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The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, December 07, 1934, Image 5

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1934-12-07/ed-1/seq-5/

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"^Ntrt
CHRISTMAS IN
EVERY HOME
V-.
Thomas G. Nolloth Again
Named General Chair
man of Movement
llie ^Christmas In Every Itome1'
campaign is again to be waged in
Hamilton this year under the «pot.v
sorship ol the Chamber of Commerce.
This is to be the fourteenth annual
event of the movement in Hamilton.
Announcement was made Saturday
morning of th e ap'pointment of
Thomas G. Nolloth as chairman of the
general committee and of Mr. Nol
loth's acceptance of the same. Mr.
Nolloth's appointment and acceptance
gives every assurance of success of
success of the movement. That is—if
he- is given the wherewithal to do it
and the co-operation he should have,
to do it. All that is necessary to make
a big success of the movement again
this year is for the good-hearted and
warm-hearted citizens to give gener
ously of toys, funds, ect. So far as
distribution Is concerned, under Mr.
Nolloth's able direction, as shown in
START
AN
ACCOUNT
WITH
The Home Loan
and Building A'ssn
Third and Court Sts.
WE PAY STATE TAXES
C. J. PARRISH, Secy.
V
ELITE i
Bakery
%#&
Fruit Cake
Fancy Cake
Pecan Rolls
Springerle
Pfeffernusse
Assorted Mints
Chocolates
Salted Nuts
Ice Cream
Sherbets
Mousse
Whipped Cream
In any quantity
212
High Street
two previous years when he was in
charge, the job will be well done.
Other officers for the campaign
are: J, A. B. Lovett, vice chairman
John E. Northway, secretary Homer
Gard, treasurer treasurer Mrs. Rob
ert D. Fisher, chairman of the wom
en's division S. M. Goodman, auditor
and Mary E. Burke, assistant secre
tary-treasurer.
Members of the executive commit
tee are D. R. Baker, Miss Isabel
Beardsley, Kenneth A. Browning, Fire
Chief William Conlin, Miss Jane
Dowty, Charles D. Kirn, Dr. H. M.
Lowell, John F. Mayer, L. J. Nardine,
City Manager Russell P. Price, Peter
E. Rentscher, Captain C. L. Royce,
John Schwalm, William Shawhan and
Alexander Thomson
JESSE L. GREGG
PASSED AWAY
It came with a great shock in trade
union circles the announcement of the
death of Jesse L. Gregg, who died sud
denly at his home, 934 South Twelfth
street, Sunday night at 9:45 o'clock.
Apparently in good health and after
enjoying an automobile ride with his
family in the afternoon of the day
of his death his sudden passing came
indeed with a great shock to a wide
circle of friends and acquaintances,
causing many expressions of sorrow
and regret.
Mr. Gregg was a molder by trade
and for many years Was a member of
Ix*on Molders' Union No. 283, and al
ways took a great interest in the
affairs of his local. He was popular
with all who knew him. He is surviv
ed by the widow, a sister and other
relatives to whom the sympathy of
organized labor is extended.
Funeral services were held at the
home Thursday morning at 10 o'clock
and were largely attended. Burial was
made at Reily Cemetery.
POSTAL RECEIPTS
ON THEGAIN
Whether Hamilton people are writ
ing more letters, sending more pack
ages, or whatnot these days, anyway
there is more money coming in to the
local posfltoffice. The receipts here
during November exceeded those of
the same month a year ago by $1,
091.05, according to the report of
George Zettler, assistant postmaster.
Receipts during the past month
amounted to $16,081.86 as compared
to $14,990.81 during November, 1933.
It is expected that the receipts dur
ing December will reach $22,000.
INCREASE SEEN
IN BUILDING
Bess Dennis, clerk in the office of
the city building inspector, in her re
port for November, submitted Satur
day, shows a gain in building permits
issued during the month over that of
the previous month.
During November, permits totaling
$8,029 were issued- as compared to
permits totaling $5,715 issued in
October.
During the last month permits were
issued for two garages, $200 Sinclair
Oil Company service station at East
avenue and Walnut street, $4,200 10
additions, $3,510, and one remodel,
$50.
Read the Press
Bring Us Your
Christmas Savings Checks
The Peoples Building and
Loan Association
High Street ... .. "Service With Safety*
.,fss*v .,.-«* Mr
rfr,
tV'
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&m
WM. F. SIEKMANN
CALLED
Well Known Painter Passed
Away Monday After
... Long Illness
William F. Siekmann, 444 South
Front street, died in Fort Hamilton
Hospital, Monday at 12:15 p.m. of
complications. At the time of his
death he had reached the age of 73
years. Surviving are one son, Wal
ter three brothers, Henry and John
of Richmond, Indiana, and R. H. Siek
mann, of Cincinnati and one sister,
Katie Mass, of Chicago.
For many, many years "Bill/' as
every one knew Mr. Siekmann, was
one of the best known men in Hamil
ton trade union circles. He was a
charter member of the Painters, Dec
orators and Paperhangers' Union No.
135, organized August 23, 1883, and
was a member in good standing to the
time he retired from the organization
because of entering the contracting
business. But he always carried an
honorable withdrawal card which he
valued highly.
No man ever did more for his union
and its members than did "Bill" Siek
mann. His counsel and aid were al
ways at hand when needed even after
becoming an employer. He served in
most all offices in his organization,
and for many years represented it
as delegate in Trades Council. He
will be much missed in trade union
circles.
To his son, brothers and sister, the
sympathy of Hamilton organized la
bor is sincerely extended.
ERNEST SNOW CHIEF
OF ISAAC WALTONS
At the meeting of the Izaak Walton
League of America, election of offi
cers for the ensuing term was held
Ernest Snow was elected president of
the league. Other officers elected are:
Clarence Wehr, vice president E. L.
McDaniel, secretary, and G. E. Condo,
Jack Detrick and Ray Martz, direc
tors.
The next regular meeting of the
league will be held December 21, and
at that time plans will be ^tnade for
future winter activities.
KUENZEL NAMED
DELEGATE
A decision to discontinue the series
of employer-employe educational
meetings until after the holiday sea
son was made at the regular meeting
of Local No. 91, International Union
of Operating Engineers, at the labor
temple on South Second street Mon
day evening.
The organization also voted to send
a delegate, John P. Kuenzel, Black &
Clawson Company engineer, to attend
the Ohio department sessions in the
Neil House at Columbus, December 9.
MUSICIANS ELECT
OFFICERS
At a meeting held last Sunday at
the labor temple, the American Fed
eration of Musicians, Local No. 31,
elected officers as follows:
President, William Glauch vice
president, Lee Inman secretary and
business agent, Frank F. Wessel
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1
THE BUTLER ICOUNTY PRESS
financial secretary and treasurer, Ed
ward Stephan executive committee,
Frank Wolpert, Lee Inman, Howard
Miller, Marion Cummins and William
Hayes Bell trustees, Lee Inman, Ber
nard Kirsch and Marion Cummins
examining board, Frank Wolpert, Lee
Inman and Frank F. Wessel ser
geant-at-arms, John Loschober.
The installation will take place Sun
day, January 6. President Glauch nam
ed a committee comprising Bernard
Kir&ch, Lee Inman, Frank F. Wessel,
Frank Wolpert and Albert Bartels, to
arrange for the musicians' annual
jamboree.
NATIONAL LABOR
Relations Board "Cracks
Down" on Radio Firm
By A. P. of L. Mews Service.
Washington.—The National Labor
Relations Board announced here its
decision in the case of the Zenith
Radio Corporation of Chicago, 111.
The company was found to have vio
lated Section 7 (a) by its discharge of
an employee named Herbert Breit.
The board also found that the com
pany's definite decision not to put
Breit back to work after a layoff,
in resentment against his action in
filing a 7 (a) complaint with the
Chicago Regional Board, constituted
in effect a discharge in violation of
the president's executive order of May
15,1931 providing that "No employer
subject to a code of fair competition
approved under said title shall dis
miss or demote any employe for mak
ing a complaint or giving evidence
with respect to an alleged violation of
the provisions of any code of fair com
petition approved under said title."
The company was ordered to rein
state Breit in his former position
within ten days or the case would be
referred to the compliance division of
NRA and to other agencies of the fed
era 1 government for appropriate
action.
Box and Crate Firms
Lose Blue Eagle Rights
Washington, D. C. (ILNS)—The
National Industrial Recovery Board
has withdrawn the right to use NRA
insignia from the Williston Crate Co.,
Williston, Fla., and the Keokuk Box
Co., Keokuk, Iowa.
This action was taken on recom
mendation of the Compliance Council,
which found the companies had vio
lated code provisions, as follows:
Williston Crate Co.: child labor,
hour and wage provisions of the lum
ber and timber products industries
code Keokuk Box Co.: wage and
hour provisions of the lumber and
timhe-r products industries code.
LARGEST PETITION
ASKS AID FOR IDLE
The Hague, The Netherlands.—A
petition containing the largest num
ber of names ever collected in this
country, 1,500,000, has just been pre
sented the minister of social affairs,
urging the government to increase
the dole and give clothing, blankets
and food to the unemployed.
MILWAUKEE STRIKE ENDS
Milwaukee (ILNS)—The strike of
meat cutters and meat shop managers
of the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea
Company in Milwaukee ended on No
vember 27 with agreement on re
employment, wages and hours. The
strike began on October 29.
Ji4.fr
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Our Christmas Savings
Club For "1935
Now Forming!
WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO JOIN!
»savinosbank&trustco*
•HAMILTON OHIO*
•#OME OF THE ORIGINAL CHRISTMAS SAVINGS CLUB"
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London (ILNS)—Opening the an
nual conference of the London labor
party, Harold Clay, chairman, warn
ed that war danger was increasing in
Europe until people were thinking of
BED JACKET
COAL
POCAHONTAS
ANTHRACITE
KOPPERS COKE
Edgar K. Wagner
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
Schwenn Coal Company
W. H. STEPHAN, Prop.
COAL AND COKE
5th and High Streets PHONE 23
HAMILTON BROKERAGE CO.
Mid-Season Sale of Men's and Boys'
jfi WINTER CLOTHING
MEN S
OVERCOATS
Big, heavy,warm coats!
Made of fabrics that
will stand long, hard
wear. A very special
price—Now!
You'll never find a better
coat at anywhere near this
price! See these values!
Zipper Jackets
Men's Suede
Cloth Zipper
Coats
Boys' Leatherette QQ
Sheep-Lined Coats....
Jersey Gloves, Pair 15c
Look, men! Genuine suede leather zipper
jackets at $4.98. Better get yours at once—
HAMILTON BROKERAGE CO.
227 Court St. Yellow Front Storp
K
*T
war not as a remote but as an early
possibility. Ruthless dictatorships had
replaced representative government,
he said, and labor must unite to com
bat both war and Fascism.
$Q.98
MEN'S RAINCOATS
$2-98
Others at $3.98
MEN'S UNION SUITS
WINTER WEIGHT
Quality union suits—long and short sleeves—
ecru and random mixtures.
79c 89c 98c
HEAVY WORK SOX 10c
Men's Suede Leather
$4.98
ZIPPER COAT
$1.98
Heavy blue,
mixture, warm
durable
Men's and Boys' Heavy
FIELD SHOES
$1.39
I
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4
.:!n:
1
qq
$2-49
Endicott-Johnson Make. Tap Sole,
Iron Heel Plates
MEN'S WORK SHOES
10
$2.98
Values, men, you'll not find
elsewhere.
Men's 4-Buckle A1I
Bubber Arctics
$1.98
49c $1.48
Sweaters
Canvas Gloves, Pair 9c
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