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The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, July 30, 1937, Image 4

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1937-07-30/ed-1/seq-4/

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LOUIS GRIM, President
FUNERAL HOME
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE
PHONES
62
63
CARBON
FROM
THE
Anderson- Shaffer
COMPANY
DELIVERED BY
A STRONG BANK k TRUST CO.
•Milling
y
The Grieamer-Grim Co.
A E I A S I N E S I N V A I A
O I E U E S
BLUE JACKET
KOPPERS
MIAMI COKE
H. PATE,R COAL CO-
159 PHONES 4980
COAL
Union Drivers
GIVE US A TRIAL
You
Will Be Satisfied!
Phones 47 and 160
NATIONAL
A N K
N'l I LTO fsl. OHIO.
Truths Pondered While
and the Worst is Yel to Come
fg)h*,9+o»
Riding at
Anchor
"Then gently scan
your brother man"—
By Mr. Modestus-
Holy Words—
The old-time technique of religious
argument—
"Don't fight against God"—
The old argument of the man who
knows God's mind—
Whose own egotis'* is so collos-
ijjlp jii! nif liijij il' jj '!,!!(
PAUL A. SICK, Sec'7-Treaa.l
WHITE
EM
The Co-Operative Trades
& Labor Council
Do Their Banking Business
With
CITIZENS
SAVINGS BANK-ft TRUSTC*
We can serve You as Well
CONSERVATIVE
BANK
OF
FRIENDLY
SERVICE
That he is unconscious of auto
apotheosis—
Or whose cause has become so pre
carious—
That he resorts to desperate blas
phemy—
When other and reasonable argu
ments crumble in his hands—
"The poor ye have always with
you"—
Therefore, poverty is a part of God's
plan—
Therefore, we need poverty in
order to be religious—
We must have the poor, on whom
to practice our charity—
Saying nothing of the damnation
of the poor—
Who have none but the birds on
whom to practice their religion—
But if there must be the poor—
There must also be the rich who
have religion—
7
THE BUTLER COUNTY PRESS
Patronize Hamilton Industries
LEADING HAMILTON CONCERNS WHO SOLICIT THE CO OPERATION OF ORGANIZED LABOR AND THEIR FRIENDS
DUERSCH COAL CO
Cement, Sewer Pipe
Try our Ebony or Pocahontas Coal on your next order
COKE. Phones 1 and 586
IRST
TWENTY-FIRST OLDEST NATIONAL
BANK IN THE UNITED STATES
Deposits insured up to $5000—
by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
DISTRICT ORGANIZATIONS
Therefore, if you would not "fight
against God"—
Get rich! honestly, if you can, but
get yours—
Because that is the divine plan, for
some to be rich—
And then, it is" so much more com
fortable—
One can be really sanitary—
It is so disugsting to be poor—
There is really no excuse for pov
erty in these days—
Any man can get work if he only
would exert himself—
Except that God made the poor,
and all that in them is—
.- v 7 ".: ^rVV,^^ f^ff^er, f,WW^y
NATIONAL BANK
T^rTRUsror
IRostet of ©tGani3ations
HAMILTON LABOR UNIONS
Trades and Labor Council .Alternate Tuesdays, Hall No. 1..... Stanley Ogg, 344 Chase Ave.
Trades and Labor Council.......™ Wiley A. Davis, Custodian. Phone 233.
Baker?' Union No. 81 1st and 3rd Saturdays, Labor Temple..Albert McDaniels, 1938 Howell Ave.
Barbers' Union No. 132 2nd and 4th Mondays, Hall No. 4 E. R. Legg, 326 South 7th St.
Bartenders 169 1st Monday, 2:30 p. m. 3rd Monday, 7:30 p. m. Labor Temple Thos. Brennan, 1108 Edison
Brew, and Soft Drink Workers No. 83....2nd and 4th Fridays, Trades Council....Jim Lauderman, R. R. 6.
Bricklayers No. 11 1st and 3rd Fridays .V. M. Lackey, 219 Eaton Ave.
Building Trades Council .........Meets alternate Tuesdays Harold Foley, 679 Clinton Ave.
Chauffeurs, Garagemen and Helpers No. 793 Frank Palmer, Secretary, 217 W. 12, Cincinnati, Ohio.
City F»*-e Fighters No. 20 1st Tuesday, T. C. Hall No. 4 Frank Wolf, 2nd Ward Hose House.
Carpenters and Joiners No. 637 .......2nd & 4th Thursdays, Labor Temple....Scott Symes, 337 N. 6th St.
Cigar Makers' Union No. 123 ..2nd and 4th Mondays, Labor Temple.... A. Lombard, 813 Vine St..
Electri*«i Workers No. 648 1st Wednesday, Labor Temple J. E. Wanamaker, 518 N. 6th St.
Lather®' Local No. 276 .Meets 1st Wednesday, Labor Temple..Sherman Clear, Sec'y, 1050 Central.
Letter •'arriers -3rd Friday Night Clarence L. Bowman, 295 Williams Av
Machinists' and Auto Mechanics' Local 241 2nd & 4th Wed., Labor TempleKarl Brown, 7 Center St.
Metal Polishers No. 43 Alternate Wednesdays, Labor Temple....G. Brandel, 1833 Pleasant Ave.
Milk & Ice Cream Drivers & Helpers....3rd Friday, T. C. Hall Ed Dulli, 2255 Noble Ave. Ph. 1635-M
Molder*' Union No. 68 Every Monday, T. C. No. 1 James V. Nutt, 332 No. 10th St.
Molder*' Union No. 283 1st and 3rd Fridays, T. C. No. 1 Cale Dodsworth, 1209 Chestnut St.
Musicians' Local No. 31 1st Sunday morning, Labor Temple....Frank F. Wessel, 227 No. St.
Paint, Dec., Paper Hangers No. 135....Every Thursday, Labor Temple Maurice Williams, 126 N. St.
Patter** Makers 2nd and 4th Fridays, T. C. Hall Art Brandhoff, 238 Chestnut St.
Plasterers and Cement Finishers No. 214 Labor Temple E. Motzer, 339 N. Third St.
Plumbers' Union No. 108 1st and 3rd Mondays, T. C. Hall Louis Brown, and Ross Ave.
Retail Berks' Union No. 119....1st and 3rd Wednesday, Labor Temple Sam K. Daneff, 801 Corwin Ave.
Roofer* No. 68 2nd and 4th Wednesday, T. C. Hall David Lyttle, 507 S. 5th St.
Sheet Metal Workers No. 141 1st and 3rd Mondays, T. C. Hall Fred Hock, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Stationary Engineers No. 91 1st and 3rd Mondays, T. C. Hall John P. Kuenzel, R. R. No. 3.
Stationary Firemen No. 98 1st Thursday, Labor Temple Harry Moore, 324 Hudson Ave.
Street Xr Men's Local 738 3rd Wednesday, T. C. Hall No 1.. W. E. Tice, 2340 Freeman Ave.
Stove Mounters' Union No. 8 1st and 3rd Fridays, T. C. Carl Reiter, 2120 Elmo Ave.
Theatrical Stage Employes No. 136....1st Sunday, T. C. Hall...., John Janser, 1024 Campbell Ave.
Truck 'drivers' Local No. 100 Third Friday, Labor Temple ...Ed Dulli, 2255 Noble Ave. Ph. 163S-M
Typogi^ujhical Union No. 290 .2nd Wednesday, Labor Temple Martin Schorr, 701 Gray Ave.
Womar-* Union Label League Every other Tuesday, Labor Temple....Mrs. Lottie Butts, 787 Ludlow St.
MIDDLETOWN LABOR UNIONS
Trades *nd Labor Council 2nd and 4th Thursday W. J. O'Brien, News-Journal.
Ladier Auxiliary Alternate Wednesdays, T. C. Hall Mrs. Bessie Mcintosh, 1818 Sherman Ave.
Amalgamated Association, Iron,
Steer *nd Tin Workers No. 20 Every Saturday morning....Arthur Domhoff, 1605 Columbia Ave.
Musicians No. 321 1st Sunday A. M., T. C. Hall R. C. Oglesby, care News-Signal.
Electr»r%i Workers No. 648 1st Wednesday, T. C. Hall... John E. Wanamaker, Labor Temple, Hamilton
Letter {Jarriers No. 188 Last Friday Earl R. Price, Post Office.
Printing Pressmen No. 236 2nd Thursday, T. C. Hall C. E. Read, 1214 Pine St., Middletown.
Carpenters No. 1477 Every Monday, T. C. Hall E. O. Otterbein, 12 Harrison St.
Plumbaar« and Steamfitters No. 510....2nd Tuesday, T. C. Hall Wm. D. Coyle, 1334 Manchester Ave.
Painter* and Decorators No. 643 2nd Friday, T. C. Hall H. C. Matthews, R. R. No. 1, Kyle, O.
Plasterers' Local No. 409 1st Monday ~T. A. Scully, 306 Castell Bldg.
Stage Rxnployes No. 282 Every other Saturday Otto Kaiser, P. O. Box 54.
Steam Operating Engineers No. 924 Every Friday, T. C. Hall George Ball, Park St.
Typogr»whical No. 487 1st Monday, T. C. Hall Dawn Turner, News-Journal.
Hod Carriers No. 612 2nd Monday, T. C. Hall Harry Roy.
Bricklayers No. 67 ...2nd and 4th Wednesdays, T. C. Hall....S. J. Anderson, 126 So. Broad.
Moldert- Conference Board Chas. L. Huter, 419 Roosevelt Ave., Piqua, O.
Sta. Engineers Frank P. Converse, 216 High, Cleveland, Ohio.
HAMILTON BUSINESS AGENTS
Bartender's .Thos. Brennan, 1108 Edison Ave.
Buildinwr Trades Council Joe Spaulding, 901 Minor Ave.
Electric*i Workers Frank Vidourek, 828 East Ave. Phone 1024-W.
Enginera' Local No. 91... John Corliss, 113% So. 3rd St.
Molder* .Jerry Galvin, 605 W. Norman Ave., Dayton, Ohio.
Carpen**rs Joe Spaulding, 901 Minor Ave.
Lather*' Local No. 276 Sherman Clear, 1050 Central Ave.
Milk St. I«e Cream Drivers St Helper3..Ed Dulli, 2255 Noble Ave. Pho. 1635-M
Painter® .Lester Long, 445 N. 9th St.
Patter* Makers Walter Friedman, 833 Campbell Ave.
Plaster®*® and Cement Finishers 214....G. Shoblom, 324 Main St.
Roofer** *-.ocal No. 68........ .....David Lyttle, 507 S. 6th St.
Plumbers
.....M.James
Stage Rands «....„Neil Johnson, 201 S. Monument Ave.
Picture Operators ...„..«Bob Wentz, 2805 Dixie Highway.
A. Solomon, 9 S. Front St.
MIDDLETOWN BUSINESS AGENTS
Painten* A. W. Stout, 608 Waite, Office T. C. Hall.
Movie iterators J3en H. Francis, 119 Monroe.
Stage Rands -Harry Keiser, Sutphin Ave.
Electrical Workers Frank Vidourek, 828 East Ave., Hamilton, Ohio.
r" r* *r i J.
So, don't fight against God—
Even the Machine has become
holy—
It has become something to lie
about, also—
It is so obvious that the "labor
saving" device—
Is effective only if it maroons the
laborer—
That the prophets of the Machine
feel constrained—
To preach a new gospel: that "The
Machine Makes Jobs"—
Glossing over glaring facts: that
Machines really make nothing—
GORHAM
Company Signs Jewelry
Union Pact
An agreement negotiated by Local
No. 31, International Jewelry Work
ers of Providence, Rhode Island, with
the Gorham Manufacturing Company
of that city recogniees the union as
the exclusive bargaining agency for
the company's employes in 36 de
partments to determine rates of pay,
wages, hours of employment or other
conditions of employment, "subject to
the provisions of the national labor
relations act, and to any require
ment of any law now or hereafter en
acted which may require the com
pany to recognize any other agent
or
agency in whole or in part for said
pui^)ose."
The eight hour day and forty hour
w
eek is established by the agreement.
bscribe for The Press
That men use or operate machine
to make commodities—
That control of machines is not even
for making of commodities—
That jobs arise from labor rela
tions of boss and his "hands"—
That when prospect of profits
not visible—
Jobs disappear, and machines
stand idle—
Making nothing at all.
In 20 years, from 1910 to 1930—
Population increased 32.5 per
cent—
While jobs of all kinds, including
small business men—
Including clerks, and women work
ers on farms—
Increased only 27 per cent—
Farm machinery made no jobs for
farmers—
There were 120,000 less farmer
owners and tenants in 1930 than in
1910—
There were 1,812,869 less farm la
borers—
There were 889,000 fewer women
farm laborers—
In 20 years, from 1910 to 1930
Proprietors, managers and officials
increased 11.9 per cent—
Wholesale and retail business men
increased 42.2 per cent—
But gained only by one-half of one
per cent of total gainfully employed
While superstitution protects the
holy faith—
In the Profit-Machine creed.
•_*
"A," ««fw S' ^bSitr' e •Mmi
'?. V '7 «,
urn
bcm
"Every ass things himself worthy to
stand with the fang's horses."
JULY
30—Chctmbersburo, Pa.,
burned by the Confed
erates, 1804.
31—Announcement
made of
the Fourth Liberty
Local
^jjr campaign, 1918.
*"AUGUST
1—The United States relin
quished control of Haiti,
1934.
2—German
troops invade
France at Cirey. 1914.
3—The first council of Eng
lishmen in Pennsylvania
was held, 1681.
4—Scotch immigrants
arrived to settle the town
of Londonde-n •/, N. H.,
1718.
5—Farragut ran the bat
teries at Mobile Bay, 1863.
QWJtVv
LaborQueries
Questions and Answers on La
bor: What It Has Done Where
It Stands on Problems of the
Day Its Aim and Program
Who's Who in the Ranks of
the Organized Toilers, etc., etc.
Q.—Did any union ever give up pre
viously existing privileges in pro
moting new contracts?
A.—Yes. The Brewery Workers'
Union insisted on the cancellation of
unlimited beer allowance, and sleep
ing quarters, for its members. Inde
pendence of workers of any favors of
the employers was gained, as well as
improvement in health and habits.
DRIVER'S RULES
The Time to Pre\#nt An Ac
cident is Before it Happens
At all times drivers must observe
the laws for speed and other traffic
regulations prescribed by local gov
ernment.
Signal by hand before, NOT WHEN,
you make a turn, slow down or stop.
When making either right or left
hand turns give pedestrians sufficient
warning and time to get out of your
path.
Keep safe distance behind vehicle
ahead in order to assure proper stop
if other vehicle stops suddenly.
Before backing up be sure that no
person or vehicle is directly behind
back slowly.
Passing of vehicles, except street
cars, proceeding in the same direction,
must be made to the left sound horn
when passing.
Street cars must be passed to the
right if street car has stopped to
take or leave passengers, stop not
less than ten feet behind car except
at safety zones, in which case proceed
slowly and with caution.
The union label has the "green
ight"—let's go!
CARD BOARD
Brass and Aluminum
CHECKS
ALL SIZES
WE SELL THEM
Nonpareil Ptg.Co.
326 Market Street
Phone 1296

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