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The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, June 18, 1943, Image 2

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THE PRESS
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF ORGANIZED LABOR

THE NONPAREIL PRINTING CO
PUBLISHERS AND PROPRIETORS
Subscription Price $1.00 per Year
Payable in Advance
We do not hold ourselves responsible for any
fiews or opinions expressed in the articles or
Communications of correspondents.
Communications solicited from secretaries
0f all societies and organizations, and should
fee addressed to The Butler County Press, 826
Market Street, Hamilton, Ohio.
The publishers reserve the right to reject
•ny advertisements at any time.
Advertising rates made known on application.
Whatever is intended for insertion must be
authenticated by the name and address of the
writer, not necessarily for publication, but
a guarantee of good faith.
Subscribers changing their address will
please notity this office, giving old and new
address to insure regular delivery of paper
Entered at the Postoffice at Hamilton,
Ohio, as Second-Class Mail Matter.
Issued Weekly at 311 Market Street
Telephone 1296 Hamilton, Ohie
Endorsed by the Trades and Labor
Council of Hamilton, Ohio
Endorsed by the Middletown Trades
and Labor Council of Middletown, O
FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 1943.
TRAGIC PRODUCTION LOSSES
You can't put out much of a fire
with a hose that has 9,300,000 leaks
in it. But that is what America tried
to do last year—put out the biggest
"lire" the world has ever seen with a
production hose that resembled a
tublar sieve.
Briefly, every accident is a leak in
the hose of war production, and last
year 9,300,000 persons in this country
were injured in accidents. To this ac
cident toll add the lost time which re
sulted from illness and avoidable ab
senteeism, and the unfavorable effect
it had on war production staggers the
imagination.
Falls killed 24,000 last year. A tre
mendous leak in the hose!
A total of 8,900 persons died of
burns!
Another 7,000 drowned!'
Catastrophes, in each of which the
toll was at least five lives, killed more
than 2,600—more than two and a half
times as many as in 1941.
Add to these all the other mishaps
which occurred, and it's tragically ob
vious that far too many holes were
punched in the war production hose.
The sad part of it is that most acci
dents took place because someone was
careless—because someone didn't plan
a job right, didn't think it through in
advance.
In the strategy of war the side
which does the best planning gets the
best results, whether it be on the bat
tlefront or the home front. And on
the safety flank of the home front
America didn't do so well in 1942.
o
PROGRESSIVE UNION STEP
The International Brotherhood of
Electrical Workers has given an ex
ample of its farsightedness and pro
gressiveness by appointment of a
o i e e o n o s w a o e s
which will cooperate with a parallel
committee from the National Electri
cal Contractors' Association.
Union members are M. H. Hedges,
Washington, D. C. J. Scott Milne,
When a fellow
needs extra cash
for taxes and other
things, where can
he get it?
At The City Loan and it's
absolutely free for 10 days.
Keep the loan a week, a month
or a year. It's up to you. The
first 10 days are always free.
Try one and see amounts up to
flOOO.
OAJM* SAVOR, AUNR.
THE CITY LOAN
and Guaranty Company
.l£s Hiffh Street Phone
Hamilton, Ohio
r"
COMMENT ON WORLD EVENTS
HIRAM
MOTHERWELL, former
European correspondent for the
Chicago Daily News and now consult
ant with the Postwar Division of the
Columbia Broadcasting System, has
come to a cheering conclusion. A long
period of starvation and chaos in
Europe, predicted by many prophets
of gloom, is not inevitable, he de
clares.
"The modern world has everything
it takes—wealth, experience, science
—to enable Europe to rebuild itself
within 5 years," he says.
In Rebuilding Europe—After Vic
tory, a new Public Affairs Committee
pamphlet, Motherwell asserts, "The
new Europe can easily become capable
of producing twice as much wealth as
it could produce in 1939." But this can
be done only if all permanent political
arrangements and settlements are de
ferred until economic Europe has got
on its feet again, he warns.
The organization which will be re
sponsible for the reconstruction of
Europe is being built now, according
to the pamphlet, out of agencies which
exist in the United Nations. Chief
among these are our own Office of
Foreign Relief and Rehabilitation
Operations, the British Inter-Allied
Bureau on Postwar Requirements, and
the international food commission re
cently discussed at the international
food conference at Hot Springs, Vir
ginia.
The pamphlet pictures this United
Nations Reconstruction Organization
moving in on armistice-day Europe
"as a sort of receiver in bankruptcy to
re organize the continent's assets in
trust for its peoples."
We will find a Europe in which the
San Francisco Louis Ingram, Fort
Worth J. C. Mcintosh, Philadelphia
Guy Alexander, Minneapolis.
The committee will gather all the
data that bears on the future of the
electrical construction industry in the
coming months: It will examine this
material, analyze it and make recom
mendations to the two organizations.
As the Electrical Workers Journal re
marks
"The committee will face stirring
problems. It will have to decide what
part the electrical construction indus
try is to play in rebuilding the world
that was destroyed by the war. It will
have to decide on such problems as
termination of contracts with govern
ment, reemployment of members in
peacetime occupations, and it will
have to speak with certainty and ac
curacy."
o
WHAT NEXT?
A Karlsruhe paper says that today
even women's hair can serve the Ger
man armament industry and it is now
being collected to be used in the pro
duction of driving belts. Every dress
ing table should, therefore, have a
paper bag for collecting hair, the
newspaper says, adding that block
leaders will call monthly at every
household to collect the hair.
o
WISDOM
Is life worth living? Yes, so long
As there is wrong to right.
—Alfred Austin.
State Anti-Poll Tax Bill
Held Unconstitutional
Nashville, Tenn. (ILNS).—Reac
tionaries are backing a court fight on
the bill repealing the state poll tax,
passed this year by the Tennessee
legislature. The bill's constitutionality
has been questioned in the first court
test, a chancery court holding that the
state constitution requires the pay
ment of a poll tax as a prerequisite
to voting and that only a constitu
tional amendment can abolish it.
An appeal to the higher courts is
being taken on the ground that the
state constitution does not require any
specific tax, and that the poll tax
must be expressly provided for.
Priest To Be Ordained
Rev. Joseph F. Wulftange, son of
Mrs. John A. Wulftange, 451 South
Third street, will be ordained to the
priesthood at West Baden College,
West Baden, Ind., Wednesday morn
ing and will conduct his first mass
here Sunday at St. Joseph's Church.
Stores Shorten Hours
Oxford, Ohio.—Oxford drug stores
are shortening their opening hours
for the summer, it was announced.
They will open at 8:30 o'clock daily
and will close at 9 every night, except
Saturday, when they will close at 10
o'clock. They will be closed Sunday
afternoon from 12:30 to 3 o'clock.
JLHJb
siU
social demoralization is even greater
than the tremendous physical de
struction. Governments, civil service,
political parties, and press will be
non-existent or in chaos. Transporta
tion will be crippled, and primitive
barter will be the only means of ex
change.
"Food without delay, food without
repayment, and food without dis
crimination" will be the first major
job of the reconstruction organization,
the author declares, "for food will tell
the people of Europe as nothing else
could that the United Nations repre
sent reconstruction while Hitler rep
resented destruction."
The next jobs awaiting the United
Nations agency will be: controlling
transportation, planning physical re
construction, converting war indus
tries to peacetime production, super
vising credit and banking facilities,
and fixing rules for the conduct of
business.
In these tasks, the United Nations
would be wise in "enlisting European
resources and brains—by no means
excluding German brains—to the ut
most," suggests Motherwell, pointing
to the church, to those municipal ad
ministrations which will not be torn
by civil war, to the consumer and pro
ducer cooperatives, and to the large
i n u s i a a n o e i a u s s
which can be operated as instruments
of production "when the top Nazi or
Quisling executives have been booted
out."
"Reconstruction," the pamphlet
concludes, "should soon become not a
United Nations economic dictatorship,
but a cooperative effort on the part of
all European peoples to reedem their
future."
THE
CHERRY TREE
Where with our Little Hatchet «i tell
th« truth abaut many things, sometimes
profoundly, sometimes flippantly, some
times recklessly.
This price business comes close to
being tragic.
A roll back of prices was promised.
We haven't even had a little bit of a
push back. There's just been a mere
tickling of a few prices, just enough
so they can be seen to squirm a bit.
A lady chicken that would have cost
about $1.50 pre-war now runs you up
to a total of roughly three bucks. If
you roll off three cents a pound on
that purchase, how much are you in?
Very little.
That's the story on all sides. The
reduction are:
Very little.
And you get the same old run
around when you figure in percent
ages.
Suppose there's a general 10 per
cent reduction. It never can average
out that way because nobody buys the
same amount of all the things on
which that average percentage is
figured.
Nothing is trickier than cost of liv
ing figures.
You can double the cost of a pack
of matches and nobody is going to go
broke paying it.
But if you double the cost of meat
that's something else again. And it
HAS been doubled.
Amazingly enough the cost of bread
has scarcely budged throughout the
war days.
Few commodities are more eco
nomically produced, which may have
something to do with the stability of
prices, Mr. Thurman Arnold to the
contrary notwithstanding.
But to get back to the tragedy of
price fixing and unfixing.
There's an axiom about the meeting
of the immovable object and the irre
sistable force.
Well, it doesn't apply where price
fixing and buying power are con
cerned.
Price increases seem to take the
place of the irresistable force and
when prices slam into income, or
buying capacity, in the market place,
money goes flying into spattering
particles.
The fixed income people and
the wage earners,- whose income
is practically fixed, get it in the
neck.
Prices on the rise, matched against
incomes that have to stay where they
are, raise hob with living standards.
That is happening.
When you add commodities that no
longer are to be had at any price, then
you raise more hob with living
standards.
We are in the midst of a beautiful
i»ess,
We can set a lot of the blame oppo
site the Office of Price Administra
tion. Henderson or Brown it doesn't
make much difference. It's still a
mess.
McNutt's Manpower outfit hasn't
helped the mess any. And the politics
of WLB have added to the confusion.
v
1
L/il/K L/UUJN 1 1 KiLbb
Jn IMt WW PIRIOO l9lS*
«92O COST Of MVMJT
ROSE TO 2)4 TIMES
1WAT OF fve 2OYEA0S
Pft&ceotM* iwe i
WAR.
to
THE MARCH OF LABOR
oNcie
k
While the war goes gloriously on,
straight down the path to victory,
civilian administrations can't seem to
keep their heads or their directions.
The President runs a beautiful war,
but through his appointed aides he
runs a sloppy home front.
Perhaps this isn't the President's
fault, except that he appointed the
men.
But the men, once appointed, have
been playing a lovely game of politics
and displaying a lousy brand of ad
ministration capacity at one and the
same time.
So, you'll march out and count your
pennies and count your ration points
and see what you get. Nobody will
kick against necessary sacrifices. But
we have a right to kick all over the
place at politicians who mess up the
home front needlessly.—CMW.
War Workers Face Crisis
In Automobile Tire Wear
Washington, D. C.—War workers
face a crisis in their automobile
transportation before the end of 1943
due to tire wear, making essential the
continuation and strengthening of
conservation measures, the Public
Roads Administration of the Federal
Works Agency, and the Highway
Traffic Advisory Committee to the
War Department concluded.
The conclusion was based on results
of an investigation during the latter
part of 1942 at 59 Ohio war industries
by the Ohio Planning Survey in co
operation with the Public Roads Ad
ministration and the Traffic Advisory
Committee. Estimates made by own
ers of about 55,000 cars were ana
lyzed.
Expect Lively Race
For Council Posts
The Hamilton Council race this fall
probably will be a lively affair.
Two Councilmen have announced
that they will seek reelection, others
are known to be considering running,
and several new names are expected
to enter the picture.
The latest announcement was made
tonight when Dr. Mark Millikin said
he would be a candidate for reelec
tion on November 2.
NEW BUSINESSES
Hamilton
Daniel Combs, 817 Maple avenue,
auto junk.
R. J. Henderson, R. R. 7, grocery.
Dale Kelley, Second and Hanover
streets, grocery.
New Beer Permit
Application was made by Charles
N. Hayes, for the Butler County Fair
Grounds, Hamilton, D-2.
Myriad of Union Cigarettes
Washington, D. C.—An idea of
ii4
CKAW4S Oft irt
LAlM&LS, U6EKTY
KMOtfSfJOfttlMG
Birr
Victories?
sr"
(LABOR.
WogKS,
FlGtfTE,
oives—
AND L6NQS
ifS MOrfgY
the
huge number of union-made Raleigh
cigarettes that have been sent
Read The Pres®.
J, j* jg, %.• i
by
unions to members of the armed
forces is given by the report that up
to March 31 alone, local unions af
filiated with the International Broth
erhood of Electrical Workers had
purchased 4,772,200. Many other big
national and international unions have
bought Raleighs to equal or exceed
the Electrical Workers. The cigarettes
are sent under a plan worked out by
the Brown and Williamson Tobacco
Corporation, Louisville, Ky., manufac
turers of Releighs and other union
label cigarettes and tobacco products.
&
VfalDElM^IU-lPS
1811-1064 ftoR.
WOKKERS'ei6HXS AB0UT1OW.
Including-mm GRAND CM ILOR©4 OF
iMMWrftAMT*/ tVfcfc -THlfcD Of OUR.
(BftoWfU 1*1 POPiHATUW 6*1
CB 1890
V^tXRecTiYDVfc 1b IMMIGRATION
tkices cKAHse/Bor
Utt OMtoN UA&EX- wfA
HAT ALWAYS IS YOOK
QOA&ANTU Of FOIV
vauit .'es
GOAL IS $2,000,000—
NEW YORK UNIONS
GIVE $700,000 TO
LABOR WAR CHEST
New York City (ILNS).—Nearly
$700,000 has been contributed by
American Federation of Labor unions
in this city for the Labor War Chest,
Matthew Woll, AFL vice-president
and chairman of the chest, announces.
Woll predicted that the total given
through AFL organizations here by
the end of 1943 would be $2,000,000
The money is to be devoted to vari
ous war relief purposes overseas and
to special war projects of organized
labor at home.
Among the projects planned by the
chest is that of financing a 21-car hos
pital train to be called the Thomas J.
Lyons Memorial Train, in honor of the
late president of the New York State
Federation of Labor. Wounded service
men returning from overseas would
be transported from disembarkation
points to Army and Navy hospitals in
the train.
MAKING PUBLIC
OPINION
(From Electrical Workers' Journal)
One of the most interesting facts
brought back from his world tour by
Wendell Willkie involves the probing
of public opinion by dictators. Here
in America citizens believe that pub
lic opinion is made naturally, chiefly
through the press and radio. In dic
tatorial countries the press and radio
are controlled by the government and
so dictators have their "Gallup Polls"
to find out what the citizenship is
thinking and wishing.
Here in the United States it is even
hinted that the White House has its
methods of finding out what citizens
are thinking apart from the current
channels of the private press and the
private radio.
The fact is that neither the press
nor the radio in the United States re
flects much more than the opinion of
30 percent of the citizens. Before any
one can discover what America is
really thinking about they must read
the labor press which is of consider
able scope if not influence outside of
the labor movement.
Finally all this might add up to the
fact that citizens should go on making
public opinion assiduously and with
out fear in order to effect the destiny
of the nation.
Advertise in The Press.
S29 South Second Street
V
Funds Bid the Boys Goodby
Concord, N. H.—Young folks in
New Hampshire will receive a "royal
sendoff" from their home towns upon
their induction into the armed forces,
under terms of a new law enacted re
cently by the state legislature. Muni
cipalities of the state, under the law,
may appropriate funds for "entertain
ment for men of the town at the time
of their induction into the armed
foi'ces of the United States in time of
war."
Working safely and keeping well
help war production.
ADVERTISEMENTS
State Legals
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
STATE OP OHIO
DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS
Columbus, Ohio, June 5, 1943.
Engineer of Hales Legal Copy No. 43-187
UNIT PltlOK CONTRACT
Sealed proposals will be received at
the office of the State Highway Director
of Ohio, at Columbus, Ohio, until 10:00
A. M., Ohio Standard Time, Tuesday,
June 29, 1943, for improvements in:
Butler County, Ohio, on Section of
the Hamilton-Cleves Road, State High
way No. 44, State Route No. 128, U. S.
Route No. 27 in Ross Township, and
Hamilton County, Ohio, on Section of
the Hamilton-Cleves Road, State High
way No. 44, State Route No. 128, U. S.
Route No. 50-BYP in Crosby Township,
by widening and resurfacing with as
phaltie concrete.
Width: Pavement 20 feet Roadway
variable.
Length 27,986.67 feet or 5.300 miles.
Estimated cost $72,350.00
Contract to be completed not later
than October 15, 1943.
The minimum wage to be paid to all
labor employed on this contract shall be
in accordance with the "Schedule of
Prevailing Hourly Wage Rates Ascer
tained and Determined by The Depart
ment of Industrial Relations applicable
to State Highway Department Improve
ments in accordance with Sections 17-3,
17-4, 17-4a, 17-5 and 17-5a of the General
Code of Ohio."
The bidder must submit with his bid
a certified check in an amount equal to
five per cent of the estimated cost, but
in no event more than ten thousand dol
lars.
Plans and specifications are on file in
the department of highways and the
office of the resident district deputy di
rector.
The director reserves the right to re
ject any and all bids.
H. G. SOURS,
State Highway Director.
June 11—2t.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
STAT 10 OF OHIO
DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS
Columbus, Ohio, June 5, 1943.
Engineer of Sales Legal Copy No. 43-156
UNIT PRICE CONTRACT
Sealed proposals will be received at
the office of the State Highway Director
of Ohio, at Columbus, Ohio, until 10:00
A. M., Ohio Standard Time, Tuesday,
June 29, 1943, for improvements in:
Proposals Nos. 1 to 5 inclusive are
offered as one project and will be
awarded as one contract.
Proposal No. 1
Butler County, hiw, on Sections
(Part) and of the Glendale-Princeton
Road, State Highway No. 922, State
Route No. 747, in Liberty and Union
Townships, by applying a bituminous
treatment, Item T-31.
Pavement: Width 18 feet.
Length 33,264 feet or 6.30
miles.
Proposal No. 3
Clermont County. Ohio, on Section
(Part) of the Mil ford-Vera Cruz Road,
State Highway No. 494, State Route No
13], in Miami, Goshen, and Stonelick
Townships, by applying a bituminous
treatment, Item T-31.
Pavement: Width 18 feet.
Length 34,320 feet or 6.50
miles.
Proposal No. 3
Clermont County, Ohio, on Section
of the Batavia-Clarksville Road. State
Highway No. 255, State Route No. 132
in Batavia and Stonelick Townships, bar
TP3iylne
a bitumtnous
H'/lJway
o T2Vt.£ldide£
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
BIG SOCIAL EVERY FRIDAY AND SUNDAY
COME AND SPEND AN ENJOYABLE EVENING
PLENTY OF GAMES
AND EXTRA FEATURES 0
MOOSE HOME
At 8:30 P. M.
treatment, Item
Pavement: Width 18 feet.
Length 20,064 feet or 3.80
miles.
Proposal No. 4
°hl?'
on
Section A
(Part) of the iiatavia-Southeast Road.
No- 811, State Route No!
Ill, in Batavia Township, by applying a
bituminous treatment, Item T-31
Pavement: Width 16 feet.
Length 22,704 feet or 4.30
miles.
Proposal No. 5
(:ierm(mt
County, Ohio, on Section A
of the Wilhamsburg-Chilo Road, State
li •w-Mi' k
State Route
in Williamsburg and Tate
Iteir^TNin
No. 133,
Townshins
S & bituminous
treatment)
Pavement: Width 17 feet.
Length 34,320 feet or 6.50
miles.
Total estimated cost $32 835 00
Proposals Nos. 1 to 5 inclusive of this
project to be completed not later than
September 15, 1943.
The minimum wage to be paid to all
labor employed on this contract shall be
'lance with the "Schedule of
Prevailing Hourly Wage Rates Ascer
tained and Determined by The Denart-
Industrial Relations applicable
to State Highway Department Improve-
,"e"ts17U1
accordance with Sections
"Ji ir'Shii'" "-5a
lhe
"er"17-3
subm
it with his bid
a certified check in an amount equal to
five percent of the estimated cost, but
lars°
eve
niore than ten thousand dol-
Pians and specifications are on file in
the department of highways and the of
fice of the resident district deputy direc-
The director reserves the right to re
ject any and all bids.
H. G. SOURS,
June 11—2t
Edgar K. Wagner
Hlghvvay
Dlrectors.
Hamilton, Ohio

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