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The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, January 20, 1922, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1922-01-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. XXL No. 40
Trade uniori incorporation is_.de
rflanded by modern feudalists and
their retainers, who insist that as
"capital" (they mean capitalists) is
incorporated, trade unions should do
likewise, that they "may be held re
sponsible for their acts."
This reasoning indicates the low
value greed places on the people'sMn
teljectual capacity.
Corporations are not formed for
the purpose of being "held responsi
ble." The purpose is to evade liability.
Under the partnership form of do
ing business each partner can con
tract debts in the name of the com
pany and all other partners are lia
ble for the full amount. The property
in the partnership can h§ seized for
debt, and if this is not sufficient the
other property of each partner can. be
seized.
Under the corporation form of do
ing business this danger is removed.
An officer of a corporation can con
tract debts in the name of the cor
poration, but only the property of the
corporation is liable. The property of
stockholders can not be seized, as in
the case of partnerships.
In a partnership each partner has
the fate of his associates in his hands.
In a corporation the by-laws and con
stitution of the corporation define the
limits of officials.
Corporation stockholders invest
what they are willing to lose and can
not be held for other damages.
Business men are not compelled to
incorporate, but they do so because
persons will invest money without be
ing held responsible.
It is now proposed to compel trade
unions to do what is optional with
business men.
HEART OF TRADE UNIONISM
AIMED AT BY MODERN FEUDALISTS AND THEIR
RETAINERS IN DEMAND THAT WORKERS
ORGANIZATIONS HE INCORPORATED
v
Claim Made That All That is Asked is That Unions Be
Made Responsible "Equal" to Capital
WHY PAY MORE
For Rubbers
218 South Third St. Opp. Palace Theatre
Mi"
If trade unions' were incorporated
they would be constantly menaced by
the receivership process whereby
their property and treasury would be
at the whim of hostile courts.
This danger to a corporation does
not exist. Its activities are clearly
defined in its charter.
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The activities of a trade union can
not be defined because it is a social
institution. It can not be separated
from the human beings who compos
it. These human beings have mem
ory, understanding and will, as dis
tinguished from a commodity, in
which corporations deal.
If a trade union were incorporated
it could be thrown into court by any
detective, spy or "company man" who
is a member of the union, and a prop
erty-worshipping judge would decide
that the union's activities are not sus
tained by its incorporation declara
tions.
With the changing of social view
points and the adoption of new meth
ods to meet industrial situations, no
militant trade union could function
under this system of court espionage
Aside from reasonable hours, wages
and working conditions, which affect
the national life, there are high moral
reasons for the trade union. The rea
sons for the corporation are efficiency,
profits and limited liability.
The trade union is inseparably link
ed with each individual member of the
union. The success of the union de
velops the intellectual and physical
life of each member. The success of
the corporation is judged by divi
dends.
If trade unions were incorporated
national and international organiza
(Continued on page four)
Why pay more for rubbers when
the Fit-Rite again proves its lead
ership by selling you only standard
brands at the lowest possible prices.
Compare our prices. Come and
compare our goods.
LADIES' RUBBERS CHILDREN'S RUBBERS
In all styles. To fit any To fit all styles. In all
shoe. Guaranteed first qual- sizes. First quality
ity. All sizes. $1.25 QC only—$1.00 values i DC
values at
MEN'S ARCTICS
MEN'S RUBBERS Your choice of 1", 2 or 4
To fit all styles shoes. With buckle in cloth top or all
reinforced heels and toes. rubber first quality only—
All styles, $1.50 all sizes d»0 QC
values, go at $4.00 values ^£t*VD
BOYS' RUBBERS BOYS' ARCTICS
Made of heavy first quality 1 buckle with warm, water
rubber with warm lining and proof jersey tops and sturdy
double protected he»1s and protected soles and heels
toes. All sizes, A A $2.50 values (£1 AT
$1.25 values, at «P •vU at «P mUD
FIT-RITE SHOE STORE
HAMILTON, OHIO
•••.
KW
jfid
I
Holbrock's
Semi-Annual Clearance Sale
CLEARANCE SALE OF ALL FALL AND WINTER SHOES AND RUB-*
By.Its AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES
Mens' Fine Shoes
$2.98, $3.45, $3.95, $4.45, $4.95, $5.45, $5.95, $6.45, $6.95 & $8.10
Ladies9 Fine Shoes
$2.98, $3.45, $3.95, $4.45, $4.95, $5.45, $5.95, $6.45, $6.95 and $7.45/
BOYS' AND YOUTHS' SHOES $1.50, $1.75, ^1.95, $2.45, $2.95 & $3.45
MISSES' & CHILDREN'S SHOES $1.10, $1.25, $1.45, $1.65, $1.95, $2.45, $3.45
RPBIMEB BQOTS AND SHOES OF ALL KINDS AT REDUCED PRICES
Holbrock, 3rd St. Shoe Man

inoiujilftj
THE HANPV MAN IN
fHt NEIjH&0RH°o1
JOpjrUlit)
The executive board of the Ohio
State Federation of Labor in a three
day session in Columbus, Ohio, last
week, considered and disposed of
much business of the utmost import
ance to labor, consisting as it did of
workmen' s compensation litigation,
the convention city for next year's
convention, old age pensions, dis
charge of union men by the state ad
ministration and routine business.
Only one subject acted upon by the
executive board will require the con
sideration and action of the member
ship of the Ohio State Federation pre
vious to the next convention of the
Federation namely, that of old age
pensions. It is deemed of sufficient
importance and interest to report the
proceedings at Columbus last week,
hnd the action was taken on the sub
ject.
Meeting with the executive board
for the consideration of litigation
affecting workmen's compensation
and plans for initiating an old age
pension bill were representatives of
the State Building Trades Council,
other state labor organizations and
international labor organizations hav
ing headquarters in Ohio, besides
members of the old age pension com
mittee of the United Mine Workers of
America.
It will be remembered that the
Hamilton convention of the Ohio
State Federation of Labor instructed
the executive board to initiate a bill
providing for old age pensions, and
fuHher to carry the bill to the peo
ple by referendum petition if the
legislature neglected or refused to
pass it in acceptable form.
Now going on. We can save you money by at
tending our
1
7
N THE B:0TLEK''COUNTY'vPRESS.-'•te'
Local Celebrities
pA WANT 5
-fO.0M£ OVER TO KVTli \/A
KIN
OUR. HOUSE 'THE
CH\MMEV IS 4T0rFt^
FOR OLD AGE PENSIONS
PLANS UNDER WAY TO INITIATE BILL FOR THEM IN OHIO
-STAMP SALES TO PROVIDE FUNDS-O. S. OF L.
ON THE JOB
Opportunity Rife For Labor to Demonstrate That It Is in Earnest in Its
Demand For Old Age Pensions
The afternoon of January 10th and
all of January 11th were devoted to
the consideration of old age pension
legislation.
Committees were ^elected to draft a
bill which will be submitted to a
similar meeting to be held about April
1st.
A commitec was also selected to
formulate a plan of organization for
the state, counties and municipalities.
The real problem presenting itself
to the gathering was the question of
providing the finances to carry on the
work of initiating the bill, take care
of *fhe legislative work during the
next session of the general assembly,
and, if necessary, cover the expense
of circulating referendum petitions,
etc. All were impressed with the
magnitude of the work. The discus
sion had not proceeded far until it
became clear that the executive board
could not make even a beginning until
funds were guaranteed and provided.
This led to a discussion of the dues
paid the federation by local unions
and the condition of the State Federa
tion treasury. It was disclosed that
the funds in the State Federation
treasury were less than for two
years past, and these, with dues col
lectable for the balance of the year,
would barely suffice to carry on the
regular and routine business of the
federation, let alone cover the ex
penses incident to an old age pension
bill campaign. It became necessary,
therefore, to plan in some manner the
creation of adequate funds before be
ginning the work of printing and
initiating a bill. It was felt, further,
that unless labor was interested to
the extent of providing the funds, the
resolution adopted unanimously at the
last convention of the federation did
not mean what it said and was not
expressive of the real sentiments of
labor.
Many plans were suggested and
discussed, only to be rejected because
of doubt as to results to be achieved
by their adoption. The plan finally
agreed upon is called the "stamp
plan." It was decided to ask each
affiliated union to pledge its member
ship to purchase or sell ten stamps at
10 cents per stamp. The plan in
mind is to have the unions purchase
from Secretary-Treasurer Donnelly,
of the federatioo, as many stamps
each month as they have members,
reselling them to their membership.
It is also planned to furnish with the
stamps small cardboard books, with
appropriate printing thereon, in
which the stamps can be pasted by
the members after their purchase
from the unions. These purchases
may extend over a period of 10
months, which means that the mem
bers of organized labor will be ask
ed to contribute 10 cents a month for
10 months to place an old age pen
sion law upon the statute books of
Ohio. The unions will buy the
stamps from the federation monthly
and resell them to their members. It
was thought what members of or
ganized labor would not be proud to
exhibit his filled-out old age pension
stamp book containing one dollar's
worth of stamps and thereby show
the part he took in helping to make
the law a reality?
•*.M._t"'^t?\.wr «r~*
VA FIX
IT MISTER
0AK£
WITrt
you
POD
HAMILTON, OHIO, FRIDAY, JANUARY 20,192$ ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR
\W
I
&
It has been pretty generally agree*
that the old age pension bill shouh
provide for a pension of $1.00 a day
Is this pension worth striving for
Will organized labor furnish th
money to make it possible by buyini
old age pension stamps to the exten
of $1.00 per member?
The proposition will be place
squarely up to the membership of th
Ohio State Federation of Labor.
While the greatest enthusiasm pre
vailed during the discussion of old ag
pensions last week in Columbus
(Continued on page four)
Y
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Surety
Coupons
Denver.—Because they Vefueed to
obey a court order to return to work
in the meat packing plants, 27 strik
ers, including one woman, were sen
tenced by District Judge Morley to
jail for terms ranging from one to 60
days.
The following are the names and
sentences of the wage workers who
choose prison bars rather than sur
render an American ideal:
Timothy McCreash, district presi
dent of the butcher workmen. 00 days
in jail.
Dan Mullen, Gilbert Clary and W.
H. Hays, local president, secretary
and treasurer, respectively, .50 days
each in jail.
E. E. Yokem, Oscar Hilltrop and
Herman Longhart, seven days each in
jail.
Henry Duckett, Frank Scan Ion, 10.
A. Calkins, Edgar Walter, Lawrence
$40, $45
and $47.50
Values ..
$25, $27.50 and
$30 values
We'll staki
4
OWE IT TO YOURSELF TO SHOP TODAY
The W. C. Frechtiins Co.
v* f*4«'S'?%?*\n v^ -A.*.*
DEFY "CAN'T-STRIKE" LAW
JAILED BY INJUNCTION JUDGE COLORADO
BUTCHER WORKMEN UPHOLD AMERI
CAN IDEAL
Choose Prison Bars Rather Than Accept Slave-Enforcing
Sta
ute
The crowds are coming to this
old time special purchase sale
which gains momentum with
each succeeding day
E A N U A Y
CLEARANCE SALES
offers the lowest prices in years
of only High Grade Goods
INTRODUCING AT SPECIAL PRICES
MINA TAYLOR DRESSES
THE HOUSE GARB FOR DISCRIMINATING WOMEN
Introductory Prices $2.95, $3.95
The W. C. Frechtling Co.
"MEET ME AT FRECHTLINQ'S CORNER"
\r /i-
Harnandez and Stanley Kinder, each
one day in jail.
Rose Travison and 13 others, sus
pended sentence of one day each in
jail.
The injunction was issued at the re
quest of the state industrial commis
sion, which enforces—or is supposed
to enforce the Colorado "cai^t
strike" law.
Attorneys for the unionists asked
for a stay of sentence, but this was
denied and they were hustled to jail.
The attorneys are contesting the de
cision.
Judge Morley painted a frightful
picture of conditions in this state if
violators of the slave legislation were
not punished.
"Even your own homes, your fam
ilies, would not be sure if we were
to permit open violations of the laws,
such as in this instance," he said.
(Continued on page four)
r:
$
URUSAVWOS STAMPS
i» UKO IIV TKS
UNITED HATES
GOVERNMENT
me
and
Overcoats
$18 $34
$50, $55 and
$60 values
our REPUTATION that these are the greatest
Values Hamilton has ever seen
MAX- E -EPH-RATII
EXCLUSIVE CLOTH3ER FOR MEi
Hakiltqn Hotel Blo&
OPPOSITE JEFFERSON THEATRE
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$
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Suits
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Surety
ri*n•
Coupons

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