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East Cleveland leader. [volume] (East Cleveland, Ohio) 1942-1970, May 30, 1963, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83035682/1963-05-30/ed-1/seq-4/

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Page Foo?
fek SIX
Space Flight Is Second
To Buttercup, Bluebell
A cow and her calf visited
each of the East Cleveland
grade schools recently. This
was as big news to the younger
children as Major Cooper’s
flight was after all, they had
heard news of astronauts be
fore. But at least one third of
them had never seen a live
cow, to say nothing of her
baby.
The cow s name was Butter
cup, and its calf’s name was
Bluebell. Many of the children
in each of the schools were
amazed at the large size of the
cow (which weighed 1350
pounds I. Somehow they had
pictured it as being the size of
a large dog, or perhaps a pony.
And for a four-month-old-baby
to weigh three hundred pounds
was just as surprising to them.
Thorough School work
Mayfair’s children did per
haps the most thorough job of
schoolwork on Buttercup and
Bluebell. The first graders drew
colored pictures of the mother
cow and calf, and wrote little
poems about them. The second
graders busily gathered infor
mation about 'them: the name
of their breed (Holstein), their
dimensions and their weights.
They were also just as eager
as the younger children to walk
along the rope line in the play
ground and pet the animals,
who sometimes flicked at them
a little with their tails.
To the third graders, statis
tics were even more important:
Buttercup’s age, five years her
daily food consumption, 15
pounds of hay, 15 pounds of
The
Y’S
SOId Owl
Fun-Filled
Summer Is
YW Offer
Swimming, sports, games,
dramatics, nature, music, boat
ing canoeing hiking, and crafts
will help to make the fun-filled,
healthful summer being offered
to girls 8-14 years of age by
the East Cleveland YW CA.
Centerville Mills Camp of the
Cleveland YMCA, between
Bainbridge and Aurora rds. on
Route 306, will be the scene for
this year’s resident campers for
the period of June 20th-29th, or
June 30th-July 9th. Junior High
girls may register for the first
period only. Fee is $43 per
period: a deposit of $o.00 will
hold a place. Girls may sell
candy to help pay camp fee.
YWCA Camp also offers a
nurse on duty 24 hours a day,
doctor on call, excellent food
under the supervision of a
trained dietician, Sunday Mass
nearby, and leadership by adult
counselors and YWCA staff.
For registration information,
stop in at the Y, 1831 Lee blvd.,
or call GL. 1-3425.
Day Carnp registrations are
still being accepted. Call the Y
to register your daughter now!
Y WCA Summer Activities
Summer activities at the
girs the week of June 10th.
Swim and gym cla.-ses will
meet twice a week for four
•»eeks of eight lessons.
Girls swimming classes and
recreational dip will be on Mon
day and Wednesday mornings.
Pre -beginners, Hi beginners,
and Advanced classes will meet
from 9:15 10 a m. The Recre
ational Dip will be 10 10:lu
p.m. Beginners and Intermedi
ate classes will meet 10:45
11:30 a.m.
Women’s morning cla.-5.-es will
meet on Tuesday and Thurs
day. Beginning. Intermediate
Swim and Tennis will be 9:15
10 a.m. Hi-beginning Swim.
Confidence class for tnose who
are afraid of the water, and
the exercise class will be 10
10:45 a.m. The Recreational
dip and Golf will meet 10:45
11:30 a.m. Pre-schoolers are in
vited to the recreational dip
on Thursday.
Women’s evening classes will
meet twice a week on Tues
day and Thursday. Beginning
and Intermediate swimming and
Tennis will meet 7:15 8 p.m.
The recreational dip and Ex
ercise class w’ill meet 8 8:45
p.m. Couples are invited to the
dip on Tuesday evenings. Hi
beginning, and Diving and Ad
vanced Swimming will be 8:45
9:30 p.m.
Family Swim will continue to
meet on alternate Friday and
Saturday evenings 7:30 8:30
|.m.
For further information call
the “Y” at GL. 1-3425.
CALEDONIA
CHAMBERS
MAYFAIR
I V Rozelle
A
SUPERIOR
1 W PROSPECT
grain, 40 pounds of silage, and
enough water to fill 400
glasses. The fourth graders
took these figures and others,
and did arithmetic problems
with them: 8,000 quarts of
milk produced in a year makes
22 quarts a day, or five and
one half gallons in jugs in
stores. They also figured
out that Bluebell weighed as
much as five children, and
Buttercup as much as 17 chil
dren, which is more than half
of a class.
We Should Hire Them
Mayfair’s fifth and sixth
graders assumed the role of
reporters for the cow-and-calf
story, and tried to get as much
information about them and
their visit to the school into a
short page of writing as they
could. These older children
were told that Buttercup might
someday become hamburger,,
a fact which the smaller ones
might not have appreciated.
But the older girls made a
unrecorded.
little show of being frightened
when the cow and her calf
turned their heads their way,
as if they were planning to
start after them but this didn’t
bother the boys one bit.
To climax Mayfair’s Cow
Day, a television camera was
taking pictures of this entire
bovine visit, and portions of it
were shown on the TV news
program that evening.
Much Interest
younger
grades,
interest
It was Caledonia's
children, the primary
that showed the most
in the cow and her calf when
they came there. The boys nad
girls wanted to know why a
cow has four stomachs, and
what on earth she does with
so many of them (one obvious
answer was found out to be
wrong) why the farmer that
owns the cow has put a metal
clip on her ear, and why cows
chew their food so long before
finally swallowing it for good,
They also wanted to know
how the various dairy products
such as butter and cheese were
made from the original milk,
and how intelligent a cow was,
if that term could indeed be
applied to her. These and other
questions were answered by
the farmer and the Dairy Coun
cil lady who accompanied the
animals, and who arranged for
the youngsters to come close
enough to them to stroke their
smooth hair.
Demonstrate Milking
One thing that impressed the
Prospect children who saw
Buttercup and Bluebell was the
fact that two methods of milk
ing are now being employed:
hand and machine milking. The
cow’s owner
methods for
was raining
were being
Prospect playground, nobody
seemed to mind, least of all
Buttercup and Bluebell as far
as. the boys and girls were con
cerned, so many of them had
never seen real live animals
of this sort that
the experience
tr.em forget the
demonstrated both
them. Although it
when the animals
exhibited on the
the novelty of
almost made
rain.
Troupers
Experienced
Superior was the last of the
-ix schools visited by the Dairy
Council truck. By this time
Buttercup and Bluebell had be
come experienced troupers, and
decided that they liked to be
petted so they nudged up to
the children—once again, the
younger pupils of the school—
and practically asked to be
stroked and made over.
The children asked how many
babies Buttercup had had, and
how long it would be before
Bluebell had babies. They asked
many questions about Butter
cup’s horns, large size, and
configuration in general, and
were most interested in watch
ing her being milked. One
hundred fifty Superior children
walked along past the cow and
her calf, and almost all of
them took the opportunity of
petting them a little. We could
almost say that by that time
the bovine troupers had be
come “hams”, if we didn’’
know that that term scarcely
applies to
species.
animals of that
Seen Them
the Rozelle
the
Seen One,
Although
contain a drawing and descrip
tion of a lign, a tiger, a giraffe,
a kangaroo, a hippopotamus, a
bear, a camel, an elephant, a
zebra, and a monkey. Salient
features of each of these ani
mals are set down in the themes
accompanying the pictures such
as their size, food habits,’dis
position, bodily characteristics,
and place of Iving in their wild
state.
Most of the first grade rooms
also have cutouts and drawings
of these wild animals on their
walls and tables, so that they
look a little like zoos them
selves. In these various ways
the children are becoming fa
miliar with some of the strange
creatures in our world,
are learning to identify
describe them better.
Record Science Fair
The Chambers Science
of two weeks ago got lost be
tween editions of this column,
we are afraid, and that is a
shame, because it was a major
effort of the school and de
served front-rank recognition.
Although it has since been dis
mantled, we cannot let it go
Heights DeMolay
Mothers Elect
The next monthly meeting of
the Heights DeMolay Mothers*
Club will be a dinner meeting
at the Brown Derby Restaurant,
Chagrin blvd., on June 4th at
6:30 p. m. Installation of the
newly elected officers, also,
will be held.
The new officers are: Mrs.
LaVeme Chandler, president
Mrs. Clarence Papke, vice pres
ident Mrs. Raymond A. Mitch
ell, recording secretary Mrs.
Thomas E. Dillon, treasurer
Mrs. Jack J. Ker, correspond
ing secretary Mrs. Charles
Greggs, chaplain.
Come Aboard
Northeast Yacht Club mem
bers are urged to attend and
bring another member with
them to membership meeting
on Monday at 8 p. m. in NEYC
Clubhouse.
All
first
cow?
talk
as
graders also saw’
which we have just been
ing about, they weren’t
overawed by them as they
would have been if they hadn’t
recently come back from a trip
to the Cleveland Zoo. For there
was a calf there also, in the
children’s section, along with
the young of many other do
mestic and exotic animals.
They also saw many of the
adult beasts at the Zoo, and
were especially interested in
them because they had been
studying about many of them
in class. They had, in fact, con
structed Zoo notebooks previous
to their trip, in which they
had drawn pictures of a num
ber of the more spectacular
wild animals, and had written
brief descriptions of them.
Typical Notebook
A typical Zoo notebook made
by these Rozelle children will]
gether In one place the work
of children from all over the
building.
Atom models, weather in
struments, magnetic experi
ments, water pressure tricks,
models of the solar system, a
workable telephone system, and
sound-vibration apparatus were
set up next to experiments with
growing plants, examples of
the various kinds of simple
“machines,” and motors of
various kinds. Everything had
a label, so that a child from
one classroom could find out
what something else was thatl
someone in another room had
put together. When the Fail
was in operation, guides ex
plained those parts of the ex
hibition for which their class
was responsible, and then be
came listeners as other guides
took over to explain their
specialities.
and
and
Fair
If we stop to think a minute,
this kind of expert-learner-ex
pert cooperation is just the sort
of thing that grown-up techni
cal conventions try to achieve,
with each scientist’s display
being his own responsibility,
but with all of the other dis
plays being just as new to him
as to anyone else. This is one
of the chief ways that Science
grows these days, in fact and
it is a very good way to learn
things, no matter how young
we may be when we start in on
The entire Old Library room
in the basement of the school
was given over to the Science
Fair. Every grade was repre
sented there, with experiments
and displays of many kinds
brought down from the regular
classrooms, thus bringing to- it, or how long we keep it up,
MR. BRYAN E. FURMAN (left), Ohio representative
the International Order of the Golden Rule made
presentation to Howard W. Edwards, president
Edwards Funeral Home, Inc.
Howard Edwards Receives
'Golden Rule' Citation
Special recognition was given
Mr. Howard Edwards, of the
Edwards Funeral Home, at the
annual Workshop Conference
of the Order of the Golden
Rule just concluded in New
York City.
a member of the Board
As
of Directors of the Order, Mr.
Edwards received a wall plaque
as a token of appreciation for
his efforts in advancing the
standards of modern funeral
service.
As the largest controlled-
for
the
of
June 3Oth
September 30th
December 31st
March 31st
41%
EUCLID AVENUE
OUTDOOR THEATRE
EUCLID AVENUE AT BISHOP ROAD
WICKLIFFE
THURSDAY, MAY 30 (MEMORIAL DAY)
FIREWORKS
per annum
CLEVELAND
FEDERAL
SAVINGS
and Loan Association
ot Cuyahoga County
MAIN OFFICE
614 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland 14. Ohio
Telephone 241 2 560
Member Federal Savingsand
Loan Insurance Corporation
May 29-30-31-Jum 1
Wad.-Thuri.-Fri.-Sa*.
Suzanna PlesheHa
Tony Curtis
of Trouble'*
'40 Lbs.
Frank Sinatra
Laurence Harvey
Manchurian Candidate1
Added W.d-Fri-Sat
Pot Crowley Jeffrey Hunter
Key Witness"
Sun.-Man.-TvM. June 2-3-4
James Mason Shelley Winters
"Lolita"
Sophia Loren Anthony Perkine
5 Milos To Midnito"
XAST CLEVELAND LEADER
of
[membership association
funeral directors, the Order sets
up ethical standards for mem
bers on five continents. A non
profit organization, it protects
the public interest by seeking
ways and means to achieve im
proved service at reasonable
costs to the families served.
WHERE
dividends
are paid
quarterly
An obedience and conforma
tion school for German Shep
ards only will start June 5th
and run for 10 weeks. Classes
RED HEAD
s50
entallu uouri
BY GENE HERSH
The Community Owes
Judge Addums A Lot
The recent poll of the Cleveland Bar Association, which
in our mind did not do justice to a man who has spent
more than 40 years serving his community, is the topic for
discussion today.
We have known Judge Stanton Addams, for some three
years now, and have found him an oft-times overly stern
magistrate, but always honest and devoted to his cause.
Like others, we feel that many times his fines are too
strict and dread the thought of ever appearing before him
in his professional capacity.
However, the many awards the police department and
court hold from the National Safety Council and (lawyers
note, please) the American Bar Association are a direct
result of Judge Addams.
By being a relentless foe of drunken drivers and care
less motorists, he has inspired an esprit de corps in the
rank and file policemen that has made this department one
of the finest in the nation.
And furthermore, lawyers, he has been consistently
elected to public office, lo these many years by a grateful
citizenry.
In a letter to the PD Sunday, a member of the Cleveland
Bar Association said Addams along with several other
judges “was not rejected.”
The only question voted on, the letter read, was “whether
each such incumbent judge was, on his record entitled to
immediate endorsement for reelection—in other words,
whether the judge should be promptly endorsed for re
election without consideration to other possible and quali
fied candidates for the particular post. This does not mean
that the judge denied immediate endorsement was not
qualified.”
To top it off, the bar association’s poll required an 80
per cent affirmative vote to win aproval for such “im
mediate endorsement.”
“In light of the foregoing,” the letter from the Bar
Association concluded, “it is submitted that the poll was not
intended to, nor did it in fact constitute an indictment of
the caliber of the court nor a rejection of any of the judges.
Well in light of the above foregoing, we are mighty
glad the citizens of a community elect their public servants
and not the Cleveland Bar Association.
PROUD PAPA. We can understand why Police Captain
Robert Troyan is popin' his brass buttons. Daughter Judy,
a straight A student, won first place honors in the recent
Maple Heights High School science fair. Her exhibit was
the evolution of the heart.
THE RECENT mishap on Rozelle ave., where a 2-year
old tyke was seriously hurt after running into the street
should be a warning to all parents to be especially watchful
of the real young ones during the fine outdoor weather
ahead.
Please, mothers and fathers, watch those rascals at all
times.
ANOTHER WARNING comes from Mrs. Souler Hop
kins,, 13328 Gainsboro, who tells us her son, Richard's
brand, new bicycle was swiped last week after the youngster
had it less than two months.
She said two teenagers brazenly went right into the
garage and rode off with the new bike bought with money
Richard had worked hard and long for.
She urges parents to have youngsters keep an eye
on their bikes and to lock them up when not in use.
"We don't want to see anyone else as heartbroken as
our Richard is,” she said.
YOU CAN’T KEEP A GOOD MAN DOWN, we always
say, and it is no surprise to us that Russell Reeves, 12719
Speedway Overlook, has been promoted to a high editorial
executive position at the PD. We knew he would go far
because he writes such darn good news releases for us on
events at the Phillips Avenue Presbyterian Church.
How’s Your
Dog’s Manners?
will be held at the Medusa
Portland Cement Co. parking
lot, at the Mayfield-Monticello
triangle. The school will be for
dogs older than four months.
Further information is av
ailable by calling Robert Kinley
at 761-2069.
Euclid Green LANES
18310 EUCLID AT GREEN RD
KE. 1*7410
PRESENTS
RAZZLE DAZZLE
The Most Fun Filled Enjoyable
Fantastic Stupendous Entertainment
The Bowlers Have Ever Enjoyed.
STRIKE
RICH
it
If* NOT The Red Pin But A
RAZZLE-DAZZLE
of GOLD-BLUE And
PINS For Up To
AND DOWN TO
25c IN CASH
STRIKE FOR CASH NITE
STARTING
FRIDAY, AAAY 31st at MIDNITE Until???
AIR CONDITIONED COMFORT
OPEN BOWLING Every Night
ALL SUMMER
REDUCED RATES MAY 1st to AUG 31st
MONDAY THRU SUNDAY
10 A.M. to 6 P.M_______
256
6 P.M. to Midnight 50c Per Game
Gam,
MICHAEL A. SITAR, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Sitar,
1897 Torrenson dr., has
received the Executive
Award from Junior
Achievement of Greater
Cleveland, Inc The award
is the highest progressive
recognition for two years
of exceptional leadership,
and understanding of busi
ness while also a holder
of the Junior Executive
Award. Sitar received an
Executive Pin and Certifi
cate.
Golden Wedding
Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand F.
Oster, 1886 Nela ave, will ob
serve their 50th wedding an
niversary on June 4th.
The Osters have lived at the
Nela address for the past 38
years and before that resided
on Strathmore ave.
Before his retirement in
1952, Mr. Oster had been as
sociated with the Cleveland
Trust Co. for 47 years. Prior to
becoming head of the East
152nd st. branch in 1937, he
served as manager of the Col
linwood, Waterloo and London
rd. offices.
Wanted YX£lD
We will give you $5.00 for your
old girdle, regardless of brand or
condition, toward a custom-made
Spencer er Spirella foundation in
lovely selection of materials.
Limited time offer.
Telephone today
MRS. MARY MOORMAN
SU. 1-6700 or CE. 1-8260
MRS. LAURA L. WILCOX
381-2490
DICK
CONTINO
PLAYS
THE
CORDOVOX
We AJsa Are A
FRANCHISED DEALER
FOR
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ROGER'S DRUMS
SLINGERLAND DRUMS
KING BAND INSTRUMENTS
EPIPHONE GUITARS,
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PETROMILLIS ACCORDIONS
SCANDALLI ACCORDIONS
SHEET MUSIC,
REEDS AND
ANYTHING MUSICAL
(Cor. Muskoka Ave.)
You’ll be amazed by the music you can make on the exciting new cordovox
a compact, versatile, completely electronic musical instrument. It combines organ
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enhances the performance of the most accomplished musician, yet anyone can
play H.
EXPERT REPAIR ON ACCORDIONS
AND ALL RAND INSTRUMENTS
ACCORDIONS TUNED ELECTRONICALLY
PETROMILLI’S MUSIC CENTER
917 East 185th Street
IV. 1-8648 PLENTY OP HUE PARKINO IV. 1-8649
Thursday, May 90, 1981
NOW OPERATED BY "DOC" GREGORIC
Formerly Service Mgr. at Large General Service Garage
COMPLETE TUNE-UP, BRAKE A ELECTRICAL SERVICE
Telephone 531-9774
We Specialize In
TAKE-OUT CLAM BAKES
Clams, Clam Broth and Chowder. Lobsters,
Lobster Tails and Steamers Available
Also Charcoal, Plates, Cups, Spoons and Forks tor Your Clam
Bako or Picnic—Clam Bakes prepared To Take Out With You
We Are Equipped To Handle Complete
CLAM BAKES FOR ANY OCCASION
Wholesale Prices to Restaurants, Taverns. Factories, Institutions
EUCLID FISH CO.
18601 Abby Ave. at East 185th St.
OPEN ALL DAY EVERY WEDNESDAY
John J. Cornelia, Prop. KEnmore 1-6448
WHOLE FAMILY ENJOYS
DUR
DELICIOUS DINNERS
SUPPER-TIME OR ANYTIME
"PREPARED WITH PRIDE" is our theme
in the art of preparing delicious
luncheons and dinners to please the
taste of even the "hard-to-please"!
The finest quality meats and ingredi­
ents that money can buy goes into
every order from our kitchen. Whether
it be a sandwich at our snack counter
or a full course dinner, you can be
assured of the best here. And last, but
not least, you’ll like our prices, too!
‘A
RESTAURANT and
HARLEQUIN LOUNGE
Lake Shore Blvd, at East 222nd St.
Phone RE. 2-9900
SEE AND HEAR THE NEW
cordovo*
NOW ON DISPLAY
AT
PETROMILLIS MUSIC
CENTER
this completely new kind of
musical instrument will simply
amaze youl
COME IN TODAY
FOR A FREE
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By
PROFESSIONAL TEACHERS
On All Instruments
FREE MUSICAL
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To help you and your child
choose the correct Instrument.

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