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The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, December 31, 1926, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1926-12-31/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE PRESS
iVTICIAL ORGAN OF ORGANIZED LABOR
.OF HAMILTON AND VICINITY
Cdit.M
Entered at the Postoffice at Hamilton,
Ohio, as Second Class Mail Matter.
Issard Weekly at 326 Market Street
Telephone 1296 Hamilton, Ohio
Endorsed by the Trades and Labor
Council of Hamilton, Ohio
Endorsed by the Middletown Trades
and Labor Council of Middletown, O.
LABOR IS CONSERVATIVE
Organized labor has experienced its
ebb and flow, it has arisen and fallen
with the tide of industrial activity
This is an indication of weakness that
calls for correction.
It never has been the claim o€ its
proponents that organized labor has
a perfect form and method which will
meet the ever-changing situation it
must confront. New structure and
new tactics must be adopted if success
is expected.
Critics delight in calling attention
to the failure of organized labor and
condemning it for its shortcomings.
Because victory has not crowned all
the undertakings of the labor move
ment it should be discarded, accord
ing to the logic of its opponents.
Oragnized labor has made mistakes.
It has made progressive changes in.
its form and methods to meet the
changing situations, and must con
tinue to adapt itself to the necessities
of the situaion which arises with de
velopment of industry. It is true the
program followed has been conserva
tive, and often has fallen short of the
requirements, and failure has marked
many of labor's struggles, but its prin
ciples are sound and enduring, and
it will eventually succeed.
*i to
PREVENTION BEATS PAY
Accident prevention is superior to
workmen's compensation laws, said
Industrial Commissioner Hamilton in
a message to the annual exhibition of
the American Institute. The official
urged complete data on accidents
that the cause for compensation may
be removed.
"Prevention of these accidents is a
matter of great importance to the
wage earners, employers and the com-
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Wil PRESS ASSNj
IOLABORUMK
Members
Ohio Labor Press Association
THE NONPAREIL PRINTING CO
PUBLISHERS AND PROPRIETORS
Subscription Price $1.00 per
Payable in Advance
Year
We do not hold ourselves responsible for any
views or opinions expressed in the articles
or communications of correspondents.
Communii'.-itions solicited from secretaries
of all societies and organizations, and should
be addressed to The Butler County Press, 326
Market Street, Hamilton, Ohio.
The publishers reserve the right to reject
any advertisements at any time.
Advertising: rates made known on appli
cation.
Whafcew is Intended for insertion nrast
be authenticated by the name and address of
the writer, not necessarily for publication, but
as a guarantee of pood faith.
Subscribers changing their address will
please notify this office, giving old and new
address to insure regular delivery of paper.
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 31,1926
this holiday season let us
draw up our chairs before
the Fireside of Friendship
with those whose happiness is our
happiness. Let us in memory of
old days and old times talk over
the friendships that have made
the past so worth-while and that
give such courage and promise
to the incoming year.
^...
THE RALSTON PAINT CO.
5
Happy
New
slVftW
i
munity," he( said. "Great as are the
benefits of workmen's compensation
that, after all, is only a palliative
after the accident. Prevention roots
out the evil at its source and before
suffering and loss have been caused.
"If safety work is to be efficient
it should be guided by accurate know
ledge of results being accomplished
as the work jroes on."
to to 1*
PROSPERITY AND WAGES
Highly important and significant
assertions regarding the wages being
paid in this country appeared in a
recent statement issued by the Na
tional Catholic Welfare Council.
While the pay scales quoted in the
article do not, fortunately, apply to
trade union workers, they are, never
theless, of much pathetic interest and
should be studied by every person
interested in the continuation of
prosperity in the United States.
Declaring that "the chorus of voices,
proclaiming that because of high
wages we can now look to the
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definite continuation of prosperity,
misses several plain facts,?' the coun
cil's statement goes on to say:
"High wages are not nearly so com
mon as is assured. Great numbers of
men are making as low as $3 and $4
a day. Great numbers of women are
making as low as $12, $13 and $14
a week. Great numbers of both men
and women are out of work and are
making no money at all."
While the wage-earners in the
United States are supposed to be the
most prosperous in the world, it ap
pears rather strange that the aver
age per capita savings deposit in this
country is lower than those of many
other lands, as is shown in the follow
ing table:
Denmark $883.93
New Zealand 176.83
Switzerland 140.44
Norway «... 137.31
Australia 136.23
Sweden 89.70
United States 74.94
to to to to to
MEN COUNT MOST OF ALL
I have finished a 12,000-mile trip
over the United States, and as far
west as Hawaii. One emphatic im
pression borne in is this In any and
every community men count most of
all, not natural resources, not loca
tion, not transportation facilities, not
any other material thing. I would not
even rate brains as of the most mo
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0
His
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mentous importance. Rather would I
name the spirit, the mental attitude,
the enlightened aggressiveness of the
citizens to achieve for city, state and
self as of primary moment. It is the
difference in the public spiritedness
of citizens in communities which
mainly explains why extraordinary
progress in another. The right atti
tude in many places triumphs over
material handicaps. Here and there
you can literally see mountains being
moved. This will to do, combined
with characteristic American energy,
courage and enterprise forms the
crowning glory of the people of this
nation.—Forbes Magazine.
to to to to to
CHILD LABOR EVIL
AWAKENS SOUTH
The Progressive Farmer advises
cotton growers to abandon their cheap
labor dependence that has brought
them an illiterate citizenship and low
prices for an unwanted cotton sur
plus. This Alabama publication says:
"Here is the vicious circle that
curses the South. We keep our chil
dren from school in order to make a
surplus of cotton. And then this sur
plus of cotton makes prices so low
that then we are so poor we can't
spore our children time to go to
school. And so more cotton makes
more ignorance, and more ignorance
makes more cotton—and s6 on ad in
finitum."
Privilege has used the farmer for
its low-\rf&ge and child-labor purpose.
This is shown in the campaign for the
pending child-labor constitutional
amendment. Farmers have been led
to believe the proposal would prohibit
all child labor in agriculture.
This is untrue. The amendment
reads: "The congresss shall have the
power to limit, regulate and prohibit
the labor of persons under 18 years
of age."
If this amendment is approved by
the necessary number of states, con
gress will have the power it believed it
possessed when it passed two child
labor acts which were set aside by
the supreme court.
The cotton farmer retained his
cheap labor that is now declared by
a courageous spokesman of the far
mers to be "a curse to the South.'
The farmer is pauperized and his chil
dren work in the fields when they
should be in school.
The cotton situation, as depicted by
the Progressive Farmer, is another
indorsement of organized labor's op
position to low wages and child labor.
Cheap labor affects even those
who imagine they profit by this sys
tem.
No element in society is immune
from its baneful consequences.
to to to to to
WORKERS MUST DO IT
The wage workers must get it out
of their heads that anyone is going
to give them anything. The workers
have never received anything at the
hands of those who profit off the
workers. All they have gained in the
centuries of struggle upward they
have won by their own efforts, and
that collectively. All they will ever
gain in the centuries to come will be
by the same means.
It is not meant to convey by this
the idea that there are no humane
employers and that none of them care
anything about the welfare of the
working class, but the workers have
no right to expect the employers to
fight their battles. They must learn
to fight their own and lean on no one
but themselveg.
No victory gained \y the workers
in any other way is worth having, be
cause it cannot be lasting. The law
of life is one of constant struggle to
better the condition of life. This
true of the employer as well as the
employe. The employers in general
do very well riding on the backs of
the workers. The workers can not
expect them to get off of their own
accord. That would be contrary to
the law of nature and of life. So
the workers must help remove them.
The wage workers can do this only
by banding together in a common
cause for a common end which will
mean a benefit to each and every
worker. That is what the trade union
movement means. It is strictly
business proposition to get for the
workers a larger share of that which
they create, that they may live better
enjoy life more and leave a better
world for their offspring.
Workers, do you f\nd anything
wrong with that proposition
NO COMPROMISING
L«t no union think it can tolerate
communist propaganda or compromise
with communist propositions. The
differences between trade unionists
and communists are as diverse as the
two poles. Communists are unalter
ably committed tb plans
to
destroy
THE BUTLER COUNTY PRESS
trade unions. They are revolutionar
ies who use the tactics^ of intrigue
and' maneuver. They are not inter
ested in building .better industrial
conditions by slow and steady prog
ress withip the present system, but
working for a devolution which
will destroy the system and substitute
communism. Therefore, they use the
union organization to stir up discon
tent and prevent constructive action.
They do not wish to co-operate in pro
moting union activities, but only to
use the union for their own ends. If
communists are permitted to remain
in a union, then time and resources
must be wasted in preventing their
double-crossing the union and under
mining its activities. There is only
one wise way to handle a communist
found in a union: Make public his
affiliation and expel him.
It is unwise to permit communists
any opportunity for leadership^ They
will lead to destruction.
The communist method is to form
a nucleus and let this group carry on
extended activities. If you furnish
them a foothold, the communists will
betray your "tolerance" by blocking
or defeating your every effort.
The only way to deal with com
munism is to eradicate it root and
branch, and then concentrate on con
structive work.—William Green,
to to to to to
TEXTILE STRIKE NEARS END
The long, long trail is ending for
the valiant textile strikers for the
biggest of the Passaic, N. J. mills, the
Botany, has signed an agreement with
the United Textile Workers of Amer
ica, ending a strike that lasted ten
and a half months. The first break
in this great strike came on Arriristice
Day when the Worsted Spinning
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•?3s*
•*W
SAND-GRAVEL-CEMENT
The Hamilton Gravel Co.
Phone 3708
^*srr
David Webb
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
The most modern Limousine
and Ambulance in the city
PHONE 48 219 MAIN ST.
Happy
.- -'O -"V,
Company signed an A. F. of L. union
agreement, the first ever to be made
in Passaic's ^stormy industrial life.
For the first time since last Janu
ary the picket line was missing in
front of the Botany mill, and its sub
sidiary, the Garfield Worsted Mills.
In that long struggle there occurred
some of the most turbulent strike
scenes. Pickets were slugged, ridden
down by police horses, drenched with
a hose, arrested by scores, but never
did they falter. Strike relief was pro
vided for them in abundance. Only
with the stepping in of the A. F. of
L. groups was it possible to break the
deadlock between obdurate industrial
barons and equally determined work
ers.'
The Botany agreement sends 6,000
back to work. The first settlement
sent back 1,000. Under the provi
sions the strikers gain the right of
organization in the American Federa
tion of Labor, collective bargaining
is granted, both parties agree to sub
mit to arbitration in disputes by a
third party. All strikers were to be
re-employed.
There still remain some 7,000 on
strike, but it is expected these will
all go to work soon under similar ar
rangements.
LEATHER WORKERS
ACTIVE
Philadelphia.—Leather workers
the glazed kid shops of this city are
joining the United Leather Workers'
International Union. They have
100 per cent organization in several
plants, and are making gains in other
local shops and also in Camdeiv N.
J., across the Delaware river. With
a thorough organization in the finish
ing department, they will extend
their activities.
v i y i(
and
New
-i-i""V ••V1
Our New Home
21 North 2nd Street
MONDAY JANUARY 3rd
Where we hope to meet and serve all our old friends and customers and
many new ones, to all of whom we wish a most
Dargue Cut Rate Store
NEW LOCATION 21 NORTH SECOND ST.
s'fiV
v
iEdgar K. Wagner
Former Instructor at The Cincinnati Collett
of Embalming
Funeral Director
DISTINCTIVE SERVICE 228 Heat on St
A Message of Happiness-
If it is possible to wish you
any greater Success and Happiness
in the New Year,
then this store certainly
extends that wish
to each and every one of its many
Friends and Patrons!
And better still we welcome the New
Year that will give us the opportunity to
serve you better, to give you the best
obtainable in merchandise and a| prices
you will be glad to pay!
MAY YOUR NEW YEAR BE HAPPY
The W. C. Frechtling Co.
Prosperous
Year
"v v, ii
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MODERN
Happy
New Year
liaiti*'
j-"1
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EQUIPMENT
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