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The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, December 25, 1925, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1925-12-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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Organized Farmers Refuse
To Follow Advice
.-V By JOSEPH A. WISE
$ Staff Correspnodent, International
vT' Labor News Service
Chicago.—Political leaders here are
1f the opinion that President Coolidge
gained little and lost much by coming
to Chicago to address the seventh an
nual convention of the American
Farm Bureau Federation.
Election of officers for the ensuing
$wo years and the character of the
Resolutions adopted following the de
parture of President Colidge indicate
'Ihat his address influenced the con
tention only in a small degree if at
111.
Farmers Advised to Try Co-Operation
President Coolidge told the assem
bled delegates from 33 states and the
Several thousand farmer visitors that
*|heir salvation lay in co-operative
arketing. He frowned upon govern
ent pi'ice fixing and indicated that
$e was opposed to federal creation of
.{in export corporation for the disposi
tion of surplus farm products. The
president was listened to respectfully,
%ut rather coldly, only being able to
elicit perfunctory applause a few
times.
Two days after President Coolidge's
departure from Chicago the conven
tion elected officers and acted upon
ihe report of the resolutions commit
tee. Sam H. Thompson, owner of a
•jfeOO-acre farm near Quincy, 111., was
fleeted president, defeating Oscar E.
fN
'EACE PLAN SURVIVES
GARMENT INDUSTRY
New York.—The joint board of
Sanitary control in the women's gar
ment industry celebrated its fifteenth
anniversary at a dinner that was at
tended by officers of the International
Ladies' Garment Workers' Union,
employers and public officials.
Trade unionists and employers are
on the board. It was created under
9ti agreement which ended the general
V|jjtrike of 1910. The strike was a pro
test against sweatshops, fire hazards
'.-«ttud other bad working conditions.
In reviewing the board's remark
Able success, speakers said it was the
One thing created by the agreement
which has weathered all storms, ignor
ed all quarrels and survived all
changes in the garment trades.
.•v^:.
Coolidge in Chicago Speech
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS, NEW
AND OLD CUSTOMERS, WE
WANT TO WISH YOU ALL A
MERRY CHRISTMAS AND
HAPPY NEW YEAR
The Burnett-Waite Co.
'W
& &
10 &
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I^ I^ I^
THE SEASON'S GREETINGS
HE SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS
CALLS US TO A BETTER
APPRECIATION OF OLD AS
SOCIATIONS AND THE VALUE OF
OLD FRIENDSHIPS. MAY THE
NEW YEAR BRING YOU A FULL
QUOTA OF PROSPERITY.
THE RALSTON PAINT CO.
,," ff
Bradfute, of Xenia, Ohio, who had
held the office for the last three years.
New President Oppose Coolidge
Bradfute had praised President
Coolidge's address in interviews with
the reporters, while Thompson had
taken sharp issue with the president's
views. Thompson said:
"The president in his address re
ferred to, but failed to recognize ade
quately, the paramount problem be
fore the great surplus producing
states, which is the disposition of that
surplus in a way that will not hold
domestic markets permanently to
world price levels with resultant dam
age to American farm living stand
ards.
1.
'V:
"In taking up" the surplus problem,
the president consciously or uncon
sciously assumed the responsibility of
dealing with it."
Convention Calls for Federal Aid
Following installation of the newly
elected officers, the report ofthe reso
lutions committee further demonstrat
ed its disagreement with President
Coolidge by unanimously voting for a
resolution calling for federal aid in
the establishment of a farmers' ex
port corporation. The resolution fol
lows:
"We indorse the enactment of a:
federal law based on the principle of
a farmers' export corporation, pro
viding for the creation of an agency
with broad powers for the purpose of
so handling the surplus of farm crops
that the Ameriean producer may re
ceive an American price in the do
mestic market, and we instruct our
officers and representatives to work
for the early enactment of such a
law, founded on sound economic poli
cies and not involving government
subsidy."
The McNary-Haugen bill is not
mentioned in the resolution, nor was it
referred to in the debate. Interviews
by International Labor News Service
with delegates indicate that the farm
ers have modified their views in ref
erence to the McNary-Haugen bill.
They said that what they want now
is to have the federal government in
augurate the export corporation at
government expense, and later turn it
over to the farmers, but under gov
ernment supervision, after it has been
established as a going concern.
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Do Not Seek Federal Subsidy
The delegates interviewed further
said that they did not seek a subsidy
and that the purpose was to return to
the government any money it may ex
pend in creating the export corpora
tion.
A companion resolution to the one
on the export corporation favored the
fostering of an American merchant
marine in order to establish foreign
trade routes for the disposition of
surplus American products.
Although disagreeing witn rresi
dent Coolidge's views in the main, the
convention went on record as being
heartily in favor of co-operative mar
keting. It seemed to be the view,
however, that co-operative marketing
could only meet the domestice situa
tion in part.
EMPLOYERS PROFIT
BY TOO MUCH POLITICS
Chicago.—The Bakers' Journal, of
ficial paper of the Bakery and Con
fectionery Workers' International
Union, says that Milwaukee unorgan
ized workers are paying too much at
tention to politics. This is why they
are working 12 and 14 hours a day for
$23 and $25 a week.
"We doubt whether there is another
city in the United States that can be
compared with Milwaukee, both as to
the lack of organization among the
bakery workers as well as to the re
peated attempts that have been made
during the more than 21 years of its
existence to place Local No. 205 upon
a. sustaining basis and in a proper
working order," says the labor jour-
$
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The Cherry
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HAMILTON, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25,1925
Where with our
1 TGC
Little
Hatchet
we tell the truth
about many things, sometimes pro
foundly, sometimes fliDuantlv.
sometimes recklessly.
There is something admirable about
Secretary of the Navy Wilbur. It is
his native bluntness that age can not
wither nor custom stale. He used to
be blunt in the old days when the
writer knew him as a much-loved ju
venile judge—judge in a juvenile
court. He used to say things he
thought and sometimes the chips fell
heavily on meticulous and fussy per
sons who interested themselves in
public affairs.
As Secretary of the Navy he may
have been tainted with the official
snobbishness of the navy—one hopes
not, but it may have happened.
Thoy are now telling the story of
how Secretary Wilbur indulged in an
old-time piece of bluntness the other
night at a dinner where President
Coolidge was entertaining the Italian
debt-funding commission. Someone
brought up as a subject of discussion
the "personality of Benito Mussolini."
It was politely suggested that he
had a genius for organization. No one
disagreed, but suddenly Secretary
Wilbur turned to Signor Alberto Pi
relli, "financial wizard of Italy," and
remarked:
"That boss of yours thinks he ean
accomplish everything by force. How
long does he think he can get away
with that stuff?"
V
1
No disclosure has been made of the
answer. One guesses it was mur
murs, polite dissimulations and pret
ty patches of politeness.
It was a pertinent question and one
the world would like to have answer
ed. Really, now, Messieurs, how long
will it be?
Here is a problem that may require
some very expert handling to bring a
solution:
John W. Langley, of Pikeville, Ky.,
was convicted some 18 months ago of
conspiracy to violate the prohibition
law.
Some twelve months ago the same
man was elected to serve two years
in congress at a salary of $10,000 a
year.
A couple of weeks ago the United
States circuit court of appeals de
cided that Langley should serve two
years in the penitentiary and pay a
$10,00 fine.
Now, it would seem, the question
is: in which place shall he serve time
and shall the sentences run concur
rently?
At any rate, if the sentence should
stand the test of the supreme court,
it will knock off all the profits of the
congressional salary.
Also, it would seem that, as they
say in Texas, Mr. Langley is between
a rock and a hard place.
The funniest tiling that has happen
ed in America in the last 30 days is
the appointment of an oyster censor
in Washington, D. C. This appoint
ment synchronized with the conven
ing of congress, intentionally or other
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T3T3 17CO
liiLOO,
By International Labor News Service.
Washington, D. C.—In concluding
his annual report to congress, Secre
tary of Labor James J. Davis reported
progress in the field of industrial
peace and said that in his association
with men in all ranks of industry, in
cluding labor, he had noted a spirit
of enthusiasm for service to the na
tion and to the welfare of all. He con
tinued:
"The welfare of the American wage
earner is my first charge, but in the
study of conditions among the toilers
of other countries of the world I have
noted the achievements of the work
ers of my own nation. There is today
in America a better, kindlier feeling
among men engaged in industry—
owner, manager, and worker. There
is recognition of the force of that apt
illustration: 'Two moose, leaders of
their herds, once met in deadly com
bat. Today their locked antlers, mute
evidence of the futility of antagonism
and strife, lie bleaching on the plains."
Industry realize that the thing is not
to lock horns and die, but to lock arms
and live in industrial peace and amity.
"In closing my fifth report it is a
source of pleasure to me, not because
I claim any credit for the result, to be
able* in summary to say that the mil
lions who were without employment
only four years ago are again engag
ed in profitable industry. Notwith
standing the present disturbed condi
tion. of the coal industry, a comparison
of this group with the great body of
41,000,000 persons gainfully employed
is testimony to the general prosperous
conditions prevailing. More and more
children are being taken out of the
ranks of industrially employed and
placed in schools for the training and
mental and physical growth to which
they are entitled.
"The material proof of the Ameri-
Almost everything else apparently
was found already properly censored
and there was a pressing need for a
new censor to keep up interest in cen
soring.
It now will not be considered bad
form for oysters to appear publicy on
the half shell. Neither will oysters be
allowed to deliver public addresses not
first passed by the censor. No more
than six oysters will be allowed to
congregate in any one place.
And at the white house there will
be -more silence than ever!
V)*a
Slogan of Industrial Peace
Stirs Enthusiasm of Industry/
Says Secretary of Labor Davis
ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR
Make Christmas
Merry and Happy
Place The Refining Influence Of
Music In Your Home
0
can worker's prosperity is shown in
the gains during the past four years
of two and a half billion dollars in sav
ings accounts. Eighteen million auto
mobiles are owned by our people, most
of whom are workers. The forty-four
and a half billion dollars of life in
surance which they held in 1921 has
been increased to sixty-four billion
more and better homes are being built
and owned by more workers than at
any time in the world's history.
"Our people generally are enjoying
a prosperity far beyond that achieved
by any other people at any other
period in history. There is a better
feeling prevailing among employers
and workers—a feeling of partner
ship, a realization that the success of
the one depends on the success of the
other. These things are being
brought about through a closer ob
servance of the Golden Rule—that
principle of treating others as fairly
as we hope to be treated ourselves."
SHIP OWNERS MUST
PAY FOR MEDI
CAL TREATMENT
Washington. The United States
supreme court has ruled that ship
owners are liable for expenses for
medical treatment afforded alien sea
men in American ports, on American
as well as foreign ships. The case
involved the New York and Cuba
Steamship Company.
The company resisted enforcement
of a law passed by congress in 1920
which provides that the vessel owner
shall pay hosiptal expenses of alien
seamen who arrive in this country
and are afflicted with loathsome or
contagious disease. The effect of the
decision will be to discourage the em
ployment of alien seamen.
FINANCIERS WRECK
ROAD
New York.—High finance methods
were revealed in a suit of minority
stockholders for $200,000,000 against
former directors of the Denver & Rio
Grande railroad. The plaintiffs
charge that the directors permitted
default on $50,000,000 interest charges
of the Western Pacific. This default,
it is stated, was part of a conspiracy
to wreck the Western Pacific and the
Denver & Rio Grande and wrest con
trol from the stockholders.
I-
The Edison
The Only Phonograph That Plays All
Records Properly
The Only Phonograph That Dares the Test
of Direct Comparison
LET US PROVE THIS TO YOU
This Is The Time To Make
The
Family
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Happy
K-R-E-B-S
MUSIC DEPARTMENT
Christmas Checks Accepted
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