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The Butte daily bulletin. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1918-1921, January 16, 1919, Image 3

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HANSON'
CASH GROCERY V
605-607 S. Main Street
VERY REST CREAMERY
Butter, lb.. 65c
TAKE WITH YOU
-FRESH CLAMS
FRESH OLYMPIA
OYSTERS
Sego Milk "IZ"5
('CASH AND) C'ARIRY
FRESH LAID 75
EGGS, Per Doz.
Poynter's Cash Store
185 IHAIRRISON AVE.
Wholesale to Consumer.
PI'ONE 6531-R.
Mr. Consumer
I)o you realize that by buying
your sulpplies each (lay in small
quantities that your day's pay
goes little moe than half as far
as it would if you bought the
whole week's supply at one
lime? C'all up Poynter's
\\holesale-to-Consunmer, Phonle
6534-R, and order your week's
supply.
-]b. can pure lard ......... $1.45
l )-lb. calln ure lard ........$2.75.3
White navy bacnlls, l)... 12 S'c
Sige) milk l 8 tall cans ....$7.25
Sago milk, I~ tall cans ....$1.85
!S-lb, sack hard wheal flour
for _ ......................... .... $5. 5
l'aney hain, per lb. ............
Ppr-,i c ,g s ...........e_. ...........--l-- c
Strlip fancy breakfast bacon,
p lb ------ --------------4
Linpton Yellow label tea ..75c
High grad. coffee. 5 lb ...$1.50
Higih girade colffce, 1 lb)... $1.00
SHINERS
-SELLS
Furniture, Rugs
Ranges and
Home Necessities
for Less on
Easiest of Terms
Jacques Drug Co.
PRESCRIPTION DRUGGISTS
Phone 999. 1957 Harrison Ave.
Night Bell for Prescriptions
MOTORCYCLE DELIVERY
Agency Webster's Home Remedies
Drugs, Che nicals, Toilet Articles,
Patent Medicines, Cigars
and Candies
Eastman Kodaks and Supplies
Developing and Printing
QUALITY FIRST GOODS
Teas, Coffees, Spices, Extracts,
l.aking P1owder.
GRAND NTION TEA COMPANY
Si2 W. Broadway. P'hone 1670
DR. S. HERMAN, Dentist
Permanently located at 404-405
Phoenix block.
Phone 1742.
('lo.ed Evenings Except Tuesday.
B The OLD RELIABLE
ARBER SHOTr
CON LOWNEY.
309 N. Main.
First-Class Woik.
A Place for Ladies and Gentlemen
Moxom Cafe
OPEN AT ALL HOURS.
39 WEST BROADWAY
Handley's Cafe
BEST PIE IN TOWN
'326 N. Wyoming.
CRYSTAL CAFE
We Serve the hest on :tihe: MA
St . P AopRlr- hic rf -,
69 E. PARK ST.
QUIET WHEN AL
LIED TROOPS
LAND
Press Reports Were Not
True As to Scenes of Dis
order, Says a' Eye Wit
ness to the Affairs.
NOTHING TO SANCTION
TROOPS IN SIBERIA
Russian Intervention Has
Become for America a
Tragic Anachronism Since
Defeat of Germany.
The news from Russia, particularly
since the bolsheviki have had control,
has been notoriously ifalse. The sto
ries of massacre and anarchy are, of
course, largely for effect .
It is also well known that the vari
ous governmental ceusorshi ps, prin
cipally the British, have suppressed
actual news messages sent by accred
ited correspondents of accredited
news associations from Moscow and
Petrograd--nessages sent by men
who were not themselves bolsheviki
at all, but simply honest journalists.
And many are the stories of events
by "eyewitnesses" wllo. saw no fnore
than the inside of a hotel in Stock
holm. Not a word of he constructive
work being done by the soviet go'v
ernment has been given out by the
press. . . All that we are al
lowed are silly stories about new de
crees on marriage and free love, is
sued (where rarely authentic) by i'r
responsible groups striving to put the
soviet government in) a false light.
When a really first-rate analysis of
what the soviet government is doing
is published-like "The Soviet at.
W\ork," by Lenine- -we are informed
by Postmaster General Burleson that
it is unmailable.
But the worst of all is the fashion
in which the news about allied in
tervention is distorted. We are led
lo believe that allied troops landed
in Vladivostok to resore "law and
order," to put down the rule of an
anarchial minority and to substitute
a democratic government. .It is false.
There was quiet and tffe best of law
and order at Vladivostok when allied
troops landed. The soviet had the
support and affection of the people.
The allied troops did not set up a
democratic government: they set up
a reactionary dictatorship. We are
preplared to prove that in every case
where allied troops have invaded
Russian soil they have overthrown
the piolpular government and set tiup
a temllpora'ry government. resting for
support on foreign bayonets, a gov
ernlment' reactionary and, in some
cases, even frankly monarchist. It
is safe to say that the average Anmer
ican citizen would be thoroughly
shocked at knowing the kind of im
perialistic and anti-democratic gaine
which is being played by our own and
allies' armies in Russia. These arr
facts, and we think it high time that
they be told. We do not believe that
oulr own goverlllnment wants the resto
ration of the monarchy in Russia,
or that it would support a demon
strably unpol)llar government for
ever. The American government
would like to see in Russia a liberal
and 'omlnmercial republic like our
selves a quiet, respectable govern
m!ent with which we could do busi
ness. UIndoubtedly. But what we
should like and what we are as a mact
ter of cold fact getting are two wide
ly different things.
Japanese Ambitions.
It is no secret that powerful par
ties in Japan are advocating the un
ostentatious annexation of large sec
lions of Siberia, and that they have
no interest in seeing any stable popu
lar government arise east of the
'rals. It is no secret that England
trembles for Persia, Afghanistan and
India, and that the tory pIarty would
gladly crushli the Russian revolution
if it exhibited any tendency toward
proselytismi in foreign countries (as
it has). It is no secret that a certain
section of thie French governmental
opinion cares not a fig what sort of
a reactionary government there is in
Russia. provided only it is a govern
mient that will iimmediately repay the
foreign loans. In a word, our inter
vention in Russia may have been un
dclertaken with the best of intentions,
but thIe practical situation with which
we are faced today is either to sup
port reaction and imiperialism or
to withdraw our trtoas.
Tragic Aacllrlonisml.
Russian intervention has become
for America a tragic anachronism
since the defeat of Germany. We
have neither a national nor an in
ternational interest which today le
gitimately sanctions the presence of
our troops on Russian soil. It is
false to our traditions to he fighting
a workingman's republic, even if we
do not approve of its form or its
manners. It is not in accordance with
any doctrine of American national
policy for us to be engaged in crush
ing a revolution or in crucifying the
hopes and aspirations of a great and
mighty people. It is really difficult
to believe that this is the same.coun
try whic1 in Washington's time al
most had a civil war because the gov
ernment refused to intervene in the
French revolution, on behalf of the
revolutionists. Andi not even the
most severe critics of the present
leaders of the soviet government have
said one-tenth as bitter things as
were said of Robespierre and Marat
in their day. No, to help crush a
revolution is not itn accordance with
the real American tradition.-The
Dial. - -
The AulletiWI1 36O
Printing
UTTE'S RQLLOF HONOR
THE HO PfiED DEAD.
LIEUT ENANT.
Brdwn, Frank I.
Carr, John.
Tuohy, C. K.
SERGEANT.
Cowie, Allen 13.
Driscoll, John R.
Dunlap, Ernest R.
Graham, Leon R.
McGuire, Peter J.
Sanger, Leslie.
CORPORAL.
13arelli, Edward.
Miller, Fred.
Sullivan, Cecil.
DRIVER.
Guyette, Mike.
PRIVATES.
Anderson, Raymond G.
Anton, Vidor.
Arnett, Winston.
Barelli, Edward.
Barto, Thomas.
Bennett, Xavier.
Best, William C.
Blixt, Gustav.
Brownlee, Bruce.
Byrne, John.
Carlisle, Stanley.
Chatham, Elmer A.
Clancy. Dan B.
Clark, Don.
Coward, Frank.
Cunningham, Joseph.
Dulffy, Michael.
Edwards, John.
Ewing, Leroy B.
Gearing, Teddy.
Harrington, John T.
Hebert, Ernest.
Henderspn, Alfred.
Heodge, James P.
Hoey, John.
Holmes, Leroy K.
KApich, Blas.
Leahy, Daniel J.
Llewellyn, David.
McCoard, Arthur.
Mainwariug, William.
Maberteau. Vincent J,
Martin, Christopher.
Metters, Leonard.
Murray, George.
Nedved, Jerry J.
Noy, Robert.
Oates, William.
Parko, Joseph.
Petritz, Mark.
Pospisher, Anthony.
Rainville, Albert.
Ray, Joseph.
Richardson, John R.
Robinson, Seth A.
Steele, Ralph.
Salter, George:
Sidley, Walter J.
Sullivan, Daniel F.
Sullivan, Dan.
Tohte, Solomgary Dozi.
Winters, Elmer.
Woodcock, Rudolph.
Wyatt, George.
WOUNDED IN ACTION.
LIEUTENANT.
Brinton, Ben.
SERGEANT.
Gordon, James K.
Reif, W. Harry.
CORPORAL.
Coulsey, Stanley L.
McAuliffe, D. C.
Rand, Ralph P.
Leslie Stockman..
WAGONER.
Dolan, James.
PRIVATES.
Bagley, Robert D.
Beaupre, Clarence E.
Carrara, George.
Cotton, William S.
Crowley, Timothy.
Dahl, Albert.
Dazzi, IErnest.
Darragh, Ed
Dofelmier, William.
Doble, Fred L.
Donaldson, Edward C.
Duffy, Edward.
Emmett, William H.
Fluent, Russell.
Fortina, Albert J.
Gannells, William.
Gillett, Lynn.
Gregory, Ray.
Griffith, John.
Ham, Thomas James
Harrington, Edward J.
Harrington, John J.
Hicks, Arthur.
Hboem, Arthur.
Hoffman, Christian.
Huber, Thomas J.
Ilich, Rada.
Jackson, John T,
James, Edwin.
Jewell, Charles.
Kelsey, Charles G.
Kenmmel, Ernest W.
Kennedy, W. J.
King, Matthew.
Lawson, Goodman.
Lehn, Fred A.
Lenz, Paul G.
Leonard, Charles L.
Lloyd, Ralph.
Lori, Corilo.
Manning, James.
McDerdhott, Edward.
Manowsky, Albert.
Mcfonald, Daniel A.
McGlynn, Frank.
McHugh. Roy.
MeQCuillan, John J.
Morgan, Isaie.
Mykleburst, Peter.
O'Brien, Emmett.
O'Leary, Patrick.
Paul, Albert.
Peterson, Edwin.
Rasmussen, Olaf.
Richards, John C.
Richards, William.
Richley, John.
Sikkerman, Frank.
Storrar, Andrew G.
Sullivan, Jerry.
Sullivan, John P.
Sullivan, Pa;rick F.
Trevenna, George.
Vittian, Ellis.
Vivian, Gordon.
Wilbanks, Crate.
Wills, Frank.
Woodward, Ernest H.
Young, Ray.
MANSAUHTIIEiR ASE
GOES T JURY TODAY
Colored Youth Denies He
Drove Auto Recklessly.
Claims Victim Did Not'
Heed Warning.
Following the rel tin of the case
by the stare. xiillenie for lth det
fense Was heard y'sterdl:. i ernlllllOli
in the tllnslaugllht' ease . Olh Stew
art Galloway. a colored I otllh, dei'
fondant, chaigeid with hla\ing run
down and Iillitrd with i nI aiutoiobil
Edward Lil1strt'' (on Soui lt lnttn;,
street the night of .\ug. I;.
The defendanllt w,;as pla'd on ti111
stand and testilid thdt hI, aplplit d
both the enIergnllcv lly l tfoolt hrike
on rounding ftl'om lMercut'vry :.trI il
to Montana. alfter which he 1pt :'iited,
the car to Coast until nelar (;old
street. At this poilt, hie lsa td.
I.tinstrol started fro'10 te il' \t e0ler
curb, that lie sounded his horn ani d
jammed ihin the foot braoke biu I .i
strom appeared not to pl i atlte tioll:
that he swe'ved his cat in llr"illi ; to
avert hitting t III' man to en xtenlI
that brolughtl the maclhinle clo(e to
the east e rbl of the street. I.
,tatetd lit was not excited at thI tiniil t
and was ir'ateling at o moderate
late of speed.
Frank llayves. colored, was ('alhlit
to the stanll for the de1'ense and Its
tilled that he was in Ithe reatr seal
of the aiuto lobile at the limte of tIlt
accident. H-1' statedl the macli hillne
was not goitng Iat the rate of 411 mile:'
an hour. but could not telt how lui
it was traveling. lite said I.instrotl
walked right into the radiator.
T'1he case will go to the jury this
eveninit.
GAMBLING ALLEGED
PROPRIETORS HELD
Alike Cleary of the ( ,Ocean ( ar;
lilly liohan of li:oha a Billiard h( ll:1
Oscar Johnsoln (i the lig Foulr cigi
store, and C'. lDt'rrow of the IOlyinlihi
club. were a 'rrested yesl'erdt4 l ii,
noon charg(ed with lbilng Ii'oprlit io
of resorts \whe(re gallilling was ;Il
l(\owed. All four were talkn to ihi
co.inty attornll e, :fll er being bholtl d
iat thle city jail.
Housekeepers
HE.E'S
YOUR CHANCE
To Save On
FURNITURE
Sale Tomorrow morning
ill Ilill'i lli1l l ' ill 1111' ( 't ill -
iIlI 1 ,V liHt('l elt l i4 l l't s I oit IIl
((t' t llilli'hed furi iilre
tilk( 'nl ill ('x ('111111;''(' I'iti'
I I V ' i t tI .. 0 0 lll ili, ) llll
g'rte ll l'_d I ig sile 1, 1111 is
. Ir I V illt I . . '~ I ii.
You can save one-half
and more on any article
of furniture in our base
ment salesroom if you
come to
SHINERS
TOMORROW MORNING
THE ARIZONA
CASH MARKET
429 S. ARIZONA ST.
PHONE 3552-J
!" Ilbs. Rex or ('tel'tanll; Ilolur
for $. ......... ..9... i7(1
4t lb ls Rex or1 ('e4etalla, old
slo k, l 1pur4 flo rll........ $6 .l00)
Swift's 1'Preiullm ha] nsl , Il. Wthe
Armollur's htar f:ancly strils of
I conI , lb......... .......1
Pi(nic hants, pli er II) ......287ic
('ITT I'III('E ION AILL I"I'HSHI
MEAI'S
1utller, good quality, per lb.,
111p 'roni ...................... -
Strictly fresh laid eggs, per
d(ozcIn ............... .. 7.3,
31. J. . Coffee, 2 ( -lbt. ( s
fo r .... . .......- . ....... ..... . - - 9
C(off.e, 4 lbs. good coffee..$1.(00
Cornl, tonmatoes or beans, dloz
en11 'icnlS ..........-...... ...... $ 1.70
.Milk. S cans Smilax... .$1.100
Lipton's tea, 1-lb. can yellow
label .............................. .. 75
1 lb. Tree tea ................... 55 ,
FOR A FIRST CLASS
SMOKE
BUY T1HE
UNION MADE
J. PINCUS
S DISTRIBUTOR.
Sold .Everywhere.
POOL< M: BILIARDS
i ."t;.i.inv't v "
TWO WOMEN CHAlGED
WITH YVARANCY FINED
Reckless Drivers Also Fined
by Police Judge Whitty.
Gamblers Dismissed.
Bertha Brown and Mary Moore.
charged with vagrancy were tined
$50 eachl by Judge I'. J. Whitty in
police court yesterday.
C(. M1. )urantg and Franillk Johnson,
charged with reckless driving, each
twee assessedl $20 anad 10 men held
on a gamthling .charge were dis
nlissed. They were arrested at 74
East Park street early Tueltsday
morning.
Fifteen young persons charg'd
with creating a disturbance early
yesterday morning on WVest Granite
streelt were fin edl $5 each anld \'il
liamt Watson, charged with drunk
These Business Houses
Are Fair
To organizedl labor and to the Bulletin. GIVE TIH1EM YOUR IPtATIONA(-I' and let
Ihem know the reason why. Use your purchasing power to hell) along Montana's
only Independent Labor Daily, and when you spend your money, make sure it is
not with a store that refuses to advertise in the Bulletin and is perhaps fighting
it in every underhand way conceivable.
AUTO REPAIR DANCING LESSONS LAUNDRY
SHOPS New Moose Hall, Independent Laundry,
--7---- 71% East Park Avenue. 232 S. Main Street.
Patterson & Currie, I
PattMercuy and Montana. DENTISTS MUSIC HOUSES
Murphy Garage, C. A. Pankey, Dentist, Orton Bros..
230 East Platinum. 11% W. Park street. 216-218 N. Main St.
Union Dentists,
South Side Auto Garage, Third Floor Rialto Bldg. MEN'S OUTFITTERS
2124 Cobbau Street. Dr. S. Mlarnmon,
McGrew Service Shop, 404-5 Phoenix Bldg. -- -
Corner Second and Utah. Palace Clothing & Shoe Store,
53-55 E. Park St.
Lacey Auto Repair and Service EXPRESS AND ontana Clohing d Jewelry
Shop, TRANSFER. company,
1126 Utah. 103 S. Arizona.
tPaul Rash,
Butte Battery Co. Flats Transfer Co., 3a 1 E. Park St.
9119 South Montana. 2600 Harrison Ave. O. K. Store.
24 K . Sork St.
Grand Avenue Repair Shop, F IN TACKLE. Park St.o
Corner Harrison and T
Grand. RODMAKIN(, ETC. MI LIANEIRY
'Ted Ross, Hughes Millinery.
AUTOMOBILES AND 7:: W. Park Street. 649 Utah Avenue.
PARTS BOUGHIIT FIRE INSURANCE
AND SOLD PHOTOGRAPHY
Sarles & Girroir, Real Estate,
354 Phoenix bldg. Thomson's P'ark Studio,
Montana Auto Wrecking Co., 217 East Park Street.
4171/ S. Idaho. FURNITURE
E. II. Rupert, OPTICIANS
228 S. Arizona St. Shiner's, Furniture,
75 E. Park street. Montana JeweryCo.
ASSAYERS B. Kopald Co., Furniture, Montana Jewelry Co.,
58 West Broadway. Opticians, Etc.,
73 East Park St.
Lewis & Walker, Assayers, F. LORISTS Towle-Winterhalter-Hannican
108 N. Wyoming street. Columbia Floral, Company,
47 West Broadway. 101 . Park St.
AUTOS BOU ·GHT Powell Jewelry Co.,
AUTOS BOUGHT FIRUT AND VE(GE- 112 N. Main St.
AND SOLD
Yellowstone Trail Garage, People's Fi RESTAURANTS
1861 hlarrison. 39 People's Parkl .,
Spokane Cafe,
111 S. Main street.
BANKS GROCERIES Leland Cafe,
72 East Park street.
Allen's Grocery, Moom Cae,
Yegen Bros., Bankers, 1204 E. Second street, 29 W. Broadway.
Park and Dakota streets. Kermode, Groceries, Crystal Cae,
421 East Park street. 69 East Park Street.
Poynter's Cash Store,
BUTCHERS 1854 nHar.ison.
Shannon Grocery, REAL ESTATE
609 South Main.
Schumacher Meat Co., S. F. T. A. Cash Grocery,
18 E. Park St. 627 East Galena Street. Sarles & Girroir,
Truscott's, Real Estate,
Truscott's Corner, East Park and Grant. 354 Phoenix Bldg.
E. Park and Grant. Ames Grocery,
316 i N. Main St.
Hanuson's Cash Grocery, SHOES
BAKERjIES 605-7 S. Main St.
BAKERIES T. J. McCarthy, Chicago Shoe Store,
64 E. Broadway. 7 S. Main street.
Manlhattan Bakery, -
0 W P.k W / "qalkover Shoe Co.
205 wV. Park. IIABERDASIIEi 46 V. Parlk Street.
Dalil's Bakery,
107 N. Montana Street. DIlar Shirt Shop,
Rialto Theater Bldg. TAILORS
BARBER SHIOPS HATS FOR MEN Bernard Jacoby, Tailor,
19 % S. Dakota street.
Con Lowney, Nickerson, The Hatter, Montana Tailors,
309 N. Main. 112 W. Park street. 425 N. Main street.
EHARDWARE . Zahl, Tailor,
HARDWARE 6504 W. Perk street.
Clothes C "le. ning and Otto, the Tailor,
S])ressillg Sewell's Hardware, 66 East Broadway.
- lFl'Csalhlg 221 East Park street. Dundee Woolen Mills,
Blrnard JacobyS 75 East Park Stret. 62 West Park Street.
19 V% S. Dakota Street. Butte Tailoring Co.
116 S. Main St.
CLO'.Tl'lHN AND TAI- JEt ELERS Dandy Woolen Mills,
110 W. Park St.
iLORNGU FOR MEN Montana Jewelry Co.,
Opticians, Etc.,
Lip 4 Tair, P 73 East Park street. TEAS, COFFEES,
17 West Park Street. People's Loan Office, SPICES
Allen & Darnell, 28½ East Park street. SPICES
207 East Park. Brodie, the Jeweler, r
40 East Park street. Grand Union Te. Co.,
S. & S. Jewelry Co.. 28 W. Broadway.
CHIROPRACTIC 21 East Park Street.
Towle-Winterhalter-Hannfln UNDERTAKERS
Flora W. Emery Company,
Room 9, Silbr Bow Block. 101 W. Park St. Larry Duggan, Undertaker,
Powell Jewelry Co., 322 North Main street.
112 N. Main St. Daniels & Bilboa, Undertakers,
CIGARS i. Simon, liz East Park street.
21 North Main. Sherman & Reed,
The J. A. Cigar, Broadway & Arizona.
Union Made. LADIES' TAILOR
VULCANIZING
DAIRIES O'Brien, Ladies' Tailor,
422 Phoenix blck. J. L. Mathiesen, Vulcanizing,
E. Zahl, 40 East Galena.
Crystal Creamery, re504 W. Park W. J. Trudgron,
459 E. Park street. 5
S LADIES' Gates' "Halt-Solo" Tires,
LADIES' 45 East Galena.
DRUGGISTS
GARMENTS VARIETIES
Jacques Dwug Co.,
1957 Harrison avenue. Popular Ladies' Garment Store, Iambnhert's Variety Store,
63 East Park Street. 206 West Park Street.
enness was assessed the usual $5.
George Pappas, arrested for his al
leged interference with an officer,
was lined $11a, and some of the men
::r:ested the night previous charged
with gambling at East Park street
were dismissed. The following were
fined: S. A. Spirio, $20; George Kar
dona. $2n; Nick Darokakis, Dentni,
Pappas, A. Blanna and John Gravin,
$10 each.
GRAND BALL
'Th'ursday night. Jan. 16, at Pall
mont hat1;1. G(ivlen under the aus
pices of Metal line W\orkers' union.
Everybiody welcome. Tickets $1.00.
Ladies free. Adv.
NOTICE.
'utte. ion(l.. Jtn. 16. 1919.
I will not be responsible for the
debts rontracted bly my wife onil and
after this date.
-Adv.-lt. CH'AS. 3. t"ALCONER.
Advertise that room for rent in
the want columns of the Bulletin.
IF YOU CAN'T COME
TELEPHONE
1-9-8-5
McCARTHY'S
GROCERY AND
MEAT STORE
64 E. BROADWAY
or01u tlle Big8gesI ;l iBest
l3iarg ins i 1 Butte.
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