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The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, January 13, 1922, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1922-01-13/ed-1/seq-3/

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STAGGERING
Even to Wall Street Are The
:vGigantic
Mergers Now
Being Formed
New Yorlf.—The imagination of
Wall street is aflame with stories of
gigantic combinations. Oil, steel,
copper, chemicals, machinery and to
bacco lead in this movement, which
is possible because America controls
50 per cent of the world's gold, thus
permitting the issuance of billions of
new credits.
Another factor III the centralization
of industry during the war and the
attitude of, government and the pub
lic mind. In the judicial department
of government, especially, the lessen
ing of hostility to combinations is
most marked, as indicated by the
United States supreme court's deci
sion in the steel trust case and in the
Reputation
Our Greatest
Asset
Money Cheerfully
Refunded
Without Question
Goods
Exchanged
WE ARE HERE TO PLEASE YOU
YOU CAN ALWAYS BUY THE £AME GOODS
HERE FOR LESS
10-Day Furniture Sale
$25,000 WORTH OF
Furniture, Carpets, Stoves
Linoleums, Etc.
Reduced To Cost
For 10 Days Only
HERE IS YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO SAVE ON
YOUR REQUIREMENTS IN THIS LINE
Genuine reductions throughout our store. Nothing re
stricted. Bargains which you simply cannot afford to let
vo by.
ANTICIPATE YOUR PRESENT OR FUTURE
NEEDS
This offering should induce you to buy at once, as tfche
savings are enormous.
£Thi» sale starts Friday morning and continues for 10
days.
PAY A VISIT TO
"Hamilton's Lowest Priced Furniture Store"
QUALITY FURNITURE AT LOWEST PRICES
stock dividend case.
In the steel trust case the court
acknowledged that the trust was
merely a holding company, and does
not produce steel, but if it is dissolved
the public interest may be affected
and the country's foreign trade may
be injured. This startling position
conflicts with former theories that
courts are supposed to define the law,
while permitting the legislature to
function in its sphere.
Harry Strauss Furniture Co.
SEE OUR WINDOWS
In the stock dividend case the court
ruled that corporations may escape
income taxes by issuing more stock,
upon which profits must be made,
rather than paying the profits in act
ual, cash.
Y
RAY
nom,?
NOTICE OUR PRICES
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Capitalists have not overlooked
these decisions, and combinations un
dreamed of are now in process of
formation. It is agreed that there
will be a reaction from this wild capi
talization, but Wall street replies:
"After us the deluge."
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R.IOHT
(From the American Federationist)
The best that American labor can
pledge to the cause of progress for
the coming year is a continuance of
its best effort to promote that cause
in every possible manner by every pos
sible constructive effort. Labor is the
e force in our social life that is
compelled by its very character to
strive to the utmost always for pro
gress, freedom, democracy and justice.
It would be fortunate if other ele
ments were under similar self-imposed
compulsion.
The year through which we have
just passed has been a year of con
centrated struggle.
Certain employers greeted the year
1021 with the battle cry of destruc
tion. They felt a sense of power
without responsibility to the social
entity. They felt that the road was
clear for the amassing of fabulous
wealth and for the re-establishment of
industrial dictatorship. Two things
were clear in their minds: To reduce
wages and to destroy the unions, the
voluntary organizations of the work
ers, in order that wages might be
permanently held down and in order
that working conditions might be de
termined likewise in arbitrary man
ner, to the detiremtn of the workers.
Organized labor stood firm against
this destructive movement. It has
maintained its position with such ten
acity and purpose that wage reduc
tion has made but comparatively tri
lling headway, while the detruction of
the unions has made no progress at
all. Labor is as united and as deter
mined as ever—and a great deal more
so.
Labor has more than this to con
tend with, however. The courts con
tributed their share. Judicial power
has been thrown on the side of pre
datory wealth. Destruction of law by
usurped power has continued apace.
Injunctions have grown and multi
plied.
On the other hand the propagandists
of various political and industrial
cure-alls and fantasies have been busy
in an attempt to eat at the vitals of
our movement. A great, vicious cir
cle of destructive, un-democratic, op
pressive influences has sought to the
limit of its capacity to destroy the
one great constructive force in Amer
ican industrial life.
Our movement has stood the test
with flying colors. No movement less
responsive to the needs of the work
ers, less qualified to serve, less able
to resist, could have stood so com
pletely unscarred through such a year
of conflict.
Through the year, despite the slan
ders and attacks, the movement de
veloped a vast amount of construct
ive thought, contributed constantly in
JAPAN'S SHIPPING
Greatly Aided By American
Railroads
Washington.—Complying with a re
quest by the senate, the interstate
commerce commission has compiled
a list of contracts between American
railroads and foreign steamship com
panies.
These contracts show why millions
of tons of shipping are carried in
foreign vessels, while ship subsidies
are favored and certain Americans
sagely discuss "the need to, revise the
La Follette seamen's law that the
American merchant marine can be
built up.".
In the far northwest prominent
trunk lines agree with Japanese ship
ping companies to represent each
other in their respective countries
The Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul
railroad pledges the Osaka mercantile
steamship company that it will "not
TtfK BUTLER COUNTY PRESS
Buckwheat Cakes
Forward, Onward
and Upward in 1922
the development of constructive work,
gave constantly in service to human
ity.
In the midst of an unemployment
crisis which need not have been, it
was the voice and the counsel of la
bor that made it possible for the na
tional conference on unemployment to
survive and to succeed to such an ex
tent that it is estimated a million and
a half of workers have been re-em
ployed.
The world today stands upon the
threshold of a ten year naval holiday,
from which it is hoped the world will
emerge into everlasting peace. Labor
led the way to the present conference,
with its record from the beginning of
our movement and with its declaration
adopted by the executive council in
May and by the convention in Denver
in June calling for such an interna
tional conference as the President la
ter determined to call.
These are vidences of labor's tem
per and spirit and willingness to serve.
There is no intent to draw a bill
of particulars. The old year has gone.
The efforts of reactionary employers,
of hostile newspapers, of courts, of
legislatures, of congress, to harass,
to undermine and to destroy, have
been unavailing. And even the presi
dential proposal for judicial tribunals
to arbitrarily force labor and all in
dustry under the tyrannical rule of
courts, will not succeed.
The conclusion, at the end of the
year, is that reaction has tried with
all diligence, and has failed to shake
the progressive, enlightened, construc
tive purpose of the great masses of
our people.
The conviction is inescapable that
progress is in store. Our people un
derstood too well the implications of
the proposals of reaction to be de
ceived. Reaction can not win by log
ic because the logic of the equation is
all against it. It can not win by
threats and force because the might
of the masses in their determination
to go forward is unconquerable and in
surmountable.
"Lay on,MacDuff," we said a full
year ago. MacDuff has laid on with
vigor, but with the customary blind
ness of those who will not see the
tide of human affairs and who will
not listen to the burden of the human
story as it is spoken from the lips of
the masse|.
Freedom's cause is safe because it
is in the keeping of so many.
And so, at the dawn of the New
Year—1922—we greet our fellow
workers, our fellow citizens. We bid
them look forward, we bid them en
vision the rising sun, we bid them
forward, onward and upward toward
a better day, a brighter day, a bet
ter, richer, fuller life for all man
kind.
become interested" in any other
steamship company that might be in
competition with the Japanese con
cern, while the earnings from joint
through freight business will be di
vided between the two parties.
The Great Northern Railway Com
pany agrees with the Nippon Steam
ship Company that both shall work
to their mutual advantage and the
Jap ships shall be given .preference
on freight to the Orient. The rail
road company also ijgrees "to exer
cise its best endeavors to secure ex
emption from or reduction in port,
pilotage, lighthouse dues, etc., that
steamship companies pay."
These arguments show
3
that this
American railroads and Jap shipping
companies are working as one, to the
disadvantage of American ships that
would build up a trade in the Orient,
LOW WAGES IS COSTLY
New York.—High wages and i
creased production, rather than low
wages, is urged by George H. Bruns,
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in a leading article in the Annalist,
financial paper published in this city.
"It is no argument in favor of
reduction merely to assert that cur
rent rates are 30, 40 or 50 per cent
higher, as the case may be, than at
some previous time in the history of
the industry," he says.
"So long as living costs remain at
their present level drastic wage cuts
are inadvisable.
"Building costs must come down.
This much is indisputable the means
are to be determined. But low wages,
disproportionate to the cost of living,
have in the past resulted in poor
physique, lowered standards and ideals
of living, limited education and les
sened efficiency through diminished
vitality, causing slack work and re
strained production.
"Dollars are of value only as a
medium of exchange."
FIGHTING IT
Railroad Shop Employes
Opposed to Contract
Plan
Chicago.—"The transportation act
requires the establishment of just and
reasonable wages and working condi
tions for all employes—not simply for
the train service employes.
"Are the carriers to be allowed to
deny such wages and conditions to
certain shop or maintenance-of-way
employes by means of this contracting
out?"
The above are two of the strong
points made by organized shop em
ployes in a brief to the railroad labor
board against the present policy of
railroads contracting their repair
work to private companies.
The Erie railroad originated this
scheme to get from under the juris
diction of the railroad labor board.
Thirteen other roads have adopted
the plan. These include the Pennsyl
vania, Southern Pacific, Pere Mar
quette, New York Central, Big Four,
Gulf Coast lines, Chicago Great West
ern, Ann Arbor and Chicago, Mil
waukee and St. Paul.
In their brief against the Erie's
contracting its Marion, Ohio, shops to
the railway service company th£ rail
road shop employes show that the
company is a camouflage for the Erie.
The amount of capital wfiich the set
vice company carries on its business
is $1,000, yet the payroll of the Mar
ion shops is from $21,000 to $30,000
a week. The incorporators are known
anti-unionists whose wage standard is
30 to 45 cents an hour. The manager
of the company is R. V. Blocker, for
mer master mechanic of the Erie, who
came direct to the company from the
services of the Erie.
fe V*
INDUSTRY'S TERRIBLE
TOLL
Los Angeles.—In 10 years there
have been 1,000,000 injuries to indus
trial workers, said Will J. French,
chairman of the state industrial com
mission, in a speech in this city.
"During these' 10 years," said the
speaker, "15,000 workers have suf
fered permanent inpuries, and 6,000
deaths (including 30 women) are
charged to industrial operations. If
the 6,000 dead were buried side by
side, allowing three feet for each
grave, there would be a continuous
row of graves extending a distance
of 3.41 miles. Each day in California
two workers are killed an$ more than
300 are injured."
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FIGHT HIGHER -RE^T
Washington. Landlords have an
nounced increases of from $5 to $15
a month at the expiration of the Ball
rent act, next May, and sentiment is
increasing in congress for extending
the life of the act.
The law applies to the District of
Columbia, and has been upheld by
the United States supreme court.
Under thi§ status a commission is em
powered to a^t xenja,
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NEW YORK WAGES CUT
Albany,d N. Y. The downward
trend of average weekly earnings of
factory workers in this state was con
tinued in November by a further de
crease of 21. cents, according to the
state department of labor. Tta aver
age for November was $24.32, or about
15 per cent less than in November,
last year. The averages are based on
reports received from 1648 of the
larger manufacturers throughout the
state.
Because of high clothing costs, and
the strike of garment workers in New
York city, it is interesting to note
that average weekly earnings in the
clothing, millinery and laundering in
dustry is $21.92, and in textiles, $20.11.
JBA 1ST
CAN'T JAIL WITNESSES
New York.—Justice Benedict, of the
supreme court in Brooklyn, has ruled
that the state criminal code which
provides for the detention of material
witness is unconstitutional and is an
"unwarranted interference with the
liberty of the individual." He said
persons against whom there was not
even a suspicion of wrong doing were
sometimes imprisoned for long pe
riods when they were unable to fur
nish bail in large amounts.
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FIGHTS RAIL GUARANTY
Washington.—In a public state
ment Senator La Follette warns the
country that the railroads are en
deavoring to perpetuate the rate
guaranty provision of the Cummins
Esch act.
This feature of the transportation
act will expire by statutory limitation
on March 1.
A.
A
C=~zr' pick n E
WHEREAS the Hamilton Advertising Club has con
ceived the idea, and
WHEREAS the Retail Merchants Association has
adopted the plan, and
WHEREAS the Newspapers, and all in touch with
present day conditions favor, and
WHEREAS the public at large and in general will
materially benefit by the officially
designated
REPUTATION WEEK
January 16th to 21st Inclusive
NOW THEN, THEREFORE, we take great pleasure
in announcing as our Attraction Extra
Ordinary for this Big Event.
LESS TUBERCULOSIS
Washington."The trend of the tu
berculosis death rate is downward,"
says the census bureau, which reports
that the mortality in 1920 from this
cause was 122,000, or a reduction
10,000 from the previous year.
"Of the 33 states in the registra
tion area whose rate for more than
one year has been recorded, 29 show
their lowest rates for the year 1920,"
it is stated. The death rate per 100,
000 was 114.2, as compared with 125.6
in 1919.
$20,000 OFFER IS
STILL IN EFFECT
$1.00 CERTIFICATES
GOOD
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PEMSCILLA
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Stuart Paton's
Tremendous
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A picture
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1
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"J
ARE STILL
Last Day For Redeeming of the $1.00
Merchandise Orders Set For
January 31st
For the past few months a wide
distribution of MARTIN ROSEN
BERG ER $1.00 Certificates has been
carried on by the house-to-house can
vassing method. These Certificates,
when registered at their store, lo
cated at 316-318 South 3rd St., en
titles the bearer to exactly $1.00 dis
count on a $5.00 purchase of paper.
However, a customer may use several
Certificates, each being good for the
dollar saving on each $5.00 order.
Any person who has not received one
of these Certificates can obtain same
by writing to the headquarters of
MARTIN ROSEN BERGER, 1828
Race St., Cincinnati, O., or by call
ing at any of the chain of MARTIN
ROSENBERGER stores located in
the following cities: Cincinnati, O.,
Hamilton, O., Dayton, O., Richmond,
Ind., Indianapolis, Ind., and Louis
ville, Ky. Certificates not valid after
Jan. 31, 1922.—Adv.
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