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The Butte daily bulletin. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1918-1921, February 05, 1919, Image 1

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WITH THE UNITED PRESS SERVICE AND A COMPETENT STAFF OF WRITERS, WE WILL SERVE THE NEWS AS IT REALLY HAPPIS
TELEPHONES SIX PAGES
Business Officee 52 1.. .TODA. I
UEditoria -ooms _..T292 A PREU 8,q4
\ (oIlUME 1.--NUMBER 145. IBU1TT. I MONITANA, ,' EDNI'SI - FEIIHRUARXV, 1919. PRICE FIVE 119NTS
60,00 SEATTLE WORKERS GO OUT TOMORROW
No Capital -Newspapers and No Electric Power Will Be Available
LEAGUE OF NATIONS TO CONDUCT WARS IN THE FUTURE
"Great Emergencies"' and "Troubles" to Be Handled From the World Headquarters
By FRED S. FERGUSON
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Paris, Feb. 5.-Peace delegates are now working on the
most dilliiult problem involved in the creationl of the league of
nations, the force with which the league will make its decisions
effective. Opinion seems to be divided as to whether this force
will be moral or physical. Many plans have been submitted,
ranginl g-front complete abLolition of armamncts to the organiza
tion of anl inlternational military and(1 naval police under a single
comnmlander. The plan finding the greatest support among
teslpotsible delegaltes provides for no-such radical departure.
II, irpoposes merely a reduction of each nation's armament to a
paint, consistent. with the maintenance of domestic tranquility,
the league itsell' to be judge as to the size of the army and navy
ned.ed by nations that are members of the league.
The manner of raising armies will
be left to individual countries.
Great BIritain and the United States,
it is almost certain, would rely on
volunteers, attracted by good pay.
France and Italy possibly would re
turn to conscription on the ground
that they couldn't pay wages corre
sponding to those paid in the British
and American armies. But whereas
France had to conscript an army of
800,000 before the war; she prob
ably would need only 20 or 25 per
cent of that number under the league
ofd nations plan.
In the case of Great Britain and
the United States the number of sol
diers would approximate their for
mer standing armies of 200,000 for
the British and 75,000 for the Amer
icans. When the central powers be
came members the league would fix
the size of their armies. Only great
emergencies will be likely to call
such armies to distant points. In the
event of troubles on the American
continent the United States would be
directed by the league to take ac
tion. Similarly, European troubles
would be settled by the utilization of
armies nearest the districts affected.
It is believed this plan will meet
with the readiest approval of all
countries, since it means the least
change in present methods, and over
comes the natural prejudices felt in
other countries, as well as America,
against sending troops to distant
lands except in case of greatest
provocation. Interchanges of views
by the various powers indicate that
one feature of the new "freedom of
the seas" laws will be prohibition of
floating mines outside of territorial
waters. Such mines would have to
be anchored and would be designed
so they would be rendered non-explo
sive in case they broke loose. The
three-mile limit to territorial waters
will possibly be extended, however,
due to the fact that modern guns,
both land and naval, have a greater
range than ever before.
The special committee drafting the
constitution of the league of nations
has provisionally agreed to the pre
amble and two of the articles, it is
officially announced. Satisfactory
progress is being made on other parts
of the draft.
ANACONDA COPPER MINING CO.
USING THE HELENA LEGISLATURE
TO HELP PLUTES GET RAILROADS
A. C M.I SOLONS
BELITTLEU. S.
Want Railroads Returned
to Profiteers and :Call
Fought-for Democracy a
"Colossal Failure."
Helena, Feb. 5.-Governmentcon
trol of railroads, telephone and tele
graph systems is repugnant to the
A. C. M. members of the senate of
the Sixteenth assembly, and in Don
lan's joint memorial that was con
sidered in committee of the whole
yesterday, the assertion is made that
govdrnment control has proved a
"colossal failure,". that all "sound
thinking" men subscribe to this
view, and the federal governzent is
therefore urged to '"return.the rail
. .onti. u led -o Pa-e Mi.tR .)
TEXTILE WORKERS
'REPUDIATE A., F. OF L.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Lawrence, Mass., Feb. 5.-I. W. W.
agents are making efforts to organ
ize the striking textile workers. The
general committee of strikers has re
pudiated the American Federation of
Labor and local textile workers and
unions, but hasn't joined the I. W. W.
PORTUGUESE GOVERNMtNT
DECLARES A BLOCKAGE
(Special United Press Wire.)
Madrid, Feb. 5.-The Portuguese
government has proclaimed a block
ade of all ports between Aveiro and
Cominisa, a Lisbon dispatch today
reported. Foreign ships for these
ports will not be permitted to sail.
SURELY WE ARE CLAD
THE WAR IS OVER
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, Feb. 5.-The United
States was prepared to increase its
fighting force to more than 7,000,000
men during 1919, if the war con
tinued, General Crowder stated in
his annual report to congress today.
HAMBURG WORKINGMEN
GARRISON SHIPYARDS
(Special United Press Wire.)
Berlin, Feb. 5.-Hamburg work
men today held a demonstration of
sympathy with the Spartacan insurg
ents. Armed workmen garrisoned
the Vulkan shipyards in Hamburg.
Work is at a standstill.
DECIGING PORTLAND'S
BIG ANNUAL EVENT
(By United Press.)
Portland, Ore. Feb. 5.-Repre
sentatives of 300 civic, welfare and
fraternal organizations of the city
are meeting today to definitely deter
mine whether Portland shall stage its
annual Rose Festival next June.
If held, it will also be in the na
ture of a "victory celebration."
FORGER MAKES STAKE
WHILE HEIS IN PRISON
Los Angeles, Feb. 5.-W. J. Ford,
forger, just released from the peni
tentiary, made $80,000 while in pris
on. He invented a non-forgable
check, and says the Aeierican Bank
OVER THE HILLS AND FAR AWAY
fI .
/.~/
,"'\ i
jý ý ý' . ie jý ,\ ,, _ _x." "!Z. mi' ýJ
"ýDo you see the sunrise, Jim?"
"Yes, and there's a bit of red in it this morning."
. ..- .7 ---' - _-' __
'i~~~~o yo e h unie i?
"Yes andther's abit t: rd i it th~-is morning." Z
WOLD DONATE TO
BANKING HOUSES
Labor Representatives in
Washington Touched by
Tearful Tale of Jawn D.
and Would Help.
Washington, Feb. 4.-The depart
ment of labor today announced that
officials of the department and some
delegates supposed to represent la
bor in Montana, Utah and Arizona,
had established a "permanent" joint
conference comlmittee, which is "em
powered" to confer with the man
agers of the industry with a view to
establishing a "working agreement
for the delicate price for readjust
ment on a peace basis."
Iyan's Hard Luck. Tale.
John D. Ryan of the Amalgamated
Copper company went before the
agents of the department of labor
and miners, and delivered himself
of a woeful tale regarding the pres
ent condition of the copper indus
try. It was pdinted out by hini that
there has beep no market for cop
per since the armistice was signed.
The sales for the last 75 days do not
amount to 5 Per cent of the output.
The copper stocks on hand at mill,
smelter, in transit and in refineries
total about 1,000,000,000 pounds,
representing over $175,000,000 tied
up in stocks.
Space is too valuable to give in de
tail a verbatim report of Jawn D.'s
tearful tale bit that it was wonder
fully effective is proved by the fact
that during their stay in Washington
the labor men have interviewed the
senators and representatives of their
respective states and have recom
mended to the., the .p.p age of laws
exte4din jfl.aclat .aid to bankars
and t.s e q xniis ox thie purpose
of h tbe jn. pn dyst les.
GCABAGE QUESTION TO
BE UP AGAIN TONIGHT
The city council will meet again
this evening at 7:30 o'clock for the
purpose of taking up matters of a
routine character, although recon
sideration of the proposition of
awarding a contract for the disposal
of the garbage and ashes of the city
will also come up. Alderman James
Woods will preside.
Yesterday acting Mayor Woods
was on duty, but had little to attend
to. He found no business to occupy
his attention.
ENGLISH GOVERNMENT
TO PROTECT "SOCIETY"
(Special United Press Wire.)
London, Feb. 6.-The ministry of
labor will intervene in strikes spread
ing throughout Great Britain and
Ireland it union officials fail to gain
control of the situation. The United
Presm i; authorized to make the fol
lowing statement: "The government
regards the labor situation as a fight
bet oeen regular labor union leaders
and reelis. If the regular leaders
are unable to gain control the gov
erninenl will then intervene for the
protection of society."
INTERNED SINN FEINERS
RELFASED FROM PRISON
(Special United Press Wire.)
Londn, Feb. 5.--A Dublin dis
patch reported all BSian-Feiners iu
terned :u England *.i'be immediate
ly lele -,.d" . ' ., , -
DOCTORS WILL NOT
RAISE THE PRICES
Protest of Organized Labor
Has Desired effect. Black
Flag Would Give Labor
Hater the Credit.
The protest of the. Butte Engi
neer's union, working through the
Silver Bow Trades and Labor coun
cil, against Butte doctors charging
nearly twice the prices for their serv
ices that are asked by the physicians
of any other community In the Unit
ed States, has had the hoped for ef
fect.
The Silver Bow Medical associa
tion at a meeting last night, decided
to adhere to their former schedule of
fees.
John McIntosh butted into the
meeting in an effort to take credit
for persuading the physicians that
prices should not be raised, and im
mediately after the meeting made his
way to the black flag on West Broad
way, the capitalist paper that rep
resents the anarchists and industrial
pirates of Montana, and it was there
decided that Jawn should "break into
print" and not the labor unions..
After a short discussion at the
meeting last night the physicians
unanimously decided to adopt the
following resolutions:
"Whereas, The Silver Bow Medi
cal society recently voted certain
changes in the schedule of fees which
seem unfair, only because they are
misunderstood; and
"Whereas, This time seems inop
portune for any change because ov
general and growing depressed eco
nomic and industrial conditions,
therefore be it
"Resolved, That the medical pro
fession of Silver Bow county adhere
to the former scedhule of tees."
(Special United Press Wire to The Bulletin.)
Seattle, Feb. 5.-The Electrical Workers union has over
whelmingly voted to refuse exemption from the city's general
strike to municipal light and power employes. Leon Green,
business agent of the Electrical Workers, declared the strike
will last only a few days, and that the tieing up of the electrical
supply will be the deciding factor in establishing a works s'
victory.
The street car men will hold a mass meeting early to
morrow morning to consider their strike action. Even if
the men remain on the job, it is doubtful if cars can bp
erate without adequate power supply, although Mayor
Hanson asserted that eniergency workers will be in
stalled to supply traction power and light. The munici
pal street car employes are threatened with disoharge if
they walk out.
SEAITTLE MAYOR CALLS
FOR STRIKE-BREAKERS
(Special United Press Wire.)
Seattle, Feb. 5.---Ten thousand ex
tra policemen will be sworn in if nec
essary to preserve order in Seattle
during the general strike scheduled
to commence tomorrow, according to
Mayor Hanson. He declared that city
utilities will operate with the aid of
emergency workers. A civil appeal
has been issued from the city hall
for citizens to volunteer for light de
partment work. Despite the appeal
for volunteers to operate the ma
chinery of the power department,
union leaders declare the city will
be dark, and that this factor more
than anything else will effect a set
tlement of the strike at an early
date in favor of the 60,000 workers.
1,000 TEXTILE WORKERS
LOCKED OUT IN CEORBIA
(Special United Press Wire.)
Columbus, Ga., Feb. 5.-Follow
lug the refusal of mill owners to
agree to eight hours a day without
an increase in wages, approximately
7,000 textile workers, it is claimed,
were locked out here today. Only
two of 14 mills are operating, and
on a limited scale with unorganized
workers.
LAWS OF UNITED STATES
A SCRAP OF PAPER HERE
(Special United Press Wire.)
Asusea, Cal., Feb. 5.-One hun
dred Russians, alleged I. W. W. agi
tators, will be deported from the
Charter Oaks orange district this aft
ernoon by a vigilance committee, it
is reported here.
"NATION HOVERS ON BORDERLAND
BETWEEN PEACE AND WAR AND
WILSON HOBNOBS WITH ROYALTY"
A GOO0 TOWN FOR
THE PORCH CLIMBER
(By United Press.)
Chicagoff, Alaska, Feb. 5.-The
population of this place is 217, count
ing every man, woman and child.
A movie show opened here a few
nights ago-the first one in the his
tory of the town.
The attendance at the initial exhi
bition was 217.
EX-QUEEN OF BAVARIA
IS DEAD, SAYS DISPATCH
(Special United Press Wire.)
Copenhagen, Feb. 5.-Marie Ther
esa, former queen of Bavaria, and
widow of "Mad hKing" Otto, is dead,
according to a4 Mui;ahi dispatch re
ceived here today.
Seattle, Feb. 5. - At 10
o'clock tomorow morning 60,
000 organized workers in the
city of Seattle will stand shouil
dter to shoulder in the first geh
eral strike that has ever been
successfully inaugurated in the
history of this country. Ins9
lently and contemptuously Mr.
lharles Piez and his labor-snub
bing. shipping board threw down
the defiant gauntlet which has
now been taken up with a flrui
ness of resolution and a solidar.
ity unmatched in the annals of
the American labor movement.
The workers of the northwest be.
lieve that they have been flouted and
fooled by Piez and his fellow labor
baiters, that they have been deceived
and betrayed by the politicians, boy
state and federal, and they have res
olutely grasped the only weapon over
which they have any direct control,
determined to make a fight that will
demonstrate whether or not they
have the power to secure the justice
that has been denied them by in
dustrial barons and bureaucratic des
pots.
Negotiations Fall.
In proof of these statements the
officers of the Metal Trades council
point out that they were unable
after long months of patient waiting
-to get a square deal from the
Macy board, that they exhausted
every means at their disposal to have
their grievances peacefully adjuisted,
that they were given permission by
Piez and his associates to deal direct
ly with the employers, and that as
these employers, stubbornly refuse to
grant a living wage the shipyard
workers, by a referendum vote
subsequenty endorsed unanimously
by all locals at their meetings---de
cided to strike.
Recognizing that this fight vital.
ly concerned the rank and file of
all the workers, the Central Labor
council called for a general strike as
the most effective way of reaching
a decisive conclusion to the comflict.
By an overwhelming majority practi
cally all the unions in the city en
dorsed the strike and authorized
three representatives from each local
(Continued on Page Eight.)
SEN, SHERMAN
ASSAILS WILSON
Nation Drifts While Wil
son Chases Infinite Ab
strations in Empy
Heights of the Impossible.
Washington, Feb. 5. - Senator
Sherman of Illinois, republican, de
livered another address in the sen
ate yesterday, assailing President
Wilson and his administrationf He
took the subject "Superman Gov
ernment and Self-government,' and
asserted that the president was a
superman by virtue of usurped au
thority.
"The United States," said Senator
Sherman, "Is no longer a repulbIa o
self-governed people. It is uade t!N
(Continaud on Ps --

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