OCR Interpretation


The Butte daily bulletin. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1918-1921, January 27, 1919, Image 1

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045085/1919-01-27/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

WITH THE UNITED PRESS SERVICE AND A COMPETENT STAFF OF WRITERS, WE WILL SERVE THE NEWS AS IT REALLf IIAPPLR
Business OfficeB t te 5 TOD AY'S IUN
XOIUME I.-NUMBER 137 IdTTI MONTANA, MON I)A'Y\. JAN 27, It) 1. mnRv F1n'fmwTQ
PEACE WRANGLE MAY LAST MANY MONTHS
Americ Delegates Are Sending for Their Families
FIFTY THOUSAND IN LIEBKNECHT FUNERAL PROCESSION
Five Miles of Workers Escort Martyr to His Grave
SHIPYARDS
STRIKE AP
PROVED
Boiler Makers at Seattle
Unanimous in Demands.
18,000 Members. Strike
News From Northwest.
Seattle, Jan. 27.-Six
thousand shipyard workers,
members of the Boiler Mak
ers' union, by -a standing
vote at a mass meeting Sun
day afterinoon, unanimously
approved the shipyard
strike and announced their
intention to continue the
strike until the wage in
creases demanded by 35,000
striking employes of the
shipbuilding plants in Se
attle, Tacoma and other
Washington coast cities are
granted. The boiler makers
have a membership of 18,000
in Seattle, their union being
the largest of the 21 unions
making up the Metal Trades
council, which called the
strike.
Workers to Establish
Co-Operative Store
(Special United Press Wire.)
Seattle, Jan. 27.-Seattle shipyard
strikers need not worry over the food
problem should the' strike continue
for a long time, according to Fred
Nelson, vice president of the Metal
Trades council, who has announced
plans for'a co-operative market where
strikers with families may obtain
groceries on credit.
Henry White, government concilia
tion chief, is trying to bring together
the strikers and the employers for
the purpose of arranging for a set
tlement of the men's demands for a
blanket agreement of $6, $7 and $8
a day.
Frisco Ironworkers
Refuse Seattle Help
(Special United Press Wire.)
San Francisco, aJn. 27.-Seattle
union labor men, here in an attempt
to tie up the bay district in a strike
to encourage the Puget sound work
ers, today lost their first fight. They
were unable to prevent unionists ac
cepting a compromise that would cal,
off the strike of the Ironworkers her,
Feb. 1.
THE YANIKEES WILL BE
HOMEIN SIX MONTHS
Special United Press Wire to The Bulletin.
Washington, Jan. 27.-All American soldiers now in France
will have been returned to the United States within six months,
except those left for joint police work with the allies, General
March has announced. He said that 1,800,000 American
troops are abroad and that Just as soon as the German ships for
which E2ward Hurley is negotiating are available the soldiers
will return at the rate of 300,000 a month. It is also announced
that 785,000 troops in An]erican cainps will be demobilized by
March 1, except for the few needed to care for cantonments.
The Task Set for
Helena Labor and
Farmer Legislators
A herd law.
A nonpartisan election law.
A mine license tax.
To provide management and
finance for a state elevator.
To exempt farm improvements
from taxation.
Creating an industrial com
mission for compensation pur
poses,
'A hail insurance act.
For a constitutional conven
tion.
A bi-monthly pay bill.
BUTTE UNION MEN
ARE CALLED TO
WASHINGTON
Representatives of Butte
Workers Go to Attend U.
S. Conference on the Fu
ture of the Industries.
At the invitation of the United
States department of labor six repre
sentatives of local labor unions left
for JVashington this morning to at
tend a conference of labor repre
sentatives.
Those who went from Butte are:
J. F. O'Brien, president of the Metal
Trades council; J. F. Buckley, busi
ness agent of the Blacksmiths' un
ion; John P. Mahoney of the Boiler
makers' union; George Tucker of the
H-lodcarriers; John McMullen and
Patrick Deloughrey of the Engineers'
union.
The conference will be held Friday
and questions of particular interest
to organized labor and laboring men
will be discussed.
In the announcement of the meet
ing the department of labor stated
that "in view of the curtailment of
war essentials following the signing
of the armistice and the consequent
reduction of working forces, the sec
cetary of labor has invited the griev
ance committee of employes in Ari
zona, Utah and Montana to send dele
gates to confer with him next Fri
day.
Continuing, the announcement
from the Secretary of labor said:
"On account of the grave condi
tions confronting the industries, it is
the desire of the department of labor
to co-operate in sectring the best
possible working conditions during
the readjustment period. Therefore,
you are respectfully requested to
join with other grievance commit
tees in your district, which may be
selected in the same manner you
elect members of your own griev
ance committees. These delegates,
with similar delegates from other dis
tricts in the state, to report at the
department of labor in Washington
on the morning of Friday, Jan. 31,
for the purpose of general conference
with the department of labor."
THE WEATHER.
Fair today and tomorrow; slightly
colder today in east portion.
BUSINESS
GOOD AT
HELENA
Silver Bow Democrat Wants
His Money. Probing Butte
Medical Profiteers. Ber
kin Is "Honored."
Helena, Jan. 27.--And the nine
Silver Bow democrats, who are al
leged to have been elected by votes of
soldiers who wete lying beneath the
sod in France at the time they were
supposed to have cast their votes, are
still unpaid.
Charles Boulware, a democrat
front Silver Bow, who was supported
in his race for election by the Butte
Daily Bulletin, stated today that he
would bring mandamus proceedings
against the state in all attempt to se
cure his salary and mileage.
The state auditor has refused to
issue warrants to the nine Silver Bow
democrats until a decision disposing
of the contest proceedings brought
against them his been announced.
Silver Bow Physicians'
Rates Probed Today
Helena, Jan. 27.---Investigation ot
conditions alleged to have induced an
increase in living costs will be re
sumed tonight, members of the joint
investigating committee have an
nounced. At this time Silver B1ow
representatives will present resolu
tions adopted by the Butte Metal
Trades council, the Silver Bow
Trades and Labor assembly and tihe
Engineers' union of Butte. relating
to physicians of that city who have
increased their fees.
Berkin Made Honorary
Deputy Game Warden
Helena, Jan. 27.-The "father" of
Montana fish and game laws, John
Berkin of Butte, an A. C. M. gun
man, has been made an honorary
deputy fish and game warden for thil
state.
The appointment was made during
the past week by State Game Warden
Continued on Page Threes
A. C. M. BRAND OF LAWNORDER
DEMONSTRATED AT WINNIPEG
Patrioteers and Profiteers, Assisted by Gunmen, Practice
Anarchy at Meeting Being Held by Soldiers and Workers.
People Refuse to Be Stampeded by the Direct-Actionists
and Quietly Watch Money-Huns Break the Law.
Winnipeg, Canada, Jani. 27.
-In an effort to discredit the
labor movement here and to
furnish headlines for the junk
er press of the United States
and Canada, a number of pro
fessional flag-wavers and paid
gunmen of the radical capital
ist element, assisted by a few
soldiers who are endeavoriig
to make Canada safe for the
profiteers, last night gathered
at a peaceable meeting and en
deavored to start trouble and
break the laws of the do
minion.
Uniabe to secure a hall, ow
AT THE STATE CAPITOL
o f- -._ 1
/
A. C. M. and its kept press working overtime to make Montana safo
for a copper-collared democracy.
WAR DEPARTMENT MAY REDUCE
AMERICAN ARMY OF OCCUPATION
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, Jan. 27.-That the war department will
reduce the American army of occupation to less than 13
divisions is the interpretation placed here on the Brit
ish statement as to occupation strength. The statement
declared that the armies would be of moderate size com
pared to those now holding occupied regions. Any joint
reduction of forces would naturally reduce American
representation.
iog I, the dirty tactics of the
mjillintiaires of the city. who
are (lkdeavoring to overthrow
the constitution which grants
the l',le free speech and ftree
asseh 1bhly, hundreds of workers
anld rieturned soldiers gathered
at .;Market square to hold a
niŽ,I- meeting, in which they
irl .,cd to voice opposition to
the j.iirker press and the cap
italli- idea of reconstruction,
rilll iictidentally to honor the
nll('ilY of Karl Liebkneeht.
r c.toltily murdered in Berlin by
Ih,;-t who are opposed to :e
l iln'J'·y. .1
A, the erovwd of returned
sohlier: and working people
were holding their peaceable
meeting Ihey were swooped
down o4 by the gunmen and a
fe\\ sldiers in uniform, who
began clubbing the men,
wtmoneu and children. Thi,
crow I immediately dispersed.
rather thiani have trouble with
the giinmen and tools of the
jllukers. No arrests were
iatde.
The guniimeln then proceeded
to the headquarters of the so
(Continued on Page Two)
Washington, Jan. 27.-America's peace experts expect to
be much longer in session than was originally anticipated, It,
was learned here today. A number of them have sent for their
families to join them in Paris while the deliberations are be
ing carried on.
LEAGUE OF NATIONS 18 UPPERMOST IN
MINDS OF THE PEACE DELEGATES.
lBy LOWELL sNlLLE:TT
(lUniled Press Staff Correspondent.)
IParis, Jani. 27.---Thli e supreme w', ar council is understood to
he c0onlsidering the (lispositio, or1' tlhe (erman colonies and
other tetrritorial questions. 'rThlleague league of nations, however,
is the chief' subject under coensitceration by the peace delegates.
The prilncipal dev eloplmcint, was to be tlie selection by small;
natl ions of their five delegates oi the special committees created
Satulray. The league of nations commission is generally ac
c:epted ais Inhe most imtl)n'anit of tlhese. Working alongside this
commrnissioti will be the iiollicial organization, the allied so
c:ieties for the league of Inations. It held its initial meeting last
night and intends to conlliitnue iin session throughout the peace
conference with the object of futrnishing a clearing house fog;
information to assist the official committee.
,lames Thomas, head of the British railway men, made a
striking speech at the first mneeting of the allied societies. He
declared: "I hope to meet the Germans in a few days," refer
ring to Ithe fabct thllat he wili altend tile international labor anti
socialist conference at Bernie. "I want to tell them: 'We
allies saved you; you imay not, knsow it, but we did. Now it's
l.p 1(o y(4 I save1 you rselves aid eilp s ave file world.' "
BIG FIVE STARTS FIREWORKS AT 10:30.
NINETEEN SMALL BOYS ALSO IN SESSION.
(Special United Press Wire to The Bulletin.)
Par'is, .Ja t. 27.--'Thle delegates of 1t smaller nations par
licipi.tiing itl lihe peace confernce mset at 3 o'clock this after
ooii l'4 , Ih Ir the pil'lnp se (of sete('illig their representatives on the
coimillees that arie expleted to work out the big problems.
The Sllpentle \' i'war coinilllit restuii(edc its sessionl s today at 10:30.
LIEBKNECHT'S BODY LAID TO REST;
WIDOW AND TWO SONS AT FUNERAL.
Iterlin, Jl;. 25. (I)Delaed.) --Although military officials
,wetse+ I lelre prepred o' an." "eentualliy," thle funeral of Karl Lieb
knl1(,liI and :31 (,Iher Slparl'lct s plassed quietly here today.
Morelc thain 50,t (0h) persons malrelied in the funeral procession,
which was five miles long. Twenty per cent of the marchers
wore w\\realhs of flowers. Ther' e was no shouting or cheering.
TIhe government had fieltl and machine guns along the route
and sigis Ipo sted \\'arnli ig the (ilizens to remain orderly. The
cortege was headed by a hand; LIiebknecht's body was on a
separante \\'agio. lHis was the firtst to be lowered into the mon
lstr grave in the Luiszieti cemetery. A brief obituary was re
cited ad ait hymn sung. Lielbknehlt's widow and two sons stood
near the grave until the other' (colinis were placed and covered
with clods. Trafflic o the subway was stopped for hours as a
Iril)ute to the workers.
PEARCE-CONNOLLY CLUB
HONORS MEMORY OF DEAD
Metal Mine Workers' Hall Is Crowded to Capacity to
Listen to Speakers Extol Virtues of Cornelius Lehane,
James M. Ferriter and Other Departed Fighters in
the Cause of Workers' Emancipation.
Last night's meeting under the
auspices of the Pearce-Connolly club
was great. Not a seat was vacant at
7:30 and the meeting did not start
until 8 o'clock. The Metal Mine
Workers' hall, in which the workers
gathered, was decorated with the
flags of Ireland and America.
Mr. Duggan was chairman and in
line, pointed remarks stated that the
meeting was in memory of departed
fellow workers, Cornelius Lehane
and James M. Ferriter. As usual Mr.
Duggan voiced the cause of the work
ing class and the meeting could not
have had a stauncher champion to
represent it.
Fellow Worker Joe Shannan was
the first speaker, and in ringing lan
guage he showed the class nature of
society and gave it as the reason for
the death of the workers whose mem
ory we all hell so dear. Taking the
audience to the great battles for
Irish freedom, he pointed to those
who had really fought for the emaa
cipation of the working class and
those who had but hoodwinked them.
Time and time again the adilence
applauded his remarks, espeqlally
when he called upon them to unite as
a class into one big union.
The chairman then introduced the
Hon. W. F. Dunn, who was received
with great applause. He, true to his
style, soon got down to the workers'
position and their historical strug
gle. Deeply regretting the fall in the
great battle of the most courageous,
still he said we must take up where
they leave off and continue the lght
for the great goal for which they
dedicated their lives. Speaking of
the independence of small nations
and freedom for Ireland he etlo
gized the number of great flg lhrs
(Contlnued on Page Two.)

xml | txt