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The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, February 02, 1923, Image 3

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1923-02-02/ed-1/seq-3/

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P1M PASSES BY"
Will Be Staged For Benefit
Public Library By Com
munity Drama League
Permanent organization of the
Community Drama League was ef
fected at a meeting of representa
tives of the various drama clubs of
Hamilton and the Rural Community
theatre at the Chamber of Commerce
Ifcesday afternoon. The league or
ganized with Miss Helena Frechtling,
chairman, and Miss Helen Milders,
gtcretary.
For several years it has been the
desire of many members of the
various drama clubs to form some
sort of a federation in the interest
Of "Better Plays." From time to time
the newly formed Community Drama
League will endeavor to present some
good play to the public of Hamilton,
and it is understood that the coaching,
tbe playing of the parts and business
management ,etc., i» done without re
muneration, and that each time a play
is presented, the proceeds are to go
to some worthy community enterprise.
With this commendable purpose in
H?ind, the Community Drama League
•Will, on February 23rd, present "Mr.
Pim Passes By" by Milne, one of the
best known modern plays. It is plan
ning to use the proceeds from this
performance to instill in the public
library an up-to-date department of
better plays which can be used by all
the people of Hamilton and the sur
rounding communities.
The seat sale for the two perform
ances of "Mr. Pim Passes By," Friday
and Saturday, February 23-24, at the
high school auditorium, started today
and it is going big. The High School
Dramatic Club has charge of the
ticket sale in Hamilton, and no more
need be said as to the success of the
sale. Only this, get in quick if you
want tickets.
COSSACK CHIEF QUITS
were killed or burned to death. The
adjutant head of the state rangers,
resigned his office just before Wil
liam E. Sweet was installed as gov
ernor. The new state executive was
pledged to clip the wings of the cos
sacks if elected.
Hamrock was in control of the state
militia when a crowd of thugs in the
uniform of the state shot up the min
ers' camp at Ludlow, April 20, 1914.
Thirty-three men, women and children
Denver, Col. General Hamrock,
miners were striking against the Col
orado Fuel and Iron Company, a Hock
efeller unit.
OPPOSE ALLEN l*AW
Lawrence, Kan.—The Douglas coun
ty taxpayers league has declared
against the Allen "can't-strike" law.
It was stated that-the law is costing
Kansas $600 a day. The new gover
nor is committed to the repeal of the
law, but he has a legislature that op
poses him politically, and this may
affect his campaign pledge.
"Yep, that's Pinchpenny Ms wife
ran away last spring and he has been
waiting all summer for a sale of car
bolic acid so he can commit suieide."
—Sun Dodger.
TO URGE LABOR LAWS
Newark, N. J.—At a conference of
trade unionists from every section of
the state, a legislative program to be
urged at the next session of the state
legislature was agreed to.
The major matters are: Strengthen
the workmen's compensation law
prohibit the issuance of injunctions
in labor disputes oppose nigkt work
for women.
MEXICO WARNS LABOR
New York.—The Mexican consulate
general warns persons contemplating
going to Mexico for employment not
to forward money to private agencies.
These concerns are advertising in the
daily press for workers to go to Mex
ico, where enormous salaries are al
leged to be paid.
The consulate general says the de
partment of labor in Mexico City
maintains a bureau of information for
workers wishing to obtain employ
ment in Mexico, and its services are
without cost.
In organization work let us buckle
on our armor and adopt the slogan
"Onward, union workers," and success
will crown our efforts.
Economically speaking the union is
our best friend. Treat it as such
Treat it right. It deserves it.
BRITISH ROADS UNITE
London, England.—Wfth the open
ing of 1923 a new era in the history
of British railway transport has be
gun. Four groups take the place of
120 unrelated companies, and a di
rectorate of 1,300 is reduced to 100.
Fares are also reduced. The most
important change is in the establish
ment of a permanent rates commis
sion, composed of representatives of
the general public and of the rail
ways, with power continually to ad
just the cost of transport to a point
fair to both.
HUGE STOCK DIVI
DENDS
Community Drama League
PRESENTS
"Mr. Pim Passes By"
High School Auditorium
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS
FEBRUARY 23 and 24, 8:15 P. M.
Price, including War Tax, 50c Reserved Seats, High School, Feb. 20-21
New York.—Complete returns of
stock dividends by leading corpora
tions last year show that a total of
139 companies issued stock dividends
aggregating $1,484,107,719. Stand
ard oil companies issued the largest
dividends, the Atlantic Refining Com
pany leading with a 900 per cent
issue.
The Standard Steel Gar Company
had a 900 per cent issue and the Vic
tor Talking Machine Company had a
600 per cent issue.
FREEJ5PEECH
Defended By Arizona's Gov
ernor in Message to
State Body
Phoenix, Ariz.—"The greatest safe
ty valve to alleviate discontent in any
country is the right to expound ideas,
advocate governmental reform and
criticize public officials or govern
ment institutions," said Governor
Hunt, in his message to the state leg
islature.
The state executive denounced the
practice of some officials in Arizona
who arrest persons as vagrants when
they insist on expressing ideas in
public that these officials do not favor.
"The founders of this republic and
the authors of the constitution of the
United States provided for freedom of
speech and the freedom of the press
The constitution of the state of Ari
zona contains like provisions," said
Governor Hunt.
"At this time, when the nations of
the world are undergoing rapid
changes in government, any attempt
to tie down this safety v^lve ,a
dangerous expedient.
"In this connection I desire to sug
gest that the widest possible latitude
in public discussion should be per
mitted. Meetings on street corners,
where it will not interfere with the
traffic, in the parks or on vacant lots,
should not be interefered with, so
long as' public peace is maintained.
"Oratory cannot injure the govern
ment of our country. Suppression of
free speech may cause a revolution
Public authorities should, under no
circumstances, attempt to prevent the
free exercise by every citizen of his
constitutional rights of expressing his
opinion in public."
SIGN 44-HOUR CONTRACT
Detroit, Mich.—The Typographical
Union and the commercial shop pro
prietors have signed a 44-hour week
contract. Wages will be $1.05 an
hour for day work, $1.10 for night
work and $1.20 for the third shift
These employers have organized a
union-shop branch of the typothetae
PROFITS IN SHOES
St. Louis, Mo.—If one objects to
the high cost of shoes let him recall
that these prices made it possible for
the International Shoe Company to
make a clear profit last year of $8,822,
011. These figures are announced
after dividends, taxes and other
charges were met.
BROOM MAKERS GAIN
Chicago.—The International Broom
and Whisk Makers' Union has re
newed agreements with every union
label shop in the United States. In
many cases improved working con
ditions have been secured. The union
has issued new charters to Norwich
Ontario and Louisville, Ky.
WORKERS' PALTRY WAGE
Washington.—The census bureau
reports that in 1921 the number of
wage earners engaged in smelting
and refining of lead averaged 4,509
and they were paid $5,957,900. This
is an annual wage of $1,321 or $25.40
a week for one of the most dangerous
callings in industry.
5SS
Qidun
3
RD
S A I N
TODAY
PERFORMANCES*:
AT
1:00
2:30
4.45
7:00
9:15
P. M.
ONCE
MATINEES 30c
NIGHTS 40c
?THE BUTLER COUNTY PRESS
ANNIVERSARY
CELEBRATION
in a blue moon they come—the
truly great, the epoch-making pictures.
Here is the season's dazzling sensation, the
production New York stormed the box-office
for fifteen weeks to see. Everywhere it has
scored similar triumphs everywhere the
critics have lavished superlative praise upon
it.
The world-famous and beloved romance of
the bewitching, madcap princess who loved
a gallant commoner and defied a king, to win
her heart's desire.
You Will See—
Settings and gowns of a magnificent beauty
never approached before on the screen. De
signed by Joseph Urban.
Gallant knights clashing upon the tourney
field while hundreds of fair women applaud.
Armor, jewels, tapestries of priceless value.
The thrilling elopement of the royal heroine
in boy's clothing with her lover, including
the leap for life on horseback from a high
bridge.
Flashing: swordplay, the intrigues and pas
sions of a profligate court laid bare.
A spetacular romance of hot, impetuous
youth—as old as time, as fresh as tomorrow.
Admission Prices:
Week Day
FREE LIST SUSPENDED!
HAMILl UTIFUL
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THE MOST AMAZINGLY BEAUTIFUL PICTURE EVER SCREENED
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PRODUCED AT A COST OF $1,500,000
WITH A GREAT CAST, HEADED BY
MARION DAVIES
I'RESENTEi) "THE PALACE WAY"
i
TODAY
Tomorrow
Monday
Tuesday
ADULTS
40c
CHILDREN
20c
Plux Tax
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