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The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, October 22, 1943, Image 3

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1943-10-22/ed-1/seq-3/

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Navy's New Policy on
Release of News Hailed As
Step In Right Direction
New York City (ILNS).—Hailing
the Navy Department's new policy
providing for the speedier release of
news, Editors & Publisher says, un
der the heading, "Navy Censor Re
laxes."
"Under a heavy barrage of pro
tests from newspaper editors and cor
respondents, the Navy Department
apparently has eased off its tight grip
on the news. To be sure, the first evi
dences of a new policy concern mat
ters which are scarcely current.
Eleven months after the event, the
public has at last been informed that
the famous Battleship is the U.S.S.
South Dakota which thousands of
people have known all year, but which
newspapers could not print.
"We also hear now that the com
manding officers at Pearl Harbor will
not be brought to court-maritial for
their alleged negligence until after
the war—a fact which we seem to
have read several months ago. Also
of 1942 vintage is the release of de
tails on the sinking of the U.S.S.
Hornet.
"It must be plain to the President
and his military and naval advisers
that no newspaper in America wishes
to violate any reasonable regulations
designed to promote the safety of our
fighting units. The press has cheer
fully complied with requests for se
crecy, even when no logical basis for
them was evident. As months passed,
it became more and more clear to
competent editors and Washington re
porters that military censorship was
suppressing news to which the people
had a just right. The findings of the
newspaper advisory board of the OWI
made this plain in words which could
not be misunderstood, and the appar
ent change in naval policy followed
immediately.
"If the new order is to be perma
nent, it will have to have similar sup
port in the War Department, even
more, from the President himself. Mr.
Roosevelt's attitude toward the White
House reporters in recent months has
all too often been either peevish or
arrogant, and in neither guise is he at
his best."
Labor and Many Other
Organizations to Help
Returning War Veterans
Washington, D. C. (ILNS).—Eight
government agencies, headed by the
Veterans' Administration and U. S.
Employment Service, the Red Cross,
labor organizations and civic leadei's
in every community in the country
will aid in obtaining civilan jobs for
returning war veterans.
A bulletin issued by Selective Serv
ice announces plans to assign to every
draft board a reemployment commit
teeman, who will be the veteran's
"personal representative, agent and
adviser" in returning him to his old
job.
In addition, the bulletin announces
the creation of a national clearing
house committee, consisting of repre
sentatives from 16 organizations, and
said that state and local committees
were now being organized.
Labor on Local Groups
The function of local committees
will be to handle, as community prob
lems, "all reemployment cases that
cannot be adjusted by the reemploy
ment committeemen" attached to the
draft boards.
The local committees will be com
posed. of persons from the 16 organi­
•5AVINCS
s
1
zations represented on the national
committee and from any other groups
which can help with the task.
The 16 organizations include the
American Federation of Labor, Rail
way Labor Executive Association,
and Congress of Industrial Organiza
tions. Others are: American Farm
Bureau Federation, American Iron
and Steel Institute, American Legion,
Disabled American Veterans, Kiwanis
International, Lions International, Na
tional Association of Manufacturers,
National Exchange Club, National
Grange, Rotary International, United
States Chamber of Commerce, United
States Junior Chamber of Commerce,
Veterans of Foreign Wars.
Committeeman's Duties
Each honorably discharged veteran
is entitled to have his problem handled
by the reemployment committeeman
of his own local board, or if that is
inconvenient, the committeeman of
any other local board.
The reemployment committeeman,
in addition to his direct responsibility
of returning the veteran to his old
job when possible, will serve as liai
son man with Government agencies
which provide specific services for
veterans.
WAR ACTIVITY COUNCIL
OF STUDENTS: SWACS
Oxford, Ohio.—Taking their cue
from the WAVES and WACS, Miami
U n i v e s i y o- e s a e e o i n
SWACS this fall. The name stands for
Student War Activities Council.
Members donate blood to the Red
Cross, help in the Red Cro^s surgical
dressing unit and do a host of other
things that help the war effort.
Safety and Health Ignored
Boston. State legislatures com
pletely ignored need for adequate in
dustrial safety measures and inspec
tion staffs, the AFL Executive Coun
cil reported to the federation's annual
convention. About half the states have
no authority to make safety codes for
industry and not one state was given
authority this year, the council said,
adding that the need for passage of
the Norton bill for federal aid to state
labor departments to protect the
health and safety of workers is
"amply demonstrated by the lack of
interest shown by the states in this
subject."
Garbage Contract Signed
BANIV&
•HAMILTON OHIO*
"The Bank of Helpful Service"
Middletown, Ohio.—A contract for
the removal of garbage in five dis
tricts of Lemon Townships was signed
Monday by Township Trustees. The
work will be handled by Carl D. Kash
who was authorized to make the col
lection's in Dixie Heights, Maple
Ridge, Avalon, Maple Park, and
Graham Subdivisions. A charge for
the collection will be made direct
against householders on the basis of
the quantity carted away.
TOP THIS ONE
The mill foreman came upon two
darkies walking slowly up the road,
single file.
"Say, you, why ain't you working?"
"We's working, boss, sho' nuff.
We's carrying this plank up to the
mill."
"What plank? I don't see any
plank."
"Well, fo' de land's sake, Abe, ef
we ain't gone an' forgot de plank."
Advertise in The Press.
tires
•Triumph
"over illness, weather
and work handicaps*
TRUST-CO*
ME B£ R' £E ERA DEPOSIT INSURANCE. CORPORATION
flUTMOftt WAft 0OHO$f
LEVI YOUNG PUBLIC SALE
A public sale of personal property
will be held at the residence of Levi
Young, at his residence in Bethany,
Thursday, October 21, at 1 o'clock. A
general assortment of household ar
ticles will be offered for sale. Harry
H. Despond, attorney and Harry Hon
erlaw will be in charge of the sale.
CANT YOU
SLEEP?
Wliving
HEN the stress of modern
gets "on your nerves"
ft good sedative can do a lot to
lessen nervous tension, to make
you more comfortable, to permit
rostfol sleep.
Next time a day's work and
vorrv or a night's wakefulnesss,
makes you Irritable, Restless or
Jumpy—gives you Nervous Head
ache or Nervous
'WHEN 'MORNING AFTER'CLOUP*
APPEAR
"DON'T WASTE YOUR TIME A W«l WNG.
JL£T ALKA-SELTZER LIFT THE FOG,
YOUlLFINDTHE SUN STILL SHINING.
ImORNING AFT£Tiii
HEARTY dinner or midnight
»ok-
A1ing,
lunch, a little too much imol
perhaps a cocktail or two
—great fun tonight: a miserable
letdown headachey feeling tomor
row morning.
TRY ALKA-SELTZER
Alka-Seltzer is one medidna
useful in the relief of raanv minor
ailments, Headache, Acid Indiges
tion, Cold Symptoms, Muscular
a i u e N e u a i a u s u a
Pains.
Alka-Seltzer
is
THE BUTLER COUNTY PRESS
THE MAFCH 2F LAUC1
WE OO MORE THAN BUY WISE'
LY WHEN WE BUY UNION-MADE
OOOOS. WE REAFFIRM OUR
BELIEF IN ORGANIZED LABOR'S
FIGHT FOR A GETTER WORLD.
LOOK FOR THIS LASIl WHEN YOU BUY A HAT.
NEW BUSINESSES
Hamilton
Frank J. Wiley, 325 South Third
streeet, furniture.
Alice Jones, 435 Sycamore street,
restaurant.
George R. Berger, Front and Mar
ket streets, service station.
Anna M. Johnson, 127 South Third
street, restaurant.
Middletown
Raymond Cottingin, 1790 Central
avenue, repair garage.
INDUSTRY'S USING COST OF NBOUCT
OhM Off**
to ml/in mXnii fttf
WOtKttS
KtUIO 1940 17.000 27000 44000
1041 11000 I2JOOO 90,000
wotxro
tWJUUO I MS MtOjia* IMSM Ufijm
m\ IjETOjO* UOOjOO* 1,170,000
MAM-SAYS
LOST IN0 ITOjOOUW SOJOOjOOO 420400400
mi tSUOOJQB MOjOOOJOO 400400400
anxmrn.
'±191
,cC?WE
1721-I0O3
EM6LISH
Of
STATUTESLABORERS
1349
WERE
LAWS PASSED
WHILE
Wt BLACK DEATH WAS STILL RAGING
IN THE
tfORTri Of
ENGLAND TO PR6-
VWT laborers from demanding
HIGHER
WAGES FROM fcMPlOVERS.
OfT
UN\o3-
Puts All Pay In War Bonds
Alexandria, La.—E. S. Speir of Lo
cal No. 247, United Association of
Journeymen Plumbers and Steam Fit
ters, is investing his entire pay of
$325 each month in war bonds. He is
employed on the Army Air Base here.
He has been congratulated by Capt.
T. L. Moss, Jr., post engineer for his
patriotism.
LEVY PROPOSAL O.K.'D
BY HAMILTON GROUP
The two-tenths mill levy proposal
for recreational purposes which will be
submitted to voters in the November
2 election was approved by the Hamil
ton Coordinating Council for the
treatment and prevention of juvenile
delinquency at a meeting tonight in
Council chambers of the Municipal
Building.
Subscribe for The Press.
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Indigestion,
try
Dr. Miles Nervine
'((Liquid or Effervescent Tablets)
Dr. Miles Nervine is a time
tested sedative that has been
bringing relief from Functional
Nervous Disturbances for sixty
years yet is as up-to-date as this
morning's newspaper. Liquid 25*
and $1.00, Effervescent tablets 35*
and 75*. Read directions and use
only as directed.
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
non-laxativ4
pleasant to take—try
it.
At all drug stores by
the
drink
and by the package.
Ba UUitJi Try
A k a S e z e
Y
Y
Here is a Real
P-arv-^i
«*t
Bids In On USO Office
Oxford, Ohio.—Bids on work to be
done in remodeling a downtown store
room for use of USO headquarters
are now in the hands of the Chicago
regional office of the USO. Work will
begin as soon as approval is given.
The cost is estimated at almost
$10,000.
CENTRAL LABOR UNIONS
BUY BOMBER FOR ARMY
San Bernardino, Calif.—A check for
$413,707 was turned over to the U. S.
Treasury Department recently by offi
cials of the AFL San Bernardino and
Riverside Central Labor Councils to
purchase a four-motored Army bomb
er which will be christened "The
Spirit of Labor," Frank P. Ryan, pub
lic relations director of the San Ber
nardino Metal Trades Council, an
nounced. The money was collected in
a three-week's War Bond sale cam
paign.
—FOR VICTORY: BUY BONDS—
United Labor Group To Work
For Woman Candidate
New York City (ILNS).—A trade
union committee composed of AFL
and CIO representatives has been or
ganized to work for the reelection of
Mrs. Gertrude Weil Klein to the City
Council. Mrs. Klein, candidate of the
American Labor Party, is the only
woman running for office in the Bronx.
•ON PAY DAY, BUY BONDS—
GREAT BRITAIN HOLDS
COST-OF-LIVING LINE
London.—Cost of living levels in
Great Britain have remained at about
28-29% above 1939 with only slight
fluctuation for several months, the
bulletin of the International Federa
tion of Trade Unions states.
Food prices have been unchanged
for at least two years, around 20%
above pre-war level. Stabilization is
attributed to Britain's price control
policy which makes wide use of sub
sidies.
Liberty Ship for Chinese
i o n a i e U n i e
States has transferred to the Chinese
government a Liberty Ship built here
at the Permanente Metals Corp. yard
by AFL workers. The ship is named
for Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek. It
will enter the trans-Pacific trade as a
training vessel for merchant seamen.
Social Security Record
and Pay Envelope
TIME and MONEY
SAVER
for your records
necessary under the
SOCIAL SECURITY ACT
n^HIS combination record and payroll
envelope eliminates the necessity of a
great number of bothersome and intricate
records.
Simple and inexpensive, it embodies all
the records necessary under the Social Se
curity Act.
Why put yourself to needless expense and
waste of time when this simple, inexpensive,
combination record and payroll envelope does
the job.
For additional information and samples call
NONPAREIL PRINTING CO.
326 Market St Phone 1296
Hamilton.~~Ohio
CONGRESS ABSENTEEISM
(From the International Teamster)
Congress has stopped talking about
absenteeism at the moment, but it has
not stopped practicing it. When the
present session opened more than half
the members were absent, according
to the United Press.
Out of 96 Senators* only 53 were
present.
Of 435 House members, only 168
answered the opening roll call. The
present session of Congress may be
called for one of the most important
ever held for the nation. But a major
ity of the members were too busy
with their own personal affairs to be
there.
A. A. MYRUP DIES
AT AFL CONVENTION
Boston. Delegates attending the
annual convention of the AFL here
were shocked and saddened by the
sudden and untimely death of Andrew
A. Myrup, executive head of the Bak
ery and Confectionery Workers' Union
for more than a quarter of a centsury.
Mr. Myrup, who was sixty-three,
died in his sleep at the Statler Hotel
the night of Sept. 30. The evening be
fore he had dined with AFL President
Green and other labor officials in the
hotel and appeared in the best of
health and spirits.
His body was sent to his home in
Chicago for burial.
ONE
ff
liiSiiUs
*r
4
il^
DAY
The new, pleasant, economi
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inal requirements of Vitamini
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Many people do not get
ENOUGH of these two essen
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sure that you and your family
do, if every member takes just
one "One-A-Day" brand Vita
min A and Tablet every day.
•r 3uarom**j by
Good Hoawk#«pta|
Pleasant-tasting Convenient
Economical

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