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The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, June 16, 1922, Image 2

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THE PRESS
OFFICIAL ORGAN O* oKuA^UUi LABOR
OF HAMILTON AND VICINITY.
C&S'ic'*
VV
:|PRtSS ASSH|
OHIO LABOR)
Members
Ohio Labor Press Association
THE NONPAREIL PRINTING CO.
PUBLISHERS AND PROPRIETORS
Subscription Price $1.00 per Year
Payable in Advance.
We do not hold ourselves responsible for any
views or opinions expressed In the articles
or communications of correspondents.
Communications solicited from secretaries
of all societies and
organizations,
and should
be addressed to The Butler County Press, 826
Market Street, Hamilton, Ohio.
The publishers reserve the right to reject
any advertisements at any time.
Advertising rates made known on appli
cation.
Whatever is intended for insertion must
be authenticated by the name and address of
the writer, not necessarily for publication, but
as a Kuarantee of good faith.
Subscribers changing their address will
please notify this office, giving old and new
address to insure regular delivery of paper.
FRIDAY, JUNE 16, 1922
Entered at the Postoffice at Hamilton,
Ohio, as Second Class Mail Matter
Issued Weekly at S26 Market Street.
Hamilton, Ohio.
Telephone 1296
Endorsed by the Trades and Labor
Council of Hamilton, Ohio.
Endorsed by the Middletown Trades
and Labor Council of Middletown, O
POLITICS WARMING UP
When the bell in the court house
tower tolled the hour of midnight on
last Friday night and the board of
elections declared the time for the
filing of declaration of candidacy was
up there certainly was a wonderful
string of entries in the great political
derbies to be run on August 8th. And
from the quick appearance of candi
date cards and hustling candidates
on the very next day after the time
for filing declarations closed the
trainers of the entrants must have
been busy for some months past as
there's no denying the fact that some
of them got off to a flying start. In
fact from the way some of them are
going they must have slipped under
the barrier before it was let fly.
There never were so many candi
dates, so much hand-shaking, so much
solicitousness of the health of all the
folks and the new baby. Some fellow
rushes up to you with a broad smile
and overflowing with gladness and you
jolly yourself into the idea that he is
tickled to death to see you when sud
denly it is all spoiled when he flashes
a card and tells you how much he will
a v i W e
appreciate your vote and support for
a certain office. But that all goes in
the political game and it wouldn't be
a real ^election if it didn't happen.
There is no doubt but that the coming
primaries are going to be on the old
fashioned order. The candidates are
out for b-l-o-o-d.
Even the republicans are stirring
things up in their camp. They have
a full ticket in the field but no oppo
sition for any of the offices excepting
those for central committeemen. And
here is where there is going to be a
real scrap. People who don't know
wonder what anyone would want to
fight about little, insignificant offices
like central committee when there is
seeming higher game. Well, maybe
thei*e will be some more postmasters
to appoint or perhaps a member of
the board of electipns or two. Guess
once.
to i*
"GENTLEMEN
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
The most modern Limousine
and Ambulance in the city
ed Sugar, Salt and Fleishman's Yeast.
Think of it! A one pound loaf wrapped
bread, per loaf
Country Club, great big l'/i pound loaf
wrapped bread. The best bread money can
buy. Absolutely the greatest value in the
United States. 1
Vi
pound loaf
KROGER'
ILconomy Shoe
By their fruits ye shall know them!
In Dayton, Ohio, the United Breth
ren Church is maintaining a publish
ing house in whose composing room
none but scabs and strike breakers are
employed.
This condition has existed since Jan
uary 3, when the printers put into
force their humanitarian move intend
ed to add eight years to their lives
The United Brethren was the only
office in Dayton which refused to co
operate. Professional strikebreakers
were imported and several scabs re
cruited.
The publishing agent, a preacher
named Rev. W. R. Funk, stated the
strikebreaking outfit was composed of
"gentlemen."
In juvenile court a warrant has been
sworn out against one of the "gen
tlemen," a fellow named Douglas
Morgan, charging him with contribut
ing to the delinquency of a minor girl
Another employe of the United
Brethren, answering to the name of
Muirson, was sentenced to pay a fine
of $200 and serve five days in jail on a
bootlegging charge. Still another, go
ing under the name of Williams, was
arrested for drunkenness. Still
another, known as Rogerson, commit
ted an assault on a Dayton citizen
Four of the "gentlemen" are heavy
purchasers and users of "white mule.'
The United Brethren agent has a
peculiar concept of what constitutes a
gentleman or what constitute.0. Chri
tianity.
to P* I* to
DAl GHEHTVS RE-'MORSE"
It's warmin' up in Washington
It's getting hot in the senate!
Some few weeks ago Senator Cara
way, of Arkansas, happened to men
tion that Attorney General Daugherty
and Thomas B. Felder had been prom
ised a fee of $25,000 for getting
Charles B. Morse out of jail.
Morse was sentenced for a fifteen
year term in the penitentiary in 1908
PHONE 48 219 MAIN
ST.<p></p>BREAD
Made of Pure Lard, Flour, Milk, Granulat­
5c
Sc
for making false entries in the books
of the National Bank of America. He
was pardoned by President Taft.
Daugherty had assured the president
that Morse was dying. Morse is alive
today.
Just as soon as Caraway made his
statement about the attorney general,
Watson, of Indiana, a hard-boiled
member of the old guard, asserted that
he knew that Daugherty "did not get
any fee for getting Morse out of the
penitentiary."
newspaper of Washington printed a
Then a young and enterprising
letter from Felder to Morse asking
for the "balance due" of $25,000 for
himself and Daugherty.
So they are having a great time
in the senate.
It looks as though somebody will
have to prosecute the war grafters.
Daugherty says that this whole stir
is a scheme to protect the grafting
democrats.
Why protect them, then? Why not
put them in jail where they belong?
If they were grafting republicans put
them in jail, too. Why wait? If
Daugherty means business let him
act.- If he does not mean business the
people will act.
The war ended in 1918. No grafter
has yet gone to jail. If the scandal
which now hovers over Washington
will get action from "Re-Morseful
Daugherty" perhaps some of the
grafters will fill the cells now occu
pied by political prisoners.:—J.
Baer, the Congressman-Cartoonist.
COMPANY UNION VS.
REAL TRADE UNIONS
About three years ago the West
ern Union Telegraph Company organ
ized what it was pleased to call "The
Association of Western Union Em
ployes."
The Western Union organized this
company union only for the purpose
of antagonizing and defeating the
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of
America, a bona fide trade union.
Western Union operators are now
reaping the fruits of Western Union
tactics. Wages have been cut to the
1914 level. Morse operators, formerly
getting $157 now get $110. Printer
operators are getting as low as $12
and $13 a week.
While real trade unions everywhere
were resisting wage reductions the
Association of Western Union Em
ployes a year ago accepted their re
duction, doubtless as an act of kind
ness to the company which owned it
Last year the Western Union Tele
graph Company, which organized and
owns the Association of Western
Union Emplyes, made a profit of $10,
196,029, and has left after payment
of dividends and of all "charges" a
surplus of $2,378,482.
That is how a company union oper
ates. Commercial telegraphers are
beginning to understand this and are
getting into tfye Commercial Tele
graphers' Union of America, where
they belong.
The International Typogrpahical
Union had an agreement with employ
ing printers that a 44-hour week
should go into effect April 1, 1922
The employing printers violated their
agreement. The Typographical Union
suspended work in every print shop
that refused to abide by the 44-hour
agreement. Approximately 800 local
SPECIAL SHOWING
IN
SEPARATE TROUSERS
In all manners of
nice patterns
including plain
Blue Serges
Flannels and Striped
Worsteds
Sizes ranging from
29 to 50 waistband
in all lengths
FEATURE PRICE
$5.95
Others from $3.00 up
MAXEEPH-RATH
EXCLUSIVE CLOTHIER FOR MEN
1-LA.XILToN HOTEL. BLOQ
1HE/ BUTLER COUNTY PRESS
unions originally joined the suspen
sion. Victory all down the line has
put the members of about 600 of these
local unions back at work.
Less than 8,000 of the 75,000 mem
bers originally receiving strike bene
fits remain on the strike pay-roll.
The number is being reduced rapidly.
With a 10 per cent assessment on all
members at work, the International
Typographical Union faced the fight
with a fund of $8,000,000 to its credit.
It had an agreement with the em
ployers, and it meant to see that that
agreement was kept.
The result is that practically the
whole printing industry now operates
on the basis of a 44-hour week and
the remnants of opposition are
crumbling rapidly.
That is how a real trade union oper
ates.
Ik! w
WHY WAGES ARE LOW
Inefficiency and exploitation art
causes Prof. Felix Frankfurter, of
Harvard University, assigns for low
wages.
"Wages are low not because busi
ness cannot afford to pay more, but
because business is inefficient," he
said. "The tremendous waste in ad
ministration and organization is re
vealed by Mr. Hoover, whose business
opinion, I am convinced, you will re
spect. Then, too, wages are low be
cause they are kept low through ex
ploitation."
ib
ft it
The fact that some workers are un
employed is no reason why the wages
of those that are employed should be
reduced. You cannot help the unem
ployed by cutting the wages of th
employed workers.
i»® I*
There is no better way to safeguard
the health of yourself and family than
for you and them to be consistent ad
vocates of the union label.
STANLEY OGC
Again Heads Molders'Union
68—Other Officers
Elected
Old 68 of the Iron Molders' Union
held one of its old time meetings
Monday night. The hall was packed
Many matters of importance came
before the meeting and the reports of
the various shop committees showed
that things are brightening up some
Much enthusiasm prevailed. Despite
the industrial depression of the past
year and a half the membership of
the organization holds up well. The
big feature of Monday's meeting was
the semi-annual election of officers
which resulted as follows:
President, Stanley Ogg vice presi
dent, Andrew Jackson recording sec
retary, Walter Price corresponding
secretary, Tim Farley financial sec
retary, Charles Stephan treasurer
Mat Amiot trustee, Lee Sanders in
ductor, William Brown doorkeeper
William Koger delegate to Trades
Council, Walter Price.
Together with Stanley Ogg most
appreciate faithful service.
o
the foregoing officers have been elect
ed for about the 'steenth time, show
ing that they have ever been on thv
job and that the members of Old
(58
COMMUNITY CHEST
DRIVE
Will Be Made July 10,11,12
At a meeting of the Hamilton Wei
^e Federation held Tuesday after
on, July 10, 11, 12 were fixed as
days on which to make the Cor
nity Chest drive for this year
S I e goal of the drive this year
at $80,000, which is $10,000 less
an the goal of last year.
W. N. Andrews has been appoints
hitirman of the advisory committee
1 John Neilan is campaign chair
an. These gentlemen met with tlx
nmittee on advertising and pub
:i i ty on Thursday afternoon and out
I .mid and planned a program of cam
.Mgn that will be followed vigorously
The committee on advertising an
publicity will be made up of Walt* i
Howe, chairman Roger Rothwel
William M. Goodwin, John Schwaln
l.yton A. Leiter, Sam Carr and Frt
VV
Gradolph.
PLUMBERS'STRIKE
SETTLED
Arbitration Board Awards
Workers Old Scale of
Dollar an Hour
After being out just six weeks thi'
differences between the master plumb
ers and journeymen have been ad
justed. This was brought about by
an arbitration committee composed of
three master plumbers and three jour
neymen from outside the city and
named by the two sides in the local
controversy. The committee met on
last Saturday afternoon, and after
going over the entire situation care
fully came to the conclusion that the
striking plumbers were not askint*
anything unreasonable and awarded
them the former scale, which the men
were demanding, of one dollar per
hour. Several minor concessions
were made the employers, and both
sides having agreed to accept any
award agreed upon by the committee,
the strike was declared off.
However, several of the master
plumbers have not as yet signed
agreements for the year, and of course
until they do so they are not fair to
union labor. The following firni
have signed up and are to be consul
ered fair to organized labor in all
things: Jack Dedrick, G. F. Schwab,
John L. Walker Contracting Co.,
Seevers & Ballett, Harry Thompson
and Albert Schuler & Son.
Subscribe for The Press.
We might
catch a
few more sales
by dangling
cheaper merchandise
before people's eyes
—but we're
wise enough
to know
that the
wrong bait
makes a long
wait for
the conie-back
customer
—Our clothes
are all
one price
$22.50
except Mohair
or Palm Beaches
they're only
$11.50.
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Store VTX SHOES, 215 Court St.
/,.eyre
9U.B0
I WORTHMORE
136 High St.
Opposite Court House
iji ij14' 1" •J®
A Perfect
Balance
of fine old
nature-flav- ]fo?
ored Ken
tucky and
A v v
Virginia leaf
tobaccos.
Union Made
Try a Pack and
You'll Come Back—
they're just that good
Plown
C5C&RETCES
0
1
1
$6.50 to
$8.50
Silk
Shirts
PRESSMAN
we have made for the
A Sate of Fine
1
118 High Street Hamilton, O. Opp. Court House
OUR BUSINESS IS ON THE WAY TO SUCCESS
Each passing day shows a gain in our sales every week breaks the record of the pre
vious week. This condition is NOT surprising to us, in fact it is to be expected in view
xl !nrml,l,rtlces,
WAR 11MES when others were JUMPING PRICES BY LEAPS AND BOUNDS.
During this time we stood by the public—kept prices down although we were warned
of the danger in the end. When the slump came WE WERE SWAMPED —we lost
averything BUT OUR FRIENDS and the LOYALTY and CONFIDENCE manifested at
hat time MORE THAN COMPENSATED US FOR THE MONEY LOSSES The pur
:hase of a FIVE-CENT SPOOL OP THREAD is APPRECIATED here COME and
BRING YOUR FRIENDS to OUR NEW STORE. WE RE I, O ATE I) ON THE
GROUND FLOOR—no climbing stairs—and we're showing a QUALITY LINE OF
DRY GOODS which include LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR, MILLINERY and FUR
NISHINGS. No matter how EXALTED YOUR POSITION IN LIFE WE CAN SATIS
FY YOUR FANCY and your purse. See our NEW LINE of SUMMER DRESSES—or if
you happen to be one who demands an ODD SIZE our EXPERT DRESSMAKER will
make you a dress to measure from the materials you may select and THE CHARdF^
WILL BE LESS than others ask for a HAND-ME-DOWN GARMENT Factory iiTrear
of store.
A FEW SPECIALS USTED THERE ARE MANY OTHERS
1 Lot 40-in. Organdies, About 500 Yds. Left, Yd....25c
1 Lot of Fine Dresses for This Warm Weather....$2.98
1 Lot Crepe-de-Chine Dresses (15 only) $6.98
Everything Here Priced on Live and Let Live Basis
FORM THE MONEY-SAVING HABIT OF TRADING AT
V p. *1 V
.L
i
For 10 Days
Actual Former Prices $6.50 to $8.50
OERE'S an unusual opportunity to obtain
fine silk shirts at a price that is no
higher than that of a good madras shirt.
The materials include Eagle Crepes, Jersey
Silks and heavy tub silks and the guaran
teed colors and patterns are such as will ap
peal to good dressers. Included are also
our entire assortment of white jersey silks,
so popular for summer: wear.
There are just one hundred dozen of them
and the price is so low that they should sell
very, very fast, There are all sizes and
sleeve lengths.
See Window Display
li"lllli:'iiiili illl:iil«jil!ililiiiillllttliiM
MUSIC
COLUMBIA CUM ANOI.AS
RAN BY PHONOGRAPHS
OTTO (JRAU
PLAYERS ANI) PIANOS
COLUMBIA ANI) OKEH
RECORDS
Q. R. S. MUSIC ROLLS
Erb's Music Shop
340 High Street Bet. 3d & 4th
FINEST JOB PRINTING AT THE NONPAREIL
$6.50 to
$8.50
Silk
Shirts
Pasl seven years and more especially DURING
E
S'
MUSIC
il'l!!ll!!!li!li!
PRESSMAN'S
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Nex'""rA,hcrStoreFruitton's
yl :T I

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