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The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, January 01, 1926, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1926-01-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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XXV. No. 38
By International Labor News Service.
I Washington, D. Cr—In addition to
nn impressive detailed report of work
accomplished during the past year, an
.Ambitious program for the present
year is outlined by the women's bu
reau of the United States department
4)f labor in its seventh annual report,
vrti-tv*:
^Avhich has just been issued.
V Outstanding among the new surveys
W to be iuaugurated is a study of homs
'"v/vund community facilities and family
obligations of employed women in a
selected locality. This study, the re
port states, must be undertaken at
^his time in order to form a part of
the nation-wide survey by the Gen
cral Federation of Women's Clubs in
their campaign for better homes.
-UH Both the survey of foreign-born wom
en in industry, the field work for which
«%4he bureau has now completed, and
.'• the report on the home environment
vt
»s
"S\
And employment opportunities of wom
«n in coal mine workers' families.
"INDEPENDENT"
MINER HAS SOR
ROWFUL TALE
Cedar Grove, W. Va.—Carl Gray,
miner, employed by the anti-union
West Virginia Coal and Coke Com
pany, no longer favors the "American
-plan" that coal operators so earnestly
urge.
The reason for Gray's changed
Viewpoint is that he worked two weeks
and found himself in debt $1.76 to the
company. He was then thrown in jail
for failure to pay his board bill.
His statement from the company
shows that during the last two weeks
'in October he mined 70 cars of coal
at 44 cents a ton. This made his
total earnings $33 for that period.
Coupons, good at the company store,
Charges for the doctor, for the hospi
tal, for blacksmithing and other de
ductions made him a company debtor.
Then the landlord had him arrested.
The gun men who "protect" him while
at work refused to come to his aid
and he was bailed out of jail by his
father, a striking miner, who refuses
to accept these conditions.
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Women's Bureau Plans Big
Program of Work For Yearji
To Aid Better Homes Drive
WE WISH YOU A
already published, are considered val
uable contributions to this study on
home conditions.
A study of elimination of unneces
sary fatigue, the bureau feels, also
should be taken up without further
delay as the whole question of oppor
tunity of employment and occupa
tional progress of women is so deeply
involved with problems of occupation
al adjustment.
It is unfortunate, the report points
out, that the demands for information
on many phases of the work of the
bureau must be continually deferred
because they exceed the capacity of
the organization. For example, an in
tensive study should be made relative
to the employment of married women,
which has become a subject of su
preme importance nationally. The
problem of the married woman who
works, and especially of the mother
who works, linked so closely as it is
with the welfare of the home and
family, :s naturally one of the most
vital as well as one of the most com
plex problems before the country to
day.
Census figures show that there were
almost 2,000,000' married women in
gainful occupations in 1920, and that
there was a 53.7 per cent increase in
the number of married women in
manufacturing and mechanical indus
tries, trade, and transportation during
the decade from 1910 to 1920. Despite
the many complicating social and eco
nomic factors the bureau feels that a
scientific study of the whole question
would make for a reduction of exist
ing problems. A special appropria
tion, however, will be necessary to
carry out a study of this magnitude.
The work of the women's bureau
during the past year, the report
shows, covers numerous special
studies as well as surveys in six
states of conditions surrounding the
employment of women in industry.
Utica, N. Y.—The arbitrary policy
of the Utica Steam and Mohawk Val
ley cotton mills has forced organized
textile workers to strike. This is the
second walk-out this year.
SUL OLD FASHIONED -I
HAPPY
NEW YEAR
The Dan Cohen Co.
THE SEASON'S GREETINGS
HE SPIRIT
CALLS US
'^4,
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OF CHRISTMM
TO A BETTER
APPRECIATION OF OLD AS
[ATIONS AND THE VALUE OF
OLD FRIENDSHIPS. MAY THE
NEW YEAR BRING YOU A FULL
QUOTA OF PROSPERITY
THE RALSTON PAINT C(K
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THAHK
(Written for International Labor
News Service by Santiago Iglesias,
Secretary, Pan-American Federation
of Labor, and Senator of the Legisla
ture of Porto Rico.)
Washington, D. C.—Efforts are be
ing made to get some practical action
from congress and the Washington
authorities in behalf of the people of
Porto Rico. Despite the wonderful
progress that official reports give for
Porto Rico, poverty and misery with
its accompanying immorality and
degradation prevail in that beautiful
island under the authority of the re
public of the United States.
Official statistics show that in the
last 25 years imports from the United
States into Porto Rico amounted to
over $1,200,000,000 and that the ex-*
ports from Porto Rico into the United
States amounted to $1,500,000,000.
Two-thirds of the profits from agri
culture, commerce and industry have
been sent out of Porto Rico as rents,
dividends, commissions and interest
on borrowed money, which were dis
tributed and re-invested outside of
the island.
Island in Bad Shape
This colonial condition has created
a most distressing state of affairs in
Porto Rico for more than half of the
population of Porto Rico and has
caused an enormous oversupply of
labor which has resulted in many
thousands of women, children and
men slowly starving. The curse of
the illegal monopolization of land and
of absentee landlordism and corpora
tions cuts deeply into the economic
heart of Porto Rico.
Relief bills are being prepared for
introduction in congress. One of
these bills will ask that $50,000,000
be loaned to the government of Porto
Rico to create a trust fund to foster
and promote the welfare of the peo
ple.
The trust fund would be under the
authority of the government of Porto
Rico and under the supervision and
inspection of the treasurer of the
United States.
Would Refund Loan
The loan of $50,000,000 would be
refunded by the government of Porto
Rico after ten years, at the rate of
$500,000 each year after and until the
total sum loaned has been paid into
the treasury of the United States.
Another bill provides for enforcing
the provisions of the joint resolution
approved by congress May 1, 1900,
with respect to the buying, selling or
holding of real estate, and to impose
additional and progressive taxes on
all property owned or controlled in
excess of 500 acres by corporations,
partnerships, associations and indi
viduals. Under the proposed law, the
rule of taxation in Porto Rico would
be uniform, but this provision would
not interfere with the power of the
legislature to take the real property
and incomes of the non-residents of
the island in excess of the property
and income of the residents.
Bill for Investigation
Another bill will provide for an in
vestigation to help the people of
Porto Rico*
*'•*-*•*~^/«, ',, •=!'-',€, l.*
Legislation to Give Relief to
Island Now Being Prepared
For Introduction in Congress
HAMILTON, OHIO, FRIDAY, JANUARY 1, 1926
One-Nine-Two'Six
Working Masses of Porto Rico Ask Help
Condition of People Wretched in Extreme
For years the bureau of insular
affairs of the war department has
been opposed to any kind of investi
gation of the affairs of the island.
For the solution of the Porto Rican
problems, Gen. Frank Mclntyre, chief
of the bureau, is stimulating and fa
cilitating the project of an emigra
tion of as many thousands of families
as possible to go anywhere outside of
the island.
Beg for Inquiry
The people of Porto Rico are beg
ging congress to send for the first
time a joint committee of the senate
and the house to investigate the af
fairs of Porto Rico and the actual
conditions of the masses of the people
of that island whose condition are a
stigma upon the record, history and
international honor of our country.
HEAVUOSS
To
Uncle Sam Through
Favoritism in Taxes
Washington. Tax evasions that
total millions of dollars have been al
lowed prominent persons and big cor
porations by the treasury department,
according to a special senate commit
tee.
Oil companies, industrial concerns,
shipping companies and banks are
among those favored. The Mellon
National Bank of Pittsburgh, the Rob
ert Dollar shipping line, General Mo
tors Company and others were also
benefited.
In the case of the Kerr Navigation
Company, it is asserted that the gov
ernment allowed the. company $480,000
to keep the case out of court. The
Robert Dollar Company had $500,000
taxes wiped out. This procedure, the
committee's investigator says, was
"absolutely contrary to the statute."
The report states that an "astounding
condition*' existed in the department.
Employes in the internal revenue bu
reau, the report added, "do not dare
protest such cases for fear of losing
their positions."
The Gulf Oil Company, known as
one of Secretary of the Treasury Mel
lon's interests, was allowed a "tax re
adjustment" of $4,590,385.61 prior to
Mr. Mellon taking office in March,
1921. The Standard Oil Company of
California has been improperly grant
ed a refund of $3,378,000. The testi
mony alleged favoritism to the Sin
clair Consolidated Oil Corporation,
which has been spared tax payments
of $5,000,000 since 1916.
A. H. Fay, a mining engineer, told
the committee that Secretary Mellon
was the principal owner of the Gulf
Oil Company when the favorable al
lowance was made, but since then he
has reduced his interest or withdrawn
It is stated that the tax cases of
S. G. Kennery and T. A. Springer,
who made a profit of $6,000,000 in
Oklahoma oil lands, were "kicked
around from pillar to post until the
statute of limitations ran and no tax
was assessed against that profit."
Subscribe for The Preaa.
VfRnt"
LAND NATIONAL
IZATION IS FAVOR
ED IN ENGLAND
London, Eng.—Land nationaliza
tion in a modified form has been ac
cepted by the Liberal Candidates' As
sociation. For years the principle has
been urged by Lloyd George, war
prime minister of England.
The association favors land nation
alization under these conditions:
When the land is offered for sale
when a farm becomes vacant when a
farm is badly managed, and when a
farm is badly cultivated.
IRON WORKERS UNITE
Mobile, Ala.—Bridge and structural
iron workers have oi'ganized.
:"i
ILLOGICAL
Position of Large Employ
ers Pointed Out By
Laborite
Washington.—"If government 'must
not interfere with private business/
it is logical for the government to
scrap its navy yards and arsenals, and
turn over every other activity to pri
vate business," said N. P. Alifas, pres
ident navy yard district, International
Association of Machinists.
The trade unionist made this com
ment in connection with a meeting of
epresentatives of 300 business organ
izations in this city.
"The purpose of the conference, as
I understand it," said Mr. Alifas, "is
to see that all supplies used by the
government, principally the navy and
war departments, are purchased by
private contractors, instead of being
produced in government work shops.
"If this is good policy, it is also log
ical to insist that the post office de
partment be abolished and the distri
bution of mail placed in private hands.
All government buildings might be
vacated, that private builders and
landlords be encouraged. There is no
reason why the bulk of the business of
the several executive departments
should not be turned over to private
parties so long as we have private
auditing, accounting and printing
companies ready to handle the busi
ness of the government at a profit."
The employers' program, Mr. Alifas
said, would mean the closing down of
all navy yards, arsenals and torpedo
stations.
"By following out this line of rea
soning, the absurdity of trying to 'put.
the government out of business' can
be appreciated. Furthermore, many
of the concerns represented in this
conference pay the lowest wages," he
said.
PARTY SYSTEM DOOMED
New York.—The political machines
of cities are threatening the political
party system in this country, said Al
derman George U. Harvey in an ad
dress before college men. The cities
are being governed by dictators and
representative government no longer
exists in many large cities, he said.
Begin The New Year
With a Home Renewed
t| Dining Room Suites
Living Room Suites
Bedroom Suites
o o u s
Judge Who Soaked Shopmen
During Big Strike Now Faces
Impeachment Proceedings
mm
Of all your 1926 resolutions the one in which you say "I must
have a beautiful home this year," is the most commendable. A
handsomely furnished home is an inspiration, both to you and to
your family. It is a source of joy for the year and the many
years that follow it. Fine Furniture, the kind we sell, typifies
this spirit—the essence of reliability, the worthiness of substan
tial construction, the beauty of having the newest—these factors
will help yotl decide immediately to select new Furniture for
your entire home or merely to choose for one or two rooms in it.
Put Your Christmas Gift Check on a Suite for the Home
Third and Court Streets
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ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR
By International Labor News Service.
Chicago.—Illinois trade unionists
are shedding no tears over the pros
pective impeachment in congress of
Federal Judge George W. English, of
the eastern district of Illinois.
Judge English issued some of the
most drastic and brutal orders from
his bench at East St. Louis, 111., that
were put forth by any federal judge
during the railroad shopmen's strike
five years ago. Judge English was
merciless to both the strikers and to
their sympathizers.
It is related that many merchants
at East St. Louis were threatened
with imprisonment by Judge English
because the merchants had refused to
supply foodstuffs and other supplies
to the strikebreakers.
Judge English's autocratic- disbar
ment of Charles Karsh, an East St.
Louis attorney, is recalled. Karsh had
previously made a splendid record as
a member of the Illinois legislature,
and was a former United States dis
trict attorney. Karsh had committed
the unpardonable offense—in the eyes
of Judge English—of demanding jury
trials for strikers cited on contempt
charges.
Judge English was charged* in a
resolution introduced by Representa
tive W. B. Boies (Rep., Iowa) with
having been "guilty of acts which, in
contemplation of the constitution,
constitute high crimes and misde
meanors requiring the interposition of
the constitutional powers of the house
of representatives."
It was charged ill the house by
Representatives Hawes (Dem., Mo.)
a year ago that Judge English had
deposited bankrupt funds in banks of
which he was a stockholder that C.
B. Thomas, referee in bankruptcy in
his court, had been permitted to prac
tice as an attorney in bankruptcy
cases, and that Judge English arbi
trarily had disbarred attorneys for
using violent language.
MANY WORKERS LAID OFF
Wheeling, W. Va.—Stockholders of
the steel trust "should bow their
heads in shame/' said Mrs. Edward
C. Kruetzer, secretary of the Asso
ciated Charities, when the National
Tube Company, a subsidiary of the
steel trust, closed down without warn
ing and threw 2,000 workers oat of
employment.
$185.00
$179.00
$215.00
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