OCR Interpretation


The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, January 01, 1926, Image 2

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1926-01-01/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for


4
w*
'fW*
v
|b
I
S$£v
rc
PI--'
fe.
Mf."
fc
I-
X".
kr
I
I,"
t-
I'
&
p..
fu
V
Si
I '$
il
®r 5gv
Si"
Pv fr'w'
THE PRESS
OFFICIAL ORGAN OP OBQANRSD LABOB
Off HAMILTON AND VlODRff
tow
10 IA»0* PRESS
Members
Ohio Labor Preae Association
IBB NONPAREIL PRINTING CO.
PUBLISHERS AND PROPRIETORS
Jhibscription Price $1.00 per
Payable la Advance
That
W« do not bold ouroelvei reaponalbl*
tor may
vfowi or opinion* expressed la the article*
or communication* of correspondent*.
Communication* aolicited from •ecretarte*
of all *ocietia* and organization*, and should
be addressed to The Butler County Press, 186
Market Street, Hamilton, Ohio.
The publisher* reserve the riffht to reject
any advertisements at any time.
Advertising rates aa*de known on appli
cation.
Whatever i* intended for insertion must
be authenticated by the name and address of
the writer, not necessarily for publication, bat
as a guarantee of good faith.
Subscribers changing: their address will
please notify this offtce, giving old and new
address to insure regular delivery of paper.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 1, 1926
Entered at the Postoffice at Hamilton,
Ohio, as Second Class Mail Matter,
Issued Weekly at S28 Market Street
Itfephone 12M Hamilton, Ohio
Endorsed by the Trades and Labor
Council of Hamilton, Ohio
Endorsed by the Middletown Trades
And Labor Council of Middletown. O.
HAPPY NEW YEA*
The Press wishes for everybody
A Happy and Prosperous New Year
ik j«
THEN AND NOW
When the eighteenth amendment
was enacted and the wicked Volstead
law passed over the veto of President
Wilson not one person in a million
knew how to manufacture an intoxi
eating drink, and this is the reason
why there was such a great drop in
the amount of liquor consumed in a
short time but the people are learn
tng the trade with an aptness char
_acteristic of American genius, so that
the future looks mighty moist. In
the pre-Volstead days a man who got
drunk didn't hide, so that the num
ber of soaks could easily be counted
while in this day of "drinking behind
tlie screens" the fellow who feels
himself beginning to reel gets in the
dear in order to escape the cops, and
thus the prohib exponent feels free
to assert that there are "no drunks
no more.'' The wine rooms are no
longer located in the rear of saloons
but they are to be found in some fliv
ver. Oh, yes, this prohibition stuff
has done great things if you call it
great to make about one-half of the
people law breakers.—Minster (O.)
Post.
LIBERTY
"The right to think, to know, to
utter," as John Milton says, is the
dearest of all liberties. Without this
rijght there can be no liberty to any
people with it, there can be no slav
ery. When you have convinced think
ing men that it is right, and the hu
mane men that it is just, you will
gain your cause. Men always lose
half of what is gained by violence
What is gained by argument is gain
ed forever. Let us believe that the
whole of truth can never do harm to
the whole of virtue. The last
lesson a man ever learns is that lib
erty of thought and speech is the
right of all mankind that the man
who denies every article of our creed
is to be allowed to preach just as
often and just as loud as we our
selves.—Wendell Phillips.
ALL-EXPENSE TOURS
TO
JACKSONVILLE
FLORIDA
VIA
Washington, Baltimore
and Steamer
Leave Every Monday and Thursday tap
ing Nov.. Dec.. Jan, and Feb.
$79.70
Includes Rail and Steamer Fare, Lowar
Berth in Pullman Car, Stateroom Ac
commodations, All Meals to Jackson
ville, Sitrht-SeeinK Trips at Washing
ton and Savannah, Return Railroad
Ticket from Jacksonville Good Until
June 15, 1926.
Slight increase charged over above
when extra priced rooms are assigned.
Ask local ticket agent for copy of de
tailed itinerary or address TTieo. Hei
land, Div. Passenger Agent, 42 West
Second Street, Dayton, Ohio.
Baltimore & Ohio
.1--'
Vt%?'^
BILL BOOSTER SAYS:
OUE
OP THE SUfcE-FWtE
METHODS OF PKOMOntlft
LOCAL PROCPERTTM \S "THE
PROMPT WNMEUT OF WU.S
UOU&4 TRAVMEtS UJ CMSt* 10
TVttS TOWU, SO "THE KAOUEM NOU
PAN our WILL SOOU ©OAAE BACK
FROM THOSE WHO OWE VCXJ
SO \F SOU OWE AINBOOM,
SEkiD 'EKA A CHECK. MID MAKE
TWEVA FEEL GOOD
THE OVERHEAD
Each time you buy a motor car
you pay for five things in which you
can never take a ride. That state
ment is made in an advertisement of
one of the leading American cars
The five items are set forth as:
War, tax, freight charge, factory's
profit, and salesman's commission.
But why stop at that point? You
are exploited at every turn in your
operation of your car. You are ex
ported at every tarn if you have no
car.
A gallon of gasoline for your kitch
en stove has as much "overhead" as
a gallon of gasoline for your car. You
burn gas. All right, you eat grocer
ies. You buy the gasoline that brings
the delivery car to your door. But
gasoline is the least, smallest and
most unimportant of your day's ex
ploitation.
If you light a match, bite an ap
pie, inhale a bowl of soup or surround
a bean sandwich at your noonday
lunch at your favorite pie foundry you
are paying rent, interest, taxes
overhead on all sorts of things, and
you are lucky if you get back to your
work without paying war taxes
freight charges, dealer's profits and
other overhead on somebody's car.
During your day's work you will
help, by your surplus and uncollected
earnings, to pay somebody's "five
things" in which they can't ride—
and you can't and won't, either!
1
~Y
Kl I*
WISDOM
I desire that on no occasion, whether
near or remote, nor for any reason
whatsoever, shall demonstrations of
political or religious character be
made over my remains, as I consider
the time devoted to the dead would
be better employed in improving the
condition of the living, most of whom
stand in great need of this.—From
the will of Francisco Ferrer, Spanish
educator and radical, executed in 1909
i*
ARE THEY SINCERE?
Why is so little attention paid to
Governor Pinchot's charge that the
stealing of votes in Pennsylvania
elections "threatens the safety of our
institutions."
The governor lists this evil in his
call for a special session of the Penn
sylvania general assembly.
Pennsylvania originated the lawless
Cossack system that state is the
home of the steel trust, the anthra
cite trust, and other great monopo
lies it is the home of contract
breaking, anti-union bituminous coal
companies whose working conditions
are those of Siberia. That state
the bulwark of trade union opposi
tion, where injunction judges flourish
and free speech has been gagged
times without number.
0
Recently Judge Gary, of the steel
trust, and other large employers or
ganized a committee to secure the
enforcement of law. Wouldn't it be
well for the judge to start in his own
state?
Are the men who profit by this
vote sealing—and who are now silent
—sincere in their plea for law en
forcement? -...
If the stealing of votes in Pennsyl
vania is so general that it threatens
our democratic form of government,
can we cover up this evil by discuss
ing individual crime?
to
"YOUNG BOB'S" DEFY
"Ytrang Bob" La Follette, senator
from Wisconsin, defied standpatism
and machine politicians at a dinner
in his honor given by Labor, official
newspaper of the 16 railroad trade
unions and brotherhoods.
Senator La Follette left no doubt
as to where he stands on the issues
being urged by the progressive ele
ments in the political parties of thisj
SlU
country. He gave notice that threats,
propaganda and loss of federal pat
ronage will not change his course.
I will not yield an inch in the
fight for the principles of my father,"
he said. "We are enlisted for life in
the struggle to bring government
back to the people. We will not quit
and we will not compromise. Our
task is
great, hat oar
Atta boy, "Bob."
cause is
greater."
Senator La Follette had previously
made public a letter he forwarded to
Senator Watson, chairman of the sen
ate committee on committees, in
which he gave notice that if he is
appointed on any commitee as a re
publican it must be with the under
standing that he will not change his
announced policy or abandon any
principle urged by his father.
PRAISE FOR GREEff
Dr. George Stoves is pastor of the
West End Methodist Church of Nash
ville, Tenn. He is considered to be
one of the foremost ministers of the
Methodist Church. Dr. Stoves, in his
Thanksgiving proclamation, had this
to say of William Green, president of
the American Federation of Labor:
I am thankful for William Green
who has been elected the worthy suc
cessor of the late Samuel Gompers as
head of the American Federation of
Labor. Mr. Green possesses a fine
brain, a clean life and deeply religious
experience."
Dr. Stoves puts it tersely, speaking
of the endowments of labor's peerless
leader. A leader of the masses said
to be possessed of a "fine brain, a
clean life and a deeply religious ex
perience."
It is certainly gratifying to have a
minister of the great Methodist
Church to say such truthful words
about the chief executive of the Amer
ican Federation of Labor. The times
are changing. The leaders of the re
ligious thought of the present day are
beginning to realize that the mem
bers of organized labor typify the
principles of the Christ by living
clean life," and at heart they are
"deeply religious."
NEW TRUSTS
Forming' Under Changec
Title Will Replace Old
System
Washington. "American industry
is passing through another period of
trust making comparable to the ear
lier one of from 15 to 30 years ago,'
says the bulletin of the department
of social action, National Catholic
Welfare Council.
"The difference now is that the
newly formed trusts are called mer
gers ajad holding companies. When
the trust is a compound of various in
dividual concerns, it is called a trade
association, some of which, however
have not yet entered the price-fixing
stage.
"The result to the consumers, both
in city and country, is that they pay
the higher prices which monopoly
power can exact. To the small busi
ness man the result is that they are
either pushed out of business by com
petition or they hang on to the coat
tails of the larger companies. To the
small investor, the result is that they
more definitely lack control over
their investment. And to labor there
comes a still greater difficulty in or
ganizing effectively because of the
greater strength of the company or
companies they work for.
"The earlier age of trust making
was followed by a period of trust
breaking, which continued up to the
war. During the war the equivalent of
trusts was encouraged for purposes of
foreign trade, and when we entered
the war business understandings, as
sociations, etc., were encouraged, but
at the same time a check was put
upon rising prices by government fix
ing of prices. Since the war price
fixing has been abandoned and yet
with rare exceptions and some ineffec
tive agitation, the encouragement has
been all- the greater to form trusts
under one name or another for do
mestic trade."
The churchmen hint that if private
monopoly becomes so strong as
tvithstand the government, "govern
ment-owned concerns might be in or
der."
Washington.—Members of congress
are receiving protests on the mount
ing cost of living. The United States
bureau of labor statistics says the
retail food index shows for Novem
ber 15 an increase of almost 3% per
cent since October 15, 1925 an in
crease of about 11 Vz per cent since
November 15, 1924, and an increase
of 59)4 per cent since November 15,
1913.
Every effort is being made by poli
ticians to convince the peopl that liv
ing costs are being lowered, but the
test on the national pocketbook is the
best answer.
The protests have stirred members
of the house, and 6 committee has
voted to probe soaring prices in the
District of
PiktSM. rs Pas3*
TtiE BUTLER COUNTY PRESS
MIDNIGHT FROLIC
At Palace Theatre to Usher
In New Year—Will Be a
Cheer-Ringing Affair
Everything is in complete readi
ness for the Palace theatre's annual
midnight frolic, which will usher in
the New Year tonight—Thursday—
at 11:30 p.m. The Palace theatre six
years ago first started these popular
midnight events, and ever since 1920,
when every seat was occupied long
before the clock struck 12, these mid
night frolics have become bigger and
better. The record of "a sell-out
every New Year's eve"' promises to
again be fulfilled tonight at tile Pal
ace theatre.
As the Press goes to press, there
are still hundreds of choice seats
available at the boi office of the Pal
ace theatre, but this is undoubtedly
in view of the fact that Hamilton
Itheatre-goers usually wait until the
Very last minute before they definitely
decide "what to do News Year's eve.'
A splendid program has been ar
ranged for this midnight frolic. Of
course there will be a series of brand
new comedy features. There always
are at vhese events, and while the
frolic starts at 11:30 p.m. in 1925
the "good morning" slide is not dis
played until the wee small hours of
the New Year. Vaudeville acts will
be presented by the very best profes
sional acts obtainable. Comedy skits
dancing acts, singers, dancers, acro
bats, hypnotists—anything the heart
desires will be found "on tab" at the
Palace midnight frolic. If anything
has been overlooked, from grand oper
to jazz, from the ridiculous to the
sublime, such omission will not
noticeable until next year.
THE PEOPLE'S
ANTHEM
By EBENEZER ELLIOTT
(One of the leaders of the Chartist
movement in England he was known
as the "Poet of the People.")
When wilt Thou save the people?
O God of Mercy! When?
Not kings and lords, but nations!
Not thrones and crowns, but men!
Flowers of Thy heart, O God, are they
Let them not pass, like weeds, away!
Their heritage a sunless day!
God save the people!
Shall crime bring crime forever,
Strength aiding still the strong?
Is it Thy will, O Father!
That man shall toil for wrong?
"No!" say Thy mountains "No!" Thy
skies
"Man's clouded sun shall brightly rise$
And songs be heard instead of sight."
God save the people!
When wilt Thou save the people?
O God of Mercy! When?
The people, Lord! the people!
to
LiyiNG COSTS SOAR
CONGRESS TO PROBE
Not thrones and crowns, but men!
God save the people Thine they are
Thy children, as Thy angels fair
Save them from bondage and despair
God save the people!
WASTE
In Coal Mines Reaches High
Figure
Baltimore.—At an open forum
this city John Brophy, president of
Anthracite District No. 2, United
Mine Workers, said that the waste of
coal was "almost unbelievable." He
said that 500,000,000 tons have been
irrevocably and needlessly lost be
cause of faults in the organization of
that industry.
"A difference of from 10 to 20 cfnts
a ton has meant the leaving of mil
lions of tons which never can be re
deemed because under the pretent
competitive system that difference
would have to be sacrificed by the
mine owners," he said.
"The talk of our 'inexhaustible sap
ply of coal' recalls that heard a few
years ago about our timber resources
The effect of such loose talk will be
more disastrous in the case of coal
than it has been in the timber indus
try because in time we can grow more
trees, while lost coal is gone forever
"The accident rate in American
mines is a crying shame. We have
twice the number of fatalities report
ed in the British mines with half the
number of miners employed. In the
bituminous mines of Pennsylvania
alone about 500 men are killed annu
ally and even more die in the anthra
cite mines."
HONEY IN FIRE INSURANCE
New York.—During the past 10
years 23 leading fire insurance com
panies have distributed cash dividends
of more than $150,000,000 and stock
dividends that have a par value of
J$8,0ft0#Q0O
•?r
ALMOST*
be
Yes, indications are that this New
Year's midnight frolic will by far
surpass those of the past. Souvenirs
are to be given to all who enter
"Life savers" are to be dispensed
freely, so that hilarity may go on un
dismayed, and oh yes, there's another
thing—if you should become hungry
around about one a. m., just when
you're really enjoying yourself, just
walk out in the lobby. There'll be a
refreshment stand erected specially
for this occasion. So if you want to
start the New Year right, there
seems no better method than by tak
ing in the Palace theatre'% sixth an
nual midnight frolic.
That poor old man you saw
begging on the street corner
ALMOST started a thrift ac
count back when he was earn
inga good ineome.,
4
V I, I
The parents of that Sickly
child that needed better care
ALMOST started a thrift ac
count three years ago..
The moral is plain.
Why not start YOUR thrift
account now—while you can.
The Peoples Deposit
Improvement and Loan Co.
Rentachler Bldf.
E. F. WARNDORF, Secretory
OPPOSES POWER LEASE
Washington.—Senator McKellar ob
jects to turning over waterpower
rights in the Tennessee river to the
electric power trust. In a telegram
to Chattanooga business men, he says
the trust might "strangle for all time
the development of commercial and
manufacturing interests in Tennes
see."
WHEN YOU NEED
THE SERVICES OP
A RELIABLE DRUG
STORE
GALL ON
RADCLIFFE
The e a 11 Store
Cor. High and Second Sts.
0
LET US DEVELOP
YOUR PICTURES
WittnidnTent£ Awning v
S3T 339 S SlCVHOSTVtrr
-1
DICTATOR FOR FRANCE
IPUBLICLY DISCUSSED
New York.—Is France headed for a
dictatorship to solve her financial
troubles. The franc, that country's
money unit, has dropped to its lowest
value, and the entire financial strug­
I Ambulance Service
Three Desks For
Sale Inquire At
PRESS OFFICE
fi.
C. W. GATH CO.
rt*
gle is on ian uncertain basis becausV
of the large amount of paper money
that has been issued the past feW
years.
Funeral Directors
-h. a
Phone 35
136 High Street Hamilton, Ohio
Opposite Court House
To You and
Yours
We extend our best wishes for
a most prosperous
and
Happy New Year
Dunlap Tailors
18 South 3rd Street
In financial circles in this city dio*
tatorship seems only a matter of tims
until a "strong man" appears. Th»
question is freely discussed in French
newpapers.
-3-
Chairs and Tables Kented
17 So. Sfeet
Happy New Year!
We hope the twelve muscles it takes
to make a smile on your face work
overtime during 1926—
0'
And the 26 it takes to bring a frown
—lose their job.
1%
"if
ft
&
5
I
6
&
o

xml | txt