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The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, June 07, 1935, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1935-06-07/ed-1/seq-3/

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MEDICAL TECHNICIAN
EXAMINATIONS
The United States Civil Service
Commission has announced open com
petitive examinations for the posi
tions of senior medical technician,
$2,000 a year, and medical technician
$1,620 a year.
Optional subjects are (1) Bacteriol
ogy, (2) Roentgenology, and (3) Bac
teriology and Roentgenology (com
bined).
Certain experience is required.
Full information may be obtained
from Stanley B. Kimble, secretary of
the United States Civil Service Board
of Examiners, at the post office in
this city.
CHEAPRATES
In an effort to promote interest in
Russells Point, the Cincinnati & Lake
Erie Railroad is offering an excep
tionally low one-day excursion from
Hamilton, June 9, of $1.60 round trip
Extra train will leave Hamilton at
8:20 a.m., Sunday morning, returning
from Russells Point at 4:10 p. m. and
7.18 p. m. Increased interest in Rus
sells Point is caused by the scheduling
of a number of famous bands and
orchestras to play in the dance pavil
ion. Management at Russells Point
claims the largest Memorial Day since
1929—10,000 having visited the dance
hall. This excursion is the first of a
series of two to be operated by the
Cincinnati & Lake Erie Railroad (lur
ing the summer months.
STATE PUBLIC
SERVICE
Employer Bill Passes Both
Houses
Columbus (Special) Labor was
given great aid in the closing hours
of the Ohio legislature when its
friends from Hamilton section gave
the Ohio state employes' retirement
system bill support, which resulted
in its passing the house 94 to 26. It
was sent at once to the senate, which
had previously passed it by over
whelming vote, and which nov con
curred the light amendments.
The amendments were asked by the
proponents of the bill which is des
tined to give state employes the same
support in their old age as the state
teachers' retirement system does. It
was introduced early in the session
by Senator William H. Herner, of
Norwalk, and State Representative
Charles S. Best, of Columbus. The
bills had no trouble in the senate,
but was delayed many weeks in th
house after being recommended bj
Brass and Aluminum
.jLVi
ALIi SIZES
WE SELL THEM
Nonpareil Ptg.Co.
326 Market Street
Phone 1296
3JjH
i he house finance committee. At the
deventh hour it was forcd out for
passage.
The bill through its long, hard fight
had the support of the Ohio Federa
tion cf Labor, of the railway brother
hoods, of the Association of Frefight
ers and Policemen, and of various
women's organizations.
Dale Stump, former president of
the Columbus Federation of Labor
and former head of the claims de
partment of the state industrial com
mission, is secretary of the state em
ployes' retirement system, and as
such directs the work of the system.
Mr. Stump said in addition to a
greater measure of social security to
this group, the new law actually will
bring -greater economy and increas
ed efficiency to the state service.
The bill now only lacks the gov
ernor's signature to become a law.
Both Butler county representatives,
Charles Lake and John F. Heath, vot
ed for the bill, as did State Senator
Harold D. Nichols.
SENATOR KING
Condemns Hitler's Cruel
Policies
Washington, D. O. (ILNTS)—Opin
ion that the severance of diplomatic
relations between the United States
and Germany might be justified by
the persecution of Jews by the Hitler
dictatorship was expressed by Sena
tor William H. King, of Utah, in an
address to the Southeastern regional
convention of the Union of Orthodox
Jewish Congregations in America.
Senator King praised orthodox
Jewry for its steadfastness in trial
and suffering, attacked Germany for
what he termed its reversion to the
"bigotry of the Middle Ages,' and de
clared that the policies of the Ilitlei
regime were "inconceivable in thin
age of civilization."
"When nations with which we have
international relations adopt policies
winch are cruel, bigoted and incon
sistent with civilization," he said, "I
am not so sure but. what the severance
of diplomatic relations might be jus
t-ified."
Resolutions condemning the Hitlei.
regime in Germany, and pointing out
that the persecutions there were not
directed merely against Jews but
threatened as well other religious
groups and labor organizations, wen
adopted.
In another resolution the conven
tion went on record as believing that
the American people generally should
support the boycott movement, which
has the support of organized labor.
REFEREE SAYS
Former Directors Owe
Stockholders Over Million
New York City (ILNS)—An echo
of the regime of Charles E. Mitchell
as czar of the National City Bank
sounded through Wall street when
Referee Frank C. Laughlin reported
to the state supreme court that the
former directors of the National City
Company owed storkholders a little
matter of $1,70)5,703.
In Mitchell's days, the National Citv
Company was the "security affiliate'
of the National City Bank. What
ever the bank wanted to do and was
barred from doing by the banking
laws was handed over to the company
One of the jobs of this company wa.
to pay bonuses to the officers of thf
bank, who were also officers of the
company.
Minority stockholders of the bank
sued for $70,000,000. With the award
by Referee Laughlin, they have
leeted to date $1,844,641 much of i
on the bonus account.
Arms Makers Branded
"Public Enemy No. 1'
New York City (ILNS)—Ann 11 i1
Public Enemies Nos. 1 and 4 wer
named by Sen. Gerald P. Nyt at
mass meeting sponsored by the peace
conference here.
Munitions makers were branded
Enemy No. 1 bankers who would
back them in war profits efforts, No
2 industrialists who hope to gain
from war, No. 8, and Americans who
recklessly go into war zones, No. 4
Senators Nye and Clark and Rep
Maury Maverick urged public support
for neutrality legislation pending be
fore congress.
SEE OUR WINDOW
REUTX1 BUILDING
Second and Court Streets
gm THIRTY-FIVE YEARS' CONT1NU
OUS, SATISFACTORY SERVICE
Phone 1611....
WITTMAN TENT AND AWNING CO.
It^SS \.&r-<"-zj^
THE BUTLER COUNTY PRESS
Old Sam's Advice
By E. L. GILL
0, MoClure Newspaper Syndlcat*.
WNU Service,
Teye.flower
HE caught Bill Holland's
Blooming there so wliitely in
the stagnant waters of the swamp.
He grasped Old Sam Matthias by the
shoulder and pointed it out. Old Sam
grunted in noncommittal fashion.
Young Bill had not been a cheerful
companion to Old Sam on this last
trip and Old Sam was showing his dis
appointment. Young Bill, for his part,
was both definitely disappointed and
irritated with Old Sam. He had come
to the mountain shack of the old
guide, seeking sympathy and help in
the major crisis of his twenty-two
years. But Old Sam was bored. Count
less times before the boy had taken
his problems to the unlettered, weather
beaten old guide in the hills, and al
ways before Old Sam had set him
aright
The old man's attitude deepened
Bill's resentment toward the world in
general—and Betty In particular. The
entire trouble, of course, was Betty.
It was an ancient story that Bill told
Old Sam—a story of the magnificent
Jove of a boy for a girl the boy im
bued with the Idealism of the age of
chivalry hopelessly, fantastically In
love with a fascinating bit of a girl sud
denly irked by the restraint of old
fashioned standards and "out to find
what life is all about."
It was not, Bill often told himself,
that he had any desire whatever for
the young lady's affection any longer,
The maddening thing wag that he
couldn't rid his heart and mind and
soul of her.
"I wouldn't know what to say to that,
son," Old Sam condescended once or
twice during the day. Nothing more.
And when night had settled and they
sat on the porch of the mountain shack,
Old Sam talked of trout.
"I'm going to bed,'* the youth said.
"Got a little somethln' I'd might like
to do tonight, been a thlnkin' of that
flower we saw back there in the swamp
today. Somethin' sort of queer about
that. Don't hanker much for sleep
myself and have a mind to take the
lantern and have a look. Better come
along, you'll sleep the better for it.
The old man's suggestion sounded
silly to the distracted youngster, who
nevertheless consented, grudgingly.
The swamp was little more than a
ten minute walk, along the trail. Old
Sam, boots drawn to his hips, led the
way, carrying the lantern. The youth
followed, flashlight in hand. At the
edge of the water they stopped and
at Old Sam's direction, Bill searched
the surface of the swamp until the flash
light caught the white flower.
"I'm a bit curious about that flower
Bill I'm a-goln' to get it out and take
It back to the shack looks to me like a
lily," and Old Sam started into the
swamp, sinking knee-deep in the mire.
"It's some sort of a lily, sure as you
live, son," he called back to Bill.
Back in the shack Ma Matthias
rustled an old bucket, grumbling the
while at "these consarn fool notions."
Bill was dispatched to fill the bucket
with clean rich earth and Old Sam set
to work to replant his lily, talking the
while In quiet, soothing tones, as he
might have to a sick wayfarer.
"Brave little lady—had a right tough
time of it out there in that swamp, I
reckon.
"Can't figure out how you come to be
in such a vile smellin' place—mighty
bad company you was in.
"Seemed to like it right smart at that
—stubborn as an old mule about com
In' out—guess you didn't knew them
weeds was a-goin' to choke you in time
"There she is now, Ma, good as new
—and ain't she a beauty! Reckon she
feels a lot better, too—suspect if she
could talk she would be a-tellln' us that
she's mighty happy to get out of that
swamp."
But Old Sam got no further with his
monologue. Young Bill Holland was
dashing out through the open doorway
of the shack.
Betty was dancing lightly from table
to table, regaling the party with a
song. Bill stood, unnoticed, watching,
He waited until Betty's solo dance
brought her close to where he stood
As she whirled, he caught her upraised
arm in a biting grip. A youth rushed
forward to resent the indignity. Bill's
flst caught the point of his chin.
The merry-makers confronted Bill
en masse at the doorway, denouncing
him in shrill outbursts. Meanwhile
Bill was delivering eloquent if dis
Jointed references to poisonous weeds
and filthy water.
Betty was a subdued young lady,
The first flush of fiery indignation
passed as quickly as it came. It may
have been an expression on Bill Hoi
land's face it may have been some
thing else.
She was quite ready to go to the car
with Bill. Meekly, she allowed herself
to be led up the steps of the record
er's ho:ne. Meekly, too, aided by Bill'
gruff promptings, she answered the
necessary questions.
When they were again in the road
ster and Bill had pocketed the docu
ment given him by the recorder, Betty
laid her head on Bill's shoulder and
women-like, cried great, warm tears,
Now, for the first time since he left
Old Sam Matthias' shack far up in the
hills, Bill's clenched jaw relaxed.
Far up in the hills Ma Matthias was
again reminding Old Sam that he had
to go to the swamp after breakfast
Ma was a practical soul and saw no
sense in paying that florist down in
town a dollar and a half for a potted
lily and then leaving the pot buried In
that dirty swamp.
But Old Sam was sleeping peacefully
Read the Press—it is the best.
STRAIGHT FROM
ism
By STEPHEN M. YOUNG
Congressman-at-Large
President Roosevelt is supremely
confident that his recovery program
will end the depression. Therefore,
there will be no inflation during the
pi*esent session of the congress. If
the soldiers' "bonus" is compi'omised,
as was predicted in this column some
weeks ago, it will be on a basis that
will not involve inflation.
Many thoughtful congressmen dis
like the word "inflation." They prefer
to say "expansion of the currency."
There is no doubt whatever but that
more money in circulation would be
beneficial to the country. The facts
are there is probably ample money
in existence, but this money is not in
circulation.
V6* V V
Dr. Sao-Ko Alfred Sze, Chinese am
bassador to this country, is one of the
most brilliant and popular officials in
Washington. Also he is a famed host.
Recently at a reception at the beau
tiful Chinese embassy, a congress
man's wife gushed, "Doctor, it is real
ly difficult to believe that you Chinese
eat rats." "Oh, that's not hard to
understand," said Dr. Sze, with a
bland Chinese smile, "so many of you
Americans eat hot dogs."
V & V V
Federal Railway Co-ordinator East
man proposes that our railroads re
duce passenger fares to two cents a
mile or less. They could then compete
with buses and privately owned auto
mobiles. Empty train seats would be
filled. He thinks that a railroad does
not make money by taking the conduc
tor for a ride.
V tr V
/-j-tfrt-:,-
V
There will be no important third
party movement in 11)30. Huey Long
ind Father Coughlin have enthusias
tic followers. Father Coughlin crit
icizes President Roosevelt, but at the
ame time expresses confidence in
ii. i. He has at no time indicated
that he would not support him. In 1936
it will require a man and an issue
to beat President Roosevelt. That
man certainly will not be Huey Lory
Also there is no issue that can be
unearthed which will prevail against
good times. If the depression is wan
ing. as we believe it is, then the presi
dent's re-elction is certain.
The New Deal may be considered a
revolution. American revolutions are
usually good for eight years. Exam
pies that could be cited are: Thomas
Jefferson, Andrew Jackson, Abraham
Lincoln and Woodrow Wilson. Then
examples of definite swings toward
conservatism ait Piesident Grant
MmKinley, Harding, Coolidge and
Hoover.
V & V V
Congressmen are frequently called
upon to be glorified errand boys for
their constituents. This request came
in to an Ohio congressman: A young
ItwCu
•'l
c-1
I
7
man married to Mollie Elizabeth
Buchanan claims that his wife is a
descendant of ex-President Buchanan
md heir to his estate. He requests
-hat the congressman enter a contest
for the balance of the estate, collect
the money and remit without delay.
VS-V V
Washington, D. C., June 3.—The
young lady who handles Congressman
Stephen M. Young's incoming mail has
"psychic" touch and an "X-ray
eye." From Mai*ch 12 to May 20 she
put aside more than 6000 unopened
letters. These were from every sec
tion of Ohio and were not uniform in
size or handwriting. She filed these
unopened letters in cabinets and label
ed them "Opposed to Wheeler-Ray
burn bill." Other mail was given the
right of way. Recently when the vol
ume of incoming mail slackened for
a few days these envelopes were open
ed. Of more than 6000 letters only
twelve related to other subjects. "May
my voting record and attendance be
as nearly perfect as that," said
Young.
Albany Gets Large Region
For Light and Power Plant
Albany, N. Y. (AFLNS)—Governor
Lehman signed the bill which permits
the city of Albany and its environs to
own and operate electric light and
power facilities. Under previous legis
lation municipalities in New York
state were not permitted to manufac
ture and sell power beyond their own
borders, but the Albany enabling act
£oes beyond these limitations and ex
tends the jurisdiction of the Albany
regional light, heat and power au
thority to all but a small section of
Albany county, taking in two other
cities and several other towns.
Cotton Garment
Workers Strike
New York City (ILNS)—Strikes of
cotton garment workers, involving
several thousand women on Decatur,
111., Dallas, Texas, and St. Louis, Mo.,
have been called by the International
Ladies' Garment Workers' Union to
protest wage minimums called for un
der NRA codes. Now that the NRA
has been declared unconstitutional, the
union proposes to "take over the func
tions of NRA" in these cases and seek
to force payment of code wages, it was
annnounced at union headquarters
here.
No reasonable person wants to
abandon our present gains—we must
continue to protect children, to en
force minimum wages, to prevent ex
cessivi hours, to safeguard, define and
y
fitiifu
PRUNE
°lve
a buttered
CllJviJ
V. TU
sOUFFL
INGREDIENTS: juice.'
*Vc
eees-
cup sugar, A ®P
e 2 hrs.
A light, delicious and healthful dessert that will score a distinct success whether
served to the family or to your most fastidious guests. You can bake it in your
nld ranoe. but remember:
Estate Gas Ranges are made in Hamilton by Hamilton workmen. They are sold by:
K-R-E B-S FAHRNEY-MARTSNDALE SPOERL HOWE. CO.
LOWENSTEIN FURN. CO. GRIMMER & LONG IMFELD'S
enforce collective bargaining and,
while retaining fair competition, to
eliminate as far as humanly possible
the kinds of unfair pi'actices by self
ish minorities which unfortunately
did mere than anything else to bring
about the recent collapse of indus
tries.—From President Roosevelt's
radio address of April 28, 1935, ex
plaining his legislative program.
Notice of Hearing
For Parole
Mansfield, Ohio, June 1. 1935.
27159, Charles Moore, a prisoner now con
fined in the Ohio State Reformatory, Mans
field, admitted from Butler county, convicted
September 15, 1931, of the crime of robbery
and servinj? a .sentence of 10 25 years, ia
eligible for a hearing before the Board of
Parole, on or after July 1,1935.
THE BOARD OF PAROLE,
By J.J. Feeney,
Parole and Record CMerk.
SEE US
IF YOU NEED A LOAN
TO
Build—Improve—Buy
YOUR HOME
EDERAL oAVlNGS
*&! ASP LOAN ASSOCIATION
OF HAMILTON
C. J. PARRISH, Secy.
3rd and Court
,,£/ I
xV/,\
LI, NOT tS3 1T-r
THE UNION LAliEI. IS THE
SYMBOL OF HIGHEST QUALITY
OF AMERICAN-MADE PROP
TOTS.
PATRON IZi BUSINESS
PLACE8
WHICH DISPLAY THE UNION
LABEL, SHOP CARD A BUTTONS.
UNION LABEL TRADES DEPARTMENT
American Federation of Labor Wash.,
D. C.
Ed&ar K. Wagner
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
/uaJudiiu kriqldb
timi ab a"
dtfliiinX" dtMiit.
w
hites
i
stramer.
from PRU^SHITEFUNTU stiff and add to
Add sugar. Beat*££». PB.
orune mixture.
Add
Se heat
Allow to
...
control at 275.
at a com­
pact price. No. 924 Estate "the
Perfect 36' —is only 36 inches wide
yet it has a big Estate Fresh-Air Bake
Oven, heavy rock-wool insulation,
oven heat control, waist-high drawer
type broiler, roomy cooking top, grid
dle built into table top, two non-slam
ming lop covers, big utensil com*
partment. Full porcelain enamel, o£
course. Wonderful value at $79.73.
LIBERAL TEHiVSS
SMALL CARRYING CHARGE
Other Estate Modern Gas Ranges
from $59.75 to $164.00.

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