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The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, January 13, 1922, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1922-01-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. XXI. No. 39
™"T
I
GAMENT WORKERS
WIN
Chicago.—After a month's strike
more than 5,000 members of the Inter
national Labor Garment Workers'
.Union have reached an agreement
•with employers.
The 44-hour week is retained, as is
the week work system and former
wage rates. The question of pi'oduc
tion has been referred to a joint com
mittee and an impartial chairman.
The settlement was made possible
when the employers abandoned the
New York war cry: "Down with week
work, the 44-hour week and the wage
standards." Prior to the strike the
employers emphasized the need for
greater production, but the unionists
nullified this cry by their offer to dis
cuss the matter in a sensible manner
when peace was restored.
156 HIGH ST.
GearanceSale
—Our "Reputation" for Highest Quality Merchandise at
Lowest Prices was never better demonstrated than dur
ing this sale. We are offering values, that can only be
appreciated by your personal inspection. "Drastic Re
ductions" on
The styles now most in
demand—in a varied
selection of shades and
materials, i n I u ding
Gros de Londres, Faille
Silk, Satin and Straw
Combinations, Feath
ered Hats, o e n
Sand, Cherry, Per
winkle and all the de
sired colors for Spring.
ALL WOOL SERGES
inches wide, in a variety
colors.
$2.25 value
Coats
Suits
Dresses
Skirts
Blouses
Sweaters, etc.
1 fA 1
n(C
White Wash Goods
500 Yards, Slightly Soiled from Handling
DIMITIES VOILES LAWNS, ETC.
Actual prices formerly were 39c, 49c and 59c
For tomorrow only, January
Clearance Price, all go out
at
Silks and Piece Goods at
Drastic Price Reductions
54
of
$1.79
STRIPED SKIRTING 56
and 58 inches wide, sold for
merly at dJO QP
$4.95 and $5.95 ...
POIKET TWILLS, TRICO
TINES and FINE MEN'S
WEAR SERGES AT GREATLY
REDUCED PRICES.
CHIFFON VELVETS
inches wide, black and
Actual
value
|L$r'95
itit
ii.
40
colors.
$4.95
*'Z%
ALLEN IS EXPENSIVE
Topeka, Kan.—"Taxpayers' leagues
forming in a large number of Kansas
counties," says the Kansas Trade
Unionist, "are devoting considerable
time to Governor Allen's industrial
court expenses and his nation-wide
seeing-America speaking tour. The
Kansas farmer may be down and out
financially, but he is getting up in
arms politically, and there will be a
'harrowing' experience for some one
in the coming campaign."
NON-UNION MOTORCYCLE
Springfietd, Mass.—The Hendee In
dian motorcycle is manufactured Un
der anti-union conditions. The Hen
dee manufacturing company has dis
continued an agreement with its or
ganized employes and will hereafter
operate an anti-union shop.
1
Formei
310 2 Prices
SPRING MILLINERY
25c Yard
CHINCHILLA—54 inches wide,
excellent coating material.
$3.50
value
STRIPED
wool, 12
worth
$2.69. Special
$2.98
SKIRTING
inches wide,
AH
easily
$1.95
CANTON CREPES 40 inches
wide, black and colors for
raerl
$3.79. Now
$3.19
MESS A LINES—35 inches wide,
black and colors. CQ
Reduced from $1.98.... «k •Off
4
1
(Copyright)
The New Law Provides
Be
Washington, I).
C.
Within the
next week or two weeks there will be
submitted to congress with the ap
proval of the Harding administration
a bill for the creation of an industrial
court to adjudioate labor disputes in
basic industries, such as railroads,
coal, iron and steel. ,,
The measure of the President's in
dorsement" of such a measure in his
annual address to congress and prepa
ration of it has gone on in the face
of the outcry raised by organized la
bor when the recommendation was
made. Labor has cited the failure of
the proposed plan in the countries of
New Zealand and Australia.
The bill, it is now learned, will be
introduced by William S. Kenyon (R.),
senator from Iowa, chairman of the
committee on education and labor, at
the same time he submits to the sen
ate his report on the West Virginia
industrial warfare. This report is now
approaching -completion.
The report will declare that if there
had been an official body with legal
powers to take cognizance of condi
tions and to investigate such a condi
tion as West Virginia presented dur
ing the last two years when lives and
property were intermittently destroy
ed, the trouble would have been pre
vented. The lack of such an instru
mentality to place the facts before
the country and the government, the
committee wjll conclude in its find
ings, would have beea almost certain
to stop the warfare at its inception.
It is learned that the plan for an
industrial court will not be altogether
the Kansas court plan, which is ana
thema to organized labor, nor will it
be entirely on the lines of the rail
road labor board, created under the
transportation act, and which was
used to prevent a railroad strike a
few months ago.
As planned now, the bill which Sen
ator Kenyon will submit will embody
the best features of both the Kansas
court and the railroad labor board.
The fact that the Iowa senator, who
is known as a friend of labor and who
is preeminent for his fairness on
questions of public policy, is at the
back of the scheme is counted on by
the administration as an influence that
will be used to assist it in the fight
that will be waged by organized la
bor against the obnoxious legislation
that is proposed.
The Kansas court plan has four dis
tinct features:«
1. It forbids a strike or a lockout
and- it imposes a jail sentence on labor
leaders who organize a strike or en
courage a lockout. (Labor says this
chains the wage earner to his job and
reduces the toiler to a state of chat
tel slavery.)
2. It declares the public interest in
certain basic industries to be para
mount.
3. It creates a tribunal composed
entirely of representatives of the pub
lic to adjudicate disputes. Labor says
these representatives' sympathies be
cause of environment are always fa
vorable to the employers.)
4. It specifies that wages shall be
based on the returns of the industries
affected.
The plan that Senator Kenyon is
working outvand which has been dis-
K% -*vo-
-rr^':,\\* T". '--t^
TIIK 151'I'l.KH COUNTY^RESS
HAMILTON, OHIO, FRIDAY, JANUARY 13,1922
Scrap Iron
PRESIDENT'S LABOR BILL
IS|EXPECTED TO BE INTRODUCED IN CONGRESS IN THE NEXT
WEEK OR TWO-BILL WILL EMBODY
KANSAS PLAN
cussed in conference between him
and President Harding would adopt
the basic idea that the public interest
is paramount so far as basic indus
tries is concerned and also that the
tribunal to deal with industrial dis
putes should be composed altogether
of public representatives.. But here
it is proposed to make a radical de
parture.
Instead of imposing a jail sentence,
the Kenyon bill would forbid a strike
while the case is before the court but
thereafter only the pressure of public
opinion would be depended on to se
cure acquiescence in the decision of
the court. Thus, as with the railroad
labor board, which is really an arbi
tration body, the final sanction is not
jail sentences but the pressure of pub
lie sentiment, mobilized through a ju
dicial agency. The Kenyon bill wili
also reject the idea of basing wage
on the profits of the industry in whicl
they are earned.
So far as giving predominance ti
the public interest is concerned, tin
Kenyon bill will go much farther thai
the railroad labor board legislatioi
went. The railroad board is com
posed of representatives of the rail
roads, representatives of labor, witl
representatives of the public sitting a:
a buffer between the two in the pub
lie interest the plan now being worked
out calls for a tribunal entirely com
posed of representatives of the public
on the assumption that it would worl.
quicker and always start with the pub
lie welfare as the common denomina
tor. If composed entirely of represen
tatives of the public it will be fair ti
argue that such a federal agenc
would have equal regard for the right:
of capital and labor in an industrial
dispute. ^Unfortunately, in actua
practice this very rarely proves true
Both Australia and New Zealand la
bor disputes furnish many examples
The plan further provides for reg
ional courts, the judges of which
would be appointed by the president
it will provide that labor or employer
of labor may bring a dispute befor
the courts or its machinery can be se
in motion and its jurisdiction estab
lished by a complaint from a citizei
EXTEND CONTRACT
PLAN
Marion, O.—The Erie railroad an
nounees that a private company will
employ track laboi'ers and foremen
and crossing watchmen on the Chicago
division of that road. Employes de
siring to continue work must apply
to the new concern.
This move is in line with the Erie's
policy of contracting its repair work.
The Erie originated this scheme,
which is now being use} by an in
creasing number of roads. As the con
tractors claim to be outside the juris
diction of the railroad labor board,
wages ire reduced, hours lengthened
and working standards lowered. The
company that has charge of the Erie's
shops in this city is enforcing medical
examination on employes, who must
pay for same. This policy of the
railroads is being considered by the
railroad labor board, on appeal by the
railroad shop employes' department
o fthe A. F.
of
L.
For Regional Courts, The judges of Which Will
Appointed By the President
Et?*
who can show an interest in accord
ance with well known rules of juris
pimdence.
When jurisdiction has once been as
sumed by the court, an order would
be issued forbidding a strike or a
lockout pending an investigation of
the merits of the case, which would
mean a hearing for both parties to the
dispute. The law would cover all
necessaries moving in interstate com
merce, thus coming under the inter
state commerce clause of the consti
tution and thereby grounding the new
agency in the fundamental law of the
land.
Men's t-buckleArctics
$1.49
—Beat makes all rub
ber sizes 7 to 12.
Men's Dress Shoes
$5.00 V*lue.
Itlack
or
Brown
$2.99
—All the newest models.
Goodyear welts.
Boys' Dress Shoes
$4.00 Values
$1.99
—Sturdy shoes in black or
brown calf, English or blu
cher styles.
246 HIGH
New York.—In an announcement
covered with molasses and sugar, the
New York board of trade and trans
portation states that it has drafted a
"can't-strike" bill that will "protect
the interests of the public, the em
ployer and the employe."
the employe."
It will be noticed that the em
ploye is third in the list, although
he is most vitally affected because he
will be denied the right to strike and
will be compelled to place his weffare
in the hands of courts.
The bill provides for a court of in
dustrial relations that will act in "ag
gravated and extreme cases"—which
means that if workers insist on retain
ing their America^ right to cease
work, they will be jailed.
In cases where workers are docile,
matters will be arranged for them by
the state industrial commissioner and
the supreme court justices. The lat
ter will be armed with the injunction,
although this provision seems- un
necessary, in view of present tenden
cies of courts.
The bill is a combination of the
Canadian and the Kansas laws.
Thirty days' notice must be given the
state industrial commissioner. He
will appoint a board of conciliation.
If this method fails the employer or
employes may appeal to the supreme
ourt for an injunction against the
proposed strike or lockout.
The authors of this wondrous plan
make no distinction between a strike
and a lockout. They seem to believe
that an employer uses brass band
methods when he applies the lockout,
and that he does not quietly discharge
the "agitators" for plausible reasons
that will be sustained by thfe court.
The details of the bill have not
been made public. The plan seems
to be to feed it out to the public in
small doses that anti-union sentiment
may be developed in favor of it.
The following jumble of words, that
sound like Allen of Kansas, indicates
how the backers of the hill are con
fusing the public:
"Its prime purpose i to preserve
public peace, protest public health,
prevent industi'ial strike, disorder and
waste, to secure the regular and or
derly conduct of the business directly
Great crowds took advantage Thursday and Friday of this most
Sensational
Cash Raising
DON'T WAIT—KK HKKE TOMORROW $1 RE
liVY YOUR SHOE NEEDS FOR MONTHS TO COME
$1.00 Values
49c
—Storm or Sandal best
quality. All sizes.
English
or
Blucher
Every pair
Ladies' High Shoes
84.00 Values
$1.99
—Black or brown, with
low walking heels.
a.
"CAN'T-STRIKE" LAW! ?H~1
ONE THAT "PROTECTS" ALL CLASSES IS FAVOR
ED BY NEW YORK BOARD OF TRADE
AND TRANSPORTATION
It Is Noted, However. That the Employe is Last on The
List to Be.Protected
of them.
£5
EVERY PAIR OF SHOES AND OXFORDS GREATLY REDUCED
Ladies' Rubbers
WS.S.
WAX S*V' SIA*4W
l»«UI. HY TBft
UNITED STATE*
OOVtMMENT
ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR
Ten thousand milk wagon drivers
are on strike because of wage differ
ences with milk companies that have
declared for the anti-union shop. The
companies have refused to arbitrate
and Dr. Copeland, health commission
of this city, has stated, publicly,
that the attitude af the companies is
ndangering the public health.
The New York board of trade and
transportation affects a blissful ig
norance of these conditions while it
urges handcuffing the workers to their
jobs on the plea of public peace, pub
lic hen It'll u ii 1 the people's general
welfare.
»a a* R*
WOODEN CARS ARE
USED
New
York.
fatal.
ne in 1891
part of
'I
.'S
affecting living conditions of the peo-1
pie of the state, and to promote gen
eral welfare."
Trade-unionists show that Jf *hese
business men were honestly striving
to do the things they allege they
would become interested in three large
strikes now being waged in this city.
About 50,000 garment workers are
attempting to enforce compliance with
an agreement that does not expire un
tli next June.
Several thousand butcher workmen
are resisting wage cuts. Arbitration
and other peace overtures have been
rejected by the meat barons who have
raised meat prices and are strangling
independent meat packers who have
harmonious relations with their em
ployes.
*3
Investigation of a
.wreck on
one of the elevated
lines in this city shows that all of
the cars are wooden arid that one was
uilt in 1879. One was built
in
and
I88i,
four in 11)0:5.
The transit commission announces
that "the subject of wooden cars has
been taken up
hv the
commission as
a ueneral study of
ment."
equip­
?ss in
ARE YOU GOING?
Sunday is "Go to Church Sunday."
You know just wWieh you are going
attend?
If not, just drop
into
Children's Shoes
.S1.7"
endless selection to choose
Misses' & Children's
DRESS SHOKS
$1.99
—Beautiful shoes in
black or brown, button or
lace styles.
any
They are all
good.
Read the Press.
Values
99c
Soft black kid. wedge
heels sizes 3 to 8.-*
Ladies' Low Shoes
$5.00 Values
Oxfords, Pumps, Straps
Black a*s High and
Brown or *1 W Medium
I'atent fl/ JL Heels
—An
from.
PHONE M*
If
4
'v*

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