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The Butte daily bulletin. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1918-1921, March 06, 1919, Image 1

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WITH THE UNITED PRESS SERVICE AND A COMPETENT SUTFF OF WRITERS, WE WiLL SERVE THE NEWS AS IT REALLY HAP
TELEPHONES • EIGHT PAGES
7BusTiEs 2 7S OUioI X J"Ij _f TODAY'S PRESS I-E
Editoria Rooms ..... _ _ __ 11,225
A'(11,1_11 I.-NUMBER 0 TTE. MONTANA. TIHURISI MAIH ( 11 PRICE FIVE CENT
Mr A DEMOCRACY ENTER THE RACE FOR MM
While the War Profiteers, 1bnch Dodgers and Black Flag of the A. C. M. Industrial Pirates Prepare to Launch Campaign of Ause
NATION-WIDE CAMPAIGN AGAINST WILSON'S LEAGUE OF NATIONS BEGINS
Spartacans of Germany Still
Held In Check By Government
By FRANI( J. TAYLOR
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Irli n. Marclih 4.---Despite spasmodic attemplts ol' the Spar
;incis Io revive the ew revolution, thle government appears
In have the situation well in hand tonight. Sectioiis of the
.ily where the revolution c(entered have been isolated by
rar Ioe Wire enllagIIemUnLs recitUU
under direction of officers specially
trained in this method of defense
during thle war.
Government troops have extended
their control until the revolutionists
are forced to limit their activities to
shiplping. Plundering continued in
somne parts of the city, however. The'
casualties haIre been extremely light.
Employes of many factories refused
to join the general strike, which was
to have been the signal for a nation
wide revolution. The telephone sys
tem is working as usual and railway
service has not been seriously im
paired.
The bourgeois are threatening to
start a counter strike in sympathy
with the government. General opin
PORK PRICE
JliS GOING
SKYWARD
Grain and Meat Prices to
Reach Record, Height Is
Prediction of Those in a
Position to Know.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Chicago, March 6.-"The balloon
has been cut loose," according to ex
perts commenting on the unfixed
price of hogs. Packing house olfi
:iale said they expect an immediate
advnnce in live hog prices to set
marks' far above the $20 record of
last winter.
"Prices will be up for two or three
years," said F. W. Waddell, head of
the Armour company's pork depart
minent.
"Lifting the embargo on pork ex
ports opens much new territory.
'T'here isn't enough pork on hand to
meet this demand, and the .live hog
supply of this country is almost ex
hausted.
"The farmer rushed his hogs to
market while the food administration
had fixed the price for his animals."
Some startling high prices are un
officially named as possible records
for both grains and meats.
THOUGHT CONTROLLER
MAY PRECIPITATE STRIKE
(Special United Press Wire.)
San Francisco, March 6.-Elec
trical workers and girl telephone op
erators are ready to strike at a mo
ment's notice, according to advices
received here. A secret strike vote
was taken a fortnight ago, and the
result was announced today. The
walkout will be called if Burleson
does not meet the demands of the
coast electrical workers and girls,
numbering 18,000, who want better
working conditions and increased
wages.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Boston, March 6.-Fifteen thou
sand:employes of New England and
Providence telephone companies will
strike March 11 unless Postmaster
Burleson agrees to the wage demands
of the telephone workers or Presi
dent Wilson intervenes, it is learned
here today.
MfRS:'IlOI .FAIRBIANKS
OBTAINS FINAL DECREE
White Plains, N. Y., March 5.-A
final decree of divorce in favor of
Mrs. Douglas Fairbanks, wife of the
motion picture.actor, was signed to
clay by State Suprente Court Justice
Young. The papers mentioned an
unknown woman as co-respondent.
Under the terms of the decree the
custody Of a child, Douglas Fair
banks, Jr., is given to the mother
with the provision that the father
shall be allowed to see him at fre
quent "Intervals.
ion is the radicals are overconfident
and "went off half-cocked." Some
of their leaders, including Hugo
Haase, are already disclaiming any
connection with the strike.
The government, so far, has not
been seriously endangered. The cab
inet is planning to hurry the social
ization of certain indultries, though
its program is far short of that the
radicals have demanded. All govern
ment work will be directed from
Weimar until order is completely re
stored in Berlin.
Unconfirmed reports have been re
ceived that heavily armed hands are
advancing on Weimar for the pur
pose of looting the town. As far as
is learned the bands apparently have
no political affiliation.
AMERICAN JEWS
NOT IN FAVOR
OF NEW STATE
Ihiladelplhi, March 0. - A
statement signed by 300 prominent
American Jews setting forth their
objections to the organization of
a Jewish state in Palestine as pro.
posed by the Zionist societies in
-this country and Europe, to be
presented to the peace conference
in Paris, was made public here
last night. Objections to the seg
regation of the Jews as a nation
alistic unit. in any country is also
made in the statement, which will
be plesented to the peace confer
ence by Representative Julius
Kahn of California.
RELEASING THE
POLITICAL
PRISONERS
Department of Justice Re
views 52 Cases Convicted
Under Espionage Act;
Fredk. Krafft Pardoned.
Washington, March 6.-Sentences
imposed on a number of persons con
victed during the war of violating the
espionage act will be corrected from
time to time through executive clem
ency by President Wilson, it was an
nounced yesterday, simultaneously
with the commutation of sentences in
52 cases and complete pardon in one.
As fast as the department of justice
can review the cases still awating
examination, recommendations for
the shortening of sentences will be
sent to the president.
In many of the cases acted on yes
terday department of justice officials
said prisoners had been victims of
wartime passion or prejudice and had
been given long sentences not com
mensurate with their offense. To
eliminate any possible injustice, the
reviews were undertaken. Official:
explained, however; they would take
care not to recommend clemency for
the scores of persons against whom
there was strong evidence of disloy
alty, whose sentences were not ex
treme.
Frederick Krafft of Newark, N. J.,
secretary of the socialist party in
New Jersey, was given the only full
pardon. He was convicted for ut:
terances in a speech in Newark, but
in pardoning him consideraton was
given to the fact that in the socialist
convention at St. Louis early in the
war he was one of the pro-war lead
err.
Those granted clemency today in
cluded a number of socialists, I. W.
W. agitators and religious pacifists.
RAINBOW DIVISION'S
RETURN IS DELAYED
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, March 6.-Secretary
Baker has advised Secretary Glass
that it will be impossible to advance
the home-coming date of the 42nd
division. Glass wanted the return
hastened so the division could pat
,ticipate in the Victory loan campaign.
-, .II t
EjF O f~jj 41P
FRENCH GOVERNMENT OFFENSIVE ON
AGAINST THE HIGH COST OF LIVING
GERMANY'S RESOLUTION
IS UPPERMOST SUBJECT
(Special United Press Wire.)
Paris, March 6.-Conditions of the
separate peace treaty are said to
have been worked out to an extent
where the formal approval of Presi
dent Wilson, Lloyd George and
Premier Orlando would be obtained
within a remarkable short time after
they had undertaken a discussion of
terms.
President Wilson will find an en
tirely new atmosphere when he ar
rives here. Concern over what is
going on in Germany will be topmost
among the anxieties rather than in
dividual desires, and designs of va
rious nationalities. Possible ar
rangements admitting 270,000 tons
of fats into Germany will be com
pleted before the president has
reached Paris.
MONTANA WEATHER.
Mostly cloudy Thursday and Fri
day; probably light local snows; not
much change in temperature.
BUTTE WEATHER
Unsettled today and tomorrow,
with light snow; colder.
W. F. DUNN HAS FILED FOR MAYOR
AND FIGHT FOR DEMOCRACY IS ON;
PEOPLE AGAINST THE PROFITEERS
W. F. Dunn, editor of the Butte
Daily Bulletin, member of the Elec
tricians' union and the only repre
sentative from Silver Bow county
sent to Helena by the democrats
whose seat was not contested, has
filed for mayor of Butte on the dem
ocratic ticket and the efforts of the
decent people of Butte to secure a
real mayor and real democracy are
now about to begin.
In an interview with one of Butte's
leading merchants this morning, a
man who has ever had the welfare of
the city at heart, when asked for an
expression of opinion he began by
bringing up the recent meeting of the
republican central committee at St.
John's parish house, and said:
"At the meeting of the republican
central commlittee' held at
the parish _,9M s~.4ogol ay,,.venuing
Hope to Reduce Prices in
Paris 40 Per Cent Within
Fortnight. ATipfor
Woodrow Wilson.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Paris, March 6.-The French gov
ernlment has started an offensive
against profiteering with the excep
tion of lowering the cost of living in
Paris 40 per cent within a fortnight.
Fifteen large sheds, located in
various public squares, have been
opened for the sale of' government
controlled provisions. More will be
opened as soon as possible. These
supplies consist principally of food
bought from inter-allied commissions
already in existence.
The state will transport them from
ports to selling places by special
trains. The government expects
price reductions on other commnod
Ities through indirect compression.
The model scientific ration for the
aveI age mlan, as worked out by the
interallied comllmission, now (osts 05
cents a day in Paris. Under new
government sales system the cost
will be only 3Il cents a day. If the
Paris experiment is successful food
will be sent to other towns to he re
tailed subject to state-control.
The ministry of food supplies is
also arranging a. system of workmen's
restaurants in Paris capable of serv
camouflage memners sat onR the plat
form, but the leaders stood on the
floor of the house and circulated
around among the 'central commit
tee' and delivered the word when
certain members were to jump
through the hoop.
"John ('orrette stood at the en
trance door of the Mteeting room of
the parish house, never seating him
self once during the performance.
Malcolm Gillis took up his station at
the rear of the hall. Not one of the
black flags wrote up the meeting cor
rectly. for reasons best known to
themselves. \\. D. Fenner presided,
and I will say that I believe the 'cen
tral comnmittee' got the best of him,
as he was one of the tew republican
square dealler. present.
.'(".arles Jackman w-eabie to get
in a; few wotrs edgewfne ti "the tail
BERLIN HIOTS ARE
BECOMING VIOLENT
SSpecial United Press Wire.)
Basle, March 6.-The present Ber
lin riots have become as violent as
those which marked the Spartacan
revolt that Karl Leibknecht led, ac
cording to dispatches.
The radicals appear to be con
centrating their efforts in capturing
police stations, 32 precinct stations
having been attacked. The central
station has been assaulted three
times. Several policemen, captured
by mobs, are reported to have been
lynched. Arms depots, jewelry
shops and food stores have been pil
laged.
"We are trying to render the sit
uation more tolerable than that in
Russia," said Herr Schumacher, one
of the Spartacan leaders. "When
factories are demolished and people
are starving we will rebuild the state
on the ruins."
ing 400,000 meals a day. Charges
will be reduced 30 per cent by ob
talning the principal supplies direct
ly from the government. Three hun
dred thousand tons of provisions have
been br'ought to Paris within the last
five days.
end of the meeting, after all the elect
had filed out, having put their Man
in for mayor. Those filing out were
Mialcolm Gillis, S. I-. Greenwood of
the A. ('. M. Hardware company;
a prominent gunman; C. J. Nepper,
representative on the school board,
who speaks broken English, and a
member of the Carpenters' union;
John Corrette. A. C. M. attorney, etc.,
etc.
The meeting was called to order by
the chairman, W. D. Fenner, who, by
the way, may be a sound citizen and
republiean, but he has a poor mem
ory, for he has forgotten about that
high cost. of living committee find
ing he was supposed to make with
the committee he hand-picked from
among republican ranks, taking all
(Continued on Page Eight.)
Opponents of Wilson's League
To Present Their Objections
(Special United Press Wire to The Bulletin.)
Washiigtongli. lll'('l (l-.---;\ iA lllint -\i- e ('lllllnaig against
Ie leaguie 41' nliils croitsittlionii heg-its in New York tonight,
Wheni Senatoi l t'i0lt o1t Itahott Spealk. erly Seiatnr lwho joifl.
il the cnmpiiiaigni. extenlding It every statle. \\ith the exception
til' llhati, plaitns Io Ill his audience it is tit. the leagle of na
lioilts lie is ltlpposintg. hilt a league as outlined in the tenitaLive
cinlistitullioni. There is ni) dtispositio.i to tlltack President Wil
stil except ais pItiliti'g utll hat lie slated ,jisl before leaving
'or Franc.oe Ilihat the cnllitio d)oes nl.t neetd an amendment.
Republicans say their whole ca1m
ign will e ased on that pont and league's constitution, but in his two
ili will he ased on tha (in an speeches in this country and his tal.K
the following: That sponsers for the with the congressmen he did not re
league have no more authority for veal one of the reasons; that the pro,
declaring the league will not inter- posed league will fail because it tries
fere with the Monroe doctrine and to do more than the world is ready
American rights than their opponents for now and that Europe is counting
have for asserting they will interfere; on America bearing the burden fi
that the president said there was rea- nancially, militarily and economical
son for every provision of the ly of making the league a success.
ROBERT EMMET
DAY OBSERVED
AT ANACONDA
Anaconda, March 6.-The Phil
lheridan club will obser\ve the one
m:jindred and forlty-llrrst alnniver
slry of the birth of the hrish pa
I riot, RIobert Emlnet, at Hibernia
hall tomorrowV evening. A comn
mlitte(e halis been apIpoillted to nmllke
all Ilnecen'ary tarrllangemsents for Ian
interesting musical and literary
program.
T'lie (committee, Con(sisting of
.John Durkin, Michael ('onnors andi
,lanmes Strappe has taken charge
of tihe evening's progralm and is
sures (lie melnlbers of the cllllub
thalt everythinug conducive to ia
mllost eljoyatble time onl that oiCll
sion hals been prepared.
CANADIANS WERE
SACRIFICED IN
BATTLE
Sir Sam Hughes Charges
Men Needlessly Slaugh
tered That Officers Might
Get Advancement.
Toronto, March 6. -- All Cgnada
has been stirred by charges made in
the house of commons by Sir SanI
Hughes, former minister of militia,
that officers commanding the domin
ion forces in France had needlessly
sacrificed the lives of their men in
order to advance themselves. Al
though his allegations were assumed
to refer to Sir Arthur Currie, com
mander-in-chief of the Canadian
forces, there is apparent a strong in
clination in many quarters to tdis
agree with him. Soldiers who serve:l
overseas already have taken up the
cudgels in support of General Currie.
Sir Sam opened his attack with the
announcement that he had protested
several times to Premier Borden
against the waste of Canadian boys'
lives in tnnecessary stunts on the
battlefield. He then read a letter he
had sent to Sir Robert protesting
against what he termed needles.
ldaughter at Cambrai and stating that
he had drawn attention of the prime
minister on previous occasions to thei
"nassacres at Leds, Passehendaele,
etc., where the only apparent object
Swas to glorify the general in comn
mand and make it impossible
t through butchery to have a fifth and
sixth division and two army corps."
1-He leclared that any general who
f would undertake the attack at Cam
brai by suburban or street fighting
should be court-martialed. The sam:
was true, he said, of the officer who
i had ordered the storming of Mons
four hours before the signing of tht
armistice. This, he characterized as a
bit of theatrical display which hao
cost tht lives of many fine Canadian
boys who could ill be spared.
Some of the newspapers hint Sit
SSan's attack was inspired by chagrin
t at the failure of his son, Gen. Garnet
lHughes, to get to France as the com
1 mander of a fifth brigade of Canadi
i ans, but all were unanimous in their
1 assertion that the charges call for
(Continued on Page Three.)
ELECTRICAL
MEN TO
STRIKE
Will Call Out 12,000 Work
ers in Four Western States
Unless Burleson Grants
Wage Demand.
8an Francisco, March G.-A strike
of !),000 telephone operators and 3,
000 linemen in California, Washing
ton. Oregon and Nevada has been or
dered by the executive committee of
the International Brotherhood of
Electrical Workers in the event that
Postmaster General Burleson does
not speedily grant wage demandi of
the brotherhood, it was announced
here yesterday by T. C. Robbins, per
sonal representative of L. C. Grasser,
vice president of the organization.
Robbins received a telegram from
Charles P. Ford, secretary of the
brotherhood, indicating that a recent
teferendum of the workers in the
tour states mentioned favored a
strike.
Robbins announced receipt of an
other telegram front Grasser author
izing him to advise electrical work
ers' organizations in coast states to
"pay no attention to wage increases
offered by Burleson through the Pa
cific Telephone and Telegraph com
pany..'
The respective unions were cau
tioned in the telegram from Ford to
take no strike action on their own
account "or they would be properly
disciplined."
The male workers demand an in
crease of from $4.75 to $6.40 a day
and the girls front basic wages of $9
and $14 a week to a flat wage of $2
and $4 a day.
Recognition of the brotherhood of
any of its subsidiary organizations
persistently has been refused by
Burleson, brotherhood officials con
tended, and this concession also is
sought. The increases offered by
Burleson through the telephone com
pany ranged from $5 to $5.50. No
mention was made of the operators in
this offer.
iRobbins said he understood the
strike order would apply to all por
tions of the United States where re
cent referendum votes followed de
mands made on Burleson unless the
federal administration of wire utili.
ties granted the demands in full.
The recent wage increases granted
on the coast by Burlesonl i ted'
California and Washington t 1 .
FORD PERFECTING PLANS
FOR CHEAPER AUTOMOBILE
Los Angeles. Cal., March 6.
Henry Ford left for his home in De
troit today after announcing he soon
would perfect plans for the manu
kacture, by a new corpora.Cttfi ,ot a
cheaper automobile, to i. _or a
lower price than any now
marketed. Mr. Ford said 1.es de
signed the car while "reatlng".it Al"
tadena, near here.

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