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The Butte daily bulletin. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1918-1921, February 03, 1919, Image 1

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WITH THE UNITED PRESS SERVICE AND A COMPETENT STAFF OF WRITERS, WE WILL SERVE THE NEWS AS IT REALLY HAPPNS
TELEPHONES _u t 7 EIGHT PAGES
B3usiness Office ..... 52 TODAY'S PRES RUN
Elitorial Rooms .......... 292 8,400
i~oLA NDWING IN, RUSSIA AND TH.E WORERS ARE BOLSHEVIKI
ANOTTIC STRIKE WOULD SOCIALIZEN SYMPATHY WITH THE INDUSTRIES
r',ýýANTIC STRIKE WOULD SOCIALIZE ALL BRITISH INDUSTRIES
GF 7UANY'Sl
KERS
BtSY
Ploi, Unearthed to Have Ex
Nairer Return in Effort
to Maintain Capitalist
Co ntrol.
,I i: ATHN OfRITIES
:,1:: Report Says New
St ,rt [acan Outbreak Is
C". :ii:i SLt.en-.gth in Vari
7y,- !rr of Germany.
, 1 l n . ). .\II, 1 11111 Of.' -
,f , ' . I" l 11 ill i i' 11'd
i , , , u ll: !t i$m (1h1] i '
AACUS
A§TVI ITY
.i . _ _ 1' O yll_ _i lti
W ....ing Through Soldiers'
and Workmen's Councils,
They Are Menacing Sta
bility of Junkers.
[D6 I SOLDIERS
ESENT WAR ORDER
Trcops on Point of Revolt
Against Mandate of War
Office Lessening Author
ity of Soldiers' Councils.
. F . 1.- --Wilh the tioe for
" .* . il ! i ii i t I uitialtl na itlZ"
, ob ly? , six days off, th
Sit:. inn har. suddenly tal
1 'I. a' i " , t \i hic h lmtust he con
, ..,' ,,, 1! i tht juI nkers. 'liT'
ir independent so
, :I '.t c,-operating willit
S r.: ,I i st: d ,o. r l lonl 's co ilr -
;: I, ý '.ir, i n Blrts of th(e country.
t, i! u eanlaign which al
- ,a , , oly IeFbarrass and
I: t'ore's workitig fur Ihl(
, ! t" ern7ment and mtalke ([i
.. a, t his "ideal" im possibi-.
ifor the nxt f,.w weeks or
\ i;. it is unlikely that any at
1 : ' ill 1, lmade to disperse tile
a a"'bly at \Veimnar
Sill bi probabily what amouints
i, ii. il iamnwnt in ses.ion si
i:il!.i ii -nly in Berlin. The birlin
u i \ill ble it national congres.i
• l ' 1 .idirs' c uitie llh.
lthole who have follow (d
Continued on Page Three)
JUNKER PRESS
IN BUENOS AIRES
New York, Feb. :1.--T''le editor
of i Iltazoni, Ilie foremiiost evenilng
iieiwpap'ler of li(hlen.s Aires, has
btwi elected to llembers.hip ill the
.scs'ial - 1 '., andI I beglnlinlning li
lday will rIceive a naily newvs re
pIrl tihvl 'i'omn New York. Thi's
is thie (ieni'i-firsl imlportanit iouth
Amlerican piper to join the Assio
cildated Press since Jlan. . I. t is
evidlent ilill 11he calpitalists are
hald pIressed andl evey effoll'rt will
nlow e llllmade to 1lUmould publlic olpin
ion to ulit jiuker (lesires.
431.W.W.RECEIVE
THEIR SENTENCE
WITH A LAUGH
The Defiant Stand of Union
ists in Sacramento Trial
Told in Eye-Witnesses'
Account.
-n11 eoye-wit1.l"ss' n'O lunt of ilw
coulrtrl'aOlln secee when 43 melmll lrs
lof the 1. W. \V . well s-nitence(d ill
Sacl lll(nto l dalys Iago. uafter ha-' ;i
ing maii ainedii i a itlhllen strike
against cuapitalist justice" during h111e
rial, 1as just lbeen publ)ished by tlhe
New Vu(irk dlefise .oillllittiee, 27
fast Fouith . troel, \New York city.
,i'te•r etig ol u oonly 70 millutes tile
i r,'y brouht18" i11 .1 y ve' dt; of ' (AU ,ny
s clirtged"' giainst all of lthe de
fendnt5.I,, showing that the cast' of
(ach had ht (', displatched ill a muin
t111' and n half.
The li 110i se011iiid ratti' glatl L
have it over with, it is rlepoirltd:
((Contnllueed oiln age Three.)
IRELAND'S SINN FEINERS
ARE CO-OPERATING
S (Speci'.l \\nited Press Wi 1r.)
Lenldoil. Febl). 3.--Sinn Fteiners are
S-ittl'ia ilug wilthi ii workers toI
force a glr'oal sutrikte throughot
e lid, n iticcording tii o ai Ihi ill diN.
ptlch to the Dlaily News. ]By (oniliii
ing fonc1s with the strikers the Sinn
Ieiller.s loie l lo force the ricle.se of
tihoir imembers now jailed. besides ob
tainaing ciolicessions for the viworkers.
WILL NAME CROWDER
JUDE[ ADVOCATE CENERAL
(Special lUnited Press Wire.)
Washington, Feb. 3.--llMaj. Gen.
iEno ('rowder will be reappointed
arilmy judge advocate general. Inti
inations that he would be shelved
were dissipated when it was learned
upon reliable authority that Presi
(ltent Wilsonl will again nalme him
for the post.
WOULD FIGHT TO FINISH
WITH RUSS BOLSHEVIKI
(rpecial United Press \\'ire.)
London, Feb. 3.-"''The suggestion
that the north RussIa'ns meet with
the holsheviki is impracticable; one
of us must prevail over the other,"
said President Tchailkovsky of the
north Russianl republic in an inter
view. lie is en route to Paris to
confer with other anti-bolshllviki
leade'rs.
TIME CHANGES
ON MILWAUKEE
UInder a now timne tatle, eff'ctive
this miorning, two M1ilwaukce trains,
Nos. 15 and 18, will arrive and die
part from Butte a few minute.s later
than they formerly did.
Train No. 15, the Olympian, west
bound, will arrive in Bnutto at 10i p.
In., mllountain time, instead (f 9:.5
o'clock. and depart at 10:10 (Iclock
inst-ad of 9:55 o'clock.
Train No. 1S, Colutmbian. east
tIollund is due to arrive in lIntlr at
10:15 o'clock instead of 1.:1
o'clock, and will depart at lI:2;
o'clock instead of 10:2 io'clock
There are no other changes of i:r itic'
ular interest to Butte ill thel In, i tiii
table.
MANY QUITl
WORK IN
EAST
New Jersey Silk Workers
Want 47-Hour Week. New
York and Massachusetts
Strikes Are On.
(Special (llitcd 411r s W' i
IP't.d son, N. J., lFeb. :3.--II- pro
dieted lthat 30,0t Slll ikers will hi e out
in the silk plants il this ( 'ity ilef In
night. This will completely Ira4:ll.'
Ie silk indunslry.
(Spe4i(' li '11 1 1'td rc;·,< W ir'e.
'alerson, N. .I. Ioh. . Mor
111ihan 5,1lll10 s mik l ill u11 trk1 s s'tlru1 C,
here, leorl' di4 ng l 4i ll 14i4 ll,4fiia e:-tI
allite, follou'illoln ti h Ie 4m11()yer' ' r.
f(1(14al to 4meel d1e1 alni4 dS for n 47-h14441
\ i4k. 'ft , strikers' ori'4 al r' ] 14;01st
\411 f 1' II 11011 ho tvr .
(Special 1'nit'd P'ress Wire.)
.'4 Y-\'Iork, Feb.2. Str ikin4g gar
t14 at 44 or\ rs 1 ,41e' it,1 1 ''1'4rIo 01
pickel s al'orn11 t11ht ' eh( hinlg 41' ll41
aillre in 111h down IOVl I oll di 4'iL of
11 hulhuttan1, this 1morninlg, gri'elil½,
I11i non-nnioill el4illtlOy o 04( i 1111m;:I
iO work with ('nies i ' ".1el(." Strong
forces o' p(oli1e 44 '0e e41,lh' d 1 o prI 1 -
(Special Tl'lil, I'r1 ss \ i.'. l
L01'1 nce( . \11 ;lss., I F 'i. 1 ' .-4 l1
more 1than half of the :0.000 , t! t lel
wol'kers enlioyetl hitl t .plructk loda1L
to lenfore their dell n ds f l'or a rai
ill ,'1(er s 11(11 ' 4 1 lt- ou 4l8 1 4 ,h :
Il-por! ;. The mlajoritv (it' the ; tril
(s 14:- 'e f14'o4 igner1 . llu1 ndreds 4 I
pic. 1' surro1nded 1ll mill01 \11
Ihey 0i11:1ed1 today-.
OIL LAND CONFE[DIIS
REACH AN ARIIEEMENT
(:speial nited Press; Wire.)
\Vashi'ngtol. F b. . ('. onif'eels on1
(the oil lands leasing bill have
rlache1d 141 agre41nei4ll (t which 1pro
v1ides th4l piersoins holding (claims
in g4'lverl' ent, oil 4 lreserves 1l11' y 1 lease
1111ds f1'1ro4 the goverlnment oil pay
l"iltl. of o4ne-eighth roylltly, but no
(nw well can be drilled in the 14 111v1 l
STRIKERS AND POLICE
CLASH IN TEXTILE SITRIKE
(Special United Press ' Wire.)
Lawrence, :A1hss., Peb1. . - -4Shots
were fired when striking texilile
workers clashed with the police near
the Everett mill this afternoon.
There were 11no casallies. The (o0
lice said the strikers didl the shioot
ing. The police dispersed a ('crowd
estimated at 1i,01)00.
SPEECH. OF W. F. DUNN AT STATE CAPITOL
IN WHICH HE PLACES RED FLAG OF WORKERS.
ABOVE BLACK FLAG OF INDUSTRIAL PIRATES
"With the indulgence of ith house,
I would like to preface my motion
with a few remarks. Members o,
this body will probably realize that
I occupy a somewhat peculiar losi
tion in this legislative assenmbl; I
am not a republican, I have been
excolmmlunicated by lthe demllocratl(
party, I have never been a mllellmler'l'
of the socialist party, ni ither have\- ,
belonged to the I. W. \W. It 'would
appear, therefore, that I anim Itherll
fish, flesh or good red herring.
"Occupying thd positionl that 1 do.
I would ask that some little latitude
be extended to mie in the lruarllilt
that I amn about to make. I expectl
Ithat they may cover considerable tc'
ritory.
"I have watched, Mr. Speaker, al;,'
gentlemen of the assembly, bills thau
have been introduced and it seemns to
me that they have all dealt with con
ditions as they were before the worl,
went to war in 1914. It seems to ii,
most of the men assembled here be
lieve that this is the satlie old world
that it was before 1914. and this is
not the case. It is not the :ame oiti
(Copyright. 1 ! I b,, I Ii, l ,s.l
London, Feb. 3. -The
present strikes in Great
Britain are the first step
,toward the socialization of
all industries and the estab
lishment of revolutionary
committees like those of
Russia, William Watson,
member of the Shop Stew
ards' National council, today
declared. He frankly admit
ted that the shop stewards
are in sympathy with the
bolshevist philosophy and
said that the English work
ers hope to establish revolu
tionary committees like
'those in Russia.
Watson said: "We al
ready represent 50 per cent
of the English laborers and
the shop stewards are be
hind practically all of the
present strikes. We are di
rect actionists as opposed to
the regular unionists who
are constitutionalists. We
are against the bourgeois.
We hop.e that they will sub
mit to the new regime, but
if they become obstreperous
we intend to be firm. Person
ally, I would not be sur
prised to see violence in
England, but I hope it will
not come. I presume it may
be necessary to control the
London newspapers. We do
not intend to touch the tele
graph lines.
Our present program in
cludes a 40-hour week, and
perhaps shorter, if it is
found advisable and desir
able."
AD C LU WARRIORS
WILL AGAIN SIP
THE SOUP
ITomol row at noone, sharp, the
lutlt(e :(d club will 11 eet at theill
I:ntel grill and partake of their
'regular; weekly mutlligan. All 1uid
Ihill advertiserw.l.. who hlIve the
Ir prl'ice arel'( invited to Ibe present allllnd
ilntestigatle the war records of the(
leadill lln nembers of this wonderfulll
it b:?ll 1o[ I,lbraVes.
world ;il it never will be. 1 believe,
\ir s,.tker, that during imy absence
Ia bti! wtas introduced and passed~
Unt IS it a crime to display any eli
bli ui lthit meant revolt against op
p, :"in. I believe that there was a
bill ii,tlrduced that made it a crime
lti i-pity a red emiblemn either pub
lil r privately, and I do not dIts
S;,:. l the judglllent of yolll
i \:i, i . expiressed in thatll meilasure.
1 . I,owever, differ with the nitl
i i i:tt aCtuated that itea ua-tlt',
:!! ni . lot speakling lagainiit it be
a(, ii particularly eO rnetd as
results that will accirue fronl
i.,..:-.age of that measure, be
,; , student of history I know
idea has never been killed bi
,ithstanding the fact thatI OIio
, . ,:ti from Missoula, who is lihe
; ' the bill, and who, I aim in
,: " . was the sole survivor in llthe
, i h to introduce the bill that
\ plosedly popular, assutlred li'
,'d withhold action until I
,,,: , here, and until I could ex
I1,, . i " views upon it. In spite ut
WORKERS'
COUNCIL
MEETS
And Is Addressed by Re
turned Soldiers, Who Will
Form Organization Which
Will Bar Politicians.
, uirdtay niZlht Vi 1' 14 44.',d a l:trgely
lat4ienl 4dt4 ,h lliltl 1:il; it' i leeting
of Ih \''orkers' ('otui'ncil of llultte.
.1 4an} i t'rit '.l ig talks;4 4 we'ro mia4de,
Itm)l t. )" 4'44(1 11'(I it 'hl rs, who 40 '(t 1
Ul441tr;1 tl' d 1h11;1( 1hy 1 IIdi'rsl ood (Ih1'
p (o itloll 1 4i he ll' . 111 te as Illt 01
the wVork4'4rs; in fal it \was pointe'd
4t4444 4le;4 rly Ib 44 ,' of 4 1' t1 ( r4't14r144'd
lolbt'b1 r h iha4t4 II 4 llmat44 4 tl4d prop14 '(
c'n .Im' for I' the reit I4 n144'd s 'old'iers ''as
t t4lra1444l4 tll ,; oldiershr\\r-';' 'O 4i l ('-.
operate w 4h th414' Work(ers' 4 o14ll4iis,
ve'lI tually t144 ti4' t '1 adrift 1444r1 14( Iho
wh,)!., sinifster pullrposes; :uI l political
hI4' s(holdiers.
4\ c'lo.Ll4ll4 4i(ttl tlto [l'oi) 4 ('1;fl4s-W' al
prione t'r1, at. Le \tnenwort'lh N\ w ' re
c4tivtd, inllusin.. $11 For the relief 4 of
s.-tr 4d4,4'td fig1(ht'4' l (hor d lo(''crat'y a1lld
11t4' co(t44Ic.il dt'cided to start 1( fund ' (
4for 4a141t. 414l'p44O44'.
A ('o41 411 i 'te4 wt as ' :4 lppoint Id 14
dt r'al't 4'r';4ol ttitons setting forth the
U ljjts't' ; of (I1''" t'0 lt il lfor tl e' iftll r
4 t41(4ioI4 of s;illli;tr organizations else
The dil'ffrent labor orgallizsations
in Ilutte are11I kn1414g 1 t 1144' 1 ( Workers'
c('lu il iln good shapel', 1ill1(, hroullg
h(b' ousil4incil, holie' is Ino doubtl that
muclh o1f 4 h friction, which ha1 s o
tined 44( o1 1t4Il tho~ t 104' labor ,elen4 h 'lts
which ar14'e r4ally striving 1o lbett4'1
lho 'on llitions thil' 1tllk and file
will be eliluminated.l.
Leatvenworth, 1Kans., l14. 27, 1919.
\Vt'kerI;' 'ttlCouncil,
l1n t'e, Mei41t.
Flllow Vorlers: M brs of tilee sfhe
I. W. W. who ame in this institu
tilo1 as p'iso 'ers; of Wil' inll the class
struggle hl rn '1 with indlignaition that
thousands o(f soldiers are being dis
chlarge40 daily from 1ll1 a1i11 y. I'e'4
l4ils1s alnd witho'ut 11 chance t o get
wor(, ofter havillg riseti their lives,
linmbs and iealth in the service of
1the 1141ion, they lare e1ast aside 10 s no
lunger 'usefulI. 'Tie linasteris of in
dustry c(41'4. absolutely nothing for'
lthe welftr1 of these mlenI,4.
'lThe labove( information cotl es to
us through the columus of that fine
working-class 1paper, "The Butte
Daily Bulletin."
We are pleas4ed to note the spirit
of good-fellowshi p displayed by the
workers of BIutte in their efforts to
1ti( 1 l( more plehhtsantl, the loit of the
4refrned fighters.
Those of us (onf'1;1led here', have
at le(as food to eat and beds to sleep
in. Stlme of the boys had11 a dollar
(1the side ah(1nd have instlructed me
to ftorwardl tel ($10) doltlars to help
relieve the most prl'essillg needs of
discharged sgoldiers. The amoun0t is
not large, 1but when you consider'
that the highest 1paid amongst us
are but one dollar 1i year men, it
(Conltinued on Page Three.)
the fauet Itht Ithi; gentlemnln, an1d,
uiindetllt d ni, d. lr. Speaker and gcn
illeniiin of this asIsemitbly, that I alit
not deailing in personalities any fullr
ther than is Ilce(ssaIry to illustrate
the loilti that I wish to make, not
wit hlistanldinig tlhat this gentleitmta
gaint-id lis knowleidge of the working
class Iom\ma tit atl fair Harvard, that
11i, was bortn ,, illt a golden slpooni ill
his immuth, tha.t his practice of law ;
largtly oItr Ills own atIlUsenttt, hit
still presmlls to foist upon the ipo
ple of MIonlan| his views upoln this
particular subject.
No\u, in miy 1|t years of mlore or
less - IcI' work in the labor move'
ment in all sections of the Ul'nit.d
State, of .\lmrica, I have n(. e\ yet
secII th, rd flag displayed. \lhalt,
thenll, Ctlll.lllIn, are you aifrid of?
1 hiird it tis xcuellency, the gover.lnor.
i hi:t address to this body ask fol
hi-t islation against the red flag of
;larcllhy. As usual, the governlor it
nistaken iil his ideas of revolution,
b.Icalus- tred is not the color of ain
(Continilued on Page Seven.)
GUNMAN'S PLACE
DECLARED UNFAIR
l'he Motor Car Dlistriibuting Co.,
108 I. Broadway, John Ilerkin,
general mlanagel', wa (declared
unfair by the Machinistsi' union,
land its action was endorsed b3y
the Metal T'rades collllncil at their
last. regular meeting. This action
will not comell as a surprise in
view of the part the general man
ager of the above coincernll is ll'ore
generally known as a "guniman,'"
a breed that has no use for Imea
who work for :l livillng.
PEARSE CONNOLLY
CLUB PARADES
MARCH 17
Leading Butte Irish Will
Stage Parade and Invite
Returned Soldiers and
Sailors to Join Them.
Theill 'earse-('oninolly club will pa
Iradel ' ll n IIMarch 17 ill honor of Ire
land'S Ia4 tr4)n salilt alld ill memollllry of
those Ill'tyrl's to the cause of Irish
free.ldom.ll, PIll'erse ainld Connolly, who
wero killed in 1916 1by English au
tocrlacy.
'T'he par)Llade will start from North
\V llling and Copper streets ald the
liii of March will he: \Vest on Cop
pe, soth oil Matill, west on1 Broad
way, soulth oil W\Vashiington, east on0,
Silver, north on Idaho, east on Park,
north oii Atlantic, west on Broadway,
nolrth on Maini to Quartz andit disband.
A sleelal invitation to all re
i .urn4ed soldiers and sailors aid all
lovers of liberty to join in the pa
rade is extended by the club.
REPORT SAYS LENINE
INTENDS TO SURRENDER
(Special Unlited Press WVire.
London, Feb. :3.- Anl unconllirled
iIetrograld disptllch today relorted
that soldiers have revolted iand thaLt
considerable machine) gun fighting is
raging in the streets. Kronstadt
troops ire said to be bombardilng
|1Petrograd. Rumlllors are current in
Pl'etrograd that Lenine is preparing
to surrender to the entenllte. A
Stoc'hlolmn correspondent to the
iondon Tehlegralph reported that the
bolsllhviki troops are withdrawing
from the Baltic provinces, particu
larly Esthonia.
HINES IS AGAINST
GOVERNMENT OWNERSHIP
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, Feb. 3. -- Govern
ment control of the railroads must be
extended for at least three years or
be shelved immediately. This ulti
matum has been issued by Walker LD.
Hines, director general of railroads.
llines has proposed the three-year
extensioL period as a compromise
due to the bitter opposition of con
gress to the recent five-year recom
illlendation of McAdoo. In iany event,
Ilines told the senate interstate comi
merce committtee, the Ipresent 21
montlh limit on government opera
tion is intolerable. lie had in mind
the resolution Senator Clummins in
troduced to prevent the return ol
the railroads to private control be
fore that limit expires.
Ilines came out frankly against
government ownership, but earnestly
appealed for the adoptlion of the live
year test period.
RAILROAD TRAFFIC IN
SWEDEN IS PARALYZED
(Special United Press .Wire.)
Copenhagen, Feb. 3. - Traffic
throughout Swenden is paralyzed to
day as a result of the strike of the
trainmen on 19 railways. The food
situation in some interior towns is
said to be desperate.
MONTANA WEATHER.
Generally fair today and tomor
row; somewhat warmer tomorrow.
Butte District-Fair, warmer.
Butte Temperatures - Maximum,
30; minimum, 14.
SHIPYARDS
STRIKE
NEWS
General Strike Thursday at
Seattle. Printers to Par
ticipate. Longshoremen
Disregard Orders.
STREET CAR MEN TO
JOIN THE STRIKERS
Great 'Falls Strike Starts
Tomorrow. Butte Railway
Electricians Are Threat
ening to Strike.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Tacomna, Feb. :3.-A mass meeting
of the Ta.roml: Soldiers' Sailors' and
.Workmllen's ~ouncil pracked two halls
to the idoors last night. Three thou
sand union labor men and women,
eIIIlel.I's of the 1. W. W., and many
soldiers in uniforml attended. Rus
sta.n hIolshevis.ml w:uis openlly advoca4t
e(d rand cheered.
Writings of Lenine, the Russian
soviet premier, were circulated. The
audience joined in singing the I. V.
W. song, "Hold the Fort." A peace
fill overt hrow of the present formu of
gov'ernment in ihie United States and
thei seizilng of the governmlent and
the industries by the working class
was urged by most of the speakers.
Seattle, Feb. 3.--Information this
morning from the conference room
where representatives of 130 local
unions, affiliated with the Seattle
Continued on Page Three)
BOLSHEVIKI
FIGHTING
ALLIES
Workers of Russia En
deavor to Force Trespass
ers From Their Country.
Want Peace.
PEACE CONFERENCE CON
SIDERING WITHDRAWAL
Bolsheviki Forces Growing
Stronger and the Allied
Troops Are Massing to
Prevent Annihilation.
Archangel, Feb. 2.-Another vio
lent attack by the bolsheviki on the
Amerigan and British positions at
Taresevo has compelled the hard
pressed and outnumbered little al
lied column in this sector to with
draw approximately 40 miles. Its
new position is at the village of
Srdmakrenga.
The bolsheviki attack followed a
bout in which gas, incendiary, shrap
nel and high explosive shells were
used. It was the first time that gas
shells had been employed in this
northern Russia warfare.
The bolsheviki in the field from
the River Dvina to the Vologna rail
road are estimated to number 15,
000. They are heavily shelling the
p-'w American position on the Vaga
river and also the position pa the
i vina at Tulgas.
The American exacuation of Tare
sevo came only after a week of fight
ing.
Although attacked at Tareseva
(Continued on Page Three.)

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