OCR Interpretation


The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, June 07, 1935, Image 4

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1935-06-07/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

t* ."A .'
k
LOUIS
GRIM, President
FUNERAL HOME
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE
PHONES
62
63
ins
lOKE
The Griesmer-Grim Co.
A E I A S I N E S I N V A I A
Monuments and Markers
SELECT BARRE GRANITE
We feature select Granite from only Union quarries in the Barre,
Vermont, district.
Our plant is complete and we invite you to come and visit and see
how this work is done.
We cut and polish in our own plant
COAL
CARPENTER'S MEMORIAL STUDIO
924 High St. Phone
CARBON
DELIVERED BY
Union Drivers
GIVE US A TRIAL
Yon
2540
O I E U E S
BLUE JACKET
KOPPERS
FROM
THE
Undersoil -Shaffer
COMPANY
MIAMI COKE
H. PATE.R. COAL CO.
159 PHONES —4980
Will Be Satisfied!
Phones 47 and 160
A
STRONG BANK TRUST CO.
TNATIONAL
A N K
I—I /K r^l 1 L.T ON. OHIO.
and
\L
4- w%
Coal Mine Closed 650 Lose
Jobs Back Wages Not Paid
Shamokin. Pa. (AFLNS)—Six hun
dred and fifty employes of the Enter
prise Colliery, near here, operated by
the Northumberland Mining Company,
were thrown out of work by the deci
sion of the company permanently to
close the mine.
PAUL A. SICK, Sec-Tnas.
Hamilton, Ohio
BOB WHITE
tOPPtftS
&
The Co-Operative Trades
& Labor Council
Do Their Banking Business
With
j^n% THE
CITIZENS
4
VIN
Cv
S A
JV &
the Worst is Yet to Come
Am
-T U SI
HAMILTON OHIO*
We can serve You as Well
?cd)
CONSERVATIVE
BANK
OF
FRIENDLY
SERVICE
w is a
The reason given for the shutdown
was inability to obtain a federal loan
to pay coal royalties to the Philadel
phia & Reading Coal & Iron Company
and ether creditors, including miners
who have unpaid wages due them dat
ing from last October. Animated by
fear that the company would not pay
them their wages, the miners recently
struck.
THE BL1LER COUNTY PRESS
Patronize Hamilton Industries
LEADING HAMILTON CONCERNS WHO SOLICIT THE CO-OPERATION OF ORGANIZED LABOR AND THEIR FRIENDS
DUERSCH COAL CO
Cement, Sewer Pipe
Try our Ebony or Pocahontas Coal on your next order
COKE. Phones 1 and 586
Truths Pondered While
"Then gently scan
your brother man"—
YOUR DAY'S WORK
counts for more if you make a part of your earnings
work for you. FIRST NATIONAL will help you
to do this, as it has helped so many thousands of
Hamilton's workers since 1863.
Steel and Tin Workers No. 20 ...Every Saturday morning....Arthur
Musicians No. 821 1st Sunday A. T. C. Hall
DISTRICT ORGANIZATIONS
Molders* Conference Board Chas. L. Huter, 419 Roosevelt ave, Piqua, O.
By Mr. Modestus"
Try it!
You don't know—
You want to find out—
Use the laboratory method—
ROSTER OF ORGANIZATIONS
HAMILTON LABOR UNIONS
Trades and Labor Council.... Alternate Tuesdays, Hall No. 1 -Stanley Ogg, 1039 Hamilton Ave.
Bakers' Union No. 81 1st and 3rd Saturdays, Labor Temple..Cornelius Nichting, 1269 Shuler Ave.
Barbers' Union No. 132 .. 2nd and 4th Mondays, Hall No. 4 E. R. Legg, 227 South 7th St.
Bartenders' Local 169....Meets 1st Mon. & 3rd Tues., Labor Temple Thomas Brennan, Secy., 1102 Edison Ave.
Brew, and Soft Drink Workers No. 83....2nd and 4th Fridays, Trades Coucil .Ray Mefford, 607 So. 2nd St.
Bricklayers No. 11....1st and 3rd Fridays V. M. Lackey, 219 Eaton Ave.
Building Trades Council Meets alternate Tuesdays Scott Symmes, Sec'y, 341 N. 6th St.
Chauffeurs, Garagemen and Helpers No. 793 Frank Palmer, Secretary, 217 W. 12, Cincinnati, Ohio,
City Employes No. 19357 2nd Monday, Labor Temple....John Lemons, Cor. Sec., 718 Sycamore St.
City Fire Fighters No. 20 1st Tuesday, T. C. Hall No. 4 Frank Wolf, 2nd Ward Hose House
Carpenters and Joiners No. 637 2nd & 4th Thursday, Labor Temple....Robert J. Getz, 123 Ross Ave.
Cigar Makers' Union No. 123 2nd and 4th Mondays, Labor Temple....Robert Mick, 609 So. Front St
Common Laborers' Union No. 775 Meets 2nd and 4th Fridays, T. C. Hall Wm. Utrecht, Secy.
Electrical Workers No. 648 3rd Wednesday, Labor Temple J. E. Wanamaker, 518 N. 6th St.
Letter Carriers 3rd Friday Night John A. Westrick, 1037 Hooven Ave.
Machinists' and Auto Machanics' Local 241 2nd & 4th Wed., Labor Temple....Karl Brown, 822 Buckeye St.
Metal Polishers No. 43 Alternate Wednesdays, Labor Temple....G. Brandel, 1833 Pleasant Av«.
Milk & Ice Cream Drivers & Helpers ..3rd Friday, T. C. Hall Otwell Condon, 23 So. St.
Molders' Union No. 68 Every Monday, T. C. No. l.......»«„^.^James V. Nutt, 332 No. 10th St.
I. M. U. No. 68 Auxiliary -2nd and 4th Fridays, Labor Temple....Chris Reidinger, 2426 Noble Ave.
Molders' Union No. 283 1st and 3rd Fridays, T. C. No. 1 A1 Besanceney, 714 Clinton Av«.
Musicians' Local No. 31 .1st Sunday morning, Labor Temple....Frank F. Wessel, 227 No. St.
Paint., Dec., Paper Hangers No. lM....Every Thursday, Labor Temple.. Arthur Byrd, 1109 Reservoir St.
Pattern Makers ...............2nd and 4th Fridays, T. C. Hall Wm. Fremgen. 522 Ridgelawm Ave.
Plasterers' Union No. 214. —.......1st and 3rd Thursday, Labor Temple....E. Motzer, 315 S. Second St.
Plumbers' Union No. 108 1st and 3rd Mondays, Labor TempJe.-Chas. Hosea, 904 Sycamore St.
Retail Clerks' Union No. 119....1st and 3rd Wednesday, Labor Temple Edw. Feltman, Secy., 345 So. St.
Roofers, No. 68 2nd and 4th Wednesday, T. C. Hall .Walter Foster, 539 Ludlow St.
Sheet Metal Workers, No. 141 1st and 3rd Mondays, T. C. Hall Fred Hock, Cincinnati, O.
Stationary Engineers No. 91................1st and 3rd Mondays, T. C. Hall... ...John P. Kuenzel, R. R. No. 3.
Stationary Firemen No. 98 -1st Thursday, Labor Temple... Harry Moore, 324 Hudson Ave.
Street Car Men's Local 738..................3rd Wednesday, T. C. Hall No. 1 W. E. Tice, 2340" Freeman Ave.
Stove Mounters' Union No. 8. 1st and 3rd Fridays, T. ...Carl Reiter, 2120 Elmo Ave.
Theatrical Stage Employes No. 136.... 1st Sunday, T. C. Hall John Janser, 1024 Campbell Ave.
Truck Drivers' Local No. 100 Third Friday, Labor Temple Otwell Condon, 23 So. St.
Typographical Union No. 290 ....2nd Wednesday, Labor Temple Martin Schorr, 701 Gray Ave.
Woman's Union Label League Every Tuesday, Labor Temple Mm. C. A. Rosson, R. R. No. 2.
MIDDLETOWN LABOR UNIONS
Trades and Labor Council 2nd and 4th Thursday Noel Ford, P. O. Box 47
Ladies' Auxiliary.... Alternate Wednesdays, T. C. Hall Mrs. Bessie Mcintosh, 1818 Sherman Ave.
Amalgamated Association, Iran,
Electrical Workers No. 648 1st Wednesday, T. C. Hall...John E. Wanamaker, Labor Temple, Hamilton
Barbers No. 70 —4th Monday, T. C. Hall Noel Ford, Eagle Barber Shop
Letter Carriers No. 188 Last Friday Earl R. Price, Post Office.
Printing Pressmen No. 235....... ^....2nd Thursday, T. C. Hall C. E. Read, 1214 Pine St., Middletown
Carpenters No. 1477 Every Monday, T. C. Hall E. O. Otterbein, 12 Harrison St.
Plumbers and Steamfitters No. 510....2nd Tuesday, T. C. Hall Wm. D. Coyle, 1334 Manchester Ave.
Painters and Decorators No. 643 2nd Friday, T. C. Hall H. C. Matthews, R. R. No. 1, Klye, O.
Plasterers' Local No. 409 1st Monday T. A. Scully. 306 Castell Bldg.
Stage Employes No. 282 ....Every other Saturday Otto Kaiser, P. O. Box 54
Steam and Operating Engineers No. 024 Every Friday, T. C. Hall George Ball, Park St.
Typographical No. 487 1st Monday, T. C. Hall Jack Ferguson, Naegele-Auer Ptg. Co.
Hod Carriers No. 512 2nd Monday, T. C. Hall Harry Roy.
Bricklayers No. 67 2nd and 4th Wednesdays, T. C. Hall....S. J. Anderson, 125 So. Broad.
HAMILTON BUSINESS AGENTS
Building Trades Council Chas. Hosea, 903 Sycamore St.
Electrical Workers Frank Vidourek, 828 East Ave. Phone 1024-W
Molders Jerry Galvin, 605 W. Norman Ave., Dayton, Ohio.
Carpenters Chas. Chapen, 411 Wiliams Ave. Phone 2714-M
Milk & Ice Cream Drivers & Helpers..O. Condon, 23 S. St. Phone 2683-W.
Painters L. A. Brown, 404 Harrison Ave. Phone 2253-M
Pattern Maker* Rob't Service, 220 East Ave.
Plasterers G. Shoblom, Y. M. C. A.
Plumbers Charles L. Hosea, 904 Cycamore St. Phone 3320-J
Stage Hands Neil Johnson, 201 S. Monument Ave.
Picture Operators Bob Wentz, 2805 Dixie Highway.
Retail Clerks No. 119 Edw. Engler, 107 Buckeye St.
MIDDLETOWN BUSINESS AGENTS
Painters a. W. Stout, 608 Waite, Office T. C. Hall
Movie Operators Ben H. Francis, 119 Monroe..
Stage Hands Harry Keiser, Sutphin Ave.
Electrical Workers Frank Viduorek, 828 East Ave., Hamilton, Ohio
Trial and error system reveals
secrets—
Tr/ the acid test—
Then try the alkali—
Try them both together—
Then measure what is left in the
crucible.
NIRA built the crucible—
NRA was the public experiment—
Business men—"industry"—had to
take the test—
The purpose of the experiment was
to develop co-operation—
But the world saw what happened
"in the gold-fish bowl"—
"Co-operation" was just a Greek
word to them—
Which not even the Greeks among
them understood.
NERVES"
9*
Here's a good
way to quiet
"NERVES"—
A Dr. Mi lea*
E fervescent
Nervine Tab
let, a glass of
water, a pleas
ant, sparkling
drink.
Nerves relax.
You can rest,
sleep, enjoy life.
At your drug
store. 25c and
$1.00.
Do'nhoff,
1605 Columbia Ave.
R-
C. Oglesby, care News-Signal.
"Fair competition" was just two
words—
Which contradicted each other.
"Emergency" was just a chance to
take advantage of others—
"Social security" was called plain
communism—
"Rights of labor" meant freedom
to sign a yellow dog contract—
"Collective bargaining" was accom
plished by posting notices in fac
tories.
These were what went into the
laboratory crucible—
These were the chemical elements
contained in the business man—
Along with them went the millions
of unemployed—
There were the young men and
young men and women-
Having had training of body and
mind in schools and colleges—
But never having had a chance at
"experience in work"—
Skilled hands and brains frozen in
idleness—
Surplus products of land and ma
chines-
Surplus of youth and excess of
age
Emptying schools and mounting
bond issues—
Billions of gold multiplied into used
billions of credit
Great machines silent and furnaces
cold—
Chiseling parasites gnawing foun
dations—
Tinctures of profits in solutions of
dividends—
W»I ~i "kll. ft -1
^OU TAKf
APvr i
"Everybody Iniun
D,
11 eat your brother trade unionists
WHITE, and not allow the depression
make you BLUE, buy union prod
its and services. That's true patriot
im hocnuso thrv nre made in America.
s good
i except
those that have need of it
JUNE
11—Richard Strauss, great
ImS} composer, born 1864.
if
^,\v.r 12—Congress orders commer
.' cial relations with France
ended. 179&
13—Plug
tobacco manufacture
ers form trust, 1889.
|»?-^14—Norcross patents first
—practical diving suit. 1834.
15—Franklin
shows relation
lightning with electricity,
1752.
dyV -?i-*16—28 ounce hailstones {all at
Dubuque. Iowa, 1882.
-rr~\/ 17—Magna Charta, English
I =E§iV-- charter of liberty, signed
1215. ©WNU
Labor Queries
Questions and Answers on La
bor: What It Has Done Where
It Stands on Problems of the
Day Its Aim and Program
Who's Who in the Ranks of
the Organized Toilers, etc., etc.
Q.—What is a shop card?
A.—A shop card is a printed sign
which is displayed in the window or
on the wall of all shops and business
places whose employes are unionized.
Q.—Did organized labor from its
beginning fight child labor?
A.—Yes. The American Federation
of Labor, in its first constitution,
adopted in 1881, said: "We are in
favor of the passage of laws in the
several states forbidding the employ
ment of children under the age of 14
in any capacity under penalty of
fine and imprisonment."
Q.—Who said: "Whoever produces
anything by weary labor, does not
need a revelation from heaven to
teach him that he has a right to the
thing produced"?
A.—Robert G. Ingersoll.
Labor Measure Adopted In
Massachusetts
Boston (ILNS)—An anti-alien labor
bill which passed the Massachusetts
house and senate is awaiting the sig
nature of Gov, Curley. Under the
bill, all employes of the state who are
aliens and all employes of each of the
counties who are aliens would be de
prived of their jobs in December,
1936, if they have not become U. S.
citizens by that time.
It is necessary that two years
elapse between the taking out of first
and second papers of citizenship.
Hence, those who are now rushing for
the first papers will be disappointed
in December of next year unless the
bill is vetoed. Employed regularly by
the state and counties are numerous
doctors, nurses, orderlies, domestics,
foremen, matrons, guards, chemists,
skilled tradesmen, unskilled help,
etc., who have made no effort to shift
from British and Canadian citizenship
until the anti-alien labor legislation
was passed or on the verge of being
passed.
Labor organizations backed the bill
strongly.
After two years of mixing and stir
ring—
Business men bring the test to the
bench for examination—
Contents of the cauldron are pour
ed by nine elderly men
Through the fabric of the ancient
constitution-
Litmus paper to find and locate the
acids—
Sieve to determine the remaining
structures—
Sorting process to classify for re
jection and keeping—
Human problems drain off to the
sewer of history—
Residues forcing conclusions remain
held by the sieve—
The old sieve finds no trace of so
cial facts—
Bones, fleshand feathers of chickens
are kept—
They are property and profits and
power—
Decent wages, humane hours, la
bor's rights—
Dissolved and run off in solution of
by-product—•
Down the pipe of judicial decision.
The experiment's done!
Laboratory doors slam shut!
NO! The experiment has only
begun!
i

xml | txt