OCR Interpretation


East Cleveland leader. [volume] (East Cleveland, Ohio) 1942-1970, November 24, 1960, Image 4

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83035682/1960-11-24/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Faw Four
Home for a weekend breather
between expansion meetings in
New York, Vice President Geo.
A. Medinger revealed that the
share-the-talent program under
which the Los Angeles and
Washington tarns will be given
a fighting chance to finish
eighth instead of tenth, did not
go as far as some of his Ameri
can League associates believed
it should.
Not Santa
These generous souls urged
the Indians to let Lane take the
then-vacant Washington job—
for the good of the league. The
pressure failed for two rea
sons. Lane was not willing to
accept Washington’s offer—at
least not the first one—and the
Cleveland owners, represented
by Medinger and Nate Dolin, re
minded their colleagues it’s too
early to play Santa Claus.
Although Lane announced he
had turned down Gen. Elwood
(Pete) Quesada, Washington’s
new boss, Medinger expected the
famous airman would try again.
And he had no guarantee that
Lane would not be tempted by
a sweetened bid.
“It’s possible,” the veep said
shortly before the Doherty an
nouncement, “that the Washing
ton people will offer Frank some
9. A. TOOMEY
DEALEB IN PIANOS
and
PIANO TUNING
38027 Euclid Avaw Willoughby
WH. 2-6633
1 ........ 11 1 ............
Book Your Holiday
Shows Now
JOHN J. GRDINA
Dean of Cleveland
MAGICIANS
WH. 6-1032
38025 Lake Shore Blvd.
Ed McAuley
ON
SPORTS
Possibility Of Losing
Lane Is Not So Remote
Frank Lane still is general manager of the Cleve
land Indians, but not until the new Washington club
named Ed Doherty front office chief did Tribe offi
cials consider the matter settled—and they still face
the possibility of losing Lane elsewhere on the ex
ploding baseball map.
CLOSE OUT
5 Pound
Excellent Seconds
OO QQ
Selection
of Sizes
kind of stock deal which he’d
feel he couldn’t refuse. In that
case, we’d have to let him go.
His contract has two years to
run, but who wants an officer
who’d rather work elsewhere.
After all, we got Frank from St.
Louis before his contract with
the Cardinals had expired.”
Policy Matter
Medinger said the Cleveland
club, as a matter of policy,
would not attempt to match a
bid which included stock. Tribal
executives hoped Lane's good
contract here, as well as his
playing material in comparison
with Washington’s, would keep
Frank in the Wigwam.
“But I’ll tell you what we’re
not going to do,” Medinger
added. "We’re not going to listen
to these fellows who think we
ought to let Frank go to Wash
ington so the new team there
can get off to the best possi
ble start. General managers of
Frank’s caliber are not as plen
tiful as that. Wouldn’t we look
great if we gave him up patri
otically, then our team went
sour?”
The threat from the capital is
ended, but Lane undoubtedly
will have other opportunities to
move. The Houston club in the
National League, which will
start its expansion program in
1962, has lured Gabe Paul away
from Cincinnati, but the New
York Nationals have not named
their chief executive. In the
American League, the Los Ange
les situation hasn’t jelled.
Competition Grows
Besides, some of the estab
lished clubs may be looking for
topnotch general managers as
the always-taxing competition
for new talent
tense with the
petition.
CEMENT PAINT
FLUSH DOORS
Birch or Mahogany
up
Make Your Own Desk*,
Coffee Tables, Drop Tablet, Etc.
TRAIN
BOARDS
5 Ft. 8 Ft.
GENUINE
CALIFORNIA
$4-95
REDWOOD
CORNICES
GARAGES
grows more in
increased com-
turning down
Even after
Washington’s offer. Lane rfe
marked he did not think it wise
to use the word ‘never’ in con
nection with these matters.
Frank’s baseball home is where
he drops his well-traveled brief
case. This Hessian of the base
ball wars already has run three
big league clubs, so no one can
be sure he’ll stay in Cleveland
the rest of his life.
But regardless of the wishes
of Minoso and Colavito fans, the
Tribe’s owners have no plans to
turn philanthropists for the sake
of the American or any other
league.
SM/TNGSjjpjO4$?
READY- TO -PAINT FURNITURE
CORNER CABINETS from............. $18.95
*.k
Players must be 13 through
16 years of age and for the $1
fee they will be assigned to a
team for ten games, given a
team shirt, and can attend the
banquet at the close of the
season.
All boys interested should
come to clinics ready play.
George Bridenbaugh of the Ex
change Club is League Director
and Ray Snyder, YMCA Phy
sical Director is League secre
tary.
Class Church League
basketball is organized to start
on Wednesday. Dec. 14th at
Kirk Jr. High Gym. Teams are
organized through the
churches. Game times are 7
8-9 p.m. League Director is
Ray Snyder, YMCA Phpsical
Director.
Class “B” for adults. This
league is being formed in co
operation with the Heights
and Hillcrest Branches of the
Cleveland YMCA. Play will be
at Kirk Jr. High Gym on Tues
day. East Cleveland teams will
be managed by Ray Suydam,
Ken Roberts, and John Bodmer.
The league will be adminis
tered by staff members from
the’ three participating “Y’
branches.
The East Cleveland YMCA
is planning a jr. Boys (Ages
13-14) team to compete in the
inter-city YMCA League. Boys
interested should contact Ray
Snvder, at the East Cleveland
YMCA.
Basketball
For Younger
Set to Start
Record Cabinets $11.39 up Desk Tables $11.39
Book Cases from ... $5.95 Chests from $8.95
$1 40
Package
89'
INSULATION
Loom
Sq.
$2.98
$3.60|
“First-class friends deserve
first-class mail!” Postmaster
Joseph S. Frantz declared to
day, as the arrival of Christ
mas- cards and gift packages in
heavy volume indicated that
the Yuletide Season has offi
cially begun.
at
at
racing
Sunday
MIDGET AUTO
the Arena this
2 p. m. will feature Don
Wolf, 1304 East 142nd it.
He will pilot the Phil
Schoenen 18 Micro Midget,
"Y Basketball
Schedule Listed
Class "E” YMCA Basket
ball starts at Shaw High Schoo]
Gym on Saturday afternoons
12:30 to 3 p.m. This league is
sponsored by the East Clevland
Exchange Club. Organizational
clinics will be held Saturdays,
Dec. 3rd and 10th.
By way of explanation, the
Postmaster said, ‘Most of our
grief is caused each year by
hastily scribbled addresses that
we can’t read, or
cards being sent as
mail which can’t be
or returned if the
has moved. Loosely wrapped
are other
be
are
Registration blanks
now being distributed to all
fifth, sixth, seventh and
eighth grade boys. The
Junior Basketball program
is scheduled to start Satur
day. Dec. 3rd and will run
for 10 sessions.
The program is sponsored
by the East Cleveland Board
of Education and is in its
seventh year.
Aluminum Safety-Type
Household Ladders
5 ft. $6.95 6 ft. $8.95
$1.19
Rock
Wool per bag
Fiber Glass Standard
Roll
Per roll ______
Aluminum Foil
One Side .........
PANELING
23c
KNOTTY PINE
e—
exFt.___
Now in 7 Ft and 8 Ft. Lengths
Now Paper Wrapped
No Cutting—No Waste
No Blemished Pieces
Factory Clean and Bright
Complete With
Dust Stops and
Side Brackets
Materials or Completely Erected
CALL US NOW FOR FREE ESTIMATES
St. Clair Lumber Co.
16530 Ste Clair Ave. KEnmore 1-2400
Open Daily Till 5:30 P.M. and Friday and Monday Evenings Till 9 P.M.
THOROSEAL
MASONRY
PAINT
50 Lb. Package
$4.95
99c
As Low As
BUY NOW—AT WINTER PRICES
Each
Christmas
third-class
forwarded
addressee
gift packages
trouble-makers that can
avoided.”
Public Service
To offset these perennial
problems, Postmaster Frantz
recommends that you begin
now to correct and bring your
address book up to date. Re
member, as a public service,
without obligation, the post of
fice will zone your Christmas
card local-address list if sub
mitted before next Thursday.
Identify your list with your
own name and address under
scored to enable the letter car
rier to return the completed
list. “And by all means,” he
continued, “mail those precious
packages and Christmas cards
early—next week, if possible!”
Wrap your shipping cartons
carefully, with a good cord
pulled over and under several
times around. Stuff your pack
ages properly to cushion any
fragile items they may con
tain.
paper
sound
Use heavy wrapping
to help insure safe
delivery.”
‘The limits on size
weight of packages varies, de
pending on where you send
them. However, parcels to any
domestic destination may
weigh as much as 20 pounds
and measure 72 inches in com
bined length and girth. If your
package exceeds these limits,
phone the post office for infor
mation.
A letter may be enclosed in
side a parcel provided postage
for the letter—four cents per
ounce—is added to the postage
affixed to the parcel, and the
sender places the endorsement
"First Class Mail Enclosed” on
the wrapper just below the
postage. Parcels must be
wrapped so that they can be
easily examined. Sealed par
cels, mailed at the third- or
fourth-class rate of postage,
are subject to postal inspection.
Special care should be given
to writing or printing all
names and addresses clearly.
Christmas seals may be placed
only on the backs of packag
es. “Do Not Open Until Christ
mas” stickers may be used.
4 Cent Stamps
The postmaster particularly
stressed the Importance of
sending all Christmas cards
with four-cent stamps as first
class mail, and. gain these ad
vantages:
1. Your cards may carry
written messages.
2. They are dispatched ,and
delivered first.
3. If necessary, they are for
warded to new addresses with
out additional charge.
4. If undeliverable, they are
M.
BAST CLEVELAND LEADER
Heavy Yuletide Mail
Forseen Officials
Urge Early Posting
returned if the sender’s ad
dress is on the envelope.
The rate for greeting cards,
sealed or unsealed, to Canada
and Mexico, is four cents.
To avoid last-minute crowds,
Postmaster Frantz recommends
that you visit the post office
early next week to purchase *11
those extra stamps you’ll soon
need. The stamp lines are
short now, and this is one
phase of Christmas shopping
that can be done easily.
“We anticipate an even heav
ier load of Christmas mail
this year than in 1959,” the
Postmaster said.
“Consequently, we’ve en
larged our staff of mail clerks
and carriers as much as pos
sible. The sorting tables and
delivery trucks are all set up.
Mail your gift parcels and
greeting cards early next week.
It’s One Day Closer To Christ
mas. Please Mail Early.
Knights Taking
Part In Area
Blood Drive
The Knights of Columbus
the Northeast district of Ohio
are taking part in the drive to
supply blood to the hospitals
for the holiday needs.
of
The Councils taking part in
this drive are Euclid and Ima
culata both in Euclid, North
east in Collinwood and Winder
mere in East Cleveland, i
and
Size Limits
The response has been so
great that a new location had
to be added to take care of
everyone. They have been asked
to report to Cleveland Wire
Division of the General Electric
Co., 1331 Chardon rd. between
4:30 and 7 p.m. on December
19th. To make reservations call
Mr. Robert Keefer, KE. 1-5050.
and
Mr. Keefer is in the Person
nel department of General
Electric and is in charge of the
program. He suggests that
each one call and make an
appointment in order to save
time.
Magazine Editor
Speaks To Club
“Be Thankful for the Now
was the topic of the Rev. Earl
R. Henderson when he spoke
yesterday to the Rotary Club
of Eastern Cleveland ,at its
luncheon meeting at Tudor
Arms hotel. Rev. Henderson is
pastor of the First Methodist
church of Elyria.
Next week, Mr. James
Keebler, managing editor of
the magazine, “Automation”,
will speak on “Automation and
You.”
Sub Vets Needed
A Greater Cleveland Chapter
of Submarine Veterans of
World War II is being formed.
Additional information can
be obtained by calling Michael
Morel at RE. 2-7647.
INVALID CAR SERVICE
24 HOURS A DAY
Stanley H. fohneton Funeral Hook
KEnmore I -3600
Stanley H. Johnston
Funeral Home
Corner Eatl 152nd and Lake Shore Blvd.
KEnmore 1-3600
15314 MACAULEY AVENUE
o BEAUTIFUL SURROUNDINGS
o AIR CONDITIONED
o AMPLE PARKING
z
A complete line of merchandise in our own
show-room to meet the financial circum
stances of all families.
Complete Funerals From $395 to $2500
Why spend a day making funeral arrange
ments when it can be done all under one
roof in a short time?
AT YOUR SERVICE AT AU TIMES
PRIVATE INVALID CAR
ALL CALLS WILL HAVE THE
PERSONAL ATTENTION OF
STANLEY H. JOHNSTON and EDWARD G. WELLER
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
ELEANOR METCALF. Organist
I
'-VV' hr4’’-
Mrs. Bolton Reports On
Special White House Meet
White House Conference On Aging
More then 200 persons from all the States and
Territories are meeting in Washington this week to
develop final plans for the White House Conference
on Aging which opens Jan. 9th. The Conference pro
gram and rules of order will be agreed upon during
this week's sessions.
In attendance will be 150
members of the national ad
visory committee and 53 repre
sentatives from the States and
Territories. The Honorable
Robert W. Kean, former New
Jersey Congressman, who is
chairman of the advisory com
mittee will lead the discussions.
The White House Conference
on Aging is expected to draw
3,000 delegates to the Nation’s
Capitol in January to study the
needs of the aged in the fields
of health, employment, income,
housing, and leisure activities.
Exchange Programs
Statistics recently made
available indicate that the
United States maintains a stu
dent exchange program ap
proximately three times as
large as that carried on by the
Soviet Union. During the 1959
60 school year, there were
48,486 foreign students from
141 countries and political
areas enrolled in American col
leges and universities. Depart
ment of State figures for a
comparable period show 17,000
foreign students from 40 coun
tries in the Soviet Union and
its satellites, with only 1,163
of them from the free world.
Engineering was the subject
most frequently pursued by
foreign students in the Soviet
Union, followed by law, social
and natural sciences. In the
United States by comparison
23 per cent studied engineer
ing, while 19 per cent were in
the humanities, 15 per cent in
the physical and natural sci
ences, and 14 per cent in the
social sciences.
Perhaps the most striking
feature of our exchange pro
gram is the fact that 38 per
cent of the foreign students
paid their own way, while an
other 28 per cent were financed
by private American organiza
tions. In contrast to the Soviet
Union where the State finances
its foreign program 100 per
cent, the United States Govern
ment supported less than 6 per
cent of the total number.
1 It is truly gratifying to note
that more and more private or
ganizations, societies and cor
porations are helping to bring
foreign students to this coun
try for study and training,
thereby adding immeasurably
to better understanding
throughout the world.
Housing Gain
Ohio matched the national
average gain of 27 per cent in
the increase of housing units
from 1950 to 1960. Sixth among
the States in total number of
units, Ohio had 3,052,058 hous
ing units in 1960, a gain of
649,493 since the preceding
census was taken ten years ago.
v The total count of housing
units in the 50 states and the
District of Columbia reached
58.6 million on April 6 1960, ac
cording to the Bureau of the
Census. This was an increase of
about 12.4 million or 27 per cent
over the 1950 total of 46.1 mil
lion. The ten leading states in
number of units counted in 1960
were New York, California,
Pennsylvania, Illinois, Texas,
Ohio, Michigan, New Jersey,
Florida and Massachusetts.
President Eisenhower has
issued a proclamation designat
ing 'the week of Dec. 11th as
Human Rights Week. All
Americans are called upon to
rededicate themselves to the
Bill of Rights so that, by ex
ample, they can help peoples in
other lands achieve equality
with regard to differences in
race, sex, language or religion.
The President said: “Let us
remember that it is only
through free and responsible
efforts that humanity can make
lasting progress toward the
goal of peace with justice.
iMviiTta.ew«u
Who benefits from an investor-owned Electric Company?
YOU DO
Because The Illuminating Company is owned by people*
not by the government—we pay taxes just like you do.
In 1860, for example, The Illuminating Company will pay
more than $26,000,000 in federal, state and local taxes. Of this
amount, $9,500,000 will go to local city and county govern
ments, to public schools, poor relief and welfare.
The balance—more than $16,500,000—will go to tye state or
Ohio and the federal government, and a substantial amount
will come back to you in the form of new and improved high
ways, Social Security benefits, national defense and other
things administered by the various levels of government
This is one of the reasons you benefit when a tax-paying,
investor-owned electric company serves you.
csmpabt hbvhis tm but ibcaiibn im natim
AS ULYlHtMWNIB C6MPAKY 8I8VM* 2M BUT ItCAIItN IB IM MRTtM
Clyde Zinn, 14015 Superior Ave. WUHcon Zles. 14678 Elderwood Ave.
A'
1
'W:
fH
Thundoy, Wiriibw N, IMP
Schwinn Bicycles
MR AR
AU
UP
SIZES OWovV TERMS
Sam Rebuilt Bleyde*
Wheel*, tire*. tube*. all Typo* an* I
Bicycle* end Trlcvdoc Repalrad
Wheel* Straightened Repaired
Re tired Welding
ART’S BICYCLE STORE
15104-08 Euclid Avenue Glenville 1-4495
SHIBLEYS SAHARA LOUNGE
Route 6 (Chardon Rd., West of SOM Center) Route 91
DANCING FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
FRIDAY, NOV. 25th I SAT., NOV. 26th
EDDY "Hambona" I Dynamic
HABAT I RAY MODIC'S
And Hi* Orchestral ORCHESTRA
Lebanese Dinners including Shish-Kebab
Served Every Wednesday from 6 P.M.
FISH FRIES FRIDAY 95c (Blue Fike)
I.............*.........................................................
For Reservations Call WH. 4-3320 After 2 P.M.
CHARLITE
Steak House
RESTAURANT A COCKTAIL LOUNGE
22350 Lake Shore Blvd.
Cor. 8. 222 and Lake Shore Blvd.
RE. 1-1800
Announces ...
COMMENCING THANKSGIVING
DAY AND EVERY THURSDAY
EVENING AND SUNDAY THEREAFTER
We Will Feature
BUFFET DINNERS
Our table* will be chock-full ef
appetizing and tatty food* for a treat
you and your family or guoit* will
really enjoy.
Please Remember
Thanksgiving and Sundays
From 12 Noon Till 8:30 P.M.
Every Thursday Evening
From 5:30 P.M. till 9 P.M.
A
a

xml | txt