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The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, May 03, 1918, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1918-05-03/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE PRESS
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF ORGANIZED LABOR
OF HAMILTON AND VICINITY.
Members
Ohio Labor Press Association
THE NONPAREIL PRINTING CO.
PUBLISHERS AND PROPRIETORS
Subscription Price 75 cts per
Payable in Advance.
The union label is an appeal to
principle—principle that is above
price The principle that a dollar
expended in the maintenance of fair
labor is worth more in the end than
a dollar saved at the bargain counter.
te to fe "IBs
Mr. S. M. Goodman, Secretary of
the Chamber of Commerce, in his talk
before the Hamilton Commercial and
Industrial Association on last Mon
day evening wherein he explained the
Housing proposition, stated that the
manufacturer is looking at things dif­
u,f^
™p*
Year
Whatever is intended for insertion must
be authenticated by the name and address of
the writer, not necessarily for publication, but
as a guarantee of good faith.
Subscribers changing their address will
please notify this office,, giving old and new
address to insure regular delivery of paper.
We do not hold ourselves responsible for any
views or opinions exppressed in the articles
or communications of correspondents.
Communications solicited from secretaries
of all societies and organizations, and should
be addressed to The Butler County Press, 326
Market Street, Hamilton, Ohio.
The publisher^ ruserw the right to reject
nny advevtisemcnta at any time.
Advertising rates made known on appH
cation.
FRIDAY, MAY 3, 1918
Entered at the Postoffice at Hamilton,
Ohio, as Second Class Mail Matter
Issued Weekly at 326 Market Street,
Hamilton, Ohio.
Home Telephone 809.
Bell 1296-X.
Endorsed by the Trades and Labor
Council of Hamilton, Ohio.
Endorsed by the Middletown Trades
and Labor Council of Middletown, O.
UBnrrr lom
uom& FLAQ
Work Clothes
cn«^
Hamilton "Over the top" for the
Third Liberty Loan. Of course she
is. Nothing strange about that. Ham
ilton goes over the top for anything
she goes in to. When it is all over
with, Hamilton won't have to be a
shamed of her share in the war's
work.
to us te hi to
The hasty, quiet manner in which
the agreements were signed between
the breweries and their employes
speaks well for the efficiency of the
officers of the local organisations of
the crafts involved. This is the first
time in many years, or we might say
the very first time that the yearly
agreements were signed up without
the calling in and the assistance of
international officers. It also speaks
well for the spirit of fairness shown
by the employers. Both sides are to
be congratulated.
*.•.
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By that we mean, the boy's job in life is to play. Why
not dress him for the job? Give him stoutly made, good
looking, long wearing clothes, and let him go to it to his
heart's content.
We have just received some extra substantial boys'
suits that are all you can ask for, seams are strong, buttons
are sewed fast, and the materials are unusually stout.
For Boys 6 to 18, prices range from $5.00 to $10.00
Boys' Waists 39c to
Boys' Hats and Caps 50c to $1.00
Hen's Dress Shoes
(Union made) genuine gun metai
English, Button or Lace
$3.50 to $5.50
No High Rent
No
Heavy
Expense
You Save
the
difference
BOTH PHONES
.J*
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'*r.
ferent now from what he did ten
years ago. What he meant by this
remark is that the manufacturer ap
preciated his workmen, no longer re
gards him as a mere machine, is
willing to meet him half way in all
things and is interested in his welfare
and conditions. This is true to a
certain extent all over the country but
right here in Hamilton we have one
or two (just one or two mind you)
concerns that have failed to keep up
with the procession and instead of
advancing ten years have gone back
that much so that they are now
twenty years behind the times. In
fact the general manager of one big
plant, if he believes what he says is
true, "doesn't know that there is a
strike on in his establishment and
it has been on for more than a year.
fe
¥.
Whatever thrift is, it is not averice
aver ice is not generosity after all,
the thrifty people are generous
Show your thrift and generosity by
your government by buying War
Savings and Thrift Stamps.
sa ri
The cases of several persons charg
ed with perjury come before the
grand jury at its session beginning
next week. Organized labor is very
much interested in these cases and
are watching them closely.
r:. 'fe
"Play Clothes"
Are The Boy's
It is pretty hard for the man whose
all is invested in the liquor traffic or
the men whose jobs are at stake in
the coming wet and dry election to
concentrate their minds on the war.
It would seem that it would have been
good policy to let this matter rest at
this time and let everyone put in all
his time and money on the one big
thing— the war. -But not so with the
dry's, they should worry about a little
thing like the war so long as they
75c
FINEST
&15.CG
SUIT SUIT
,,-/-' j. «•.
i -v
"THE OUT OF IHE WAV SHOE i»TCRE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY"
QUALITY and LOW PRICES
Is The Better Way
Iron Clad Boys' Shoes
$2.75 to $3.50
1 1
.- v .-
V
have their little pet fad before them—
making the State dry.
to Pa to to to
Wonder if Governor Cox will send
special representative to aid the
prosecution before the grand jury in
the perjury case resulting from the
trials of the alleged rioters. He seem
ed very much interested in these
cases but no doubt his time is so much
taken up with conducting the war and
seeing to it that EVERY Ohio boy
goes into the trenches that a little
thing like the perjury cases to be
brought up is too small a matter for
him to bother about.
fei to to to
The Hamilton Commercial and In
dustrial Association held an interest
ing meeting on Monday night. The
housing proposition was discussed.
Here is a matter that every working
man should be interested in. Even
though you don't intend to buy a
house and expect to rent all your
life, don't you see, the more houses
there are the cheaper the rent will be.
Many of the unions havn't as yet
elected a delegate.
Have your organization take thti
matter up, elect a delegate and be
represented at the meetings of the
Association and take part in all the
big things that will come up in the
future. The cost is small and every
labor union SHOULD be represented.
Trades Council is in, why not Your
local.
na to to to to
Elsewhere in this issue will be
found several articles telling of the
signing of agreements by several of
the crafts in the local breweries. The
firemen, engineers and all employes
receive substantial increases and de
crease of working hours. This is cer
tainly gratifying to these employes
and very much appreciated by them.
It is only a few years ago that many
of the brewery employes were receiv
ing ten and twelve dollars a week for
which they worked 12 and 14 hours
a day and 7 days a week. Under the
agreements signed this week no em
ploy, in whatever capacity, will re
ceive less than twenty dollars a week.
This is the minimum, while some of
the men are making as much as thir
ty-five dollars. Eight hours consti
tute a day's work and they work six
days a week. All these bettered con
ditions are due directly to organiza
tion. Some of you fellows who are
on the fence about joining a labor
organization and continually bemoan
ing low wages and long hours, read
this over and do a little thinking.
to to to to to
Still time for you County Commis
sioners to rectify your mistake and
give the court house employes a ilving
wage. Better hurry, things are going
up, the Charity Organization Society
New York in a report this week,
tys $18.00 a week is not enough
ir a man to support a family accord
tu American standards of living,
i erhnps this amount will not be big
lough in a few months The poor
ivils who are keeping your office
,uce and cozy are receiving $16.00
and will be tickled to death to get
$ L8.00. Come across men, the money's
)t yours and the people who own it
on't kick. In fact they will be glad
i have you do it, they want their
nployes to live.
to to to to to
A plan to bring about the ending
the war and a good one has been
i roposed. It has been suggested that
lie Kaiser be shown over our city
rail with a threat of locking him up
i it for three days unless hostilities
»se. Of course it is a horrible
iought and looks like going to ex
•ernes but we should stop at nothing
mt will bring about the ending of
le war. If this doesn't do it, nothing
ill.
to' to to to to
Old Glory would look mighty nice
oating beside that honor flag, Mise
Honor Flag looks lonesome and no
oubt wishing for her champion to
me and keep her company. Cin
nnati's honor flag has the Stars and
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E A E
-A -'. =. .fS',. ., •.•«:••• *"'. •. r- v:-( ..• .• ••.^:. ..v ,./v
421 SOUTH SECOND ST. SURETY OR HOME STAMPS
Stripes on each side of it and they|
look mighty becoming.
is*. to to it.
It tally be
u«iI
good grace, do it anyway.
to to to to to
ORGANIZATION IS
GROWING FAST.
Much enthusiasm exists in the
carpenters union these days. A pack
ed meeting of local 637 was held
Thursday evening. Much routine
business was transacted and several
matters of much importance to the
organization were discussed. Several
candidates were initiated and a large
number of applications were re
ceived.
Business agent, Swain Corson, re
ported there is scarcity of carpenters
in the city and that he had gone to
Middletown, Eaton and Richmond
where he secured eight men for con
tractors in this city.
It was also reported that contractor
Jean Arent who signed the agreement
several weeks ago had secured con
tracts for twelve additional houses,
25 in all to be built on Prospect Hill.
Arent employes none but union car
penters.
It was reported that a member of
the local machinists union was having
a house built by a contractor who
employes only non-union carpenters.
The matter was referred for investi
gation.
The carpenters union is growing
to be one of the largest organizations
in the city.
to to to
Everett, Wash.—A wage increase
of 3 cents an hour has been ordered
by the Puget Sound International
Railway and Power company,
to to
METAL WORKERS GAIN.
Washington.—Sheet Metal Work
ers' union No. 102 has secured a one
year agreement with employers.
Wages are increased to $5.oO a day
until August 31, when the rate will
be $6.
to to to
SECURE RECOGNITION.
Toronto, Ontario,—For the first
time in the history of their organiza
tion the Machinists' union has secured
recognition by the Toronto Employ
ers' association. Wages are advanced
5 cents an hour and working condi
tions are improved,
to\ to to
TEAMSTERS RAISE WAGES.
Springfield, 111,—An agreement be
tween the Teamsters' union and the
Team Owners' association provides for
wage increases of $4.50 a week.
English Walkers
For Young L&dks.
Nifty, Stylish JL&sU
$3.50, $4.25 to $4.98
"M-
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'THE BUTLER COUNTY PRESS
rightcfo give the
Devil his due, but it is ft'ot all ri^ht
for a union man to give his money to
non-union employer. Buy union
labeled goods and there will be no
non-union employers.
to to to to to
Strengthen your patriotism by ex-|
cercising it with a pair of Liberty
Bonds. If the Sammies
can
Try Our
-William's
Hers Shoes
A
k
.•* r^v v^-':," .'• '.. ..•••-.- ,.
die for
Liberty surely you can buy for
it.
to to to to to
If you can't do a kind
act With
a|
Have you noticed our Fire Boys in I
the parades of the farewell demon-1
strations held for our boys off to the
front. They certainly have been there
and they have done much to make up I
these parades. Much comment has
been made of their natty appearance.
to to to to
Brewery Firemea
TO
RECEIVE MORE MONEY
SIX -SAY WELL
AND
The firemen at the two local brew
eries signed agreements this week
with their employers for the coming
year. It was a splendid agreement
reached for the men and they are to
be congratulated. Under the terms of
the agreement they increase their
wages from $19.30 to $24.00 per
week. In addition to the increase in
wages shorter time was granted them.
Where they formerly received but one
day off in two weeks they now work
but six days a week eight-hours per
day. The men are members of local
Brotherhood of Stationary Firemen
No. 98. The negotiations were carried
on by the men without any outside
assistance and they are to be congrat
ulated.
CARPENTERS
Sale
Saturday we will place on sale
100 trimmed hats in handsome
black Lisere Hats, flower trimmed
Hats, white Milans and light
shades. Black and white Hats,
smart Turbans, drop brim sailors,
many with colored facings at three
prices,
$2.95 $3.95
Worth to $6.00 Worth to $7.50
$4.95
Worth to $8.50
Georgette Waists in new beaded
effects, some handsomely embroid
ered with satin collars in all shades,
values to $5.00. Choice $2.98
38 High St.
All Suits Greatly Reduced.
Merchants' Dinner 25c
BACON'5
29 HIGH ST.
GKOCfcK* cLEKkfcj STRIKE.
St. Louis.—Despairing of improv
ing conditions by conciliatory meth
ods, additional grocery clerks are
joining the strike movement of these
workers. Long hours and wages that
range from $11 to $16 a week is the
role.
te to
Seattle.—The Contractors' associa
tion has signed an agreement with
Electrical Workers' union No. 46,
which increases wages $1 a day. Jour
neymen will receive $7 apd foremen
$8. Existing contracts will be finished
under the old scale.
te oa A
Brewery Employes
Securt Increase In Wages
Agreement Signed.
Agreements were signed during the
past week between the local Brew
eries and Brewery Agencies and the
Brewers Union Local No. 83, whereby
all brewery employes secure an aver^
ege increase in wages of $3.50 per
week. In addition thereto the drivers,
who formerly worked nine hours per
day were granted the eight-hour day.
All brewery employes throughout the
city now enjoy the eight-hour day.
The minimum wage of the employes
in this industry is $20.00 per week.
The conditions and agreements for
the employes were negotiated by the
local officers whe are to be congratu
lated on their success in obtaining
ifee liberal increases for their Ijrilqw
*£t*ty ',.-
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Is it any wonder that the sales have been increasing
30 rapidly as people come to kfiow the wonderful
quality of Kroger's Bread? Our ovens are working
All bakers' loaves weigh one pound of & pound and
a half—it's a Government requirement. There is no
such thing as getting a larger loaf. This enables
Just think of what it means to you to be able to save
2 1-2 on every pound loaf of bread bought at a Kro
ger store. You'll be surprised at what a figure it
RYE BREAD
You will like the delic
ious flavor of this bread.
Biggest value in the city.
KROGER'
BIG
HAT
A truly wonderful loaf of bread-
Just your idea of a good loaf of bread, a perfect product of the skill of our master baker. Cer
tainly an excellent loaf, and you should be particular about bread quality, the all-important
food, eaten thre times a day, and just the food you should really enjoy. You'll just have to try
Kroger's Bread, it's so good.
YOU SAVE IVx TO 4c ON EVERY LOAF YOU BOY
10c Size Pound Loaf, 7lc 15c-Size Pound Loaf, 11c
A I S I IN
The kiddies like it better
than sweets. Made with
Sunmaid raisins.
Pound Loaf, 10c Pound Loaf, 10c
3T
.WORKERS UNION
UNIO^STAMP]
factory
i: UlS
reading
live
Tb*
CUvaUnd &
K1
1
vt
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full capacity to iupply the tremendous demand, ami
there is a real treat in store for you if you haven't
tried Kroger's full pound loaf of
you to see more readily the value you receive. No
doubt, you are aware of the fact that a pound loaf of
bread usually sells for 10c, but at Kroger's
amounts to in a month's time. That saving will help
greatly towards buying more Liberty Bonds and War
Savings Stamps. Get a loaf of Kroger's bread today.
Victory Jumble*
You'll like these crisp,
spicy cakes, made without
wheat flour.
2 lbs., 25c
246 Summer Street, Boston, Mass.
John P. Tobln, Pres. Charles L. Balne, Sec.-Treas
Patronize Home Industry
BOTTLERS OF
Pure Gold
EITHER PHONE 133
Try a case today
N I K
leveland
8i00 P.M.)
reading- tWwMn Oifvf-Ian.'! and Buffalo urt good for transport&tio
ticket for tickets via C. & I*. Line. New Tourist Autom
with days return iimit, for earn rot excluding
Connections at Buffalo (or Niagara Fall* and all Eastern and
b«!twe#n Cleveland ona
BeautifuJiv
Buffalo
Buffalo
Tran it Company
Cleveland, Ohio
The Croat ifblp "Sawmttwe"
—-U»* l*rge«t am! xuoot r»lly
p«Men^«r Slaauirr on inland
water* o. -hr world. Hk-cplug
capacity, 1500 p»*»cnger».
All Suits and Pants made to
individual order in a
workers.
The establishments Involved "ate the
Cincinnati Brewing Co., Martin Ma-
ty^vfyjZm -a' -*nS,
U
NT STEAMERS
Tke Great Ship "SEEANDBEE"—"CITY OF ERIE" "CITY OF fcUFFALO"
I I E W N
CLEVELAND Daily, May 1st to Nov. 15th
Leive
entral
Arrive uffalo 6:30 A.M.) Standard "I'tmr
lajri
",V
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I"v*?T^y'
V

w'
Oatmeal Crackers
Another wheatless pro
duct—try a pound.
Pound, 15c
THIRTEEN GROCERIES
"•SIX SflEfiT MARKETS
IN HAMILTON
Do
Named shoes are frequently made in
Non-Utjion factories.
NOT
BUY ANY SHOE
No matter what its name, unless it blares a plain
and readable impression of
This UNION STAMP
All shoes without the UNION STAMP «rr alwajg Ncn-Un'on
Do not accept any fxtuse for Abferrc of the T'NIC N STA?.'?
Boot and Shoe Workers' Union
JH FFAI.O
Leave Eui'VAi.o
Arrive Cleveland
Si00 P.M.
6:
vH i
JO A.M.
Canadian points.
arc- good for transportation n
KaiJroad
tick eta
our
ticket 6R-!it for tickets via C. & I*. Line. New Tourist Automobile Kute—?7.oG Hound Trip,
12?
nti-amers. A k your
in. wtiuclliase.
!-oiort)(i Rurtiuiial t-u.ia.io ciuirt of The Great
Also «ak for our 24-page pictorial and deacriptiv
lii "SKKA.NOBEE" Btnt on receipt of
booklet free.
mm
Union Shop
106 HIGH STREET
MODERN PLUMBING GO.
139 MARKET STREET
Brewing Co., and tfye aganckn oi
Plumbing, Steam, Hot Water, Gas Fitting.
PROMPT SERVICE. GIVE US A TRIAL
JOHN P. HEM*-—Props.--—JOHN A. HOIZBERGEH
Bell 428-L— PHONES—Home 751-M
*35*
ke
Square is !lie name. Square is our aim
your
ors
-9
Jaw-IMf
the Moerlein Brewing Co., the Wiede
man Brewing Co., and Indianapolis'
Brewing Co. The agreements are
tot one yf«r. 'r v
/.",*•% -''i 'a:- Z

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