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The Butler County press. [volume] (Hamilton, Ohio) 1900-1946, March 01, 1946, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045012/1946-03-01/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE PRESS
OFFICIAL 0B6AN OF ORGANIZED LABOR
THE NONPAREIL PRINTING CO.
PUBLISHERS AND PROPRIETORS
Subscription Price $1.00 per Year
Payable in Advance
We do not hold ourselves responsible for any
views or opinions expressed in the article* or
communications of correspondents.
Communications solicited from secretaries
of all societies and organizations, and should
be addressed to The Butler County Press, 326
Market Street, Hamilton, Ohio.
The publishers reserve the right to reject
any advertisements at any time.
Advertising rates made known on application.
Whatever is intended for insertion most be
authenticated by the name and address of the
writer, not necessarily for publication, bat as
a guarantee of good faith.
Subscribers changing their address will
please notify this office, giving old and new
address to insure regular delivery of paper.
Entered at the Postoffice at Hamilton,
Ohio, as Second-Class Mail Matter.
Issued Weekly at 326 Market Street
Telephone 1296 Hamilton, Ohio
Endorsed by the Trades and Labor
Council of Hamilton, Ohio
Endorsed by the Middletown Trades
and Labor Council of Middletown, O.
FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 1946
RED CROSS IN ACTION AT HOME
America's first peacetime Christmas
in 5 years was a time of rejoicing
throughout the nation. The Yuletide
spirit was dampened a day later, how
ever, when tragedy struck a little
mining town in Kentucky.
An explosion at the Straight Creek
coal mine near Pineville trapped 31
miners. Of that number, only 7 sur
vived the disaster. The other 24 were
killed in the mine or died after res
cue. Twenty-four wives became wid
ows. Eighty-two children were or
phaned.
The Red Cross swung into imme
diate action as rescue crews fought
their way through still-blazing rubble
and deadly, gas-filled ureas. Volun
teers from the Bell County Red Cross
Chapters, aided by Eastern area per
sonnel, brought food to the rescuers
until efforts were abandoned. Then a
survey of emergency needs and long
range relief for the widows and or
phans was begun. The bereaved fam
ilies were interviewed, food and other
necessities provided for those who
needed them. Red Cross representa
tives met with union officers and
heads of local, state and federal agen
cies to plan for continued care of the
stricken families.
The Red Cross will undoubtedly be
concerned with the problems of these
widows and orphans for months. For
that very reason, this case serves as
an object lesson for support of the
current Red Cross campaign.
The work of the American Red
Cross is not limited, to war-stricken
areas, nor even to serricemen and vet
erans.
Disaster can and does strike at
home. When it does, help is needed
quickly. That help must be adequate,
it must be sustained. Good intentions
and amateurish efforts, however, well
meaning, are not enough.
Every member of the American Fed
eration of Labor has a stake in the
work of the Red Cross. Our brothers
and sons in the occupation forces, as
well as those who have returned, will
share in its widespread services. The
work of the Red Cross among victims
of war and oppression is a source of
pride to all Americans. Disaster re
lief, civilian blood donor plans, acci
dent prevention, home activities and
nursing programs are important.
By tradition we are humanitarians.
129 South Second Street
COMMENT ON WORLD EVENTS
Increased international trade, in it
self, should not be held out as a "pana
cea for the world's ills," the Ameri
can Tariff League declared in an
analysis of the recently published
State Department's "Proposals for Ex
pansion of World Trade and Employ
ment."
"Maximum employment depends on
maximum production," the league
stated, pointing out that production
creates and increases wealth, whereas
trade only facilitates its distribution
and consumption. "Invariably as a na
tion prospers through increasing and
diversified production, its interna
tional trade increases.'^
"It is grossly misleading to make
foreign trade appear as the alpha and
omega of national well-being," the
league declared. "It should be made
clear that some nations are far more
dependent on foreign trade than oth-
"Many nations hope that the Unit
ed States will furnish a market for
their exports," the league said. "With
in reason it will do so if prosperous.
But to set our policy to meet the max
imum needs of foreign countries even
though such a policy will entail major
social and economic shifts at home,
seems both undersirable and danger
ous."
The economic conditions which have
enabled the United States to take a
leading and generous part in reestab
lishing foreign countries and promot
ing a world organization, should not
be destroyed at the conference table,
the league believes, particularly since
the State Department program offers
"no indication of any intention to work
lor greater uniformity of wages, hours
or relative efficiency in the activities
of different people of the world."
"What sort of consideration will the
interests of the United States receive
The Red Cross and the millions of
people who need its help are counting
on us. We can fulfill our responsibili
ty by giving generously to the 1946
campaign.
EQUAL PAY LAWS NEEDED
Common practice that depresses
wage rates and promotes destructive
competition involves a double rate,
one for men and a lower one for wo
men doing the same or comparable
work. Six states have attempted to
meet this problem by enacting equal
pay laws. Concern for simple justice
to women workers and for the eco
nomic soundness of a single job rate
should lead all states to consider the
extension of such laws.
WHAT NEXT?
Carl L. Estes, Longview, Texas,
newspaper publisher, has announced
development of a machine to turn
out a 2-bedroom, low-cost concrete
house in 24 hours. Estes said the ma
chine, to be manufactured in Texas,
looks like an enormous hen laying an
egg. It maneuvers on 12-foot-high rub
ber tired wheels to the desired site,
then produces the new house, ready
for occupancy except for the installa
tion of window panes and finishing
touches.
WISDOM
So long as all the increased wealth
which modern progress brings, goes
but to build up great fortunes, to in
crease luxury, and to make sharper
the contest between the House of Have
and the House of Want, progress is
not real and cannot be permanent.—
Henry George.
A man walked up to the lunch coun
ter and asked for a ham sandwich.
"Will you have it here or take it
with you?" asked the waitress.
"Both," replied the customer.
BIG SOCIAL EVERY FRIDAY AND SUNDAY
Let Nonpareil Printing Co. Fill
Your Printing Needs.
Edgar K. Wagner
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
COME AND SPEND AN ENJOYABLE EVENING
PLENTY OF GAMES
AND EXTRA FEATURES
MOOSE HOME
At 8:S0 P. H.
n—.m— Qtte
THE BUTLER COUNTY PRESS
if her own representatives are apolo
getic in the sense that they start with
the conviction that the United States
is a great world offender in respect
to its restrictions on the movement of
trade?" the league asked.
The United State* has almost noth
ing to offer in exchange for the re
moval of foreign quotas, licenses, ex
change controls and similar devices,
the league declared. "We are asked
to trade our remaining tariffs against
these barriers. But what an unequal
trade that would be. When all United
States tariffs had been traded away
the other nations would still have
their tariffs, which in most cases are
now higher than those of the United
States."
Declaring that
the State Depart­
ment publication "implants tne idea
that all tariffs are arbitrary and bad,"
the league declared, "it would be very
easy to make the declaration an honest
and reasonable one by calling for re
duction of unreasonable or unneces
saxy tariffs."
Wherever American goods can be
efficiently produced at low unit cost,
it should be "the objective of the Unit
ed States to permit the maximum of
trade without unnecessary restriction,"
according to the league. Wherever
such costs cannot be brought any low
er, the United States policy should be
"to impose only such restrictions, and
to such a degree, as will provide ap
proximate equalization to the end
that trade is possible with all nations
without impairment of the higher
standards of the United States. It
(should be) the further policy of the
United States to continue free im
portations from all nations of those
products which it does not itself pro
duce or of which production is in
sufficient to supply its needs."
NEWS AND VIEWS
By ALEXANDER S. LIPSETT
(An ILNS Feature)
Repeal of the British Trade Dis
putes Act of 1927 by the House of
Commons corrects a situation which
in the words of labor spokesmen,
weakened the industrial structure of
Britain and subjected tha workers to
"as iniquitious a piece of class legis
lation as was ever placed on the statute
books." This act was the aftermath
of the British general strike of 1926
and contains a series of union curbs
and restrictions which have been
fought by the Labor party for nearly
20 years.
So much has been said and written
about that legislation that a recital of
its clauses seems superfluous. But to
get a clear picture of what went on
in these hectic days, it is desirable to
quote from the recent speech by
Ernest Bevin, then principal leader of
that strike and now His Majesty's
minister of foreign affairs. It was
Bevin, hard-hitting fighter and for
mer general secretary of the Trans
port and General Workers Union, who
led the repeal forces and made good
the promise of organized labor that
when it ever came to political power
this law would have to go.
Following are excerpts from the
speech of Ernest Bevm, which it will
do well to remember. "It is a story I
have waited 20 years to tell. I am
fighting to remove the stigma which
the Tory party put upon me. This act
classed trade unions as enemies of
the state. I have never been an enemy
of the state I am a constitutionalist."
And then he launched into a recital of
the situation prevailing before the
general strike and the role played by
Winston Churchill, whom he blamed
as "the father of all these struggles.
The strike, Mr. Bevin said, was the
direct result of the deflation of Brit
ish currency in 1921, "done without a
mention to trade unions or industry,
upsetting the whole wage standards
of the country." The situation be
came desperate, and though labor was
prepared to oppose further wage
cuts, negotiations to prevent a strike
took place." And then:
"On Sunday, May 2, we were
within 5 minutes of a settlement.
The documents were drafted and
are still in my possession. Sud
denly a message came to us. Mr.
Churchill had swept Prime Min
ister Baldwin off his feet. Nego
tiations were off. We did not
know what had happened."
What had happened was a walkout
by printers, which spread to include
more than 2,500,000 workers of all
occupations. The strike collapsed af
ter 6 days.
The story off the British general
strike is a lesson not only to British
labor, but to American workers as
well. Events similar to those
prevailing in England we repeating
.]o COMBAT THE ANTI-U/vllOfvJ
XAVVS OF
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iM EMGMNP
THE WORKERS COMBINED
U/40ER.THE CLOAKOF
Ns
FRIENDLY SOCIETIES
(gfcllON
labels
ARE VOORGtfiDE
•p PRODUCTS MAAJUFACTCftpO
UAJDPR. RAlR WORKjfte CGNPlTiotfS.
fcooK FoR THIS LA0EL TH£"
tfE*T HAT YOO 0UV.
themselves in our midst, and if Am
erican labor does not take stock of
the existing situation and let itself
be guided by wise counsel, the same
forces will prevail here which pre
vailed in England 2 decades ago.
It behooves labor to weigh the
strike weapon with great care and
not to use it unless all the pros and
cons have been weighed. To ignore
the long range consequences of the
present strike wave is bound to create
an atmosphere not dissimilar to that
of England in 1927. It is bound to
have repercussions which not only
labor but all thoughtful Americans
interested in the progress and wel
fare of our nation are anxious to
avoid.
To those who advocate "force, more
force and still more force," the words
of Sir Hartley Shawcross, attorney
general in the British Labor govern
ment, will bring no comfort. "We have
realized, because of our experience
with unofficial strikes during the
war, that it is utterly impossible to
prevent strikes by the process of
criminal law."
This is the issue, and it is an issue
which might well be heeded by friend
and foe alike. Nobody can deny that
the adoption of the Trade Disputes
Act in 1927 as well as its repeal of
yesterday are pure and simple politi
cal acts. Mr. Bevin's parting shot to
the conservatives that "you will do it
again if you were in power" was well
taken. Whether the experience and
bitter lesson of the British people will
be heeded on this side of the Atlantic,
remains to be seen.
Traction Workers' Union
Reports Big Advances
Detroit (ILNS).—"Tremendous ad
vances" were made last year by the
Amalgamated Association of Street,
Electric Railway and Motor Coach
Employes of America, the union's of
ficial journal says.
Twenty-six new charters were is
sued to local divisions and 36,030 new
members were enrolled, while Amal
gamated wage rates "soared to un
precedented heights," the journal re
ports.
"For the first time in the history of
the transit industry," it adds, "the
trend has turned toward the 8-hour
day and the 40-hour week. With the
international officers of the Amal
gamated leading the fight for a short
er work week, hundreds of our divi
sions have negotiated contracts for
shorter hours and a majority of our
members are now receiving time and
one half pay for time worked in ex
cess of 8 hours per day and 40 hours
per week."
W.
Beer, Liquor Applications,
Permits, Applications
*5J A
Application
Merle Cavin, R. R. No. 1, Middle
town Pike, Middletown, D-l.
Julia Falconi DBA Chatterbox Cafe,
653 N. 'E", C-l-2.
E. R. Reidel, Box 72, Ross, O., D-2.
Eugene Smith, 26 S. 7th, Hamilton,
D-2.
Ray Haren, DBA Turf Cafe, 906
Central, Middletown, D-5.
Permits Granted
Mr. 6 Mrs. Boyd Bays, DBA Ye
Olde Tavern, Box 12, Monroe, Ohio,
D-l.
Cancellations
Homer Hughes & Alfred Fredelake,
DBA Turf Cafe, Central, Middle
town, D-2.
Or LflBOB
WORKERS VVERE KJUEPCNIH^
JOB IN L044-.
I
wEfce -in ii*4-
\a, OQQ.COO
AMERICAisI WORKERS
WHOSF
HoURtV
wAee
WAS LESS THAN/65d
Aeronca Workers
Given Increase
Middletown, Ohio.—Pay increases
for hourly rate and salaried employees
of Aeronca Aircraft Corp., were an
nounced by John Friedlander, pres
ident. The increases will amount to
slightly more than 10 per cent and
will make Aeronca's annual payroll
$3,749,000, an increase of $343,500 for
1946. The raises will be effective as of
February 11.
Two Strikes Still Oh
Middletown, Ohio.—Strikes at two
Middletown plants, United Welding
Co. and Barkelew Electric Mfg. Co.,
entered their sixth week with no im
mediate prospects of settlement.
In negotiations last week, CIO of
ficials of the Cincinnati district made
an afficial demand for an increase
of 18% cents an hour in each of the
two plants. Officials of both com
panies rejected the demand with an
explanation that they have not re
ceived clarification of the govern
ment's policy on price relief.
Nonpareil for Quality Printing.
Letter Heali
Bill
Heada
Statements
Invoice*
Duplicate, Triplicate,
Quadruplet Forms
Business Cards
Window Cards
Show Cards
For Sale Cards
For Rent Cards
No Hunting and
Trespassing Signs
Furnished Room Cards
Admission Tickets
Roll Tickets
Combination Tickets
Numbered Tickets
Raffle Tickets
Cardboard Checkp
Alominom Chechjp
Brass Cheeks
Bank Checks
Return Bottle Cheeks
32t MaifcatSI,
Let Record Speak
Here is a list of 14 Ohio congress
men who voted for the infamous anti
labor Case bill.
Those who stood with Big Business
in demanding repeal of the anti-in
junction law,. in rigidly restricting
picketing, in shackling labor in oth
er ways, are the following—all Re
publicans:
Walter Brehm, Logan Clareitte
Brown, Blanchester Frances Boltdft,
Cleveland Cliff Clevenger, Bryan
Charles Elston and William Hess, Cin
cinnati P. W. Griffiths, Marietta
Thomas A. Jenkins, Ironton Edward
O. McCowan, Wheelersburg J. Harry
McGregor, West Lafayette Robert P.
Jones, Lima Frederick C. Smith, Mar
ion Alvin F. Weichel, Sandusky, and
John M. Vorys, Columbus.
Those who stood with Labor in op*
posing the Case bill: George Bender,
Cleveland, and Earl Lewis, St. Clairs
ville, Republicans and the following
Democrats: Michael Feighan, Cleve
land Edward J. Gardner, Hamilton
Walter B. Huber, Akron Michael Kir
wan, Youngstown and William R.
Thom, Canton.
The time to consult this record will
be on ELECEION DAY.
LET THEM KNOW!
Write and wire your opposition to
the anti-union Case bill to U. S. Sena
tors James Huffman and Robert A.
Taft. Senate Office Building, Wash
ington, D. C. DO THIS TODAY!
IF OVEREATING 15 A JIN.
I SOMETIMES AM A SINNER.
BUT ALKA-SELTZER HELP IF I
FEEL BAP EFFECTS FROM DINNER.
fACIP tMPtGESTioM
AGOOD
V CHECK YOUR PRINTING NEEDS
THEN CALL THE
Nonpareil Printing Co.
FOR COMPLETE PRINTING SERVICE!
FOR ALL KINDS OF PRINTING, CALL
NONPAREIL
PRINTING CO.
-BamiHoa OU»
appetite a hearty din­
ner food that we Lik* but
that doesn't like us—of course
we
should "let good digestion
govern appetite," but do we?
When Acid Indigestion. Heart
burn or Gas on Stomach result—
BE WISE-TRY ALKA-SELTZER
Try Alka-Seltzer too for Head
ache, Muscular Fatigue, "Morning
After" and Muscular Pains.
Alka-Seltzer contains an analge
sic, pain reliever, (sodium acetyl
salicylate) as well as alkaline
buffer salts.
In handy packages
s
1
HERE'S HOW THET
VOTED ON CASE BILL
or by the
glass at your drug store.
BaHJUa-i'Try
Alka
-Seltzer
Trade Cheeks
Direct Mail Advertising
Post Cards
Hand Bills
Posters
Sale Bills
Envelope Enclosures
Pamphlets
Catalogues
Magazines
Programs
Constitutions and By-Laws
Ping-Pong Sheets
Milk Route Books
Wedding Invitations
Wedding Announcements
Social Security Pay Envelopes
Labels
Advertising Bosk Mitrhes
Padding
Stitching
Punchinig
Round-Cornering
Die-Cutting
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