OCR Interpretation


The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, November 14, 1941, Image 2

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1941-11-14/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE PRESS
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF ORGANIZED LABOR
THE NONPAREIL PRINTING CO.
PUBLISHERS AND PROPRIETORS
Subscription Price $1.00 per Tear
Payable in Advance
Ws do not bold ourmelvee responsible for any
riewa or opinions expressed in the articles
communications of correspondents.
Communications solicited from secretaries
of all societies and organizations, and should
e addressed to The Butler County Press, 826
Market Street, Hamilton, Ohio.
The publishers reserve the right to reject
tny advertisements at any time.
Advertising rates made known on application.
Whatever is intended for inrertion must be
authenticated by the name and address of the
writer, not necessarily for publication, but as
a guarantee of good faith.
Subscribers changing their address will
please notify this office, giving old and new
address to insure regular delivery of paper.
Entered at the Postoffice at Hamilton,
Ohio, as Second-Class Mail Matter.
Issued Weekly at SSI Market Strest
T«i*ph*n* liH Hamilton. Okie
Endorsed by the Trades and Labor
Council of Hamilton, Ohio
Endorsed by the Middletown Trades
and Labor Council of Middletown, O.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1941.
UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS
More than two years have now
elapsed since unemployment benefit
payments were begun in all the states
Reports covering 11 states, analyzed
by the Bureau of Employment Se
curity, Social Security Board, show
that while the unemployment funds
of most states are not only solvent
but have increased their reserves, these
reserves "in some states have been ac
cumulated at the expense of benefit
adequacy."
Not only have the weekly benefits
been too small, but the period for
which these benefits have been re
ceived has been short when account is
taken of the total amount of unem
ployment experienced by some work
ers. In other words, benefits are in
adequate and paid for too short
periods.
Findings of the study support or
ganized labor's demand for improve
ment of the unemployment compensa
tion system. Not only does the system
require liberalization, to provide larger
benefits for longer periods, but it
needs strengthening to meet the se
rious unemployment expected when
the defense program ends. In some
states with heavy defense employment,
it is likely that reserve funds will go
bankrupt when hit by post-war unem
ployment. This is the opinion of those
thoroughly familiar with the unem
ployment compensation system, includ
ing Chairman Arthur J. Altmeyer of
the Social Security Board.
o
THE I. L.O.
The International Labor Organiza
tion, at its recent conference in New
York, again focused attention on
world-wide co-operation. The confer
ence, with delegates present from 35
nations, an achievement in the widst
of world war, was itself an example
of such co-operation.
The meeting unanimously approved
a program of world co-operation after
the war, submitted by American and
PUDDWGS AMD
PiCKlES AND
CHEESE AND
And
AiM-SEC&EH
FROM ONE
WHO
•s_
PIES
WISE/J
-man
iwrnttBrnni
TO/HEN YOU suffer frorr, Acid
indigestion. Heartburn Sour
Stomach, Gas in Stomach—
BE WISE—TRY ALKA-SELTZER
Don't wait until you have an
Upset Stomach before you take
Alka-Seltzer Try it for Pain Re
lief the next time you have a
Headache. Cold. Simple Neuralgia.
"Morning After" o Musculai
Pains
At
you: Dug Store by the glass
and tn .'sc :-ges for home use
Alka -Seltxer
Edgar K. Wagner
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
The German press in occupied Po
land reports the conviction in Poznan
of 24 members of an illegal Polish
"military" group. Three of them were
sentenced to death, the other 21 con
demned to imprisonment.
The aims of the secret organization
were to prepare an uprising against
German domination and to restore an
independent Poland. It published and
distributed an illegal paper, "Polonia
Poznanska."
The German press warns the pop
ulation against another attempt at in
surrection. There will be no repeti
tion, it asserts, of the events of 1918
1919, when the Ostgebiet rebelled
against Germany. Whoever believes
in reviving the old insurrectionist
spirit, or participates in subversive
activities will suffer punishment or
death.
The severity of the German policy
is proof that even in the "incorpo
rated" areas, where the persecution of
Poles is at its worst, the spirit of re
sistance is unbroken. The death sen
tences, prisons, and concentration
camps testify that the invader well
knows he has not succeeded in gaining
any foothold in conquered Polish ter
ritory.
What brought about the present
sorry state of the world? The Man
churian "incident" which took place on
September 18, 1931, was the first of a
long series of aggressive acts that
have created today's world disorder,
many students of international af
fairs believe.
When the Japanese forcibly occu
pied Manchuria in 1931 and estab
lished the puppet regime of "Man
British delegates. The program looks
forward to, among other things, im
provement of living standards when
the conflict is over. As the Washing
ton Daily News says, Americans are
rightly concerned about this problem
and the I. L. 0. is one of the organ
izations on which we must depend to
prevent standards from dropping pain
fully.
"Until dictators tore the fabric of
international co-operation," the News
adds, "peoples of other countries, in
cluding many supposed to be tradi
tionally and hopelessly addicted to
cheap labor, made agreements under
the- auspices of the I. L. 0. to adhere
to certain international labor stand
ards, higher than they had before.
This is progress. It must be resumed
after the dictators have been over
thrown."
And the News quotes Mayor La
Guardia in opening the I. L. 0. confer
ence: "If we are going to have inter
national trade as set forth in the At
lantic Charter, no nation should have
an advantage over another because of
the exploitation of its own people."
o
THAT WPA PAY INCREASE
Tangible government recognition of
the need for wage increases to offset
the rising cost of living, has been
given by the WPA in ordering a 7%
per cent pay increase for WPA work
ers. The increase is admittedly mod
est, in view of the 18 per cent jump
in the cost of food and essential cloth
ing in the last year, but it is a pro
gressive step which can hardly encour
age the interests fighting to "freeze
wages."
o
WHAT NEXT?
The Forest Service, U. S. Depart
ment of Agriculture, has devised a
tree-planting machine, for use on shel
terbelts of the prairie states. The
machine, which has undergone careful
tests for three years, will plant about
8,000 trees or shrubs a day, it is re
ported.
o
WISDOM
Let reason be opposed to reason,
and argument to argument, and every
good government will be safe.—
Thomas Erskine.
Advertise in The Press.
JOE HOLSTEIN
at
LIBERTY HOME
Seventh and Walnut. Sts.
COMMENT ON WORLD EVENTS
THE BUTLER COUNTY PRESS
chuko" in the following year, the world
hardly realized that a new totalitarian
pattern of conquest was being forged
and the Wilsonian peace organization
was to be destroyed.
Following the Japanese precedent
in Asia, Germany and Italy have in
vaded and conquered many a nation
in Europe. And today, a decade after
the Manchurian "incident," the entire
world finds itself in a life-and-death
struggle between the totalitarian
forces of aggression and the demo
cratic forces of resistance.
As we look back upon the decade
that has just ended, we must dub
Japan senior aggressor, and Germany
and Italy junior partners. It was the
Mikado who led, and Hitler and Mus
solini who followed.
From the reliable "Inside Germany
Reports" it is learned that "labor
scarcity has been aggravated since the
Russian war began. There have been
a series of new official orders issued
with the hope of augmenting the labor
supply from the only reserves left—
women, girls and pensioners. Even
before the conflict, 66 per cent of all
girls in Germany between the ages of
14 and 16 were employed. A large pro
portion of the 34 per cent remaining
were desperately needed at home to
take care of large families. The
need for more workers is so great that
the authorities are forcing pensioners
over 70 years of age to go back to
work.
"A regulation has just been issued
forbidding the military physician from
declaring that a man is 'unfit for
work.' From now on the only judg
ment the physician can pass is that
a man is 'unfit for military service.'
THE
CHERRY TREE
Wli«r« witk *ur LittU Iitch« w* toll
th« tratb ik«ii Baity watttaiM
pr*f*andly, NMIUBMtkiifi,
The shooting will continue. More
ships will be sunk. Beyond doubt we
merely await the day when there will
be an A. E. F.
When you go to war you go to win
and you don't miss doing anything
that will help win.
Before the shooting stops, either
Adolph or Uncle Sam will be licked!
That is something that most people
haven't stopped to consider.
Either the European axis or Uncle
Sam will be licked!
So, when you talk about what you
think Uncle Sam ought to do, just ask
yourself whether you want Uncle Sam
to get licked.
You needn't expect any stalemate
as the outcome. And if there should
be or could be a stalemate, that would
be, in itself, defeat for Uncle Sam.
There isn't any such thing as
stalemate for dictatorship. Either
it exists and operates, or it
doesn't. Military stalemate, if it
were possible, would be victory for
the axis. But it would be defeat
for democracy.
There has to be victory—for democ
racy. Victory for the United States
of America. That won't be easy and
it won't be cheap.
That's why Americans must make
up their minds that whatever war calls
for must be given.
"Normal" life is out, until vic
tory comes, and probably for a
long time after.
Those who want to quibble about
the terrific price, or the discomfort, or
whether we should go full force into
action, should be asked:
Do you want Hitler to winf
Hitler has started shooting. He
can't stop shooting until he is
knocked out or until he knocks
us out.
So, we shall be dilly-dally, and belly
ache and hold back in the traces?
It would seem that common sense
would urge us to fight with ALL the
force we can muster.
What American wants America to
get licked?
Finally, here are a few observations
on the question of what we may call
informal war—undeclared war.
Informal war leaves several thou
sand enemy aliens free to go about
whatever their business in the United
States may be. The moment formal,
FOK.
liyputlr, mi*.
times recklessly.
You can put it down that we are
at war.
True, there has been no formal dec
laration. But just what do you call it
when Uncle Sam and Adolph Schickel
gruber are shooting at each other?
And do you notice how ridiculous
Adolph appears when you call him by
his own real family name?
But, about this business of being at
war—it has been looming up definitely
for many months. Finally it has come.
THE MARCH OF LABOR
TRADE UNIONS AnE
THE BULWARK.(*
MODERN
DEMOCRACIES.'/
WILLIAM E.
GREAT 19*CENTURY EN6LISH fRWtMlNISItR'O
XI DENT FREQUENCY
REACHES IT5 MAXIMUM
WORKERS BFJWEEN
20 AfJD 30, AND THERE
APTfcR FAILS STEADILY
WITH ADVANCING A6E.
declared war should begin, these thou
sands would be locked up.
Informal war precludes the United
States from doing many things that
could be and would be done in de
clared war.
The logic is that while informal war
may be waged for some time, perhaps
even for some months, we move cer
tainly toward formal war, toward war
in which, internally, as well as ex
ternally, ALL of the measures of war
can be called legally into use.
But remember always, every min
ute, that war has begun and that when
it ends either the Nazi poison will be
licked and wiped out, or Uncle Sam
will be licked. If Uncle Sam should be
licked, all freedom would vanish from
the earth. That must not happen.—
C. M. W.
NEW BUSINESSES
Hamilton
Clarence Lake, 707 Cleveland Ave
nue, novelties.
S. L. Dodsworth, 903 Campbell Ave
nue, heating equipment.
Nessim Shomer, 254 High Street,
dry goods.
Middletown
The Grill, 1820 Central Avenue, res
taurant.
G. C. Stacey, 2841 Burbank Avenue,
filling station.
Vearl H. Allen, 1328 Central Ave
nue, jewelry.
H. Allen Murray, 33 North Broad
Street, photography.
Jacob Faust, 1209 Central Avenue,
beverages.
Oxford
Estill Browning, R. R. 2, filling sta
tion.
Chas. H. Williamson, brushes.
Middletown Wins High
Praise In Traffic Record
Middletown, Ohio.—An improvement
of 45.8 per cent in reduction of traffic
fatalities in Middletown as shown by
National Safety Council statistics for
the last five years was praised by a
council field representative at a meet
ing of city officials and industrial
safety officials.
Adam H. Lintz, field agent of the
safety council, commended city officials
on their enforcement activities but ad
vised the establishment of an active
safety council program in which edu
cation, engineering, and enforcement
would receive equal stress.
TURKEY DINNER AND BAZAAR
The annual turkey dinner and ba
zaar will be given by the Ladies' Aid
of the High Street Church of Christ,
Wednesday, December 3.
DON'T FORM
HABIT
BAD
(From the International Molders' and
Foundry Workers' Journal)
Election time is here again, and al
though this is not a national election
year, the matters at issue are of
enough importance to make it advis
able for every citizen to exercise his
right of franchise.
There are state and municipal leg
islators to be elected, as well as
mayors of cities and governors of
states. These are the people we look
to for laws that will benefit the work
ers and their families, and unless we
do our share to put into office those
who will help pass these laws, we
can't kick if we don't get them.
Neglecting to vote is like staying
away from a meeting. It gets to be
a habit, and a bad one at that.
F6ISIA1ICW REGELATING OR pR0HlB/1)AJ6
SALE OF PRISON-MADE
GOODS IS NOW IN EFFECT
IN 36 STATES
IT'S MO ACCIDENT
THAT WISE WORKERS
Bur HATS BEARING
THIS LA&EL-R0RA ONION
MADE: HAT ISA WELL'
MADE HAT. LOOK. FOR.
THE- UMlON LABEL..
Auto Club Officers Attend
39th Annual Conference
C. J. Parrish, president of the But
ler County Automobile Club J. W.
Krauth, vice-president William Howe,
secretary, and John F. Mayer, director,
attended the American Automobile As
sociation secretaries' conference and
the association's thirty-ninth annual
convention Wednesday through Satur
day of this week in White Sulphur
Springs, W. Va.
MINERS HONOR JOHN MITCHELL
Scranton, Pa. (ILNS). Pennsyl
vania's anthracite coal mines were
closed on October 29 in tribute to John
Mitchell, famous mine union leader.
Thousands of miners joined in celebra
tion of Mitchell Day, so called because
it is the anniversary of the settlement
of the big strike conducted under the
leadership of Mitchell as head of the
United Mine Workers. The strike
ended October 29, 1900, resulting in a
wage increase.
SPECIAL EVERY DAY
BARBECUED RIBS
Fried Chicken Plate Lunch
6'/
Hudepohl and Burger Beer on Tap
Whiskey Wine and Mixed Drinks
Phone 3184 for Your Reservations
THE OASIS
514 High Street
ROY SMITH'S CAFE
317 Maple Avenue
Open Until 2:30
n's
GUARANTEED
I"
SURE-STARTING
PUNCH I
Yes sir!—you'll have less worry about punching in on
time—or getting home on time—when you have SOHIO
Guaranteed Starting for your car. You get it-free
just by using SOHIO'S fast-starting gasoline and lubri
cants with a normal winter-strength battery—a written
guarantee that you start, or SOHIO pays the service
cost of having a garage start it for you. Get yours
today—and keep the boss smiling!
THE STANDARD OIL COMPANY (OHIO)
Why not
SOHIO
Hamilton Foundry &
Machine Company III
Birthday Celebration
Officials of the Hamilton Foundry
and Machine Company played host last
Sunday afternoon at an open-house,
held in the plant, commemorating the
firm's fiftieth anniversary. More than
1,500 persons, employes and members
of their families attended the open
house.
Featured on the program were
guided tours of the foundries, motion
pictures, light refreshments, and ex
hibits of various safety devices em
ployed by the foundry workers.
Following the plant tours the guests
sat down to cider and doughnuts and
ice cream, and as they left they re
ceived cast-iron paper weights as sou
venirs of the occasion.
Six Permits Total $11,700
Construction costing an estimated
$11,700 is provided in six building per
mits issued this week by Frank E
Weaver, city building inspector. The
permits went to Blanche Brady for
three $1,000 residences on Pascal and
Marshall Avenues Durb Tuley, $3,200
house at Hancock Avenue and Erie
Boulevard E. L. Wilder, $2,500 resi
dence at 1118 Rose Avenue, and a
$3,000 residence at 1135 Webster Ave
nue.
Don't never use a preposition to end
a sentence up with.
—%Tis "The Banner of the
Free"—Now is the time to tkow
the world which Flag you stand,
for. Display a Flag in your
home, office and ttore, every
day.
We Have A Large Stock
MADE IN AMERICA
Silk, Wool. Cotton and Paprr
WITTMAN
:M1 S. S rond St. Hamilton. O
SEE US
IF YOU NEED A LOAN
To
Build—Improve—Buy
Your Home
HOME
NULTON PARRISH, Secy.
Third and Court Sts.
S A I N

xml | txt