you d all better wait, said the
yardman. 'They won't get far before
they'll miss the car and come back.1
But, as we learned afterward, the
conductor got on board the engine at
Jtiouiton station ana rode away, sup
posing the caboose was securely shackled
behind. About twenty miles up the
line he dropped off the engine on a
grade when the train was running slow
ly, intending to catch on to the caboose
when it came along. lint to his amaze
ment when the end of the train swung
past him there was no caboose to climb
upon, and the train rattled on, leaving
him standing there upon the track. The
engineer, supposing that the conductor
had got safely on board at the grade,
let out a little and sped away.
The conductor liardly knew in which
direction to go, but while he was slowly
plodding on north a construction train
came along through the darkness and
he managed to stop it. The engineer
unshackled, and with the conductor set
off to chase the runaway train, blowing
the whistle furiously to atti-act the at
tention of the engineer ahead. After a
six-mile pursuit, the freight train was
held up snd the situation was reviewed.
There didn't seem to be anv other way
except to return for the missing caboose,
as all hands supposed it had broken
loose from the train somewhere along
the line after they left Houlton.
"so they backed slowly, mile aiter
mile, looking sharply for the car and
moving cautiously for fear of running
upon it on some curve, iinallythey
poked into the yard at Houlton, and
there their car stood on a siding, lhe
passengers were still waiting, which
fact indicates that the divine virtue of
patience is not extinct in Aroostook by
any means. It was then after mid
night, but the train pulled out, and if
there had been any sextuple drawbars,
oxebains or any other hitching con
nivances handy, the conductor would
have used them all in tying on that ca
boose." Lewiston Journal.
CROWS NOT TO BE TRUSTED.
A Cnnnluar Bird's Stratagem to Get Food
at a Hunter's Camp.
"A crow is the slickest bird flying
when it wants to be," said Lige Thom-
ner as he sat on the edge of a soap box
at V tlliams' store at Long hull center,
"and to prove it I will tell a circum
stance that occurred when a party of us
were camping at Canaan Mountain
pond last fall, says the N. Y. Sim.
"lhere were an almighty lot ot crows
around the hut we occupied and one
day I brought out my gun and shol into
a nock. All esoaped my snot except
one which wa3 lying on the ground
wounded. I went to the place and
picked the wounded bird up and found
that Its left leg had been broken by the
shot. Taking the crow to tho hut I
amputated the leg and taking a hot coal
from the lire I burned the stump so that
it wuuiu ii ul uieeu. ua uiru wua tuuu
allowed to go at liberty, but instead of j
lAa4n,T tho vimnrw rif thA pg inn it. Vm n nr
around and the boys would feed it witS
crumbs from the table and it became
quite tame. It would come limping
into camp just like a veteran after his
pension.
"At abont meal time the crow could
be expected at first but at last its visits
became more frequent. One of the
boys hinted that the bird we were feed
ing was not the victim of my gunshot
and iu investigating this theory we
found out what a great deceiver the crow
is. Up the alley leading to the spot
where the bird had been in the habit of
receiving its food there hopped one day
a fine black crow. There was nothing
about the bird to show that it wa3 not
the same one that had been the object of
our bounty so long. It had only one
leg so far as we could see.
"T'U bet that ain't our crow,' said
Charley.
"'Yes it is, too,' I says; 'it has only
one leg,'
"You wait and see,' says Charley,
and away be hurried and returned with
his gun. Raising it and taking careful
aim he fired and the bird stretched over
on the ground dead. We made an ex
amination and sure enough the bird had
two legs as good and sound as any bird
flying. When it had come into our
camp it had hitched the other up under
its wing so as to deceive us and secure
food. It must have watched us feeding
the wounded bird aud saw an opportun
ity of securing food by imitating that
one. All crows are so near alike that
there is no identifying one and tho only
way we knew ours was by the one teg,
When such a clever Imitator attacked us
we were badly fooled. I do not know
what became of the real wounded bird.
It never showed up after the other was
killed. I don't know but hat we had
been feeding the bogus bird for the real
one for weeks before we found out our
mistake as it was,"
His Chan re to Sec.
"I am going home," sadly remarked
the man who had left the theater iu the
middle of the play.
"What is the matter?" asked his friend.
"Too much theater hat. I'm not com
ing back again until a show with a fly
ing trapeze act in it comes along.
Washington Slur.
"How did Jeni.ie lok at the ball?"
Why, dear, 1 never hoped to see her
look so Ugly: Harper $ Magazine.
RUSSIAN COURTS.
Justice
Administered In Primitive
Effective Fashion.
bnt
In the poorer parts of Russia justice
is administered in a primitive yet effect
ive fashiou, says a recent writer who
had the fortune to be present at a sit
ting of one of the peasant courts in a
government of central Russia. The
fudges, chosen from tho pcusants, were
unlettered. The session was held in a
log cabin a small, low room. A pict
ure of the emperor decorated the wall,
and as iu every Russian house, in the
corner hung the holy cikons. Three
judges and a scribe were present. The
day was Sunday, a day of idleness for
tho peasantry. Tho hall, the judges
and the public all had an air of simple
dignity, almost of rude majesty.
Two cases were tried. Tarties aud
witnesses, as they entered, bowed low
to the holy images. The judges spoko
and questioned by turns, or all at once,
each loudly expressing his opinion. I
admired the patient persistence with
which thoy tried to bring the litigants
to an amicablo understanding. One
case was characteristic.
A woman, a large, robust virago,
complained of having beeu beaten by a
man. The man's defense was that the
woman had struck him first. Plaint iff
ami defendant stood before the judges
volubly pleading each his or her case
and appealing to their witnesses at
their sides.
"Varvara Petrova," declared one wit
ness for the defendaut, "has said that
with a vedro of vodka she was sure of
winning her case."
This statement did not appear to as
tonish or bcandalizo the court. The
judges gravely nodded their heads, and
after a brief rebuke went on with the
case.
"Come to terms; make it up between
you," they repeated over and over, try
ing to get the parties themselves to sug
gest a sentence, instead of pronouncing
one of excathedra.
"Well, now, Varvara Poirova," said
one of the judges, at last, "how much
indemnity do you want?"
"Three roubles."
"Ah, throe roubles! That's loo much.
You won't get that," muttered the
judge. Then turning to the defendant:
"And you, how much are you willing
to give her?"
"Nothing," replied the man.
"Ah," again muttered the judge,
"that's not enough. How much will
you give her?'
"Well, thou, one rouble."
"One rouble aud a shtof?" interrupted
the woman.
"Shtof s and whisky are not to be men
tioned here," remarked one of the
judges, whose austerity may have been
increased by our presence. "Out of
here you may drink all you want, but
that has nothing to do with the deci
sions wc render hero."
The woman, on this, looked resigned;
the scribe read tho sentence, the two
litigants bowed in acquiescence, then
again to the holy images, and withdrew
with their friends anil relatives.
A GOOD THINC.
How an "L," Boad Night Guard Earned
More than His Hay's Wages.
The colonel was carrying home a lit
tle more alcohol than usual. I don't
know whether or not he was a colonel
but that is what Billy, tho guard on one
of the night "L" trains called him, and
Billy knows most of hi3 regular passen
gers as well as he knows where they
ought to get off the train, says a writer
in the ST. Y. Herald.
The colonel lurched heavily aboard
the train at 28th street and dropped into
the seat nearest to the door.
"Hey, Billy, don't let me go past
104th street. I want to take a nap."
The colonel thereupon fumbled in his
pocket and gave Billy a bright new
silver dollar as a tip. Then he settled
himself comfortably into his big ulster
and was soon asleep.
Something broke the colonel's nap as
tbe train swung around the curve into
53d street. He moved sleepily toward
the platform and inquired: "Ish zis
Hundred-and-Foursh street?"
"Sit down, colonel," said Billy, reas
suringly. "It's only 53d and 6th avenue.
I'll put you off at your station all
right."
"Tbat'sh all right, Billy; don't forget
me, and here'sh something for your
self." The colonel thi3 time went down
into a roll of bills and gave Billy a $3
note. Billy pocketed it smilingly and
the colonel resumed bis snooze.
At 72d street an outgoing passenger
stumbled against the colonel's foot and
aroused him again. He jumped toward
the door nervously just as Billy pulled
the bell cord.
"Not there yet. colonel," said the "L1
road guardian angel. "Don't disturb
yourself, sir; I'll look after you."
"Shank you, old man; all right Buy
yourshelf a d-d-drink when yoush off
duty," and the sleepy colonel dived
again into his horde of small change
and tipped Billy a half dollar. Billy
pocketed the coin with the assurance of
a pantata as tno tram movea on,
When the train nnaiiy reached lUith
street the colonel was iu a deep sleep.
Billy shook him vigorously and helped
him toward the door.
'Now we're off," mumbled the colonel,
as he braced himself for the exit." Come
wish me, Billy, and we'll have a drink
togesher. Nice saloon right down
shreet.open all night got a pull. Come
along, and the colonel grasped Hilly
firmly to take him along onto the plat
form.
Billv protested that he couldn't leave
his post.
"Never mind zhe old train, my boy,
Train can wait for us. Won't refuse to
drink with me, will you?"
Billy stood grasping the bell cord inv
patiently and gently but urmly urging
the colonel on the piatiorm.
"W ell, bushiness is bushiness, ' mut
tered the colonel, finally. "If you can't
drink wish me, Kiliy, take something to
buy a cigar
Another silver dollar passed into the
hand of the guard as ho jerked the bell
rope and suug out:
-Iluiidert and Sixteen next!" aud
the train rumbled off, leaving the
colouel pensively looking for the exit
gate and trying the door of the ladies1
room.
"Are there many of them like that?" I
asked Uiliy.
"No. I wish there were. The colo
nel's always liberal. That's more than
my day's wages made in one trip; but
there aitft mauy like the ..olonel. Tha
colonel's :i good thing," and Billy
slammed the iloov and eame in?ide out
of the cold.
The experiment of cooking dinner for
7,500 men belonging to the guards In a
single field kitchen at the Muuoheberg
station, near Berlin, took place the oth
er day, before the troops left for their
headquarters. The affair was complete
ly successful. Thirty - five hundred
pounds of beef and 1.000 pounds of
hams were cooked.
Iu the Sitka district, Alaska, tho ea
uoes arc each cut from a 3iagle log of
wood. The log is first dresseiland hol
lowed out and theu steamed and spread
open. Many of the canoes are models of
form. Great care is expended on them,
and if the maker were paid good wages
their prices would be fabulous. A good
... w
new canoe, awe to cany imcc uuu
100 pound '
oi baggage, is wort9lv
Highest of ail in Leavening Power. Latest U. S. Gov't Report
l rvs f n 10
ABSO&DTEOT PURE
An Unwelcome "Shine."
During all tho confuuion and anxiety
of tho late civil war both officers and
men still found time for playing . prac
tical jokes, though not all were as harm
less or so unpleasantly received as the
joke one southern officer enjoyed at the
expense of another. It was just before
the siege of Vicksburg. The train bear
ing the 85th Mississippi regiment and
Bledsoe's battery was detained in Jack
son several hours.
CoL Barry and Capt. Bledsoe were
capital fellows and good friends.
Barry, gentle, genial, humorous, never
soemed to harbor an unkind thought.
Bledsoe was one of the most distin
guished battery captains of Price's
Missourians.
The two men occupied a box-car to
gether that night and after some hours
of congenial intercourse they rolled
themselves in their blankets and slum
bered. Bledsoe was about 6 feet 3 inches tall
and paid little attention to his attire.
He wore boots of extraordinary size
and length, which came half-way up
his long legs and were innocent of any
coloring save the native yellow of the
unpolished hide.
Barry awoke first and seeing, Bled
soe's great boots standing by called a
negro and gave him a confederate dol
lar to black them. The darkv per
formed his task well and put the boots
where he had found them. Theu Barry
aroused Bledsoe, told him it was time
to be up and lay chuckling as Bledsoe
searched the car for his yellow boots.
vv lien at last he realized that the
freshly blackened pair before him was
his own aud that he had furnished fun
for the company his wrath arose against
Barry and he challenged him to a duel.
But he calmed down after awhile, when
the jovial colonel srood-naturedlv in
formed him that it was impossible for a
colonel to waive his rank and fight with
a captain. Youth's Companion.
Why He Didn't Chip In.
In one of our suburbs a few Sundays
ago the priest of one of the churches
announced that a collection would be
taken up to defray the cost of coal for
heating the church. Jiverybody chipped
in but Tim well, never mind his other
name who gave a sly wink as the plate
was presented to him, but nothing else.
The priest noticed Tim's dereliction, but
surmised that ho might have left his
money at home. Not quite enough
money having been realized a similar
contribution was levied the following
Sunday. As before, everyone gave but
Tim, who looked mighty sly, and the
priest wondered thereat. Meeting Tim
after the service, he took him to task for
his conduct. "Now, Tim, why didn't yon
give something, if only a ponny?"
"barth, lather, L m on to yez. "lim!"
"Yes, father." "W'hat do yon mean?"
Oh, nothing, father. Just that I'm on
to yez, that's all." ' 1 im.yonr words are
disrespectful and require au explanation.
VV hat do you mean.-1 ' "Oh, faith, father,
a-thryiu' to pull the wool over me eyes.
A-thryin' to make us believe yez wants
tho money to buy coal to heat t he church,
an1 yer riverence knows its heated by
steam. " Boston Traveler.
The Office Boy.
The o Bice hoy sat on a high stool,
swinging his feet and jabbing a pen in
a blotting pad. while a visitor to see his
employer sat over by the window -waiting
for him.
"I presume," he said very kindly,
noticing the boy's languid condition,
that vou have a great deal of work to
do?"
"Not when the boss is out," confessed
the boy frankly.
"Um! You get well paid for it, l pre
sume?" "I don't git as much as 1 want.'
"Nobody gets as much as he wants,"
remarked the visitor philosophically.
"la like to be nobody awhile.
frlnned the boy, says the Detroit Free
Yess.
"Oh, well," laughed tho visitor, "yon
will have to wait till you become a man,
then you can have an office boy oi
your own and pay him what ho thinks
he ought to have for his valuable
services."
"Can I?" he responded emphatically,
"Well, I guess not. You bet I'm not
goin' to bankrupt my business, I an't"
but the boss came in at that moment,
and just what important communication
the office boy was going to present to
the visitor was lost in the rush of him
otf of the stooL
A "Labor Note.
"Papa," said the daughter of a large
employer of labor, "are you in favor of
the eight-hour system?"
"Well, daughter, under certain cir
cumstances I am."
"Oh, I am so glad," she rapturously
exclaimed.
"Why, my dear, are you so inter
ested?" "Because, papa, George has only been
staying four hours every evening, and
he told me last night if you favored the
eight-hour system, he needn't go home
so early. You dear old papa, I am so
glad you are in favor of it," and she
wrapped her soft white arms around
his neck and choked off all explana
tions. 2'exas Sif lings.
Some Queer Fitlllea.
There are quite a number of people
who collect musical instruments. Men
have been known to pay tremendous
prices for violins of rare make, merely
to place these instruments in collections
they are making of such things.
One of the greatest fiddles that ever
was known was to be seen at the French
court in the time of Charles the Ninth.
This was a viol so large that several
boys could be placed inside of it. The
boys used to sit inside this queer instru
ment and sing the airs that the man
who handled the bow was playing on
the viol outside. The effect is said to
have been very beautiful, though it
would seem as if the presence ot the
lads in its interior would seriously in
terfere with the tone of the "great fid
dle," as it was called. Many years
after another huge instrument of this
kind was used at concerts in Boston. It
was so large that to play it the fiddler
had to stand on a table to use his bow
at the proper point on the strings. This
instrument was called the "grandfather
of fiddles." Harper's Young Peoph.
Ilia Advice.
Fust Anarchist 1 am tired of life
uud vant to die. 1 go me out uud kill
a mayor or governor or somedings, so 1
get executed.
Second Anarchist You dake my ad
vice and don't kill no mayors or gover
nors. Dey vill take two or three years
finding out if you are zane enough to
hang. Shust you drive up to Shanty-
i inwn an run nrer a. u r.
town and run ofer a pig. Den you got
HWa v" V. WeekhJ.
'.'.r-. ..
ft
IT
A Story About lien, tirant.
Au incident is related to me by an old
friend of Mr. Lincoln, who was witness
to the occurrence. One morning after
President Lincoln's assassin atiou Gen.
Grant was carelessly riding down Penn
sylvania avenue, when he saw a group
of gentlemen, all of whom he knew. He
stopped his horse, and found these gen
tlemen excitedly discussing something
that they heard Andrew Johnson was
just about to do at tbe White House. A
spokesman told Gen. Grant that Andrew
Johnson had determined to revoke tho
parole of cerlalu confederate officers.
Grant listened quietly, slowly smoking
his cigar. When his Informant finished
Grant remounted his horse, rode rapidly
toward the White House, and went
straight in to interview Andrew John
son. He asked:
"Mr. rresideut, 1 understand you are
determined to revoke the parole of cer
tain of the confederate leaders who sur
rendered to me at Appomattox."
"I am considering the matter," re
plied the president.
"By whose authority," asked Gen.
Grant, "do yon revoke a parole signed
by me?"
"Bv the authority of the United
States," replied Andrew Johnson, with
some asperity.
Grant quietly replied: "liv the au
thority of the coinmander-in-cbief of
the armies of the United States that pa
role shall not be revoked," and turned
on his heel and quietly left the White
House.
Johnson knew Grant. He knew
army of the United States was at
back. Nothing more was heard of
matter. Washington Ctyrital.
the
hU
tha
SHE
JOINED THE CHASE.
Dragcred
Along; by Her Bullilos; In His
rnnnlt of a Cat.
I am not an admirer of that product
of canine 'Civilization the toy dog
but when it comes to selecting a com
panion for a promenade I am prepared
to maintain that for a woman the toy
dog is much preferable to the bulldog,
says a correspondent of the X. Y. Ker
ala, lhat lamclusion was arrived at
after witnessing something that occur
red in Fifth aveuue the other day.
A spinster of the emancipated woman
type was leading a bulldog by a chain
and evidently enjoying the terror which
its presence inspired among her weaker
sisters who were still bound in the
chains of conventionalism. The bull
dog, with the listless good nature pecu
liar to its species, paid no attention to
anybody ov anything until a predatory
cat essayed to cross the street a few
feet in front of it." If there is one thing
more than another that a bulldog is
death on it is a cat.
The situation was instantly reversed.
The bulldog was leading the emanci
pated woman a mad chase across the
avenue in pursuit of the feline that
stood not a moment on the order of its
going. The street was crowded with
vehicles, and it was only because that
kindly providence which tempers the
wind to the shorn lamb and the fall to
the drunken man happened just then to
be taking a keen interest in the fate o
that woman of advanced views that hef
life was preserved. As it was, the re
cording angel must have had a particu
larly busy two minutes taking steno
graphic notes of the oaths that were
uttered by excitable jehus as they threw
their horses on their haunches.
On the opposite side of the street the
cat sped down a flight of steps leading
to an areaway audnopped onto a win
dow sill, where it was beyond the reach
of its less agile foe.
The woman, either because she
wouldn't or couldn't let go the chain,
was luggedgdown the same steps, nar
rowly escaping a fall, and for five min
utes she stoodthere tugging vainly at
the chain while the dog strained aud
leaped and barked in fruitless efforts tn
get within biting distance of puss.
The crowd that gathered around en
joyed the woman's discomfiture. Not
a man offered to assist her.
"It just serves her right," remarked a
pretty girl to her companion. "She
ought to know better than to go around
with such a horrid brute."
All the women present were evidently
of the same opinion. A policeman, at
tracted by the crowd, finally came to
her rescue and by main strength pulled
the dog up the steps, while the terrified
cat made tracks for parts unknown.
And the emancipated woman hadn't
sufficient presence of mind left to re
sent the observation of the representa
tive of the law that "women ain't got
no right to go foolin around with a
bulldog anyhow."
They Shet The Do' Xow.
In "Cracker" cabins in north Georgia,
no matter how cold the weather, both
doors, back and front, stand open from
daylight till dark, the year through.
This, perhaps, is accounted for by the
fact that there are no windows " in the
houses, and the doors are kept open for
light.
One bitter cold winter's" day, while
hunting for a workman, a northern
superintendent of the Georgia Marble
company, went into one of these cabins
and found the whole family, blue with
cold, huddled over a few pine sticks in
the fireplace. Every door was open and
the icy wind was sweeping through the
room unhindered.
Before proceeding to business the
northerner banged to the doors, threw
several logs on the coals, and soon had
things steaming. As they grew com
fortable, he remarked:
"Now, don't you see how quickly you
warm up when you keep the wind out?
See what a difference it makes to shut
the doors?"
The thawed-out Cracker turned to his
wife quite energetically and said:
"Wife, danged if hit an't so! Don't
forget it. When hits cold arter this.le's
shet the do'."
Awarded
Highest Honors World's" Fair,
DIl
CREAM
MOST PERFECT MADE.
A pure Grape Cream of Tartar Powder. Free
from Ammonia, Alum or any other adulterant;
40 YEARS THS STANSASOt

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