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The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, July 31, 1925, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1925-07-31/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. XXV. No. 16
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By International Labor News Service.
Indianapolis, Ind.—The general ex
ecutive board of the Journeymen Bar
bres' Union of America in session at
national headquarters here, approved
plans for the establishment of barber
trade schools in practically every state
in the Union and for the establish
ment of a home for aged barbers.
A levy of 50 cents per capita per
month will be authorized by the board
to raise $750,000 for the establish
ment of the home, according to the
plan. Both propositions will be voted
on by referendum at a later date.
Schools to Be Self-Sustaining
In the matter of barber schools it
was said by President Shanessy that
after two years the schools will be
self-sustaining. A levy of It) cents
per member per month will be made
to raise $75,000 for the establishment
of the schools. The schools will be
established in various strategic cities
and will be under the direct supervi
sion of the union. One of the schools
will be in Indianapolis, President
Shanessy said, where the national
headquarters is located.
The establishment of a pension plan
for aged barbers was considered by
the board, but thus far the plan has
not been definitely worked out. It is
generally understood that a pension
system will be put into effect for the
benefit of the aged members of the
union.
Question of "Next" Considered
The- executive board considered a
rather unique question in the matter
of service in union shops, and it was
decided that there will be no change
in barber shop etiquette in the mat
ter of "women and children first,"
since the invasion of barber shops by
the women. The custom of "next"
will be strictly adhered to, the board
decided. The advent of hair "bob
bing" for women stimulated interest
SMOKED CALA
HAMS
Barbers' Union Approves
Plan for Trade Schools and
Home for Aged Members
Saturday Specials
FRESH SHOULDER RIBS
Per pound
FANCY BOILING BEEF
Per pound
in the tonsorial art, but barbers are
of the opinion that patrons should
be given service on order of arrival
rather than by the rule of chivalry.
Before the adjournment of the
meeting Louis Mcllvaine, Chicago,
notional organizer of the union, out
lined the views of the organization to
the board on the establishment of
trade schools, old age pensions and a
home for the old tonsorialists.
To Take Referendum Vote
The board had before it suggestions
from various members of the union
in respect .to all three propositions
under consideration. The matters
were referred to the board, designat
ed as a 'subcommittee, by the last
convention. Following the board's
recommendation the propositions will
be submitted to a referendum vote of
the union. It will take considerabl
money to finance all three proposi
tions, and it is intended to get the
view of the rank and file in the matter
before proceeding further.
NO SUNDAY MEAT MARKETS
Chicago. The city council has
unanimously approved a meat market
Sunday closing ordinance that wa
urged by organized meat cutters.
STRIKERS EVICTED
Willimatitic, Conn.—Strikers who
are living in houses owned by the
American Thread Company are being
evicted.
These workers are resisting a 10
per cent wage reduction, although the
company reported a surplus last year
of more than $1,000,000. The strikers
are housed in tents furnished by the
United Textile Workers. More than
10,000 persons are involved.
Chicago Market Co. 1
118 High Street Telephone 4506
Announcement
JOSEPH HILZ, Pres.
FRANK X. HILZ, Vice Pres. JOSEPH ERDMAN, Sec'y-Treas.
Joseph Hflz takes this means of announcing to his friends
and patrons in general that two years ago this week, he
took over the interest of his brother, William Hilz, in
The Hilz Bros. Co.
We wish to thank all of our customers for their patronage
in the past and to assure them that we will appreciate
its continuance in the future.
Upon them, and upon our prospective customers as well,
we want to impress the fact that we always stand in readi
ness to overcome and correct any defects in our work or
service.
The HILZ BROS. Co.
y
Gleaners Dyers—Carpet Cleaners V\V
Fostering the Practice of Right Business Principles
We Have But One Location First Step Over the Bridge
Lindenwald and East Hamilton Calls Made Daily
We Have No Branches
For Service Phone 4 or 157. The Original Hilz .Bros. Co., Est: 1911
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By International Labor News Service.
Organized labor is to enter the insur
ance field with a $2,000,000 concern,
to be known as the Union Labor Life
Insurance Company. Representatives
of nearly 40 national and international
unions, at* a conference in the Amer
ican Federation of Labor building,
unanimously decided to form the com
pany, which will be organized under
the direction of Matthew Woll.
The conference was called by Presi
dent William Green, of the A. F. of
L., to consider the report of an in
surance committee appointed by the
late Samuel Gompers. The commit
tee, consisting of President Woll, of
he International Photo-Engravers'
Union, and President George W. Per
kins, of the Cigarmakers' Interna-,
tional Union, was appointed by Mr.
Gompers at the Portland convention
of the A. F. of L. in 1923. The com
mittee submitted an exhaustive re
port at the El Paso convention in 1924
and the convention authorized the
calling of a conference to act on the
committee's recommendations.
Committee to Be Formed
The report of the committee- was
discussed ot length and aothorization
for the formation of the Union Labor
Life Insurance Company followed.
An organization committee of about
25 persons prominently identified with
the labor movement will be formed by
Mr.
Woll as chairman and Mr. Per
kins as secretary.
Compelling reasons for the forma
tion of the insurance company by
union labor were given in the insur
ance committee's report, which
charges the existing companies, par
ticularly those writing what is known
as group insurance, with discrimi
nation against labor unions to the ex
tent of $2 per thousand for insurance
issued to the unions over the price
charged non-union groups.
The report also arraigned the com
panies for the excessive cost of what
is known as industrial insurance pat
ronized almost exclusively by wage
earners and with extravagances in
the conduct of their business.
To Force Cut in Premium Rates
The report said that the Union
Labor Life Insurance Company hopes
by the elimination of unnecessory ex
pense, due very largely to the exces
sixe cost of weekly collections on in
dustrial policies, to point the way and
even to compel a general reduction
of premium rates charged for this
lass of insurance by the public com
panies.
President Green, who presided at
the conference, opened the meeting b$
pointing out that the lobor represent*
atives present had been called to
gether in pursuance of the action of
the El Paso convention, which heart
ily indorsed the principle of insur
ance by organized labor and recom
mended careful study of the report
made by Messrs. Woll and Perkins.
New Enterprise Expected
To Cut Cost of Policies
Matthew Woll and George W. Perkins Authorized By
Washington Conference to Direct Organization
of Union Labor Life Insurance Company
Mr. Woll. read- the ^committee's re-
Jolting the City Cousin
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£2,000,000 Company To Be Formed
By Organized Labor To Write Life
Insurance For Unionist Members
port, explaining that every means had
been used to obtain facts. He said
that the present plan of insurance
conducted by local, national anl inter
national unions was not always based
on the correct principles of insurance.
Discussing group insurance, Mr.
Woll said that those using it were
often opposed to trade unionism and
that in some states insurance com
panies were not permitted to write
insurance for trade unions. Insurance
companies discouraged this until the
A. F. of L. took up the matter, said
Mr. Woll, who went on to say thot
insui'ance companies are now ap
proaching the unionss for permission
to underwrite all the members. There
is danger in this, he said, as every
member's name and address and other
information must be given to the in
surance companies.
Labor Can Foil Employers, He Says
Then arises the question, "Shall
labor create an institution whereby
all these dangers will be avoided?" he
asked and answered it by saying:
"If we enter the insurance field we
meet the scheme of the employers in
a practical way. Where the employer
furnishes insurance of $1,000 to each
of his employes we are faced with
difficulties. The employe will not be
as militant as if there were no insur
ance. It is therefore necessary that
we enter the insurance field so that
the trade unions will not be weakened.
"Commissioners of insurance in
several states have demanded that
local unions submit their activities to
them. This has been prevented so
for. It may not be long before states
will require that we meet that situa
tion. It is our belief that we should
prepare now."
Insurance Men Address Meeting
Speakers included Charles F. Nes
bit, former insurance commissioner of
the District of Columbia L. D. Wood,
of Philadelphia, and Howard P.
Brown, actuary of the United States
veterans' bureau insurance depart
ment.
The company will probably be in
corporated under the laws of the state
of Maryland, but will have its home
office in Washington. The plans pro
vide *for an authorized capital stock
of $1,000,000, which will be sold at
double par to provide o working sur
plus equal in amount to the capital.
The company will be put into the
field and managed by union labor offi
cials, assisted by experts who will be
employed to look after the actuarial,
medical and other technical depart
ments.
The company will issue only par
ticipating policies of the union kinds.
Both men and women will be accepted
as policy holders at the usual rates
charged by the public companies. The
company will be formed without or
ganization expense. No commission
will be paid for stock and no fiscal
Agency employed. The members of
HAMILTON, OHIO, FRIDAY, JULY 31, 1925 ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR
RADIO U)6
STAn»HA
"the organization committee will serve
without pay.
Concern to Use Union Machinery
In an interview Chairman Woll said
that it was not the intention of the
company to compete with the public
companies by offering its policies at
less rates of premium but rather to
utilize existing machinery of the local
and national unions for the purposes
of writing the insurance and collect
ing the premiums at as little expense
as possible and by a reduction in ex
pense and careful attention to detail
to effect a saving for the policy hold
ers which will be returned to them in
the form of dividends to apply upon
subsequent premiums.
He also said the objective of the
company was to adequately insure
every member of organized labor and
their families as soon as it ean pos
sibly be done. This means an army
of nearly 12 million policy holders
which the company thinks" it can write
for an average of $1,000 each within
the next five years.
TREND OF WORKERS
From Farm to City Con
tinues
Washington.—That the industrial
worker should be interested in a solu
tion of the farnl question is ogain
emphasized by government reports.
In a survey by the department of
agriculture, it is shown that agricul
tural workers, farm tenants and farm
owners are flocking to cities by the
thousands) This influx increases the
competition for jobs in industry and
makes the farm question of first im
portance to city workers.
The survey reveals that on January
1, 1925, there were about 109,000 few
er hired laborers on farms than on
January 1, 1924. These figures do
not include migratory workers, but
opply only to hired laborers who live
on farms at least 30 days. Other fig
ures show that thousands of farm
tenants and farm owners and their
families have left the farms.
More Than
Incidental
Many are prone to think
of eyeglasses as instru
ments of vision but, in
a very real sense they
-are also articles of ap
parel. How fitting then
that this concern which
excels in making glass
es should also excel in
the task of making them
correct in style good
looking and becoming.
SCHIPPER
Jewelry & Optical Co.
156 High Street
By, International Labor News Service.
Washington, D. C.—More women
are working than a generation ago,
and twice as many married women,
the women's bureau of the United
States department of labor reports in
a bulletin entitled 'Facts About
Working Women." The study, which
consists of statistics and graphic rep
resentations, is based on census fig
ures and investigations of the wom
en's bureau.
"Facts About Working Women"
reveals that 23 out of every 100 wom
en and girls over 15 years of age are
working for wages or salaries out of
the home. Back in 1890, only 19 out
of every 100 were working. The dif
ference in flat figures is more im
pressive. In 1890 some three and
three-quarters million women and
girls over 10 were at work. In 1920
the number had reached eight and a
quarter millions.
More Wives Now Working
A generation ago, four of every 100
women and girls over 15 who were
working were wives. This does not
mean widows or divorced women, but
wives living with their husbands.
They numbered half a million. In
1920 they numbered almost two mil
lions and were nine out of every 100
working women over 15. Since this
percentage is computed on the age
basis of 15 years, it is low. If it
were taken on the basis for example,
of 17 years, it would be much higher.
The bulletin shows that when one
comes to specific occupations, the un
derlying facts are indicated more
clearly. The increase in the number
of wives at work is not found in agri
cultural occupations or in domestic
service. In both of these occupations
there was a decline between 1910 and
1920.
The great increase is in factories,
trade and clerical occupations. Typi
cal city industry has shown the in
crease.
Increase is Among Whites
Moreover, the increase has come
about among white women and not
among negroes, for it is found in
occupations in which few negroes
work.
One out of five of the native white
women and girls of native parentage
who were working for wages is a
wife. One out of nine native white
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-i4 i
Number of Wives at Work
Doubles In Thirty Years
More Than Eight Million Married Women Toiling For
Wages in 1920, Government Reports in
Study of Working Women
This Week Only
working women and girls of foreign
or mixed parentage is a wife. One
out of four of the foreign bom is a
wife.
The poverty of immigrants is such
as to expect that their wives will
work for wages. But the percentage
of native born of native parentage is
almost os great as the percentage of
the working wives who are foreign
born.
The women's bureau also summar
izes the figures it has collected on
the wages of working women in vari
ous states. A figure is given for
women's wages. Half of the women
get more than this sum and half less.
The figures are as follows: Rhode
Island (1920), $16.85 New Jersey
(1922), $14.95 Ohio (1922), $13.80
Georgia (19290), $12.95 Missouri
(1922), $12.65 Kansos (1920), $11.95
Arkansas (1922), $11.60 Kentucky
(1921), $10.75 South Carolina (1921),
$9.50 Alabama (19292), $8.80.
Work Days Are Long
As regards hours, studies of the
women's bureau in a number of
stotes show that most working wom
en work more than 48 hours a week,
or normally more than eight hours
every working day. In Rhode* Island,
New Jersey and Maryland, more of
them worked 48 hours or less. In
Ohio, Missouri, Iowa, Arkansas, Vir
ginia, Kentucky, Indiana, Alabama,
South Carolina, the working women
worked over 48 hours a week. The
states as enumerated show the grad
ual increase in the number of those
working the long day, Georgia having
the worst conditions of all the states
enumerated.
LABOR EXCESS IN
FLORIDA
Washington.—The Building Trades
Council of St. Petersburg, Florida,
has protested to the A. F. of L.
against an Associated Press dispatch
of July 10 that Florida needs skilled
and unskilled labor.
In a telegram to Secretary Frank
Morrison, the Florida unionists say:
"This part of the state does not need
labor of any kind. Push publicity
of the fact that it is only anti-union
shop propaganda."
I
Neponset& Congoleum
Rugs
9x12 SIZE
$11.50
OR BY THE YARD AT
59c
K-R-E-B-S
SEE OUR MANY OTHER SPECIALS
it,"
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