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The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, January 25, 1946, Image 2

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1946-01-25/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE PRESS
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF ORGANIZED LABOR
THE NONPAREIL PRINTING CO
PUilLISHERS AND PROPRIETORS
Subscription Price $1.00 per Year
Payable in Advance
do not hold ourselves responsible for any
viefm or opinions expressed in the articles or
conRftiunications of correspondents.
Communications solicited from secretaries
of «i) societies and organizations, and should
he addressed to The Butler County Press, 326
Market Street, Hamilton, Ohio.
The publishers reserve the rigfet to reject
any advertisements at any time.
Advertising rates made known on application.
Whatever is intended for insertion must be
authenticated by the name and address of the
wrijter, not necessarily fflf publication, but as
a guarantee of good faith.
^ijrbscribers changing their address will
pleasfe notify this office, giving old and new
addr/ss to insure tegular delivery of paper.
Entered at the Postoffice at Hamilton,
Oh£o as Second-Class Mail Matter.
issued Weekly at 326 Market Street
Telephone 1296 Hamilton, Ohio
Endorsed by the"'"Trades and Labor
Council of Hamilton, Ohio
Endorsed by the, Middletown Trades
and Labor Council of Middletown, O.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 1946
•3)'
*k "NOT ON THE BEAM"
Two important facts that every
American Federation of Labor mem
ber-would do well to keep in mind
and 'to impress upon his feHow citi
zens at every opportunity are empha
sized by the American Federationist
in/Its current issue. Says the Feder
ationist:
FX'
Vthere's much unwarranted talk
these days that "collective bargaining
has broken down." It is undeniable
that the headlines have been shouting
for jsome time about strikes in cer
tain^ industries, but sight should not
bef lost of two highly pertinent facts
—first, that while many other branch
es *of organized labor may monopolize
the notoriety ,the largest branch by
fa|.4s still the American Federation
of
nfcabor, with approximately 7,000,
000.'(lues-paid members secondly, that
AEMk unions and their employers are,
in ifce overwhelming number of cases,
co&finuing
to practice collective bar
gaining as they have done for years
passfc
"Considerably less than 1 percent
of =4fcFL members are on strike as we
go $o press. So it can be readily seen
thai statements about a breakdown of
K|f£ If INFANTILE
null I
PIES
tPSET STOMACH
\V/HEN YOU suffer from Acid
Indigestion. Heartburn, Sour
Stomach, Gas in Stomach—
i BE WISE-TRY ALKA-SELTZEK
Don't wait until you have aa
fjpset Stomach before you tak»
.-'Aika-Seltw Try it for Pain R*«
lief the next time you have
"Headache. Cold, Simple Neuralgia
"''"•Morning After" o Muscuta!
Jfains
At your Drug Store by the gimm
1
end in packages for home use
Alka Seltxer
SI9 Soatii Second Street
Sumner Welles, former Undersecre
tary of State, said some things recent
ly that ought to be taken to heart by
the fellows who have been howling
against admission of the former neu
tral nations to the United Nations
Organizations. Incidentally, it should
be noted that the loudest shouters
against the neutrals have been the
Communists and their sympathizers,
following the line supplied by Mos
cow, whose spokesmen have declaim
ed against democratic Switzerland and
the other neutrals, to a lesser extent.
Switzerland, Sweden, Eire and Por
tugal should be invited to join the
UNO, Welles wrote in his column in
the New York Herald Tribune. Al
though the Allies may have felt that
"all whb-were not with the United
Nations must be against them," Welles
pleads cogently for the inclusion.of
the 4 former neutral nations.
This is necessary, he points out, be
cause "if world recovery is to be ex
pedited and the healing of the inter
national differences created by the
war is to be hastened, all nations able
and willing to assist in the task of
world reconstruction must be given, as
promptly as possible, the opportunity
to take part."
"Two of the neutral states, Sweden
and Switzerland," Welles continues,
"have long been in the forefront of
the most advanced democracies.
Sweden played an outstanding part in
the League of Nations. Both countries
have always maintained the highest
standards in their international rela
tions. The contribution which Sweden
and Switzerland can make to the firm
establishment of a future world organ
ization is potentially very great. There
can
be
no
PARALYSIS
JOIN THE MARCH OF DIMES
JAM. 14-31
1&DDWGS AMD
$ICKi£S A NO
CHEESE AND
And
AIKA-SEITZEB
FROM ONE
WHO'S wist/.
question, I think, that both
Sweden and Switzerland are entitled to
collective bargaining are not exactly
on the beam.
"The practice of collective bargain
ing is continuing. There is no sub
stitute for it—unless we want to adopt
the distasteful philosophy we so re
cently warred against. Fascism may
appeal to some people. We prefer de
mocracy."
PERSEVERANCE GETS RESULTS
Members of Local 1861, Upholster
ers' International Union of North Am
erica employed at the Dubuque Casket
Co., Dubuque, Iowa, needed raises and
demanded them of the company.
Committees headed by Business
Representative Frank Lange were
gloomily told by company represent
atives that no raises could be paid. If
they were, the company would have to
go out of business—their competitors
were underselling them—nothing could
be done, etc. and etc.
So the casket workers held firm,
repeated their demands, insisted upon
them, voted down puny company of
fers at membership meetings.
Their perseverance paid off, result
ing in agreement 'on a 4-cent hourly
increase.
SUPPORT OF ALL NEEDED
Where there have been cases of in
effective or corrupt union leadership
it has frequently been due to neglect
of the union by rank and file members.
As one union pamphlet explained it
You weaken the union when you stay
away from its meetings and when you
let a handful of your fellow workers
carry the entire burden of the union
on their shoulders.
"Without your active support, the
union is only a hollow shell, a mere
shadow of its potential strength and
power. With your active support, with
your presence at your union meetings,
you make the union breathe, you make
it live, you make it a powerful instru
ment to help get a better life for you
and your fellow workers."
Edgar K. Wagner
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
BIG SOCIAL EVERY FRIDAY AND SUNDAY
COME AND SPEND AN ENJOYABLE EVENING
PLENTY OF GAMES r.
AND EXTRA FEATURES
MOOSE HOME
At S:S0 P. M.
HaariltM, Okie
THE BOTLER COUNTY PRESS
EVENTS
immediate membership
"'For both these countries," he goes
on, "the cost of a continuing mobiliza
tion to resist a German attack has
been heavy. Both governments have
suffered not only the Axis menace but
likewise the pressure of the Allied
governments. Their economists were
constantly subject to belligerent re
prisals.
"Vet the masses in both countries
unquestionably supported the demo
cratic cause. If these 4 European
states, Sweden, Switzerland, Eire, and
Portugal, are not promptly admitted
to the United Nations Organization,
not only will the political reconstruc
tion of Europe be retarded, but the
economic federation of Europe, the
most solid foundation for European
stability, will be unwarrantably delay
ed.w_. ...
..
The largest international medical re
lief program in history is now in
operation by the United Nations Re
lief and Rehabilitation Administration.
Its force of health specialists in Eu
rope and the Far East numbers over
1,200, representing 24 nationalities.
For itfe China program, now getting
under way, UNRRA is adding a con
siderable number of specialists.
The European health force includes,
540 physicians and surgeons, 543
nurses, 38 sanitary engineers, 16 medi
cal
technicians and two dentists. For
mer slave laborers and refugees in
Germany are receiving care from more
than 900 of them. The remainder are
largely in Greece, Italy, Yugoslavia,
Austria and Szechoslovakia. There
they are helping to re-establish vari
ous
health services and introducing to
local
physicians and surgeons recent
medical discoveries that failed to
reach invaded areas during the war.
WHAT NEXT?
A new-electronic canteen produces
a hot sandwich, hamburger, hot dog
or cheese, when a coin is inserted and
a button pushed. Sanitarily packaged,
the'precooked sandwiches—on individ
ual trays—pop into a oscillator coil
where high-frequency radio waves heat
them while the customer watches.
WISDOM
The best use of a journal is to print
the largest practical amount of im
portant truth—truth which tends to
make mankind wiser, and thus happier.
—Horace Greeley.
Local Firemen Made Good Last
Year. They'll Make Good This Year.
CONGRESS BACK IN
ANTI-LABOR DITHER
Washington, D. C.—Congress re
turned to the nation's capital for its
1946 session in a dither about strikes.
Not a bit mellowed by their long
year-end vacation, the legislators
burst into a flood of angry speeches
aimed at labor and warned of dras
tic action against unions.
First step was a White House con
ference at which President Truman
told Democratic leaders he would in
sist on adoption of his proposal for
compulsory cooling-off periods and
fact-finding boards to deal with major
labor-management disputes.
At the Capitol, tension boiled over
as extreme antilabor lawmakers vied
with each other for the headlines.
Senators James O. Eastland (D.,
Miss.) and W. Lee O'Daniel (D.,
Tex.) announced jointly they will
move to discharge the Senate Edu
cation and Labor Committee from
further consideration of the Presi
dent's fact-finding, cooling-off bill "so
that Congress may consider this legis
lation immediately."
Senator Harry Flood Byrd (D.,
Va.) drafted a bill to (1) incorporate
labor unions, (2) require them to
register and report financial and other
data to the Securities and Exchange
Commission as corporations must do,
(3) make unions subject to suit for
civil damages for breach of contract
or unlawful destruction of property,
and (4) penalize noncompliance by
withdrawing benefits under the Na
tional Labor Relations Act.
Senator Josiah W. Bailey (D., N.
C.) said he will draft legislation to
(1) revise the Wagner Labor Rela
tions Act "to give employers equal
footing," (2) abolish the principle of
the closed shop, and (3) displace the
NLRB with a new independent board
"to look out for the public interests."
A spokesman for the House Mili
tary Committee said it is "possible"
the committee may again ask a rule
on the Majf-Arends bill repealing the
Smith-Connally law, penalizing any
labor violation of "no strike" con
tracts, and prohibiting organized la
bor participation in primaries, con-
4 -j-«*~-*v.-i»wj- SV$»£3fc ^*n,.r"^g
V r-y if**.- ._*"
I FINNISH LOCOMOTIVE FIREMEN AND
A
ENGINEERS PREPARED TO STRIKE IN
OCT. 194-5. A FEW HOURS BEFORE
THE STCIKE WAS TO
8ESN/
Despite all this sound and fury,
Congressional leaders indicated dis
inclination to take hasty action on
antistrike legislation and predicted
current labor-management disputes
would clear up quickly*
After the White House conference,
Senator Kenneth McKellar, presiding
officer of the Senate, said:
"From what was told me, I am very
hopeful these disputes can be settled.
If they can clear up some of the big
ones, most of the pressure for drastic
action will disappear."
Senate Majority Leader Barkley,
who also conferred with the Presi
dent, echoed McKellar's views. Many
other Senators predicted Congress
would not take extreme action.
"I don't see anything Congress can
do," said Senator Millard Tydings
(D., Md.). "Let the collective bar­
Here is a Real
-y
rPHIS
'fS'
.v
-.' \." r-v 1? ?.-*?p*-r
MAHCH OF LABOR
NLV 11^ OF
THE NATION'S
POPULATION
SOME FORM
HEALTH IN
ALL THE
5,000 MEN INVOLVED WERE CALLED
UP FOR MILITARY
TRAINING
GOVERNMENT.
BY THE
AS
A RESULT, THE
STRIKE WAS BROKEN BECAUSE, UNDER
THE FINNISH
LAW
INVOKED, WORKERS
CAN BE ORPEREP TO STAT
ON
ventions or elections for federal office.
The House last session rejected a rule
on the bill.
THEIR
JOBS UNDER PENALTY OF COURT MARTIAL.
V^EPEVER gooo HATS ARE SOU?
ivilji ^UNICN-MAOE HATS ARE soup.
LOOK FOR THE UNION LA6E4
FORTriE BEST HATS-
SURANCE EITHER PRE-PAID
MEDICAL CARE OR HOSPITAL
INSURANCE.
gaining process work. It's going to
be tough, but we all want collective
bargaining. Let's have it."
Chamber of Commerce Items
Duff Mix Purchase of land on
Eaton Road for the Duff Baking Mix
division of American Home Foods,
Inc. has been completed and construc
tion will be started as soon as weather
permits. Employing between 400 and
500 persons, the plant will be in a
new, modern, clean building, beauti
fully landscaped. Products, in addition
to mixes, will include the cei-eais of
the Harold H. Clapp division of the
same company.
AFL Council Resists
Anti-Strike Measures
Miami.—-Members of the AFL Ex
ecutive Council gathered here for
their midwinter meeting determined
Social Security Record
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Why put yourself to needless expense and
waste of time when this simple, inexpensive,
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i k V •„W-
for additional information and samples call
NONPAREIL PRINTING CO,
1
Many phases of national and inter
national problems will come up for
discussion and decision at the Execu
tive Council meeting which is expect
ed to last from 10 days to 2 weeks.
Organized Labor is Asked to Help
the Firemen with Mile of Dimes Fund.
SEE US
IF YOU NEED A LOAN
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T» ..
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Your Home
NULTON PARRISH, Secy.
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ww^,.-»ai&fcfr<sffe5asflK
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aWf'
to resist to the utmost any move in
Congress to impose curbs on labor
unions and limitations on the right to
strike.
The AFL leaders were particularly
gratified by the federation's own good
Vecord
in maintaining collective bar
gaining relations with employers and
.obtaining wage increases for the most
part without resort to strikes, as was
reported to President Truman by AFL
Chief William Green.
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