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The Butte daily bulletin. (Butte, Mont.) 1918-1921, March 14, 1919, Image 4

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045085/1919-03-14/ed-1/seq-4/

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AND INTERNA THE BULLETIN'S DOUBLE PAGE OF NE
J.·' J:..lK
If yII've an iutinhlile], whetoer i be Onev w or l, Spring.s iOn.~l Io ithil andli . fi pe)ple hapopl hve s ur iil on
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Youi will findI lIte quikest nehllod for to get s one coin aheal So get hop to those desirou's of a ear of steel or lil,
Is to alverlise Ile tloo in' Ulting in a F .ler thalt i= rea . Aidl put yo i, nm oe before eni in the Ihriily lulleti n.
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-C
AUTOMOBILE
FIX-IT
MONTANA BATTERY STATION
PREST-O-LITE STORAGE BATTERY
EXPERT BATTERY SERVICE
Batteries Recharged, Repaired, Rented and in Stock.
We Specialize in Recharging Ford Magnetos in Cars.
224 S. ARIZONA ST. PHONE 5536-J
South Side Auto Garage
EXPERT MECHANICS
Any Make of Car-General Repair Shop and Supplies
PHONE 4460-W 2124 COBBAN STREWT"
C. C. DAHN, Manager
PATTERSON & CURRIE
MONTANA, CORNER MERCURY PHONE 2263
ln:tlru ('e oi l Merciley. Look Ir tihe Sig'n.
STORAGE AND REPAIRING
PHONE 251
Vulcan Welding Works
Welding Cast Iron, Steel,
Brass, Bronze, Aluminum
and Copper
We Also Burn Carbon Flronm Auto
Uylinders
116-118 S. Wyoming St.
All Work Guaranteed.
GIIAND) AVENUE REPAIR SHOPI
Automobile Repairing, Lathe
Work and Mill Work.
All Work Cuaranteed.
Storage.
Phone 3031-.T.
Corner Harrison and Orand.
Butte Battery Co.
EXIDlE DI)STRIBUTORS I
Up-to-Date Auto Electrician.
We Repair All Makes of Batteries.
I'hone 918. 119 S. Montana St.
LL o
TIRE
BARGAINS
Two 34x4 Tires at a Bargain.
SUPERIOR VULCANIZING
Old Casings Bought and Sold.
J. L. Mathiesen
40 E. Galena. PhoneO 5067-J.
I12( Utlah Ave. Phone 2179.
LACY
Auto Service and Repair Shop
Got a. spark intensilier attached
to your Ford aol forget the
worries of crauking it.
WRECKING ('Al AT YOUR
SEIRVICE.
NOT ENOUGH AUTOS IN WORLD
TO SATISFY DEMANDS WHEN
SPRIN!G COMES, SAYS EXPERT
Edward S. Jordan, President of Motor Company Speaks
at Pueblo Convention on "Salesmanship and Adver
tising." Is Great Optimist.
"There will not be enough autoino
bileu. in the world to s:atisfy the d, -
mand after the first warm day of
spring."
This was the message Edward '.
Jordan, presidept of the Jordan Mo
tor Car conlmpany, and one of the clev
erest platform speakers in the United
States, brought to the convention ni
tile Itocky Mountain Auto Trades as
sociation at Denver this week.,
"I want to ash if there is a pessim
ist in the room? If there is, will he
please stand up? If there i:;, gentlle
lmen, I would like to hit him on the
head like the p.liceman hits the buli±
in the movies. He has no businessh
anywhere except as a sexton in some
body's graveyard. He has no business
with young men in this wonderful
country at this stage of the game. Oh,
Lord, if I can just smoke little
enough, and drink little enough, a.nd
think fast enough, we are going to
have a wonderful time. Not making
moIOnIey and spending it, but ill nlmat
ilng somnle body haplpy-the children
of the boys who work with me, an-i
their wives.
(IlV1";: MANY IDlEA,
IN ORIIGINAL AI)EVIITISING.
The subject of his address was
"Salesmanship and Advertising." H.
illustrated his remarks with a chart.
With this chart he set forth many
original ideas in advertising, and
showed( why, in his opinion, many oi
the leading automobiles in their class
are leaders.
"I want to sound the clarion call
to (very man ill this 1room00111 who has
any ability, any stamina in him, or
anything in him that makes him want
to succeed in this business. Ther
won't be enough automobiles. \Vi
can't buildt enough of them. You
mIlay thinl there are a lot of thenm
stored somlnewhere. If you do, wait
until the first warm day of spring.
"Gentlemen, I feel.,that this is big
league stuff," he said, when il
stepped to the platform to make his
talk. "I amn quite a young mnan, and
only hope that with sufficient experi
ence, I will be able to think as intel
ligently, as fundamentally, and ex
pIress mly thotughts as successfully a,.
George Graham does.
'There are four family factors
which have a very important bearing
upon every sale. Father thinks in
terms of economy--the payroll; ths
inventory. Mother thinks in terms:
of success, for her children, their op
portunities. Daughter thinks in
terms of social prestige, the possi
bility of a happy marriage. The boy
thinks in terms of life, travel, speed,
getup and go.
"Now what is advertising? I asked
Roy Pellitier of Detroit the other
day to define it for me. This was a
few days before the signing of ihei
armistice. He said, 'advertising wa:
a custom practiced extensively before
the war, but now obselete.'
AiDVEITSISING ('AlRIERI)
ALL, THRIOUGH LI,'E
"What is advertising? Is it a letter
head, a blotter, a paper-weight, a
campaign in a newspaper? Or is it
the good things per.ple say about us?
I will tell you; it is all these, and a
thousand more. Advertising begins
when the child first cries its wants
to its mother, and it continues all
through life and does not end until
it reaches the point of the epitaph
on the headstone. Advertising i.
found in the bright plumage of birds,
in the pong of the meadow-lark, cir
cularizing the territory for its pro
spective mate. Advertising is ex
pressed in the spirit of accomimoda
tion in the voice of your telephone
operator. Advertising tells you when
to get a haircut and a shave, and
what kind of a necktie not to wear,
and it tells your salesman how to
make the customer put his name on
the dotted line.
"Now I am going to make some
comments upon some thoughts that i
have had in relation to what seem to
be the three most important things.
First we must have work or labor
that is pleasant for us to do. Second
ly. we must know how to do that
work well, to enjoy it. Therefore, we
must have education in doing that
work well. Thirdly, when the work
is completed we must transport it.
from the point at which it was pro
duced to some point at which there
is a market.
"We are doing work that is pleas
ant for us to do. Let's seiý how we
can increase the product of that la
bor. Let's see what method we casn
discover to educate the men to do
with greater pleasure, and greater ef.
liciency. Now, let's sell ourselces on
our own business, which is the great
est business in the world, that of
transportation.
IROMANCE IS FOUND
IN TRUI'('K . SINESS.
"A man is either proud or he is not
proud of the work of his hands and
brain. We must inspire in men the
desire to do something a little bet
ter each time.
"Now we are in the business ot
'transportation. Transportation begin,
when the child starts to crawl acrose
the floor. The horse gave civilization
its next great impetus. then the sail
boat, the locomotive and the train of
cars and now the truck and the air
plane. There is just as much ro
mance in the truck business, there is
just as much romance in the child
crawling across the floor, as there is
in anything you can possibly think of
in life. It is perfectly human; peo,
ple love to m:grate, to travel. They
love to carry goods to market. One
of the most intertsting things that
can happen in a Iman's life is when he
goes to market with his goods.
"There are a great many peopl
in this world who feel that a great
deal of money has been made in the
automobile industry, and that at
some time or another, a point will be
reached, when everyone has a car and
none ever wears out. Because, if you
are a married man, and you are dom.
inated by some woman, as every nor
mal, n.an is, you will find that jusi
as, long a: a neighbor drives by your
window with a car, and there is one
woman and a child left at home with
out an automobile; there is still one
pots ntial prosplect for some live
Eah.suman.
3MolL I ENTHISIASM
N S DII;)Il) FOR I .'('('E1SS.
"Hfow are we going to educate oun
men to enjoy their work more? If we
can inject into the men the feeling
that they are the members of a team,
member:, of an organization that is
trying to win a pennant, we will in
still in them that magical something
that makes them put into the thing
they are trying to do.all the best that
is in them. When a man has enthu
siasnm; when he is sold on his busi
ness; when lie knows it is a serious
business, and he wants to mnake this
salesman and that salesman and the
other salesman feel his potential
power' in the community, he . wit
spruce up, and he will stand in this
state of mind toward the boys on the
row: 'I can lick any salesman on
Broadway; I can beat any salesman
in this town, in a gentle, courteous,
fine, high-spirited, good-sportsmann
like way.' "
He made a number of interesting
psychological comments on the best
way to sell automobiles to women. H,
declared the best way to sell to a
woman is by appealing to her senses.
"'Men buy cars, but women choose
them," he said.
With regard to the iimmed!ate out
look for the automobile industry, he
said:
"There are 15,000,000 people
whose incomes enable them to be con
sidered, as prospects for cars costing
from $300 up to $1,500. ,There are
3,000,000 people who may be con
sidered prospects for cars costing
from $700 to $1,000. There are 2,
000,000 people in the class between
$1,100 and $1,400; 600,000 people
in the class ranging from $1,500 to
$2,000. There are 100,000 people
who can buy anything they want. I
understand there are probably 250,
000 pieople in this country Who make
more than $5,000 a year.
MARKET FOR AUTOS
N EVEi'., AS GOOD.
"There is a tremendous market for
automobiles. Isn't it peculiar that
there should ever enter into any
body's mind any doubt as to that?
Why does it enter? For the same
reason that the groundhog crawls
into his hole Nov 15 and comes out
Feb. 15 and looks to see whether the
sun is shining. We are all intro
spective in the winter. The produc
tion of the last three months of 13L18
was 109,000 cars short of the samin
period of 1917. There are about 78,
000 cars produced in the last quarter.
The four quarters of that production
would mean in the neighborhood of
300,000 cars produced as against 1,
WAN1 N1
TRA
States Prov
to Teach t
Steel
Shall the man,
operates a trace
tractorator, a tr
tioneer? That i
swer to which
ulbll)ers of stud.
schools now biel
rious parts (of
Tractor operatiol
on in a somewh-i
thus far, but mt,
ing stabilized, ir
of expression aii
in its relationls
parently beei t si
years by the ,vi
tion has out:'lri
operators. 1,:ver
brought up to to
this big tt(el Ii:
ill lquite a differ,,
tor schools pro\
turni ngl out tri l
ver thI y ali r to 1
Science MOloiltoui.
181S AUTO
NIILBE
THIR
Estimated I
Year Is
Mac
Production Ii.i
car makersl of .1
show that alppr'ox
songer cars 1i\( i'
uary, \even 1hotur.t
helow normal pt
were not in protld
ing to Motor Agg
"The figures a
and show that. i
On reconlltrctiol
will curtail the
per cent," says tl.
Had normal c
the inumbler of
trii't would hia\'
00(0 mark, aitd n
ed :,5100,1100 !, lii::
Delay ill (coillt 'O a
shlifting thi bit
peace time basi.i
edi production I
)000.(i0 inachinli
detmands leerc:;esii
overtime sclldt:
plants. Thirty
have submitted
700,000 in thi1 1
a normal year.
"Think it ovin
wonderful boy,
000,0010 wlmoner
think there will
June? Think it
The question
as to whelher 1
half of the radlia.
and whether to d
or the Olutsid('.
is cooler, it :.lieu
pIreferably frel
large pieceof
outside of t !l r
pleasing to the e
endured for the(
In cases whlr
the radiator is
water in mnakiing
axle and spatters
eral, it is an ez(
the edge of Ia fI
valve in sllh ;
rect the flow of
parts of the car i
I R
I Wa
I In U4
I
a Reo, G
I Dodge
[ Velie:
a used, five r
* Also Cadil
Chevrolets.
STRUCKS-
I ranging in
 
i
U
U
I 228 S. AR
S.

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